Date   

ShtetLinks Project Report for August 2008 #rabbinic

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen
ShtetLinks. We thank the owners and webmasters of these shtetlpages
for creating fitting memorials to the Jewish Communities that once
lived in those shtetlach and for providing a valuable resource for
future generations of their descendants.

Chabanivka (Bacsava, Bacovo, Batschive), Ukraine
Created by Marshall Katz
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ukraine.html
~~~

Hirlau, Romania
Created by Lea Haber Gedalia
Web Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Robert Zavos
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/hirlau/hirlau.htm
~~~

Kamenka (Kamionka), Belarus
Created by Ze'ev Sharon
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamenka/kamenka.html
~~~

Koden (Kodni), Poland
Created by Joyce Oshrin
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/koden/koden.html
~~~

Kolonja Izaaka (Kolonia Isaaka, Isakova), Belarus
Created by Irwin Keller
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Belarus.html
~~~

Krasnoye (Krasne), Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan and Kevin Lo
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krasnoye/krasne.html
~~~

Minsk, Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan and Kevin Lo
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/minsk/minsk.html
~~~

If you wish to follow their example and create a ShtetLinks webpage
for your ancestral shtetl or adopt an exiting "orphaned" shtetlpage
please contact us at: < shtetl-help@jewishgen.org >
~~~

GOOD NEWS!! As a result for our appeal for HTML volunteers we now have
a team of dedicated people who will help you create a webpage for
your ancestral home.
Please contact us if you would like help in creating a ShtetLinks webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, JewishGen VP, ShtetLinks
Barbara Ellman, ShtetLinks Technical Coordinator


2008 IAJGS Achievement Awards and Stern Grant Awardee #rabbinic

ANNE LEE <information@...>
 

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
is pleased to announce the 2008 IAJGS Achievement Awards and the
Stern Grant Awardee. The winners were announced at the Chicago2008
Banquet on Thursday, August 21.

Please go to www.iajgs.org for more information about the winners.
For the Achievement Awards winners, click on the left hand button
for IAJGS Awards. For the Stern Grant awardee, scroll down the
home page to find the box saying Stern Grant.

The lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Howard Margol for
his many years of pioneering work in Lithuanian Jewish Genealogy
research.

The Outstanding Contribution to Jewish Genealogy Award was
presented to Steven Lasky in recognition of his original contribution
to the Jewish genealogical community by the creation of an
online virtual museum "The Museum of Family History".

The Outstanding Project Award was presented to Petra Laidlaw
for creating "The Jewish Community in Mid-19th Century Britain"
database.

The Outstanding Publication Award was presented to
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain, for its
collection of guidebooks comprising the "Jewish Ancestors?"
series focusing on Jewish genealogical research in Europe,
understanding Hebrew inscriptions and documents, and
organizing family history records.

The 2008 IAJGS Stern Grant of $2,500 was awarded to
The Italian Genealogical Group (IGG - www.Italiangen.org)
to facilitate the creating and computerization of a
Brooklyn Brides Index for 1910-1930 >from original records
on 268 rolls of film >from the Family History Library.

We thank all the members of the 2008 IAJGS Achievement
Awards Committee and the 2008 Stern Grant Committee for
their work and for making hard decisions among the many
nominations submitted. Achievement Award committee
members were: Stephen P. Morse - Chair of San Francisco;
Rieke Nash of Sidney, Australia; Ilene Murray of St. Louis;
Hal Bookbinder of Agoura Hills; and Michael Brenner of
Las Vegas, NV. The Stern Grant Committee members were:
Eileen Polakoff - Chair of New York, NY; Alan Greenberg
of Montreal, Canada; Hadassah Lipsius, New York, NY.

I know that you all join me in congratulating the
winners and thanking them for all they have done that
enhances our ability to learn more about our ancestors.

Most sincerely,
Anne Feder Lee
IAJGS President


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic ShtetLinks Project Report for August 2008 #rabbinic

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen
ShtetLinks. We thank the owners and webmasters of these shtetlpages
for creating fitting memorials to the Jewish Communities that once
lived in those shtetlach and for providing a valuable resource for
future generations of their descendants.

Chabanivka (Bacsava, Bacovo, Batschive), Ukraine
Created by Marshall Katz
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ukraine.html
~~~

Hirlau, Romania
Created by Lea Haber Gedalia
Web Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Robert Zavos
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/hirlau/hirlau.htm
~~~

Kamenka (Kamionka), Belarus
Created by Ze'ev Sharon
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamenka/kamenka.html
~~~

Koden (Kodni), Poland
Created by Joyce Oshrin
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/koden/koden.html
~~~

Kolonja Izaaka (Kolonia Isaaka, Isakova), Belarus
Created by Irwin Keller
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Belarus.html
~~~

Krasnoye (Krasne), Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan and Kevin Lo
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krasnoye/krasne.html
~~~

Minsk, Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan and Kevin Lo
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/minsk/minsk.html
~~~

If you wish to follow their example and create a ShtetLinks webpage
for your ancestral shtetl or adopt an exiting "orphaned" shtetlpage
please contact us at: < shtetl-help@jewishgen.org >
~~~

GOOD NEWS!! As a result for our appeal for HTML volunteers we now have
a team of dedicated people who will help you create a webpage for
your ancestral home.
Please contact us if you would like help in creating a ShtetLinks webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, JewishGen VP, ShtetLinks
Barbara Ellman, ShtetLinks Technical Coordinator


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic 2008 IAJGS Achievement Awards and Stern Grant Awardee #rabbinic

ANNE LEE <information@...>
 

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
is pleased to announce the 2008 IAJGS Achievement Awards and the
Stern Grant Awardee. The winners were announced at the Chicago2008
Banquet on Thursday, August 21.

Please go to www.iajgs.org for more information about the winners.
For the Achievement Awards winners, click on the left hand button
for IAJGS Awards. For the Stern Grant awardee, scroll down the
home page to find the box saying Stern Grant.

The lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Howard Margol for
his many years of pioneering work in Lithuanian Jewish Genealogy
research.

The Outstanding Contribution to Jewish Genealogy Award was
presented to Steven Lasky in recognition of his original contribution
to the Jewish genealogical community by the creation of an
online virtual museum "The Museum of Family History".

The Outstanding Project Award was presented to Petra Laidlaw
for creating "The Jewish Community in Mid-19th Century Britain"
database.

The Outstanding Publication Award was presented to
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain, for its
collection of guidebooks comprising the "Jewish Ancestors?"
series focusing on Jewish genealogical research in Europe,
understanding Hebrew inscriptions and documents, and
organizing family history records.

The 2008 IAJGS Stern Grant of $2,500 was awarded to
The Italian Genealogical Group (IGG - www.Italiangen.org)
to facilitate the creating and computerization of a
Brooklyn Brides Index for 1910-1930 >from original records
on 268 rolls of film >from the Family History Library.

We thank all the members of the 2008 IAJGS Achievement
Awards Committee and the 2008 Stern Grant Committee for
their work and for making hard decisions among the many
nominations submitted. Achievement Award committee
members were: Stephen P. Morse - Chair of San Francisco;
Rieke Nash of Sidney, Australia; Ilene Murray of St. Louis;
Hal Bookbinder of Agoura Hills; and Michael Brenner of
Las Vegas, NV. The Stern Grant Committee members were:
Eileen Polakoff - Chair of New York, NY; Alan Greenberg
of Montreal, Canada; Hadassah Lipsius, New York, NY.

I know that you all join me in congratulating the
winners and thanking them for all they have done that
enhances our ability to learn more about our ancestors.

Most sincerely,
Anne Feder Lee
IAJGS President


Seeking Miriam NEUMAN #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact Mrs. Miriam Neuman who lived a
decade ago at xx, Old Westbury NY.
Could not find her thro Zabasearch or white pages.com
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Miriam NEUMAN #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact Mrs. Miriam Neuman who lived a
decade ago at xx, Old Westbury NY.
Could not find her thro Zabasearch or white pages.com
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein


Re: Finding Original Polish Records #general

roe kard
 

"On JRI-Poland I have found only three records: a birth in 1859
and two marriages in 1897 and 1902. "In many cases the information
I have is minimal - a family name and a rough estimate of their
birth or marriage year based on the year of birth of an offspring.

"I am aware that the records on JRI-Poland represent only those
that have been indexed and that other records might well exist
at source".

I spent two weeks in November 2007 at AGAD (Warsaw) in support of my
macro-genealogical/micro-historical research. I looked through
records >from a few different towns. What I found was that even as the
JRI-Poland online records transcribed >from the originals are a
brilliant resource without which most of us would have had nothing
with which to start our work AND maybe even a belief that nothing
still existed >from which to do research, what you see online is not
the end of the story. It is a vast amount of work to transcribe the
material they did but clearly JRI could not transcribe everything on
a record.

In virtually every town whose birth records I looked at, and in many
of the records but without consistency, the mother's parents given
names AND the house number within which the birth took place was
listed. While I assume that the parents names are indeed the parents
names, the house numbers DO NOT always match up with the names of the
house's owners on other definitive home owners records that i
collected in Lviv. It becomes clear that the birth is recorded as
having taken place either in a rented home, a neighbor's home or the
home of the midwife (midwife name is always listed and you sometimes
identify their home >from home owner or tabular records).

With death records, the names of the parents of the person who died
and the house numbers were less frequently given.

With the grandparents names, you can see which other birth mothers
listed these people on records as their parents - then you find
sisters to your ancestor. You may find a death record of a
grandparent and that may have more information.

When you have acquired a house number you can see who else listed
that house number on a given record. When there is a frequency of
reportage of a given house number, tied to either the same
grandparents names or a consistency of some family name, even if not
the same name as your ancestor, you can assume that these were your
relatives - once you can rule out that they were not the neighbors or
the midwife. If there is some pattern of given names in a house with
a specific house number, similar to that within your family, even if
there is a difference in family name >from the one you know, you hold
on to those names as the moment will come when you can tie the puzzle
together.

I found that books of records >from more recent times - the actual
books themselves or the microfilmed version - are now available at
AGAD, books that JRI (I assume) could not transcribe because their
contract had ended. Prior to my trip I was only able to take my
research up to 1901; this trip took the records I was able to use up
to 1904. It seems like each book covers about three years so I assume
that if I went back next year the books that go to 1907 might be
available.

If the family name you are researching is a unique name e.g.
GOLDWURM, and you get the grandparents names and/or house numbers,
then I suggest that you build your own excel file of all the people
with the same name in all of JRI, include all the information you
have on them >from anywhere, and then play with it and file it as
appropriate. You then may find siblings in different towns, a
consistency in naming patterns, etc. I have been filing away every
piece of information I have gotten on the GOLDWURM family for years.
Only now am I able to put some of it together AND of greatest
interest, just last week I found that a strong branch of this family
survived WWII and I am hoping to visit with them in Brooklyn before
the winter. So you never know...

As painful as it has been, these records allowed me to look further
into the Yad Vashem records to identify the individuals whose names I
had and other family members whose names i did not even know >from
their pages of testimony and necrology lists (people who were born
starting ~1870). Note: I am fluent in Hebrew and have some Yiddish -
the Yad Vashem transcriptions have many inaccuracies in the
translations.

If you are as lucky as I was several years ago to acquire copies of
the Cadastral Map >from your town, and also to have the house numbers
from your family, if the maps you acquire follow the pattern I have
found, you will find that our ancestors were often marrying their own
children to their neighbors children.

Finally (for the moment), going through the Tabular Register
collection in Lviv can be an incredibly time consuming activity but
also an astonishingly rewarding one. If your family was landowning,
in business and/or prominent you will find records on them. I have
now gone through about forty, 300-500 page books for my research and
photographed ~2000 pages of information. Not only are individuals
names listed, but often also their parents, house numbers and of
incredible value, the women. So many women who are lost to history
bounce back into life. Often the wealth was passed down via dowery to
the male line, and then the women's names got lost, especially in
Rabbinic lines where they become known as the daughter of whoever
their father was, rather than by their own names. Thankfully, the
Austro-Hungarian authorities required that they be known by their own
names.

Enough. I have to go to work. Go to Warsaw, go to Lviv or hire
someone to do the additional research for you.

B'shalom.
Karen Roekard
aka Gitel Chaye Eta Rosenfeld Rokart


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding Original Polish Records #general

roe kard
 

"On JRI-Poland I have found only three records: a birth in 1859
and two marriages in 1897 and 1902. "In many cases the information
I have is minimal - a family name and a rough estimate of their
birth or marriage year based on the year of birth of an offspring.

"I am aware that the records on JRI-Poland represent only those
that have been indexed and that other records might well exist
at source".

I spent two weeks in November 2007 at AGAD (Warsaw) in support of my
macro-genealogical/micro-historical research. I looked through
records >from a few different towns. What I found was that even as the
JRI-Poland online records transcribed >from the originals are a
brilliant resource without which most of us would have had nothing
with which to start our work AND maybe even a belief that nothing
still existed >from which to do research, what you see online is not
the end of the story. It is a vast amount of work to transcribe the
material they did but clearly JRI could not transcribe everything on
a record.

In virtually every town whose birth records I looked at, and in many
of the records but without consistency, the mother's parents given
names AND the house number within which the birth took place was
listed. While I assume that the parents names are indeed the parents
names, the house numbers DO NOT always match up with the names of the
house's owners on other definitive home owners records that i
collected in Lviv. It becomes clear that the birth is recorded as
having taken place either in a rented home, a neighbor's home or the
home of the midwife (midwife name is always listed and you sometimes
identify their home >from home owner or tabular records).

With death records, the names of the parents of the person who died
and the house numbers were less frequently given.

With the grandparents names, you can see which other birth mothers
listed these people on records as their parents - then you find
sisters to your ancestor. You may find a death record of a
grandparent and that may have more information.

When you have acquired a house number you can see who else listed
that house number on a given record. When there is a frequency of
reportage of a given house number, tied to either the same
grandparents names or a consistency of some family name, even if not
the same name as your ancestor, you can assume that these were your
relatives - once you can rule out that they were not the neighbors or
the midwife. If there is some pattern of given names in a house with
a specific house number, similar to that within your family, even if
there is a difference in family name >from the one you know, you hold
on to those names as the moment will come when you can tie the puzzle
together.

I found that books of records >from more recent times - the actual
books themselves or the microfilmed version - are now available at
AGAD, books that JRI (I assume) could not transcribe because their
contract had ended. Prior to my trip I was only able to take my
research up to 1901; this trip took the records I was able to use up
to 1904. It seems like each book covers about three years so I assume
that if I went back next year the books that go to 1907 might be
available.

If the family name you are researching is a unique name e.g.
GOLDWURM, and you get the grandparents names and/or house numbers,
then I suggest that you build your own excel file of all the people
with the same name in all of JRI, include all the information you
have on them >from anywhere, and then play with it and file it as
appropriate. You then may find siblings in different towns, a
consistency in naming patterns, etc. I have been filing away every
piece of information I have gotten on the GOLDWURM family for years.
Only now am I able to put some of it together AND of greatest
interest, just last week I found that a strong branch of this family
survived WWII and I am hoping to visit with them in Brooklyn before
the winter. So you never know...

As painful as it has been, these records allowed me to look further
into the Yad Vashem records to identify the individuals whose names I
had and other family members whose names i did not even know >from
their pages of testimony and necrology lists (people who were born
starting ~1870). Note: I am fluent in Hebrew and have some Yiddish -
the Yad Vashem transcriptions have many inaccuracies in the
translations.

If you are as lucky as I was several years ago to acquire copies of
the Cadastral Map >from your town, and also to have the house numbers
from your family, if the maps you acquire follow the pattern I have
found, you will find that our ancestors were often marrying their own
children to their neighbors children.

Finally (for the moment), going through the Tabular Register
collection in Lviv can be an incredibly time consuming activity but
also an astonishingly rewarding one. If your family was landowning,
in business and/or prominent you will find records on them. I have
now gone through about forty, 300-500 page books for my research and
photographed ~2000 pages of information. Not only are individuals
names listed, but often also their parents, house numbers and of
incredible value, the women. So many women who are lost to history
bounce back into life. Often the wealth was passed down via dowery to
the male line, and then the women's names got lost, especially in
Rabbinic lines where they become known as the daughter of whoever
their father was, rather than by their own names. Thankfully, the
Austro-Hungarian authorities required that they be known by their own
names.

Enough. I have to go to work. Go to Warsaw, go to Lviv or hire
someone to do the additional research for you.

B'shalom.
Karen Roekard
aka Gitel Chaye Eta Rosenfeld Rokart


cemetery lookups #general

lipsitzb@...
 

I've seen many requests like the one below on this list.
I discovered a resource, quite by accident, that I've
never seen mentioned here. There's an organization
called 'Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness.'

The website is www.raogk.org -- There are volunteers in
every state who will do various kinds of lookups, for
free except that they ask you to cover expenses.
A volunteer on this list photographed gravestones at
several Pittsburgh area cemeteries for me, including the
one you mention below. I'm sending this to the
whole list because I think this is a great resource.
Contact me privately for more details.

Bev Lipsitz, Portland OR (originally Pittsburgh PA)

LIPSITZ - Petrikov (Minsk,Belarus); Olyka (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh
WEISBERG - Olyka (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh, Detroit, Chicago
COOPER - Olyka, Rivne (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh
KANN/KANTOROVITZ - Lyakhovichi (Belarus); Pittsburgh
LEHMAN - Lyakhovichi (Belarus); Pittsburgh; Cincinnati
SOBEL - Serei/Sereje (Lithuania); Pittsburgh; Cincinnati


I recently found a branch of my family I've been searching for.
They're buried at Beth Hamedrash Hagadol/Beth Jacob Cemetery
snip....


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen cemetery lookups #general

lipsitzb@...
 

I've seen many requests like the one below on this list.
I discovered a resource, quite by accident, that I've
never seen mentioned here. There's an organization
called 'Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness.'

The website is www.raogk.org -- There are volunteers in
every state who will do various kinds of lookups, for
free except that they ask you to cover expenses.
A volunteer on this list photographed gravestones at
several Pittsburgh area cemeteries for me, including the
one you mention below. I'm sending this to the
whole list because I think this is a great resource.
Contact me privately for more details.

Bev Lipsitz, Portland OR (originally Pittsburgh PA)

LIPSITZ - Petrikov (Minsk,Belarus); Olyka (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh
WEISBERG - Olyka (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh, Detroit, Chicago
COOPER - Olyka, Rivne (Volhinia,Ukraine); Pittsburgh
KANN/KANTOROVITZ - Lyakhovichi (Belarus); Pittsburgh
LEHMAN - Lyakhovichi (Belarus); Pittsburgh; Cincinnati
SOBEL - Serei/Sereje (Lithuania); Pittsburgh; Cincinnati


I recently found a branch of my family I've been searching for.
They're buried at Beth Hamedrash Hagadol/Beth Jacob Cemetery
snip....


Re: Ensign Joseph Irving Segall Square #general

Jules Levin
 

Bubylu@aol.com wrote:
I am trying to get information on Joseph Irving Segall who was the
first American Jewish soldier killed in World War II.
According to the web site, Ensign Segall was killed in mid-1942.
If so, he could not have been the first Jewish fatality of the war.
I am certain that there were Jews killed at Pearl Harbor (Dec, 1941)
and in the Bataan death march. I went to grammar school in Chicago
with a boy who lived in a hotel with his mom, who worked there.
His father had been killed at Pearl Harbor.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ensign Joseph Irving Segall Square #general

Jules Levin
 

Bubylu@aol.com wrote:
I am trying to get information on Joseph Irving Segall who was the
first American Jewish soldier killed in World War II.
According to the web site, Ensign Segall was killed in mid-1942.
If so, he could not have been the first Jewish fatality of the war.
I am certain that there were Jews killed at Pearl Harbor (Dec, 1941)
and in the Bataan death march. I went to grammar school in Chicago
with a boy who lived in a hotel with his mom, who worked there.
His father had been killed at Pearl Harbor.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Re: was KLAPOWITZ - now - researching manifests #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Yehudah ben Shlomo in his detailed analysis to Rosalind Romem's
original query of 24th August, wrote: "Finally, we must note that
both Becki {OSTRINSKY} and her mother [Sime COHEN] list their
last residence as London. So most likely, the address given for
Mrs. KLAPOWITZ is in the UK as well"

Yehudah and I often work closely together and he sent me the
link to the manifest which I studied carefully. Indeed Yehudah
is correct - I read it as Mount? St, New St E? - and on checking
the map of the East End of London today, I found Mount Terrace
just off New Street, London E 1 {The Jewish East End}.

If you google: mount terrace London E and go down the list of
websites, you will find a picture of a little terraced house
in this street. This would be identical to the house the
KLAPOWITZ family lived in and Sime and Jacob COHEN and Beckie
OSTRINSKY probably lodged at before they emigrated to the USA
from Southampton to NY on the SS Olympic on 3 April 1912.
This brings genealogy to life - thank you Yehudah.

I found another big clue in the manifest, namely that Jacob aged 13
in 1912 was a British subject, ie he must have been born in England,
ie I should be able to find the family in the 1901 census. I believe
I have now found the right COHEN family in the 1901 census of England
and Wales before some reappear in NY in the 1920 census: Hyman 31 -
a tailor; Lena {Sime} 36; Rosia 14; Betsy {Beckie} 11; Moses 8;
Nathan 6; Lazarus 5; Jacob 2.

However, I can find no KLAPOWITZ in the UK in the 1901 census, nor
any bmd records. I therefore suspect these were post-1901 immigrants
to the UK. There were many clues we used to build up this picture.

I am very worried as I have not heard >from Yehudah for over a week,
and he does not respond to emails, which is unprecedented. So if
anyone has heard >from him please let me know to allay my anxiety.
I waited to hear >from him before posting this but have now decided
to go ahead.

Celia Male - London, U.K.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: was KLAPOWITZ - now - researching manifests #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Yehudah ben Shlomo in his detailed analysis to Rosalind Romem's
original query of 24th August, wrote: "Finally, we must note that
both Becki {OSTRINSKY} and her mother [Sime COHEN] list their
last residence as London. So most likely, the address given for
Mrs. KLAPOWITZ is in the UK as well"

Yehudah and I often work closely together and he sent me the
link to the manifest which I studied carefully. Indeed Yehudah
is correct - I read it as Mount? St, New St E? - and on checking
the map of the East End of London today, I found Mount Terrace
just off New Street, London E 1 {The Jewish East End}.

If you google: mount terrace London E and go down the list of
websites, you will find a picture of a little terraced house
in this street. This would be identical to the house the
KLAPOWITZ family lived in and Sime and Jacob COHEN and Beckie
OSTRINSKY probably lodged at before they emigrated to the USA
from Southampton to NY on the SS Olympic on 3 April 1912.
This brings genealogy to life - thank you Yehudah.

I found another big clue in the manifest, namely that Jacob aged 13
in 1912 was a British subject, ie he must have been born in England,
ie I should be able to find the family in the 1901 census. I believe
I have now found the right COHEN family in the 1901 census of England
and Wales before some reappear in NY in the 1920 census: Hyman 31 -
a tailor; Lena {Sime} 36; Rosia 14; Betsy {Beckie} 11; Moses 8;
Nathan 6; Lazarus 5; Jacob 2.

However, I can find no KLAPOWITZ in the UK in the 1901 census, nor
any bmd records. I therefore suspect these were post-1901 immigrants
to the UK. There were many clues we used to build up this picture.

I am very worried as I have not heard >from Yehudah for over a week,
and he does not respond to emails, which is unprecedented. So if
anyone has heard >from him please let me know to allay my anxiety.
I waited to hear >from him before posting this but have now decided
to go ahead.

Celia Male - London, U.K.


access to synagogues #galicia

Charles Burns <ckburn76@...>
 

If any readers have information or suggestions about how I can
gain access to the inside of the synagogues located in Zhovkva,
Drohobych, or Podhajce, Ukraine I would appreciate hearing >from you.
Thank you for your assistance.

Charles Burns
Houston, Texas
Reply to: vallejo45@comcast.net


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia access to synagogues #galicia

Charles Burns <ckburn76@...>
 

If any readers have information or suggestions about how I can
gain access to the inside of the synagogues located in Zhovkva,
Drohobych, or Podhajce, Ukraine I would appreciate hearing >from you.
Thank you for your assistance.

Charles Burns
Houston, Texas
Reply to: vallejo45@comcast.net


VRAZSA, FILIP, PESTYAN, MARIAN: Jewish Surnames? #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Tim Vrazo of Michigan asked if anyone thinks there is any
possibility that his grandparents' surnames could have been Jewish.

Generally relevant are three excellent JewishGen Digest
messages that may not be easily found by searching the archive at
<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archpop >.
I have sent the entire texts to Tim but they may be helpful to
others with the same question.

~ On June 1, 2008 Ann Rabinowitz in "RE: MOSIER Family" suggests first
researching surname origins.
~ On June 23, 2008 Roger Lustig in "Re: Geneology Question" (sic) emphasizes
that there's no such thing as an exclusively Jewish surname and also
suggests researching surname origin, JewishGen Family Finder and family
documents.
~ On October 31, 2007 Joseph Fibel in "Names and their Equivalents"
emphasizes that we learn our family history >from records and archives and
not >from guessing about the names.

Bette Mas
Miami, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VRAZSA, FILIP, PESTYAN, MARIAN: Jewish Surnames? #general

bette_sscf <bette_sscf@...>
 

Tim Vrazo of Michigan asked if anyone thinks there is any
possibility that his grandparents' surnames could have been Jewish.

Generally relevant are three excellent JewishGen Digest
messages that may not be easily found by searching the archive at
<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archpop >.
I have sent the entire texts to Tim but they may be helpful to
others with the same question.

~ On June 1, 2008 Ann Rabinowitz in "RE: MOSIER Family" suggests first
researching surname origins.
~ On June 23, 2008 Roger Lustig in "Re: Geneology Question" (sic) emphasizes
that there's no such thing as an exclusively Jewish surname and also
suggests researching surname origin, JewishGen Family Finder and family
documents.
~ On October 31, 2007 Joseph Fibel in "Names and their Equivalents"
emphasizes that we learn our family history >from records and archives and
not >from guessing about the names.

Bette Mas
Miami, Florida


Jewish communities of Britain 18th century #general

Irina Fridman
 

Dear Genners,

I'm conducting some research into the history of one of the
Jewish communities. The records go as far as the end of the 18th
century (1780s). However,... and these are the questions:

1. In one of the books of a local cathedral (dated 1681) is stated:
"5s paid a jew turned Christian..." This is one of several entiries
of the same nature.

I dont know whether it was the same Jew or several. I cannot confirm
either he resided locally or was just passing by and found himself
in strenous circumstances, and therefore asked for help. I also
remember reading in one of the well-known books on the subject
(cannot recall the reference at the moment), that there were around
300 Jews, all based in London by 1690. Now, was there any Jewish
charity at that time? What was the Church position on Jews at
that time? How did he need to prove that he did convert? Could it
be that the Cathedral was the only source available, and the only
way to obtain some help would have been to "convert" (given to
the fact that the only Jewish source for help was in London,
for example)?

2. Would anyone confirm that Daniel Maccabeth a Low Country
[cf. Holland/Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg] could have been a
Jew (to me Maccabeth seems obviously Jewish, but I would like to
hear another opinion)?

3. Could anyone tell me how Torah scrolls arrived to this country?
How did they travel in general? Who was able to carry them in their
travels? A Torah scroll in question is about 250 years old, and
which originated in North Africa.

Thank you very much in advance.

Kind regards,
Irina Shub
UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish communities of Britain 18th century #general

Irina Fridman
 

Dear Genners,

I'm conducting some research into the history of one of the
Jewish communities. The records go as far as the end of the 18th
century (1780s). However,... and these are the questions:

1. In one of the books of a local cathedral (dated 1681) is stated:
"5s paid a jew turned Christian..." This is one of several entiries
of the same nature.

I dont know whether it was the same Jew or several. I cannot confirm
either he resided locally or was just passing by and found himself
in strenous circumstances, and therefore asked for help. I also
remember reading in one of the well-known books on the subject
(cannot recall the reference at the moment), that there were around
300 Jews, all based in London by 1690. Now, was there any Jewish
charity at that time? What was the Church position on Jews at
that time? How did he need to prove that he did convert? Could it
be that the Cathedral was the only source available, and the only
way to obtain some help would have been to "convert" (given to
the fact that the only Jewish source for help was in London,
for example)?

2. Would anyone confirm that Daniel Maccabeth a Low Country
[cf. Holland/Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg] could have been a
Jew (to me Maccabeth seems obviously Jewish, but I would like to
hear another opinion)?

3. Could anyone tell me how Torah scrolls arrived to this country?
How did they travel in general? Who was able to carry them in their
travels? A Torah scroll in question is about 250 years old, and
which originated in North Africa.

Thank you very much in advance.

Kind regards,
Irina Shub
UK