Date   

JewishGen's Basic Genealogy Course #austria-czech

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

JewishGen's online "Basic Genealogy" course consists of 8 *text*=20
lessons, provided online twice weekly, which you can download and=20
read at your own pace. Topics include organizing and tracking=20
information, interviewing, Jewish naming conventions, U.S. vital=20
records, U.S. Census, Ellis Island passenger manifests, and the=20
JewishGen website and databases. The course includes hundreds of=20
links to genealogy web sites, and computer hints and tips on how=20
to best use your computer and browse the Internet. All classes=20
offer individualized help through an online Forum where you can=20
post your family information and photographs and get suggestions=20
and answers to your questions.
=20
The tuition for "Basic Genealogy" is $50, however, if you qualify=20
for JewishGen's Value Added Services by virtue of a $100 donation=20
(to our General Fund, within the last 12 months), you are welcome=20
to enroll at no additional charge (to do so, do not enroll, but=20
instead, send a note with your JewishGen ID to=20
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org and you'll receive=20
instructions for the waiver).
=20
To enroll and pay online, go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education=20
and select the Basic Jewish Genealogy Course (registration is limited=20
to 60 students and will close when the class is filled, usually within=20
a week). Read the details of the course, background of the instructor=20
and the requirements, then enroll by clicking on the "enroll link".=20
You will be able to pay for the course online by credit card at our=20
secure server or by check drawn on a U.S. Bank=20
=20
Once registered you will receive a confirmation email. The first lesson=20
will be posted on April 1 -- to access it go to=20
www.jewishgen.org/education and click on "enter class". =20

Hope you can join us!
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net=20
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.=20


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JewishGen's Basic Genealogy Course #austria-czech

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

JewishGen's online "Basic Genealogy" course consists of 8 *text*=20
lessons, provided online twice weekly, which you can download and=20
read at your own pace. Topics include organizing and tracking=20
information, interviewing, Jewish naming conventions, U.S. vital=20
records, U.S. Census, Ellis Island passenger manifests, and the=20
JewishGen website and databases. The course includes hundreds of=20
links to genealogy web sites, and computer hints and tips on how=20
to best use your computer and browse the Internet. All classes=20
offer individualized help through an online Forum where you can=20
post your family information and photographs and get suggestions=20
and answers to your questions.
=20
The tuition for "Basic Genealogy" is $50, however, if you qualify=20
for JewishGen's Value Added Services by virtue of a $100 donation=20
(to our General Fund, within the last 12 months), you are welcome=20
to enroll at no additional charge (to do so, do not enroll, but=20
instead, send a note with your JewishGen ID to=20
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org and you'll receive=20
instructions for the waiver).
=20
To enroll and pay online, go to http://www.jewishgen.org/education=20
and select the Basic Jewish Genealogy Course (registration is limited=20
to 60 students and will close when the class is filled, usually within=20
a week). Read the details of the course, background of the instructor=20
and the requirements, then enroll by clicking on the "enroll link".=20
You will be able to pay for the course online by credit card at our=20
secure server or by check drawn on a U.S. Bank=20
=20
Once registered you will receive a confirmation email. The first lesson=20
will be posted on April 1 -- to access it go to=20
www.jewishgen.org/education and click on "enter class". =20

Hope you can join us!
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net=20
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.=20


Searching: TRILNICK #belarus

Sarah Siegler <ss@...>
 

Hello I am researching the TRILNICK family >from Slonim. My great grandfather
Hyman born in 1863 came to the Uk in 1888 .His father was Morris and mother
Judith. He had 2 brothers and a sister. Abraham lived in Lincoln in the UK
and his other siblings emigrated to the USA.Has anyone any further
information about the family when they lived in Slonim?

Many thanks

Sarah Siegler
UK
MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: TRILNICK #belarus

Sarah Siegler <ss@...>
 

Hello I am researching the TRILNICK family >from Slonim. My great grandfather
Hyman born in 1863 came to the Uk in 1888 .His father was Morris and mother
Judith. He had 2 brothers and a sister. Abraham lived in Lincoln in the UK
and his other siblings emigrated to the USA.Has anyone any further
information about the family when they lived in Slonim?

Many thanks

Sarah Siegler
UK
MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information


London Cemetery #unitedkingdom

David Galaun <davidgalaun@...>
 

I have details of the death of a relative on 7 August 1882 aged 5
years old. Her name was Rachel Levy (although the death certificate
shows Rachel Leovine and I have seen many variations of the surname in
the family history of the time including Lavin, Levin and Lavine).

According to the US Burial Society, she is not buried in any US
cemetery. I am pretty certain that she would have been buried in a
Jewish cemetery and since she died in London it seems likely that it
would have been a London cemetery. If it was not a US cemetery, what
would the options have been in 1882? I know the Federation Burial
Society was not founded until some years later.

Interestingly, her parents were living in Hull at the time (she died
at her grandfather's house in Brixton) so there is a slim possibility
she may have been taken to Hull for burial but I am not sure how
likely that it. But if anyone has access to Hull burial records then
it may be worth checking!

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

David Galaun
London, UK


Basic Genealogy Course is Fully Registered #unitedkingdom

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Thanks to all your wonderful JewishGenners who are interested in
our Basic Course. The numbers were overwhelming and we must close
registration immediately. I sent out over 75 vouchers to Value
Added Members and over 15 folks have registerred through our
payment system.

The next class is July 1; please mark your calendars for June 15th
and check back on the education site (www.jewishgen.org/education)
for instructions. Anyone who emailed us for the waiver, and didn't
get into the class, will get an email ahead of time and first
priority in the July 1st class.

Thank you for your understanding...
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom London Cemetery #unitedkingdom

David Galaun <davidgalaun@...>
 

I have details of the death of a relative on 7 August 1882 aged 5
years old. Her name was Rachel Levy (although the death certificate
shows Rachel Leovine and I have seen many variations of the surname in
the family history of the time including Lavin, Levin and Lavine).

According to the US Burial Society, she is not buried in any US
cemetery. I am pretty certain that she would have been buried in a
Jewish cemetery and since she died in London it seems likely that it
would have been a London cemetery. If it was not a US cemetery, what
would the options have been in 1882? I know the Federation Burial
Society was not founded until some years later.

Interestingly, her parents were living in Hull at the time (she died
at her grandfather's house in Brixton) so there is a slim possibility
she may have been taken to Hull for burial but I am not sure how
likely that it. But if anyone has access to Hull burial records then
it may be worth checking!

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

David Galaun
London, UK


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Basic Genealogy Course is Fully Registered #unitedkingdom

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Thanks to all your wonderful JewishGenners who are interested in
our Basic Course. The numbers were overwhelming and we must close
registration immediately. I sent out over 75 vouchers to Value
Added Members and over 15 folks have registerred through our
payment system.

The next class is July 1; please mark your calendars for June 15th
and check back on the education site (www.jewishgen.org/education)
for instructions. Anyone who emailed us for the waiver, and didn't
get into the class, will get an email ahead of time and first
priority in the July 1st class.

Thank you for your understanding...
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.


Re: Jewish Child Conscription Practices #general

tbartman <bartmant@...>
 

I'm not sure I would choose the term conscripted labor to describe it, but I do
think that this arrangement occurred among the poor with at least some regularity
almost universally until child labor laws were passed and enforced, and there
existed some social "safety net". Even here in America I think you would have
little difficulty finding such arrangements in the 19th and perhaps even in the
early 20th century. I would view this as an adaptation to poverty well before the
age of welfare (Aide to Families with Dependent Children), food stamps, and birth
control or family planning. Just how common this was in the Jewish Shtetl is
difficult to determine. Jewish family size was very large. Families of over ten
children were not uncommon at all, four, six, or eight children were "normal". The
Jewish population in the Pale of Settlement had expanded very rapidly. Jews were
restricted by a combination of law and codes, discrimination, and tradition to
certain occupations. These occupations became quite "full". As it was said, by
the early 20th century there was "not enough for the father's let alone the sons".
Also for some other larger reasons I don't have time to describe here by the late
1800's the economic environment in which the Shtel existed had been in decline for
quite some time. Earlier many of the Shtetls had been quite prosperous with
substantial economic opportunities that Jews were in a position to exploit. The
Jewish communities were by and large relatively well off, and the average Jew was
considerably better off than the average gentile peasant. However, poverty became
an increasing problem in the Jewish community, and a source of political
radicalization, social unrest, and immigration. Also much of the antisemitism was
not just religiously but also or instead economically motivated. While there
continued to be some very wealthy Jews, and sizeable Jewish middle class, Jewish
poverty also became quite widespread and desperate. My assumption is that Jews are
by and large no different than other people, and reacted to poverty and desperation
much like others. So in that time and place I would expect to see some
"conscripted" child labor, but just how widespread it really was would requite
some pretty serious and scholarly investigation.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com

Andy wrote:

I'm working with an elderly Jewish man (1st generation American)whose mother came
from a shtetl near Bialystok. His parents migrated to the US in the early 1900's.
While in this shtetl, his mother's family was so poor, that they made her work
as a housekeeper at the age of eight. He further describes her work as
conscripted labor.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish Child Conscription Practices #general

tbartman <bartmant@...>
 

I'm not sure I would choose the term conscripted labor to describe it, but I do
think that this arrangement occurred among the poor with at least some regularity
almost universally until child labor laws were passed and enforced, and there
existed some social "safety net". Even here in America I think you would have
little difficulty finding such arrangements in the 19th and perhaps even in the
early 20th century. I would view this as an adaptation to poverty well before the
age of welfare (Aide to Families with Dependent Children), food stamps, and birth
control or family planning. Just how common this was in the Jewish Shtetl is
difficult to determine. Jewish family size was very large. Families of over ten
children were not uncommon at all, four, six, or eight children were "normal". The
Jewish population in the Pale of Settlement had expanded very rapidly. Jews were
restricted by a combination of law and codes, discrimination, and tradition to
certain occupations. These occupations became quite "full". As it was said, by
the early 20th century there was "not enough for the father's let alone the sons".
Also for some other larger reasons I don't have time to describe here by the late
1800's the economic environment in which the Shtel existed had been in decline for
quite some time. Earlier many of the Shtetls had been quite prosperous with
substantial economic opportunities that Jews were in a position to exploit. The
Jewish communities were by and large relatively well off, and the average Jew was
considerably better off than the average gentile peasant. However, poverty became
an increasing problem in the Jewish community, and a source of political
radicalization, social unrest, and immigration. Also much of the antisemitism was
not just religiously but also or instead economically motivated. While there
continued to be some very wealthy Jews, and sizeable Jewish middle class, Jewish
poverty also became quite widespread and desperate. My assumption is that Jews are
by and large no different than other people, and reacted to poverty and desperation
much like others. So in that time and place I would expect to see some
"conscripted" child labor, but just how widespread it really was would requite
some pretty serious and scholarly investigation.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com

Andy wrote:

I'm working with an elderly Jewish man (1st generation American)whose mother came
from a shtetl near Bialystok. His parents migrated to the US in the early 1900's.
While in this shtetl, his mother's family was so poor, that they made her work
as a housekeeper at the age of eight. He further describes her work as
conscripted labor.


Help in Strassbourg Archives #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Is any one going to the Strassbourg archives that can look up 3 names for me?
I am not needing copies of the certificates only the names of the parents.
1) Isadore Klinger b. March 15, 1908
2) Nisle/Nisler Levi/Levy b. August 22, 1881 Konigshofen, near Strassbourg

Thank you
Debby Painter
Searching Klinger Lodz; Levy Strassbourg; Gincig/Ginzig anywhere


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help in Strassbourg Archives #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Is any one going to the Strassbourg archives that can look up 3 names for me?
I am not needing copies of the certificates only the names of the parents.
1) Isadore Klinger b. March 15, 1908
2) Nisle/Nisler Levi/Levy b. August 22, 1881 Konigshofen, near Strassbourg

Thank you
Debby Painter
Searching Klinger Lodz; Levy Strassbourg; Gincig/Ginzig anywhere


Help please for U.H.Ocean View Cemetery 1916 - New York #general

Maggie Bonfield <bonturn2@...>
 

Hi, can anyone please help me find out what happened to my Great Grandfathers
grave? I have a burial certificate for U.H.Ocean View Cemetery New York
registered no 9087, Simon Joseph Rogal , born in Russia, who died aged 61 in a
tenement in Manhattan.

I live in England and was delighted to find this certificate but hope for a
gravestone to help verify that he is my Great Grandfather. I have phoned 2
different places, as I was told the cemetery had changed it's name , but no-one
could assist me. Any ideas please?
best wishes
Maggie Bonfield
Researching ROGAL/ROGOLSKY and variants (Salant/New York/London and USA)and
descendents of Fanny/Frances ROGAL-SIMONS born c1887 possibly married Pincus
Simons 18 March 1918 in Manhattan.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help please for U.H.Ocean View Cemetery 1916 - New York #general

Maggie Bonfield <bonturn2@...>
 

Hi, can anyone please help me find out what happened to my Great Grandfathers
grave? I have a burial certificate for U.H.Ocean View Cemetery New York
registered no 9087, Simon Joseph Rogal , born in Russia, who died aged 61 in a
tenement in Manhattan.

I live in England and was delighted to find this certificate but hope for a
gravestone to help verify that he is my Great Grandfather. I have phoned 2
different places, as I was told the cemetery had changed it's name , but no-one
could assist me. Any ideas please?
best wishes
Maggie Bonfield
Researching ROGAL/ROGOLSKY and variants (Salant/New York/London and USA)and
descendents of Fanny/Frances ROGAL-SIMONS born c1887 possibly married Pincus
Simons 18 March 1918 in Manhattan.


Poddebice - new records soon to be available! #general

Marcos Frid <marcos_frid@...>
 

If you are interested in the town of Poddebice, read on:
Work is being done now to complete full extractions of the 1872-1890 marriages and
Alegata 1857-1858. That means it will include mother's surnames, domicile, dates of
birth, full dates of marriage banns and marriages, occupation, etc.

Please contact me directly if you would like to get more information.

Marcos Frid


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Poddebice - new records soon to be available! #general

Marcos Frid <marcos_frid@...>
 

If you are interested in the town of Poddebice, read on:
Work is being done now to complete full extractions of the 1872-1890 marriages and
Alegata 1857-1858. That means it will include mother's surnames, domicile, dates of
birth, full dates of marriage banns and marriages, occupation, etc.

Please contact me directly if you would like to get more information.

Marcos Frid


Re: Strange names in family #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Lois - You're not alone!
Several of my husband's Russian family members were referred to as "yenta - the
lahnga" [ tall and lanky], "Moishe the schvartza" and "Moishe the vice-ah" [to
distinguish the light skinned son >from the dark skinned father], Big Bubby and
Little Bubby [the younger and the elder], and also Yiddish names for one who
limped, one who hunched over, and the grutteneh" for one who always had something
happening to her.
Sylvia

From: "Bubylu@aol.com" <Bubylu@aol.com>
I was wondering if other families did what ours did and that was name distinction.
My Mother had a cousin who we called Suda Madiems (Mary's daughter Sadie), Little
Ethel vs Tante Ethel, Rosie Sarah's (Sarah's daughter Rosie).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Strange names in family #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

Lois - You're not alone!
Several of my husband's Russian family members were referred to as "yenta - the
lahnga" [ tall and lanky], "Moishe the schvartza" and "Moishe the vice-ah" [to
distinguish the light skinned son >from the dark skinned father], Big Bubby and
Little Bubby [the younger and the elder], and also Yiddish names for one who
limped, one who hunched over, and the grutteneh" for one who always had something
happening to her.
Sylvia

From: "Bubylu@aol.com" <Bubylu@aol.com>
I was wondering if other families did what ours did and that was name distinction.
My Mother had a cousin who we called Suda Madiems (Mary's daughter Sadie), Little
Ethel vs Tante Ethel, Rosie Sarah's (Sarah's daughter Rosie).


Basic Genealogy Course is Fully Registered #poland

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Thanks to all your wonderful JewishGenners who are interested in
our Basic Course. The numbers were overwhelming and we must close
registration immediately. I sent out over 75 vouchers to Value
Added Members and over 15 folks have registerred through our
payment system.

The next class is July 1; please mark your calendars for June 15th
and check back on the education site (www.jewishgen.org/education)
for instructions. Anyone who emailed us for the waiver, and didn't
get into the class, will get an email ahead of time and first
priority in the July 1st class.

Thank you for your understanding...
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Basic Genealogy Course is Fully Registered #poland

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Thanks to all your wonderful JewishGenners who are interested in
our Basic Course. The numbers were overwhelming and we must close
registration immediately. I sent out over 75 vouchers to Value
Added Members and over 15 folks have registerred through our
payment system.

The next class is July 1; please mark your calendars for June 15th
and check back on the education site (www.jewishgen.org/education)
for instructions. Anyone who emailed us for the waiver, and didn't
get into the class, will get an email ahead of time and first
priority in the July 1st class.

Thank you for your understanding...
Phyllis Kramer
phylliskramer1@att.net
VP, Education, JewishGen, Inc.