Date   

Re: NYC Burial Permits #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

A post to Rootsweb's NYBROOKLYN listserv, archived at
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/NYBROOKLYN/2004-01/1074285519 , reports
that the poster got copies of burial permits >from a cemetery (Green-wood Cemetery in
Brooklyn), including one >from 1917. The poster listed the information that is
requested by the permit.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC Burial Permits #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

A post to Rootsweb's NYBROOKLYN listserv, archived at
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/NYBROOKLYN/2004-01/1074285519 , reports
that the poster got copies of burial permits >from a cemetery (Green-wood Cemetery in
Brooklyn), including one >from 1917. The poster listed the information that is
requested by the permit.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Photo detective #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

Maureen Taylor - The Photo Detective - is on the program for the 29th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy being held in Philadelphia August 2-7,
2009. Check her programs out at http://www.philly2009.org/ by clicking on
"Program."

Maureen's programs are just two of the new and interesting offerings at this year's
Conference. Hope to see many of you in Philly.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair

Alberto Guido Chester wrote:
I have found an interesting link
http://blog.familytreemagazine.com/photodetectiveblog/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Photo detective #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

Maureen Taylor - The Photo Detective - is on the program for the 29th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy being held in Philadelphia August 2-7,
2009. Check her programs out at http://www.philly2009.org/ by clicking on
"Program."

Maureen's programs are just two of the new and interesting offerings at this year's
Conference. Hope to see many of you in Philly.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair

Alberto Guido Chester wrote:
I have found an interesting link
http://blog.familytreemagazine.com/photodetectiveblog/


Yiddish Translation Assistance #general

skbernst123@...
 

Fellow Genners
I would appreciate assistance with the translation of two items. The first, being a
poem written in Yiddish appearing in the Pultusk, Poland Yizkor Book. I am
particularly interested in seeing whether translators will interpret the Yiddish
with alternate interpretations. This poem can be viewed at ViewMate VM12493

The second item is Yiddish cursive writing >from the back of a post card. The
inscription is difficult to read due to irregular writing. In addition, the bottom
of the inscription may be cut off. This poem can be viewed at ViewMate VM12493

Direct link to both submissions:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12493
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12490

Please answer directly to me at skbernst123@yahoo.com

I thank you in advance.
Stewart Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

Researching >from Pultusk & Przasnysk/Pruznitz , Poland : Niestempower, Karsch/
Karas, Kierszenbaum, Domb, Dronzek, Zelkowitz, Zylberberg, Blinkitny, Eichler,
Bernstein (some Berns in the U.S./Chicago), Najman/Neuman Researching >from Warka/
Vurka, Poland :Karczewa/Karchova, Zelkowtiz Researching >from Labun/Polonnoye,
Ukraine :Baranshteyn/Bernstein Researching >from Lithuania, & Nashville , Tennessee:
Rubin (Also Chicago), Shapiri/Shapiro


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish Translation Assistance #general

skbernst123@...
 

Fellow Genners
I would appreciate assistance with the translation of two items. The first, being a
poem written in Yiddish appearing in the Pultusk, Poland Yizkor Book. I am
particularly interested in seeing whether translators will interpret the Yiddish
with alternate interpretations. This poem can be viewed at ViewMate VM12493

The second item is Yiddish cursive writing >from the back of a post card. The
inscription is difficult to read due to irregular writing. In addition, the bottom
of the inscription may be cut off. This poem can be viewed at ViewMate VM12493

Direct link to both submissions:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12493
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=12490

Please answer directly to me at skbernst123@yahoo.com

I thank you in advance.
Stewart Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

Researching >from Pultusk & Przasnysk/Pruznitz , Poland : Niestempower, Karsch/
Karas, Kierszenbaum, Domb, Dronzek, Zelkowitz, Zylberberg, Blinkitny, Eichler,
Bernstein (some Berns in the U.S./Chicago), Najman/Neuman Researching >from Warka/
Vurka, Poland :Karczewa/Karchova, Zelkowtiz Researching >from Labun/Polonnoye,
Ukraine :Baranshteyn/Bernstein Researching >from Lithuania, & Nashville , Tennessee:
Rubin (Also Chicago), Shapiri/Shapiro


Burial permits and Transit permits, New York City #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

There has been some talk once again about burial and/or transmit permits, so I
thought this was time to talk about these permits once again for clarification.

A burial permit and a transit permit are two different things. The former is a
legal document issued by the City; the latter is a document issued by the
organization or society that owns the full burial plot. Now speaking at least for
burials/cemeteries in New York City (boroughs, etc.), both are needed for burial.
When this was first deemed necessary, I can't say, though it was so at least within
the first decade of the twentieth century. I can't say at present whether a
cemetery is required to keep both burial and transit permits forever or for a
certain period of time. Someone is looking into it for me, and hopefully I will
have an answer for you at some point.

A transmit permit is issued by the city, which is gotten by the funeral home, and
accompanies the body when it's brought to the cemetery, usually by the funeral
director, but sometimes by the hearse driver.You can read more about what's in a
transit permit at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-vr-btp.htm. A burial permit
usually contains just the name of the society, the name of the deceased, their
individual grave location and the signature of the society officer in charge of
burials for its members. Some of these burial permits might also list the names of
the officers.

Here is a possible scenario: A person passes away, whether it be at home, at a
hospital, at a nursing home, etc. The funeral parlor picks up the body. They call
the cemetery where a person is to be buried. They tell the cemetery office that
they have a burial and tell the cemetery if the burial is on a society's grounds
(assuming the burial is to be on a society's grounds). The cemetery office pulls
out the map they possess of that society's plot, that contains the names and dates
of burials of the people in that particular plot. The plot is subdivided into
squares or rectangles, each one designated as an individual grave site. Then three
things can happen:
1. the deceased is not listed in any of the grave sites displayed on the map;
2. the space for the burial plot for the deceased says, e.g. "Reserved for Sam
Cohen";
3. the space says "recorded deed for Sam Cohen." (note that if someone has a deed
for their future burial, they need to record it with the cemetery).

If 1., then, assuming the society is still in existence, they would need to be
called (usually by the funeral parlor) so that they can get the paperwork and
verify that the deceased is the person to be buried there. If 2., then the funeral
director needs to contact the society who then picks up (or is faxed) the burial
permit, and then it is brought to the funeral and given to the cemetery. If 3.,
then the deed is surrendered, and this acts as the burial permit.

Now you will say that most societies that own society plots in the NYC metro area
are no longer extant. Legally, their paperwork, after becoming defunct, should be
sent to the NY State Liquidation Bureau, though sometimes a society becomes defunct
and simply walk away >from the society and the grounds, and don't close the business
up, so to speak, and don't send their papers to the Bureau.

Usually, before a society goes defunct, deeds are given to their members who are
entitled to them. Then they're supposed to go to the cemetery to record the deed.
When someone dies, the cemetery should have then a recorded deed in their
possession, and the family of the deceased will hopefully have their copy of the
deed to bring with them to the funeral. But then, what happens if the society went
defunct and no deed was issued before this happened? The person who believes
they're entitled to a grave site within a society's grounds would need to contact
the Liquidation Bureau which now has the society records, and request a deed. Now
if they have no record of this person being entitled to a deed, they're out of
luck. All the cemetery can do then, if there is still an available space in the
society plot, is to purchase a plot for themselves.

Sometimes a still active society doesn't issue deeds. They may simply send a
notorized letter to the cemetery stating that it's okay to bury this person and put
up a monument (normally putting up a monument requires yet another permit.)

So burial permits and transmit permits should be kept by each cemetery, though they
may be stored in various forms. One cemetery may just keep them filed
alphabetically or by date; others may glue them onto a ledger in order to keep them
well organized and findable, etc. There must be some variation in all of this
between the many cemeteries that keep such records.

I know of no time that both permits were not required. Even during the flu epidemic
of 1918, I believe both were needed, but I couldn't swear by it. Hope this helps.
I'm no expert on this matter; I'm just trying to shed a bit of light on this
discussion. Perhaps you might wish to read my interview with the Mt. Judah cemetery
manager that can be found at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-vr-btp.htm.

Regards,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve725@optonline.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Burial permits and Transit permits, New York City #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

There has been some talk once again about burial and/or transmit permits, so I
thought this was time to talk about these permits once again for clarification.

A burial permit and a transit permit are two different things. The former is a
legal document issued by the City; the latter is a document issued by the
organization or society that owns the full burial plot. Now speaking at least for
burials/cemeteries in New York City (boroughs, etc.), both are needed for burial.
When this was first deemed necessary, I can't say, though it was so at least within
the first decade of the twentieth century. I can't say at present whether a
cemetery is required to keep both burial and transit permits forever or for a
certain period of time. Someone is looking into it for me, and hopefully I will
have an answer for you at some point.

A transmit permit is issued by the city, which is gotten by the funeral home, and
accompanies the body when it's brought to the cemetery, usually by the funeral
director, but sometimes by the hearse driver.You can read more about what's in a
transit permit at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-vr-btp.htm. A burial permit
usually contains just the name of the society, the name of the deceased, their
individual grave location and the signature of the society officer in charge of
burials for its members. Some of these burial permits might also list the names of
the officers.

Here is a possible scenario: A person passes away, whether it be at home, at a
hospital, at a nursing home, etc. The funeral parlor picks up the body. They call
the cemetery where a person is to be buried. They tell the cemetery office that
they have a burial and tell the cemetery if the burial is on a society's grounds
(assuming the burial is to be on a society's grounds). The cemetery office pulls
out the map they possess of that society's plot, that contains the names and dates
of burials of the people in that particular plot. The plot is subdivided into
squares or rectangles, each one designated as an individual grave site. Then three
things can happen:
1. the deceased is not listed in any of the grave sites displayed on the map;
2. the space for the burial plot for the deceased says, e.g. "Reserved for Sam
Cohen";
3. the space says "recorded deed for Sam Cohen." (note that if someone has a deed
for their future burial, they need to record it with the cemetery).

If 1., then, assuming the society is still in existence, they would need to be
called (usually by the funeral parlor) so that they can get the paperwork and
verify that the deceased is the person to be buried there. If 2., then the funeral
director needs to contact the society who then picks up (or is faxed) the burial
permit, and then it is brought to the funeral and given to the cemetery. If 3.,
then the deed is surrendered, and this acts as the burial permit.

Now you will say that most societies that own society plots in the NYC metro area
are no longer extant. Legally, their paperwork, after becoming defunct, should be
sent to the NY State Liquidation Bureau, though sometimes a society becomes defunct
and simply walk away >from the society and the grounds, and don't close the business
up, so to speak, and don't send their papers to the Bureau.

Usually, before a society goes defunct, deeds are given to their members who are
entitled to them. Then they're supposed to go to the cemetery to record the deed.
When someone dies, the cemetery should have then a recorded deed in their
possession, and the family of the deceased will hopefully have their copy of the
deed to bring with them to the funeral. But then, what happens if the society went
defunct and no deed was issued before this happened? The person who believes
they're entitled to a grave site within a society's grounds would need to contact
the Liquidation Bureau which now has the society records, and request a deed. Now
if they have no record of this person being entitled to a deed, they're out of
luck. All the cemetery can do then, if there is still an available space in the
society plot, is to purchase a plot for themselves.

Sometimes a still active society doesn't issue deeds. They may simply send a
notorized letter to the cemetery stating that it's okay to bury this person and put
up a monument (normally putting up a monument requires yet another permit.)

So burial permits and transmit permits should be kept by each cemetery, though they
may be stored in various forms. One cemetery may just keep them filed
alphabetically or by date; others may glue them onto a ledger in order to keep them
well organized and findable, etc. There must be some variation in all of this
between the many cemeteries that keep such records.

I know of no time that both permits were not required. Even during the flu epidemic
of 1918, I believe both were needed, but I couldn't swear by it. Hope this helps.
I'm no expert on this matter; I'm just trying to shed a bit of light on this
discussion. Perhaps you might wish to read my interview with the Mt. Judah cemetery
manager that can be found at www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/erc-vr-btp.htm.

Regards,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve725@optonline.net


translations #romania

gitty2@att.net
 

Thank you all for your work, it is greatly appreciated.
Gert Lord
Yellow Spgs, Ohio


Romania SIG #Romania translations #romania

gitty2@att.net
 

Thank you all for your work, it is greatly appreciated.
Gert Lord
Yellow Spgs, Ohio


Jacob (Jake) Goldstein z"l #general

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

It is with profound sadness that I advise you of the passing of Dr. Jacob
(Jake) Goldstein of Lynnfield, MA on April 2, 2009. His death is a great
loss to those of us who knew him and shared his passion for Jewish
genealogy. He is survived by his beloved wife Alma and their three children
Dana, Jeremy, and Alex.

Jake was a mathematician specializing in the modeling of random phenomena.
His community involvement included Holocaust and Jewish Family Education, as
well as assuming leadership roles in his synagogue.

Jake devoted much time to numerous volunteer Jewish genealogy projects,
including several Town Leader positions for Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
and the creation for JRI-Poland of an aggregate file model that enables
researchers to locate ancestral records when surnames were missing from
indexes and documents. I was honored to work closely with Jake using this
model for the records of Wegrow, Poland, a town >from which both our
ancestors came.

He lent his invaluable technical expertise to everyone working with the
Lyris system on various discussion groups run and hosted by JewishGen, and
he served as moderator for the RavSIG (Rabbinic Genealogy), DNA and Lodz
discussion groups. Jake also served as the leader of an internet-based
discussion group for children of survivors of the Shoah.

The family has requested that donations in Jake's memory be made to any
Jewish organization in which Jake was involved.


Let his memory be a blessing to all who knew him.

Susan Kaplan Stone
New York, N.Y.
Siedlce Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland


MODERATOR NOTE: To donate to JewishGen in Jake's memory, go to
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jacob (Jake) Goldstein z"l #general

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

It is with profound sadness that I advise you of the passing of Dr. Jacob
(Jake) Goldstein of Lynnfield, MA on April 2, 2009. His death is a great
loss to those of us who knew him and shared his passion for Jewish
genealogy. He is survived by his beloved wife Alma and their three children
Dana, Jeremy, and Alex.

Jake was a mathematician specializing in the modeling of random phenomena.
His community involvement included Holocaust and Jewish Family Education, as
well as assuming leadership roles in his synagogue.

Jake devoted much time to numerous volunteer Jewish genealogy projects,
including several Town Leader positions for Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
and the creation for JRI-Poland of an aggregate file model that enables
researchers to locate ancestral records when surnames were missing from
indexes and documents. I was honored to work closely with Jake using this
model for the records of Wegrow, Poland, a town >from which both our
ancestors came.

He lent his invaluable technical expertise to everyone working with the
Lyris system on various discussion groups run and hosted by JewishGen, and
he served as moderator for the RavSIG (Rabbinic Genealogy), DNA and Lodz
discussion groups. Jake also served as the leader of an internet-based
discussion group for children of survivors of the Shoah.

The family has requested that donations in Jake's memory be made to any
Jewish organization in which Jake was involved.


Let his memory be a blessing to all who knew him.

Susan Kaplan Stone
New York, N.Y.
Siedlce Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland


MODERATOR NOTE: To donate to JewishGen in Jake's memory, go to
www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity


Jacob (Jake) Goldstein z"l #poland

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

It is with profound sadness that I advise you of the passing of Dr. Jacob
(Jake) Goldstein of Lynnfield, MA on April 2, 2009. His death is a great
loss to those of us who knew him and shared his passion for Jewish
genealogy. He is survived by his beloved wife Alma and their three children
Dana, Jeremy, and Alex.

Jake was a mathematician specializing in the modeling of random phenomena.
His community involvement included Holocaust and Jewish Family Education, as
well as assuming leadership roles in his synagogue.

Jake devoted much time to numerous volunteer Jewish genealogy projects,
including several Town Leader positions for Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
and the creation for JRI-Poland of an aggregate file model that enables
researchers to locate ancestral records when surnames were missing from
indexes and documents. I was honored to work closely with Jake using this
model for the records of Wegrow, Poland, a town >from which both our
ancestors came.

He lent his invaluable technical expertise to everyone working with the
Lyris system on various discussion groups run and hosted by JewishGen, and
he served as moderator for the RavSIG (Rabbinic Genealogy), DNA and Lodz
discussion groups. Jake also served as the leader of an internet-based
discussion group for children of survivors of the Shoah.

The family has requested that donations in Jake's memory be made to the
Lappin Charitable Foundation, 29 Congress Street, Salem, MA 01970 or to
any Jewish organization in which Jake was involved.

Let his memory be a blessing to all who knew him.

Susan Kaplan Stone
New York, N.Y.
Siedlce Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Jacob (Jake) Goldstein z"l #poland

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

It is with profound sadness that I advise you of the passing of Dr. Jacob
(Jake) Goldstein of Lynnfield, MA on April 2, 2009. His death is a great
loss to those of us who knew him and shared his passion for Jewish
genealogy. He is survived by his beloved wife Alma and their three children
Dana, Jeremy, and Alex.

Jake was a mathematician specializing in the modeling of random phenomena.
His community involvement included Holocaust and Jewish Family Education, as
well as assuming leadership roles in his synagogue.

Jake devoted much time to numerous volunteer Jewish genealogy projects,
including several Town Leader positions for Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
and the creation for JRI-Poland of an aggregate file model that enables
researchers to locate ancestral records when surnames were missing from
indexes and documents. I was honored to work closely with Jake using this
model for the records of Wegrow, Poland, a town >from which both our
ancestors came.

He lent his invaluable technical expertise to everyone working with the
Lyris system on various discussion groups run and hosted by JewishGen, and
he served as moderator for the RavSIG (Rabbinic Genealogy), DNA and Lodz
discussion groups. Jake also served as the leader of an internet-based
discussion group for children of survivors of the Shoah.

The family has requested that donations in Jake's memory be made to the
Lappin Charitable Foundation, 29 Congress Street, Salem, MA 01970 or to
any Jewish organization in which Jake was involved.

Let his memory be a blessing to all who knew him.

Susan Kaplan Stone
New York, N.Y.
Siedlce Archives Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland


Records for Railway Station Chiefs in Galicia #galicia

Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@...>
 

According to records in the Museum of Military History in Budapest,
my grandfather was promoted to Senior Lieutenant in the Royal
Hungarian Army and Police on May 1st, 1886. He had previously
served in the Imperial-Royal Austrian Army, but went to inactive
duty status in 1883, upon marrying.

In his file, in notes for 1886, he is described as being "railway
station chief in Galicia and in case of war he could be used in
that position".

I would like to know what community he was living in at that time.
Are there records available of railway employees in 1886? Which
communities in Galicia at that time had railway stations with
station chiefs?

I do not read or speak Hungarian. The research was performed by a
professional researcher, who copied and translated the results into
Englsh.

Thank you for any help.

Samuel Kraus

Rancho Palos Verdes, California (near Los Angeles)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Records for Railway Station Chiefs in Galicia #galicia

Joan and Sam Kraus <jnskraus@...>
 

According to records in the Museum of Military History in Budapest,
my grandfather was promoted to Senior Lieutenant in the Royal
Hungarian Army and Police on May 1st, 1886. He had previously
served in the Imperial-Royal Austrian Army, but went to inactive
duty status in 1883, upon marrying.

In his file, in notes for 1886, he is described as being "railway
station chief in Galicia and in case of war he could be used in
that position".

I would like to know what community he was living in at that time.
Are there records available of railway employees in 1886? Which
communities in Galicia at that time had railway stations with
station chiefs?

I do not read or speak Hungarian. The research was performed by a
professional researcher, who copied and translated the results into
Englsh.

Thank you for any help.

Samuel Kraus

Rancho Palos Verdes, California (near Los Angeles)


Re: Where is "Manastersano, Russia"? #general

Shlomo Gurevich
 

On 5 Apr 2009 Renee Steinig <genmaven@gmail.com> wrote:
"....the one town I found that's near current-day Mahilyow, Belarus (formerly
Mogilev), and was in pre-WWI Mogilev gubernia, is Monastyrshchina. Could that be
pronounced anything like Manastersano?"

Monastyrshchina is the only town in Belarus which sounds close to Manastersano.

Monastyrshchina was a big shtetl in Mstislavl uyezd of Mogilev gubernia. The 1912
Duma voter's lists contain 5 Malkins lived in Mstislavl uyezd including 2 in
Monastyrshchina itself.

Shlomo Gurevich
Hoshaya, Israel
shl2gur@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where is "Manastersano, Russia"? #general

Shlomo Gurevich
 

On 5 Apr 2009 Renee Steinig <genmaven@gmail.com> wrote:
"....the one town I found that's near current-day Mahilyow, Belarus (formerly
Mogilev), and was in pre-WWI Mogilev gubernia, is Monastyrshchina. Could that be
pronounced anything like Manastersano?"

Monastyrshchina is the only town in Belarus which sounds close to Manastersano.

Monastyrshchina was a big shtetl in Mstislavl uyezd of Mogilev gubernia. The 1912
Duma voter's lists contain 5 Malkins lived in Mstislavl uyezd including 2 in
Monastyrshchina itself.

Shlomo Gurevich
Hoshaya, Israel
shl2gur@yahoo.com


Uschitz, Upper Silesia #germany

Judith Elam
 

My g-g-grandfather, Dr. Bernhard WEISS, was born 1807 in Uschitz, Upper
Silesia. His parents were Moses and Nanetta. Does anyone know where
Uschitz is? I cannot find it. I have found Oschitz and Uschutz (with
umlaut). Also, can anyone suggest how I might find out more about Moses and
Nanetta WEISS of Uschitz? Please respond directly to

elamj@hawaii.rr.com Thank you. Judith Elam Kihei, Hawaii, USA


German SIG #Germany Uschitz, Upper Silesia #germany

Judith Elam
 

My g-g-grandfather, Dr. Bernhard WEISS, was born 1807 in Uschitz, Upper
Silesia. His parents were Moses and Nanetta. Does anyone know where
Uschitz is? I cannot find it. I have found Oschitz and Uschutz (with
umlaut). Also, can anyone suggest how I might find out more about Moses and
Nanetta WEISS of Uschitz? Please respond directly to

elamj@hawaii.rr.com Thank you. Judith Elam Kihei, Hawaii, USA