Date   

mtDNA testing questions #dna

Shelly Crane
 

Hello,

I have debated for a long time whether to pursue mtDNA testing. I have a
few technical questions that come to mind when considering the efficacy of
genealogy testing:

1. The rate of mutation in mtDNA is higher than nuclear DNA. I've read
that is actually advantageous for genealogy testing, but that seems
counterintuitive to me. Can anyone help explain?

2 heteroplasmy: "the presence of a mixture of more than one type of an
organellar genome within a cell." In this instance I'm referring to
mitochondria DNA. Since every eukaryotic cell contains many hundreds of
mitochondria with hundreds of copies of mtDNA, I assume it's possible and
relatively frequent for mutations to affect only some copies, while the
remaining ones are unaffected in any given individual. Additionally, I
also assume there to be large random shifts in heteroplasmy level between
mother and offspring. Wouldn't that throw a monkey wrench into mtDNA
genealogy testing?

3. Like nuclear DNA, mtDNA is prone to non-inherited mutations which are
not passed to future generations. What are the implications for genealogy
testing?

4. There have been more and more reports of paternally derived mtDNA
detected in humans and other species. I assume this is rare....but how
rare and is it factored into the results?

Perhaps I'm not understanding the above concepts and/or how mtDNA works
for genealogy testing. If that is the case, I would really appreciate being
set straight as it all sounds very intriguing. Please respond privately or
to the group.

Thank you!
Shelly Levin
crzprncess@aol.com
USA


IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #dna

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #latinamerica

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


DNA Research #DNA mtDNA testing questions #dna

Shelly Crane
 

Hello,

I have debated for a long time whether to pursue mtDNA testing. I have a
few technical questions that come to mind when considering the efficacy of
genealogy testing:

1. The rate of mutation in mtDNA is higher than nuclear DNA. I've read
that is actually advantageous for genealogy testing, but that seems
counterintuitive to me. Can anyone help explain?

2 heteroplasmy: "the presence of a mixture of more than one type of an
organellar genome within a cell." In this instance I'm referring to
mitochondria DNA. Since every eukaryotic cell contains many hundreds of
mitochondria with hundreds of copies of mtDNA, I assume it's possible and
relatively frequent for mutations to affect only some copies, while the
remaining ones are unaffected in any given individual. Additionally, I
also assume there to be large random shifts in heteroplasmy level between
mother and offspring. Wouldn't that throw a monkey wrench into mtDNA
genealogy testing?

3. Like nuclear DNA, mtDNA is prone to non-inherited mutations which are
not passed to future generations. What are the implications for genealogy
testing?

4. There have been more and more reports of paternally derived mtDNA
detected in humans and other species. I assume this is rare....but how
rare and is it factored into the results?

Perhaps I'm not understanding the above concepts and/or how mtDNA works
for genealogy testing. If that is the case, I would really appreciate being
set straight as it all sounds very intriguing. Please respond privately or
to the group.

Thank you!
Shelly Levin
crzprncess@aol.com
USA


DNA Research #DNA IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #dna

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


Latin America #LatinAmerica IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #latinamerica

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland IAJGS Conference Computer Training Workshops -- A Few Changes #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

David Mink
 

The Monday, August 3 Family Tree Maker for Beginners and Intermediate Users
computer workshop (sponsored by Ancestry.com and instructed by software
designer Duff Wilson) has been sold out and a waiting list had been created.
As a result of the great demand for this workshop, Duff has graciously
agreed to instruct a second beginner/intermediate Family Tree Maker session.
This session will be held on Thursday, August 6 >from 8:15 to 10:15 AM.

If you are already registered, sign up for this session now. The cost is
$25. Go to Registration Update at
http://www.philly2009.org/registration_update.cfm and update your "Optional
Programs." The session code is Th-38.

In addition, the Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Advanced Computer Training
Workshop (Family Tree Builder is an online genealogy program with no
connection to Family Tree Maker) originally scheduled for Thursday, August 6
from 2:00 to 4:00 PM has been canceled.
There is still a Family Tree Builder 3.0 - Basic Workshop scheduled for
Sunday >from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. You can sign up for this through
Registration Update.

There are also thirteen other Computer Training Workshops. For a listing of
these, go to our Program at http://www.philly2009.org/program.cfm and search
by selecting "Computer Training Workshops" >from the "Session Topic" pop-up
menu. Space is limited to 25 per workshop, so please register soon.

Online registration for all optional programs closes at Sunday, July 19 at
11:59 pm US central time.

If you are not yet registered to attend the Conference, what are you waiting
for ???

See you in Philadelphia in about a month.

Mark Halpern
Program Co-Chair


Hebrew nicknames #general

Yohanan
 

An interesting short article in Ha'aretz newspaper (English edition) about
Hebrew nicknames:
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1096956.html

Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew nicknames #general

Yohanan
 

An interesting short article in Ha'aretz newspaper (English edition) about
Hebrew nicknames:
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1096956.html

Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne Australia


Stone Arch Inscription #general

Stewart K. Bernstein <skbernst123@...>
 

Members

I would appreciate translation help with thed inscription aon the arcg
leading to a section of Chicago's Jewish Waldheim Cemetery.

The language may be Hebrew or Yiddish.
I can be view at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13046

It will be necessary to zoom into the photo to enlarge.

You may E-maile me directly at >skbernst123@yahoo.com<
I thank you in advance for assistance.

Stewart K. Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

Researching >from Pultusk & Przasnysk/Pruznitz, Poland: Niestempower,
Karsch/Karas, Kierszenbaum, Domb, Dronzek, Zelkowitz, Zylberberg,
Blinkitny, Eichler, Bernstein (some Berns in the U.S./Chicago),
Najman/Neuman Researching >from Warka/Vurka, Poland:
Karczewa/Karchova, Zelkowtiz Researching >from Labun/Polonnoye, Ukraine:
Baranshteyn/Bernstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Stone Arch Inscription #general

Stewart K. Bernstein <skbernst123@...>
 

Members

I would appreciate translation help with thed inscription aon the arcg
leading to a section of Chicago's Jewish Waldheim Cemetery.

The language may be Hebrew or Yiddish.
I can be view at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13046

It will be necessary to zoom into the photo to enlarge.

You may E-maile me directly at >skbernst123@yahoo.com<
I thank you in advance for assistance.

Stewart K. Bernstein
Thousand Oaks, CA

Researching >from Pultusk & Przasnysk/Pruznitz, Poland: Niestempower,
Karsch/Karas, Kierszenbaum, Domb, Dronzek, Zelkowitz, Zylberberg,
Blinkitny, Eichler, Bernstein (some Berns in the U.S./Chicago),
Najman/Neuman Researching >from Warka/Vurka, Poland:
Karczewa/Karchova, Zelkowtiz Researching >from Labun/Polonnoye, Ukraine:
Baranshteyn/Bernstein


Viewmate translation tombstones #general

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Thanks in advance for translation of the Hebrew on these two
tombstones in Des Moines, Illinois.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13056
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13038

Elaine Bush
Pleasant Hill, CA USA

http://elainebush.tribalpages.com

Researching: REST, POLLACK, BASSMAN, BLUSHINSKY, GOODMAN, TUBIASH/
ZABOK (Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Argentina, South Africa, New York,
Chicago, Iowa, Colorado) SHANIN / DAVIS, FRUMHOFF , MNUHIN / MNUCHIN,
GOREN, LIFSHITZ (Russia, Belarus, Ukraine) BER, BELIZ, EDELMAN,
KOFF, PAS (various) ROBINSON (NYC), SCHVARTZ (Argentina),
SIOVITZ / SLOVITZ (NYC), ROSENFELD (Celia...Ukraine to Argentina)

MODERATOR NOTE: The password to Elaine's family tree site has been
removed because of the public nature of this forum. Please contact
Elaine for the password.
Please use the response form under each ViewMate image to reply.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation tombstones #general

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Thanks in advance for translation of the Hebrew on these two
tombstones in Des Moines, Illinois.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13056
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=13038

Elaine Bush
Pleasant Hill, CA USA

http://elainebush.tribalpages.com

Researching: REST, POLLACK, BASSMAN, BLUSHINSKY, GOODMAN, TUBIASH/
ZABOK (Lithuania, Latvia, Ukraine, Argentina, South Africa, New York,
Chicago, Iowa, Colorado) SHANIN / DAVIS, FRUMHOFF , MNUHIN / MNUCHIN,
GOREN, LIFSHITZ (Russia, Belarus, Ukraine) BER, BELIZ, EDELMAN,
KOFF, PAS (various) ROBINSON (NYC), SCHVARTZ (Argentina),
SIOVITZ / SLOVITZ (NYC), ROSENFELD (Celia...Ukraine to Argentina)

MODERATOR NOTE: The password to Elaine's family tree site has been
removed because of the public nature of this forum. Please contact
Elaine for the password.
Please use the response form under each ViewMate image to reply.


Re: Bribing to get out of death camps #general

Jules Levin
 

After reading several messages I asked my wife if she were familiar
with the topic.
She is a child survivor who worked for 10 years at the Museum of
Tolerance library in Los Angeles,
as a librarian and translator.
She said there were many such stories, but she told me something >from
a different angle. She said that
at some point there was a rule that if a Jew could "prove" that his
mother had betrayed his father with a gentile,
and he was actually illegitimate, he could get out. Apparently there
was an office where one brought the documentation.
There was a translator working in the library, a gentile, who
remembered going to such an office with her mother to
deliver documents on behalf of a Jew they knew. The translator said
they brought a large chicken with them to help seal the deal.
I am very familiar with such small "bribes" >from the Soviet Union,
but did not know they could work in the 3rd Reich.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Bribing to get out of death camps #general

Jules Levin
 

After reading several messages I asked my wife if she were familiar
with the topic.
She is a child survivor who worked for 10 years at the Museum of
Tolerance library in Los Angeles,
as a librarian and translator.
She said there were many such stories, but she told me something >from
a different angle. She said that
at some point there was a rule that if a Jew could "prove" that his
mother had betrayed his father with a gentile,
and he was actually illegitimate, he could get out. Apparently there
was an office where one brought the documentation.
There was a translator working in the library, a gentile, who
remembered going to such an office with her mother to
deliver documents on behalf of a Jew they knew. The translator said
they brought a large chicken with them to help seal the deal.
I am very familiar with such small "bribes" >from the Soviet Union,
but did not know they could work in the 3rd Reich.
Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Re: 40 year old phone numbers #general

Jeff Hecht <jeffhecht@...>
 

A little background will help explain what you can hope to learn >from
old phone numbers.

The history of US area codes dates back to 1947 when the first were
assigned, according to http://www.area-codes.com/area-code-history.asp ,
which lists those early area codes. The goal was to allow direct dialing
of long-distance calls, which was implemented later and which we now
take for granted. Relatively few changes were made in area codes until
the 1980s, and there were a flurry of changes in the late 1990s and
early 2000s.

Each area code was divided into exchanges (at least in urban and
suburban areas). Those are now denoted by the three digits that follow
the area codes. They originally were three letters, followed by four
numbers to identify phones within that exchange, but New York City in
1930 shifted to two letters and a number to identify the exchange, so a
New York number might be 212-MU5-XXXX, with MU5 the exchange. The rest
of the country followed, but since then those old exchanges have all
been converted into numbers. For more background see
http://ourwebhome.com/TENP/TENproject.html and
http://www.artlebedev.com/mandership/91/ .

Originally exchanges were assigned to certain parts of a city, or to
certain suburbs. There might be several assigned to a populous suburb or
a district of a city. If you can find an old phone book >from the proper
period, knowing the exchange can tell you something about where a person
lived. It's probably more valuable if the number is for a suburban town.
For example, in 1947, all of New Jersey was 201, but knowing an exchange
could pin down where in New Jersey the person lived. (By the 1960s, 201
was only northern New Jersey, but still covered a large area.) So if you
have an old phone number 201-YYY-XXXX, an old phone directory could tell
you what town had the YYY exchange, and greatly narrow your search.

There is considerable ancient history, and it took a long time for the
seven-digit standard to spread in the US, so if you go back to, say, the
1920s you might find only a four-digit number and a town.

Other countries have their own histories. See
http://www.artlebedev.com/mandership/91/ for some discussion.

Historically, long-distance prices in the US used to depend heavily on
distance, so it would be more common to call people in adjacent states
than across the country. Cost also meant long-distance calls were more
likely to be for emergencies than routine chatting.

Jeff Hecht (seeking HECHT, SUSSMAN)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 40 year old phone numbers #general

Jeff Hecht <jeffhecht@...>
 

A little background will help explain what you can hope to learn >from
old phone numbers.

The history of US area codes dates back to 1947 when the first were
assigned, according to http://www.area-codes.com/area-code-history.asp ,
which lists those early area codes. The goal was to allow direct dialing
of long-distance calls, which was implemented later and which we now
take for granted. Relatively few changes were made in area codes until
the 1980s, and there were a flurry of changes in the late 1990s and
early 2000s.

Each area code was divided into exchanges (at least in urban and
suburban areas). Those are now denoted by the three digits that follow
the area codes. They originally were three letters, followed by four
numbers to identify phones within that exchange, but New York City in
1930 shifted to two letters and a number to identify the exchange, so a
New York number might be 212-MU5-XXXX, with MU5 the exchange. The rest
of the country followed, but since then those old exchanges have all
been converted into numbers. For more background see
http://ourwebhome.com/TENP/TENproject.html and
http://www.artlebedev.com/mandership/91/ .

Originally exchanges were assigned to certain parts of a city, or to
certain suburbs. There might be several assigned to a populous suburb or
a district of a city. If you can find an old phone book >from the proper
period, knowing the exchange can tell you something about where a person
lived. It's probably more valuable if the number is for a suburban town.
For example, in 1947, all of New Jersey was 201, but knowing an exchange
could pin down where in New Jersey the person lived. (By the 1960s, 201
was only northern New Jersey, but still covered a large area.) So if you
have an old phone number 201-YYY-XXXX, an old phone directory could tell
you what town had the YYY exchange, and greatly narrow your search.

There is considerable ancient history, and it took a long time for the
seven-digit standard to spread in the US, so if you go back to, say, the
1920s you might find only a four-digit number and a town.

Other countries have their own histories. See
http://www.artlebedev.com/mandership/91/ for some discussion.

Historically, long-distance prices in the US used to depend heavily on
distance, so it would be more common to call people in adjacent states
than across the country. Cost also meant long-distance calls were more
likely to be for emergencies than routine chatting.

Jeff Hecht (seeking HECHT, SUSSMAN)


Re: Hitler's Children #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

You may like to view my piece which was published on the JewishGen Blog
(http://www.jewishgen.blogspot.com) on Monday, June 22, 2009 regarding this
topic. The book by this name is also mentioned which came out in 1991 and a
web site address is provided where you may read excerpts >from the book.

There are always up-to-the-minute pieces on the Blog which you should take
advantage of. Several recent titles are: "Cornerstone laid for Museum of
Polish Jews in Warsaw", Remains of Israeli MIA Found After 61 Years", "Audio
tape helps family find Lodz grave of relatives", "Small Jewish Community
Still Remains in Syria", "Holocaust Memorial in Przemysl Synagogue", "Afghan
Synagogue Now a School", and many others.

It seems that I have not been posting as much on the JewishGen digest as I
have in the past due to writing longer pieces for the Blog. In the future,
I and others who write for the Blog will try and post on the JewishGen
digest first. This will alert readers to these more detailed pieces that
are too long for the digest, but can be found on the Blog. It is important
to take advantage of these resources which may be able to bring to your
attention things which you were not aware of that relate to your family
research.

Sometime in the near future, I will be posting a piece on how one researcher
in Australia found information in one of my Blog pieces about Northern
Ireland. He then used this resource to locate his family that he did not
know existed in Belfast. Quite a surprise for him!

So, stay tuned . . . the Blog is there waiting patiently for your readership
and responses.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Hitler's Children #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

You may like to view my piece which was published on the JewishGen Blog
(http://www.jewishgen.blogspot.com) on Monday, June 22, 2009 regarding this
topic. The book by this name is also mentioned which came out in 1991 and a
web site address is provided where you may read excerpts >from the book.

There are always up-to-the-minute pieces on the Blog which you should take
advantage of. Several recent titles are: "Cornerstone laid for Museum of
Polish Jews in Warsaw", Remains of Israeli MIA Found After 61 Years", "Audio
tape helps family find Lodz grave of relatives", "Small Jewish Community
Still Remains in Syria", "Holocaust Memorial in Przemysl Synagogue", "Afghan
Synagogue Now a School", and many others.

It seems that I have not been posting as much on the JewishGen digest as I
have in the past due to writing longer pieces for the Blog. In the future,
I and others who write for the Blog will try and post on the JewishGen
digest first. This will alert readers to these more detailed pieces that
are too long for the digest, but can be found on the Blog. It is important
to take advantage of these resources which may be able to bring to your
attention things which you were not aware of that relate to your family
research.

Sometime in the near future, I will be posting a piece on how one researcher
in Australia found information in one of my Blog pieces about Northern
Ireland. He then used this resource to locate his family that he did not
know existed in Belfast. Quite a surprise for him!

So, stay tuned . . . the Blog is there waiting patiently for your readership
and responses.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net