Date   

Researching Neuman family #hungary

jillpaulchesler@...
 

I am searching for information about 3rd great grandparents Josef Neuman,
born 1818, Bud Hungary and Sara Neuman, born 1822 in Igar Hungary. They
were parents of Dora Neuman Brown (1834-1898 Albany Georgia), Moses Neuman,
and David Neuman.In 1848 the family lived in Nadudvar, Hungary

Jill Paul

Moderator: The JewishGen All Hungary Database includes several references to NEUMAN from
Nadudvar and Bud. Because the AHD is an index of records, you may find additional information
if you check the source.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Researching Neuman family #hungary

jillpaulchesler@...
 

I am searching for information about 3rd great grandparents Josef Neuman,
born 1818, Bud Hungary and Sara Neuman, born 1822 in Igar Hungary. They
were parents of Dora Neuman Brown (1834-1898 Albany Georgia), Moses Neuman,
and David Neuman.In 1848 the family lived in Nadudvar, Hungary

Jill Paul

Moderator: The JewishGen All Hungary Database includes several references to NEUMAN from
Nadudvar and Bud. Because the AHD is an index of records, you may find additional information
if you check the source.


Transcarpathian Business Directories #hungary

ajsmith98@...
 

Hi Everyone,

I would like to announce a new resource that I hope many of you will find useful in
researching our ancestors >from Transcarpathian Ukraine. I identified business
directories in the Czech National Libary for the 1920's and 1930's covering the
former Czechoslovak State, which included Transcarpathian Ukraine. The title for
this directory is:

Adresar republiky Ceskoslovenske pro prumysl, zivnosti, obchod a zemedelství =
Adressbuch der Cechoslovakischen Republik fur Industrie, Gewerbe, Handel und
Landwirtschaft

The directories were published in two volumes per year, each numbering about 1500
pages! The first volume includes information covering the area of Czech Republic.
The second volume includes Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ukraine. The section on
Transcarpathian Ukraine is approximately 80 pages in each volume. There were no
copyright restrictions on this collection, thus I have proposed a project whereby
the images could be posted on the H-SIG website. If JewishGen approves this
project, this project will move forward. In the meantime, I have obtained digital
images of the section on Transcarpathian Ukraine for the years 1925, 1930, 1937,
and 1938. This material is now available as a searchable database at:


http://genealogyindexer.org/


Additionally, there is another directory that I have had digitized which will be
added to the above website in the near future. That directory is entitled:

A visszacsatolt Felvidek es Rutenfold cimtara 1939

This directory was published in Budapest and constitutes the territories that
Hungary regained which had been part of Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ruthenia. I
had obtained permission to publish this directory on-line.

If people are interested in hearing more about this project or are interested in
sharing the cost of the copying and digitization, please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Adam Smith

New York City

Searching:
OBERLANDER: Nove Davydkovo, Chynadiyovo, Mukachevo, Ukraine and Miskolc, Hungary
SAPSZOVICS/SAPSOWITz: Khust, Lipsha, Horinchovo, Ukraine
TAMBOR: Khust, Nankovo, Ukraine
SMITH: Anyksciai, Lithuania
NAFTEL: Raguva, Lithuania
ABRAMSKY: Lomza, Poland


Hungary SIG #Hungary Transcarpathian Business Directories #hungary

ajsmith98@...
 

Hi Everyone,

I would like to announce a new resource that I hope many of you will find useful in
researching our ancestors >from Transcarpathian Ukraine. I identified business
directories in the Czech National Libary for the 1920's and 1930's covering the
former Czechoslovak State, which included Transcarpathian Ukraine. The title for
this directory is:

Adresar republiky Ceskoslovenske pro prumysl, zivnosti, obchod a zemedelství =
Adressbuch der Cechoslovakischen Republik fur Industrie, Gewerbe, Handel und
Landwirtschaft

The directories were published in two volumes per year, each numbering about 1500
pages! The first volume includes information covering the area of Czech Republic.
The second volume includes Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ukraine. The section on
Transcarpathian Ukraine is approximately 80 pages in each volume. There were no
copyright restrictions on this collection, thus I have proposed a project whereby
the images could be posted on the H-SIG website. If JewishGen approves this
project, this project will move forward. In the meantime, I have obtained digital
images of the section on Transcarpathian Ukraine for the years 1925, 1930, 1937,
and 1938. This material is now available as a searchable database at:


http://genealogyindexer.org/


Additionally, there is another directory that I have had digitized which will be
added to the above website in the near future. That directory is entitled:

A visszacsatolt Felvidek es Rutenfold cimtara 1939

This directory was published in Budapest and constitutes the territories that
Hungary regained which had been part of Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ruthenia. I
had obtained permission to publish this directory on-line.

If people are interested in hearing more about this project or are interested in
sharing the cost of the copying and digitization, please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Adam Smith

New York City

Searching:
OBERLANDER: Nove Davydkovo, Chynadiyovo, Mukachevo, Ukraine and Miskolc, Hungary
SAPSZOVICS/SAPSOWITz: Khust, Lipsha, Horinchovo, Ukraine
TAMBOR: Khust, Nankovo, Ukraine
SMITH: Anyksciai, Lithuania
NAFTEL: Raguva, Lithuania
ABRAMSKY: Lomza, Poland


Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

MBernet@...
 

roekard@lmi.net writes:
"I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or
Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name
"Isser" and "Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if
"Isser" is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher."
Any thoughts??"

Alexander Beider, in his Dictionary of Ashkenazi Given Names, attributes Isser
exclusively to Yisrael. The Kinnuy for Issachar was Dov/Ber. In eastern Europe,
Sakhar or Sokher were commonly abbreviations for Yissacher.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #general

MBernet@...
 

roekard@lmi.net writes:
"I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or
Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name
"Isser" and "Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if
"Isser" is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher."
Any thoughts??"

Alexander Beider, in his Dictionary of Ashkenazi Given Names, attributes Isser
exclusively to Yisrael. The Kinnuy for Issachar was Dov/Ber. In eastern Europe,
Sakhar or Sokher were commonly abbreviations for Yissacher.

Michael Bernet, New York


Yitzchak ben Aharon RITTENBERG/RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya #general

Sandra <shula2933@...>
 

Searching for information and descendants or researchers of Yitzchak ben Aharon
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya, Lithuania.

Yitzchak grew up in Balbieriskis, Lithuania but I don't know for certain if he was
born there. One source says he was born in Kovno.His father's name was Aharon. He
may have had a sister named Pessiya (Batya) Esther Rittenberg who married Efraim
Fischel Tiktin (Tyckocinsky). He may have been an uncle or cousin to Rabbi Shaul
Yitzchak Rittenberg of Montreal, Canada. At some point he moved to Kalvariya of
Suwalki gubernia.

He was a brilliant young married yeshiva student (avreich) when he wrote
commentaries to the Sefer Machlul of Rabbi David Kimche known as the RADAK which he
had published in Lyk in 1862. He also was a prolific Hebrew writer for Hebrew
language journals. He may have been the father of Shlomo Zalman Rittenberg.

I should ad that ISAAC / YITZCHAK is the most common male Rittenberg name and I
have found records for many Isaac Rittenbergs all over the place and believe they
are probably all named for a common prominent rabbi named Rabbi Yitzchak who may
not have had a surname.

I would love to hear >from anyone researching any of the Yitzchak Rittenbergs.
Sandra Levy, Jerusalem
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG, GOLDSTEIN, TIKTIN / TYCKOCINSKI, ROZENBLAT, PERELSTEIN,
WARSHOFSKY, KRAMER, BOYANER: Balbieriskis, Kalvarija, Vilkoviskis, Virbalis
(Lithuania, US & CANADA)LIPKIN, ADLER, HOROWITZ, EISENSTEIN: Zagare, Salantai,
Jonava, Kaunas,Vilnius, Ponevicz, Telsiai (Lithuania) BIRKHAHN: Jaunjelgava/
Friedrichstadt (Latvia)LEVINOFF, ZELCOVIN: Kirovgorod [Elizovetograd] (Ukraine);
Courland (Latvia), Montreal & Ontario CANADA LEVIN, COHEN, KUTNER: Brest (Belarus),


MODERATOR NOTE: As per JewishGen policy, the above list was truncated at 6 lines.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yitzchak ben Aharon RITTENBERG/RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya #general

Sandra <shula2933@...>
 

Searching for information and descendants or researchers of Yitzchak ben Aharon
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya, Lithuania.

Yitzchak grew up in Balbieriskis, Lithuania but I don't know for certain if he was
born there. One source says he was born in Kovno.His father's name was Aharon. He
may have had a sister named Pessiya (Batya) Esther Rittenberg who married Efraim
Fischel Tiktin (Tyckocinsky). He may have been an uncle or cousin to Rabbi Shaul
Yitzchak Rittenberg of Montreal, Canada. At some point he moved to Kalvariya of
Suwalki gubernia.

He was a brilliant young married yeshiva student (avreich) when he wrote
commentaries to the Sefer Machlul of Rabbi David Kimche known as the RADAK which he
had published in Lyk in 1862. He also was a prolific Hebrew writer for Hebrew
language journals. He may have been the father of Shlomo Zalman Rittenberg.

I should ad that ISAAC / YITZCHAK is the most common male Rittenberg name and I
have found records for many Isaac Rittenbergs all over the place and believe they
are probably all named for a common prominent rabbi named Rabbi Yitzchak who may
not have had a surname.

I would love to hear >from anyone researching any of the Yitzchak Rittenbergs.
Sandra Levy, Jerusalem
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG, GOLDSTEIN, TIKTIN / TYCKOCINSKI, ROZENBLAT, PERELSTEIN,
WARSHOFSKY, KRAMER, BOYANER: Balbieriskis, Kalvarija, Vilkoviskis, Virbalis
(Lithuania, US & CANADA)LIPKIN, ADLER, HOROWITZ, EISENSTEIN: Zagare, Salantai,
Jonava, Kaunas,Vilnius, Ponevicz, Telsiai (Lithuania) BIRKHAHN: Jaunjelgava/
Friedrichstadt (Latvia)LEVINOFF, ZELCOVIN: Kirovgorod [Elizovetograd] (Ukraine);
Courland (Latvia), Montreal & Ontario CANADA LEVIN, COHEN, KUTNER: Brest (Belarus),


MODERATOR NOTE: As per JewishGen policy, the above list was truncated at 6 lines.


name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

roe kard
 

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for
"Israel" or "Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on
it there are both the name "Isser" and "Israel" but no
"Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser"
is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for
"Yissacher." Any thoughts??

Thank you. Shabbat Shalom.

Karen ROEKARD
aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

roe kard
 

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for
"Israel" or "Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on
it there are both the name "Isser" and "Israel" but no
"Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser"
is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for
"Yissacher." Any thoughts??

Thank you. Shabbat Shalom.

Karen ROEKARD
aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

roe kard
 

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or Yisroel."
I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name "Isser" and
"Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser" is/was
used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher." Any thoughts??

Thank you. Shabbat Shalom.

Karen ROEKARD
aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #general

roe kard
 

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or Yisroel."
I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name "Isser" and
"Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser" is/was
used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher." Any thoughts??

Thank you. Shabbat Shalom.

Karen ROEKARD
aka Gitel Chaye Eta ROSENFELD ROKART


OBERNDORFER of Ermreuth, Bavaria #germany

dbmarblestone@...
 

My great-great-grandfather Jesaias OBERNDORFER was born in Ermreuth, Upper
Franconia, Bavaria, in 1807. His parents were Guetel and
David Abraham OBERNDORFER.

1. A family tree in a book on the Jewish cemetery of Ermreuth shows that
Guetel and David Abraham OBERNDORFER had seven children. Their children,
in addition to Jesaias, were: Jonas (b. 1805), Daniel (b. 1809), Jakob
(b. 1811), Salie (b. 1816), Joseph (b. 1819), and Abraham (b. 1822).
[The book is: Nadler, Rajaa; Der Juedische Friedhof Ermreuth (Ermreuth, 1998).]

For Jesaias OBERNDORFER and two of his siblings, the tree shows spouse and
children:

Jesaias and his wife Fanny BAUER (1816-1861) had eight children, including
my great-grandmother Sophie OBERNDORFER (b. 1848). Sophie came to the U.S.
in 1866; in 1870, she married Jacob BAMBERGER, who was born in Burgkunstadt,
Upper Franconia, Bavaria, in 1840.

Jakob OBERNDORFER and his wife Elonora BRAUN (b. 1818) had 15 children.
At least two of their children--Abraham (b. 1837) and Fanni (b. 1845)
--emigrated to the U.S.

Salie OBERNDORFER and her husband Laemmlein BAMBERGER (b. 1807) had seven
children.

2. As a result of leads >from JewishGen, I learned that Jesaias
OBERNDORFER's younger brothers Joseph (b. 1819) and Abraham (b. 1822)
both emigrated to the U.S. In this country, they used the surname OBERNDORF.

3. I am interested in obtaining information on Jesaias OBERNDORFER's
brothers Jonas (b. 1805) and Daniel (b. 1809). I think that Jonas settled
in Zirndorf or Fuerth, Bavaria. Except for the Ermreuth book, I don't
have information on Daniel.

I'd appreciate receiving any information on OBERNDORFERs of Zirndorf,
Fuerth or Nuremberg or any suggestions as to possible sources.

David Marblestone, Chevy Chase, Maryland dbmarblestone@att.net


German SIG #Germany OBERNDORFER of Ermreuth, Bavaria #germany

dbmarblestone@...
 

My great-great-grandfather Jesaias OBERNDORFER was born in Ermreuth, Upper
Franconia, Bavaria, in 1807. His parents were Guetel and
David Abraham OBERNDORFER.

1. A family tree in a book on the Jewish cemetery of Ermreuth shows that
Guetel and David Abraham OBERNDORFER had seven children. Their children,
in addition to Jesaias, were: Jonas (b. 1805), Daniel (b. 1809), Jakob
(b. 1811), Salie (b. 1816), Joseph (b. 1819), and Abraham (b. 1822).
[The book is: Nadler, Rajaa; Der Juedische Friedhof Ermreuth (Ermreuth, 1998).]

For Jesaias OBERNDORFER and two of his siblings, the tree shows spouse and
children:

Jesaias and his wife Fanny BAUER (1816-1861) had eight children, including
my great-grandmother Sophie OBERNDORFER (b. 1848). Sophie came to the U.S.
in 1866; in 1870, she married Jacob BAMBERGER, who was born in Burgkunstadt,
Upper Franconia, Bavaria, in 1840.

Jakob OBERNDORFER and his wife Elonora BRAUN (b. 1818) had 15 children.
At least two of their children--Abraham (b. 1837) and Fanni (b. 1845)
--emigrated to the U.S.

Salie OBERNDORFER and her husband Laemmlein BAMBERGER (b. 1807) had seven
children.

2. As a result of leads >from JewishGen, I learned that Jesaias
OBERNDORFER's younger brothers Joseph (b. 1819) and Abraham (b. 1822)
both emigrated to the U.S. In this country, they used the surname OBERNDORF.

3. I am interested in obtaining information on Jesaias OBERNDORFER's
brothers Jonas (b. 1805) and Daniel (b. 1809). I think that Jonas settled
in Zirndorf or Fuerth, Bavaria. Except for the Ermreuth book, I don't
have information on Daniel.

I'd appreciate receiving any information on OBERNDORFERs of Zirndorf,
Fuerth or Nuremberg or any suggestions as to possible sources.

David Marblestone, Chevy Chase, Maryland dbmarblestone@att.net


GETRAJDE of Warszawa, Poland #warsaw #poland

arnonh@...
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

Recently, with some new databases updated on JRI-Poland, I've found out a
lot of information about my (wife's) GETRAJDE / GETRAJDA family (other
variants are, of course, also applicable) of Warszawa, Poland.

I'm sketching here the currently-known structure of the family, in order to
maybe ring a bell somewhere, and in order to maybe find some routes to other
descendants of the family. The family is currently consisting of two
GETRAJDE branches which are not (yet?) connected but by marriage.

Mosek Dawid GETRAJDE
(b. 1813; son of Faywel and Tauba; Tauba's father: David(
married (registered in Warszawa(
Chana Szajndla WERTA
(b. 1813; daughter of Abraham Lewek and Cahye; Chaye's father: Godlow).

Their children:
1. Fayga (b. 1832)
2. Chajm (b. 1835)
married Ryfka GETRAJDE (b. 1837,
daughter of Aron and Mindla[2]; Mindla's father: Menachem).
Two children of them: Ester (b. 1862), Ejzik (1875-1944)
3. (Abraham?) Lewek (b. 1837), married Ryfka GELBGRAS[1]
Two children of them: Mendel (b. 1865), Szlama Zelman (b. 1865(
4. Sura (b. 1847(

Notes:
[1] Ryfka is the daughter of Abraham and Rykla (daughter of Jankel) GELBGRAS
[2] I've found Aron GETRAJDE - together with Abraham and Chaim - listed in
the Warsaw City Directory of 1870

---------------------------

Chajm is my wife's 3g-grandfather, however we didn't have his daughter name
until now. As for the rest of the information - it's all new to the family.

If anything of the above rings a bell, I'll be very glad to hear about it.
Any help with finding descendants of these families will be much
appreciated.

Yours,
Arnon Hershkovitz, Israel
arnonh@tpauz.co.il


New Polish Translation Guide! #warsaw #poland

se-meyer@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois (JGSI) is pleased to announce
the publication of the newly expanded and enhanced third edition of what has
become a classic genealogical reference: A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth, Marriage and
Death Records). Despite the length of the title, it does not cover the full
scope of the book, which helps the reader locate Polish ancestral towns on a
modern map, determine if old vital records exist, learn how to acquire them
and, through its unique step-by-step method, decipher and translate the
records. The book, by former JGSI President, Judith R. Frazin, will be
making its debut at this summer's IAJGS Conference in Philadelphia. You may
also wish to know that the author will be presenting a workshop
("Discovering the Treasures in 19th-Century Polish-Language Records") at the
IAJGS Conference on Sunday at 10:00 in the morning, and a book signing is
scheduled for 1:30 that same afternoon. For more information, I invite you
to visit www.jewishgen.org/jgsi/TheGuide.html. Questions may be addressed to
TheGuide@JGSI.org.

Scott E. Meyer
Recording Secretary
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) Update #warsaw #poland

bounce-1868474-772981@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009
pre-Conference update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's
Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The
JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes more than 94,000 new
records and approximately 12,000 new photos >from
16 countries. This brings JOWBR's holdings in
excess of 1.2 million records >from more than
2,400 cemeteries / cemetery section >from 46
countries!

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

U.S. National Cemetery Records. We are
very proud to add more than 23,000 records >from
150 national cemeteries located in 46 states and
Puerto Rico. These records represent veterans
whose markers have a Star of David on it.
Iasi, Romania. Thanks to Reuven Singer
and his team for more than 17,500 additional
burial records translated >from the Hebrew burial
register >from 1888 - 1894 and women's records
from 1915 - 1943.
Bathurst, Ontario. Thanks to Kevin Hanit
and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of
Canada (Toronto) for more than 9,000 records >from
60 sections of this Canadian cemetery.
Krakow, Poland. Thanks to Lili Haber and
the Association of Cracowians in Israel for their
submission of more than 6,300 records >from the
Miodowa Street Cemetery in Krakow.
Vitsyebsk, Belarus. Thanks to Esther
Herschman Rechtschafner for submitting more than
5,600 cemetery records and creating a ShtetLink
site for Vitebsk at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Vitsyebsk/Cemetery.html
Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler
and his team for an additional 5,600 records >from
the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex whose
original records were documented by Florence
Marmor and David Gevertzman.
Chernivtsi, Ukraine. Thanks to the JGS
of Ottawa, Canada's Hymie Reichstein and Bruce
Reisch for an additional installment of more
than 4,300 records and photos for this cemetery
Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda
Kurtzman for her ongoing work at the Segulah
Cemetery in Petach Tikvah with approximately
4,300 additional records and 1,500 additional
photos.
Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish
Museum of Maryland (www.jewishmuseummd.org) for
an additional 3,900 records >from various
Baltimore area cemeteries.
Uzhhorod, Ukraine (Ungvár, Hungary).
Special thanks to a team of volunteers who helped
to transcribe more than 3,900 burial records >from
the Hebrew burial register predominantly >from
pre-World War I Ungvár, Hungary. Transcription
volunteers Al Silberman, Batya Gottlieb, Shaul
Sharoni, Solomon Schlussel, Vivian Kahn, and
Zygomnt Boxer have been working on this for
almost a year. Joseph Zajonc, Shula Laby, Yossi
Gal, and Richard Nemes have been working >from a
handwritten Yiddish register.
Colorado, Nebraska and Oklahoma. Thanks
to Terry Lasky who has submitted records and
photographs that he has personally created or
coordinated with other volunteers in these
states. This update includes approximately 3,500
new records and more than 3,900 photographs.
Argentina. Thanks to Yehuda Mathov for
coordinating and submitting more than 900
additional records >from various Argentinean
cemeteries.
Wisconsin, Belarus & Lithuania. Thanks
to Joel Alpert for adding close to 900 burial
records >from his ShtetLink pages for the unlikely
trio of Sheboygan Wisconsin, Lyepyel Belarus and
Jurbarkas Lithuania. Special thanks to Rabbi
Edward Boraz of the Dartmouth Hillel Project
Preservation program whose student members
restore cemeteries in Eastern Europe for
translation and use of the Jurbarkas stones.
(http://www.dartmouth.edu/~projpreservation/)
Foreign Language Volunteers. Special
thanks to our team of Hebrew and foreign language
translators for their patience working with often
very hard to read headstones: David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat
Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.

We anticipate that the next update will be
between late fall and the end of the calendar
year.

We appreciate all the work our donors have
done and encourage you to make additional
submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery /
cemetery section individually or consider a group
project for your local Society, temple or other
group, it's your submissions that help grow the
JOWBR database and make it possible for
researchers and family members to find answers
they otherwise might not. Please also consider
other organizations you may be affiliated with
that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in
the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland GETRAJDE of Warszawa, Poland #warsaw #poland

arnonh@...
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

Recently, with some new databases updated on JRI-Poland, I've found out a
lot of information about my (wife's) GETRAJDE / GETRAJDA family (other
variants are, of course, also applicable) of Warszawa, Poland.

I'm sketching here the currently-known structure of the family, in order to
maybe ring a bell somewhere, and in order to maybe find some routes to other
descendants of the family. The family is currently consisting of two
GETRAJDE branches which are not (yet?) connected but by marriage.

Mosek Dawid GETRAJDE
(b. 1813; son of Faywel and Tauba; Tauba's father: David(
married (registered in Warszawa(
Chana Szajndla WERTA
(b. 1813; daughter of Abraham Lewek and Cahye; Chaye's father: Godlow).

Their children:
1. Fayga (b. 1832)
2. Chajm (b. 1835)
married Ryfka GETRAJDE (b. 1837,
daughter of Aron and Mindla[2]; Mindla's father: Menachem).
Two children of them: Ester (b. 1862), Ejzik (1875-1944)
3. (Abraham?) Lewek (b. 1837), married Ryfka GELBGRAS[1]
Two children of them: Mendel (b. 1865), Szlama Zelman (b. 1865(
4. Sura (b. 1847(

Notes:
[1] Ryfka is the daughter of Abraham and Rykla (daughter of Jankel) GELBGRAS
[2] I've found Aron GETRAJDE - together with Abraham and Chaim - listed in
the Warsaw City Directory of 1870

---------------------------

Chajm is my wife's 3g-grandfather, however we didn't have his daughter name
until now. As for the rest of the information - it's all new to the family.

If anything of the above rings a bell, I'll be very glad to hear about it.
Any help with finding descendants of these families will be much
appreciated.

Yours,
Arnon Hershkovitz, Israel
arnonh@tpauz.co.il


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland New Polish Translation Guide! #warsaw #poland

se-meyer@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois (JGSI) is pleased to announce
the publication of the newly expanded and enhanced third edition of what has
become a classic genealogical reference: A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth, Marriage and
Death Records). Despite the length of the title, it does not cover the full
scope of the book, which helps the reader locate Polish ancestral towns on a
modern map, determine if old vital records exist, learn how to acquire them
and, through its unique step-by-step method, decipher and translate the
records. The book, by former JGSI President, Judith R. Frazin, will be
making its debut at this summer's IAJGS Conference in Philadelphia. You may
also wish to know that the author will be presenting a workshop
("Discovering the Treasures in 19th-Century Polish-Language Records") at the
IAJGS Conference on Sunday at 10:00 in the morning, and a book signing is
scheduled for 1:30 that same afternoon. For more information, I invite you
to visit www.jewishgen.org/jgsi/TheGuide.html. Questions may be addressed to
TheGuide@JGSI.org.

Scott E. Meyer
Recording Secretary
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) Update #warsaw #poland

bounce-1868474-772981@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009
pre-Conference update to the JOWBR (JewishGen's
Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The
JOWBR database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

This update includes more than 94,000 new
records and approximately 12,000 new photos >from
16 countries. This brings JOWBR's holdings in
excess of 1.2 million records >from more than
2,400 cemeteries / cemetery section >from 46
countries!

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

U.S. National Cemetery Records. We are
very proud to add more than 23,000 records >from
150 national cemeteries located in 46 states and
Puerto Rico. These records represent veterans
whose markers have a Star of David on it.
Iasi, Romania. Thanks to Reuven Singer
and his team for more than 17,500 additional
burial records translated >from the Hebrew burial
register >from 1888 - 1894 and women's records
from 1915 - 1943.
Bathurst, Ontario. Thanks to Kevin Hanit
and Allen Halberstadt representing the JGS of
Canada (Toronto) for more than 9,000 records >from
60 sections of this Canadian cemetery.
Krakow, Poland. Thanks to Lili Haber and
the Association of Cracowians in Israel for their
submission of more than 6,300 records >from the
Miodowa Street Cemetery in Krakow.
Vitsyebsk, Belarus. Thanks to Esther
Herschman Rechtschafner for submitting more than
5,600 cemetery records and creating a ShtetLink
site for Vitebsk at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Vitsyebsk/Cemetery.html
Bayside, NY. Thanks to Maurice Kessler
and his team for an additional 5,600 records >from
the Bayside / Ozone Queens cemetery complex whose
original records were documented by Florence
Marmor and David Gevertzman.
Chernivtsi, Ukraine. Thanks to the JGS
of Ottawa, Canada's Hymie Reichstein and Bruce
Reisch for an additional installment of more
than 4,300 records and photos for this cemetery
Petach Tikvah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda
Kurtzman for her ongoing work at the Segulah
Cemetery in Petach Tikvah with approximately
4,300 additional records and 1,500 additional
photos.
Maryland Records. Thanks to the Jewish
Museum of Maryland (www.jewishmuseummd.org) for
an additional 3,900 records >from various
Baltimore area cemeteries.
Uzhhorod, Ukraine (Ungvár, Hungary).
Special thanks to a team of volunteers who helped
to transcribe more than 3,900 burial records >from
the Hebrew burial register predominantly >from
pre-World War I Ungvár, Hungary. Transcription
volunteers Al Silberman, Batya Gottlieb, Shaul
Sharoni, Solomon Schlussel, Vivian Kahn, and
Zygomnt Boxer have been working on this for
almost a year. Joseph Zajonc, Shula Laby, Yossi
Gal, and Richard Nemes have been working >from a
handwritten Yiddish register.
Colorado, Nebraska and Oklahoma. Thanks
to Terry Lasky who has submitted records and
photographs that he has personally created or
coordinated with other volunteers in these
states. This update includes approximately 3,500
new records and more than 3,900 photographs.
Argentina. Thanks to Yehuda Mathov for
coordinating and submitting more than 900
additional records >from various Argentinean
cemeteries.
Wisconsin, Belarus & Lithuania. Thanks
to Joel Alpert for adding close to 900 burial
records >from his ShtetLink pages for the unlikely
trio of Sheboygan Wisconsin, Lyepyel Belarus and
Jurbarkas Lithuania. Special thanks to Rabbi
Edward Boraz of the Dartmouth Hillel Project
Preservation program whose student members
restore cemeteries in Eastern Europe for
translation and use of the Jurbarkas stones.
(http://www.dartmouth.edu/~projpreservation/)
Foreign Language Volunteers. Special
thanks to our team of Hebrew and foreign language
translators for their patience working with often
very hard to read headstones: David Rosen, Ernest
Kallman, Gilberto Jugend, Nathen Gabriel, Osnat
Hazan, Reuben Gross, Shay Meyer and Zygmont Boxer.

We anticipate that the next update will be
between late fall and the end of the calendar
year.

We appreciate all the work our donors have
done and encourage you to make additional
submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery /
cemetery section individually or consider a group
project for your local Society, temple or other
group, it's your submissions that help grow the
JOWBR database and make it possible for
researchers and family members to find answers
they otherwise might not. Please also consider
other organizations you may be affiliated with
that may already have done cemetery indexing that
would consider having their records included in
the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
Jul 2009