Date   

Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Additions to Holocaust Database #dna

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #dna

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


DNA Research #DNA Additions to Holocaust Database #dna

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


DNA Research #DNA Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #dna

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Additions to Holocaust Database #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Additions to Holocaust Database #sephardic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #sephardic

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Additions to Holocaust Database #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Additions to Holocaust Database #sephardic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #sephardic

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Researching Neuman family #hungary

jillpaulchesler@...
 

I am searching for information about 3rd great grandparents Josef Neuman,
born 1818, Bud Hungary and Sara Neuman, born 1822 in Igar Hungary. They
were parents of Dora Neuman Brown (1834-1898 Albany Georgia), Moses Neuman,
and David Neuman.In 1848 the family lived in Nadudvar, Hungary

Jill Paul

Moderator: The JewishGen All Hungary Database includes several references to NEUMAN from
Nadudvar and Bud. Because the AHD is an index of records, you may find additional information
if you check the source.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Researching Neuman family #hungary

jillpaulchesler@...
 

I am searching for information about 3rd great grandparents Josef Neuman,
born 1818, Bud Hungary and Sara Neuman, born 1822 in Igar Hungary. They
were parents of Dora Neuman Brown (1834-1898 Albany Georgia), Moses Neuman,
and David Neuman.In 1848 the family lived in Nadudvar, Hungary

Jill Paul

Moderator: The JewishGen All Hungary Database includes several references to NEUMAN from
Nadudvar and Bud. Because the AHD is an index of records, you may find additional information
if you check the source.


Transcarpathian Business Directories #hungary

ajsmith98@...
 

Hi Everyone,

I would like to announce a new resource that I hope many of you will find useful in
researching our ancestors >from Transcarpathian Ukraine. I identified business
directories in the Czech National Libary for the 1920's and 1930's covering the
former Czechoslovak State, which included Transcarpathian Ukraine. The title for
this directory is:

Adresar republiky Ceskoslovenske pro prumysl, zivnosti, obchod a zemedelství =
Adressbuch der Cechoslovakischen Republik fur Industrie, Gewerbe, Handel und
Landwirtschaft

The directories were published in two volumes per year, each numbering about 1500
pages! The first volume includes information covering the area of Czech Republic.
The second volume includes Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ukraine. The section on
Transcarpathian Ukraine is approximately 80 pages in each volume. There were no
copyright restrictions on this collection, thus I have proposed a project whereby
the images could be posted on the H-SIG website. If JewishGen approves this
project, this project will move forward. In the meantime, I have obtained digital
images of the section on Transcarpathian Ukraine for the years 1925, 1930, 1937,
and 1938. This material is now available as a searchable database at:


http://genealogyindexer.org/


Additionally, there is another directory that I have had digitized which will be
added to the above website in the near future. That directory is entitled:

A visszacsatolt Felvidek es Rutenfold cimtara 1939

This directory was published in Budapest and constitutes the territories that
Hungary regained which had been part of Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ruthenia. I
had obtained permission to publish this directory on-line.

If people are interested in hearing more about this project or are interested in
sharing the cost of the copying and digitization, please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Adam Smith

New York City

Searching:
OBERLANDER: Nove Davydkovo, Chynadiyovo, Mukachevo, Ukraine and Miskolc, Hungary
SAPSZOVICS/SAPSOWITz: Khust, Lipsha, Horinchovo, Ukraine
TAMBOR: Khust, Nankovo, Ukraine
SMITH: Anyksciai, Lithuania
NAFTEL: Raguva, Lithuania
ABRAMSKY: Lomza, Poland


Hungary SIG #Hungary Transcarpathian Business Directories #hungary

ajsmith98@...
 

Hi Everyone,

I would like to announce a new resource that I hope many of you will find useful in
researching our ancestors >from Transcarpathian Ukraine. I identified business
directories in the Czech National Libary for the 1920's and 1930's covering the
former Czechoslovak State, which included Transcarpathian Ukraine. The title for
this directory is:

Adresar republiky Ceskoslovenske pro prumysl, zivnosti, obchod a zemedelství =
Adressbuch der Cechoslovakischen Republik fur Industrie, Gewerbe, Handel und
Landwirtschaft

The directories were published in two volumes per year, each numbering about 1500
pages! The first volume includes information covering the area of Czech Republic.
The second volume includes Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ukraine. The section on
Transcarpathian Ukraine is approximately 80 pages in each volume. There were no
copyright restrictions on this collection, thus I have proposed a project whereby
the images could be posted on the H-SIG website. If JewishGen approves this
project, this project will move forward. In the meantime, I have obtained digital
images of the section on Transcarpathian Ukraine for the years 1925, 1930, 1937,
and 1938. This material is now available as a searchable database at:


http://genealogyindexer.org/


Additionally, there is another directory that I have had digitized which will be
added to the above website in the near future. That directory is entitled:

A visszacsatolt Felvidek es Rutenfold cimtara 1939

This directory was published in Budapest and constitutes the territories that
Hungary regained which had been part of Slovakia and Transcarpathian Ruthenia. I
had obtained permission to publish this directory on-line.

If people are interested in hearing more about this project or are interested in
sharing the cost of the copying and digitization, please contact me privately.

Thanks,

Adam Smith

New York City

Searching:
OBERLANDER: Nove Davydkovo, Chynadiyovo, Mukachevo, Ukraine and Miskolc, Hungary
SAPSZOVICS/SAPSOWITz: Khust, Lipsha, Horinchovo, Ukraine
TAMBOR: Khust, Nankovo, Ukraine
SMITH: Anyksciai, Lithuania
NAFTEL: Raguva, Lithuania
ABRAMSKY: Lomza, Poland


Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

MBernet@...
 

roekard@lmi.net writes:
"I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or
Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name
"Isser" and "Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if
"Isser" is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher."
Any thoughts??"

Alexander Beider, in his Dictionary of Ashkenazi Given Names, attributes Isser
exclusively to Yisrael. The Kinnuy for Issachar was Dov/Ber. In eastern Europe,
Sakhar or Sokher were commonly abbreviations for Yissacher.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #general

MBernet@...
 

roekard@lmi.net writes:
"I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for "Israel" or
Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on it there are both the name
"Isser" and "Israel" but no "Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if
"Isser" is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for "Yissacher."
Any thoughts??"

Alexander Beider, in his Dictionary of Ashkenazi Given Names, attributes Isser
exclusively to Yisrael. The Kinnuy for Issachar was Dov/Ber. In eastern Europe,
Sakhar or Sokher were commonly abbreviations for Yissacher.

Michael Bernet, New York


Yitzchak ben Aharon RITTENBERG/RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya #general

Sandra <shula2933@...>
 

Searching for information and descendants or researchers of Yitzchak ben Aharon
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya, Lithuania.

Yitzchak grew up in Balbieriskis, Lithuania but I don't know for certain if he was
born there. One source says he was born in Kovno.His father's name was Aharon. He
may have had a sister named Pessiya (Batya) Esther Rittenberg who married Efraim
Fischel Tiktin (Tyckocinsky). He may have been an uncle or cousin to Rabbi Shaul
Yitzchak Rittenberg of Montreal, Canada. At some point he moved to Kalvariya of
Suwalki gubernia.

He was a brilliant young married yeshiva student (avreich) when he wrote
commentaries to the Sefer Machlul of Rabbi David Kimche known as the RADAK which he
had published in Lyk in 1862. He also was a prolific Hebrew writer for Hebrew
language journals. He may have been the father of Shlomo Zalman Rittenberg.

I should ad that ISAAC / YITZCHAK is the most common male Rittenberg name and I
have found records for many Isaac Rittenbergs all over the place and believe they
are probably all named for a common prominent rabbi named Rabbi Yitzchak who may
not have had a surname.

I would love to hear >from anyone researching any of the Yitzchak Rittenbergs.
Sandra Levy, Jerusalem
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG, GOLDSTEIN, TIKTIN / TYCKOCINSKI, ROZENBLAT, PERELSTEIN,
WARSHOFSKY, KRAMER, BOYANER: Balbieriskis, Kalvarija, Vilkoviskis, Virbalis
(Lithuania, US & CANADA)LIPKIN, ADLER, HOROWITZ, EISENSTEIN: Zagare, Salantai,
Jonava, Kaunas,Vilnius, Ponevicz, Telsiai (Lithuania) BIRKHAHN: Jaunjelgava/
Friedrichstadt (Latvia)LEVINOFF, ZELCOVIN: Kirovgorod [Elizovetograd] (Ukraine);
Courland (Latvia), Montreal & Ontario CANADA LEVIN, COHEN, KUTNER: Brest (Belarus),


MODERATOR NOTE: As per JewishGen policy, the above list was truncated at 6 lines.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yitzchak ben Aharon RITTENBERG/RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya #general

Sandra <shula2933@...>
 

Searching for information and descendants or researchers of Yitzchak ben Aharon
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG of Balbieriskis and Kalvariya, Lithuania.

Yitzchak grew up in Balbieriskis, Lithuania but I don't know for certain if he was
born there. One source says he was born in Kovno.His father's name was Aharon. He
may have had a sister named Pessiya (Batya) Esther Rittenberg who married Efraim
Fischel Tiktin (Tyckocinsky). He may have been an uncle or cousin to Rabbi Shaul
Yitzchak Rittenberg of Montreal, Canada. At some point he moved to Kalvariya of
Suwalki gubernia.

He was a brilliant young married yeshiva student (avreich) when he wrote
commentaries to the Sefer Machlul of Rabbi David Kimche known as the RADAK which he
had published in Lyk in 1862. He also was a prolific Hebrew writer for Hebrew
language journals. He may have been the father of Shlomo Zalman Rittenberg.

I should ad that ISAAC / YITZCHAK is the most common male Rittenberg name and I
have found records for many Isaac Rittenbergs all over the place and believe they
are probably all named for a common prominent rabbi named Rabbi Yitzchak who may
not have had a surname.

I would love to hear >from anyone researching any of the Yitzchak Rittenbergs.
Sandra Levy, Jerusalem
RITTENBERG / RYTENBERG, GOLDSTEIN, TIKTIN / TYCKOCINSKI, ROZENBLAT, PERELSTEIN,
WARSHOFSKY, KRAMER, BOYANER: Balbieriskis, Kalvarija, Vilkoviskis, Virbalis
(Lithuania, US & CANADA)LIPKIN, ADLER, HOROWITZ, EISENSTEIN: Zagare, Salantai,
Jonava, Kaunas,Vilnius, Ponevicz, Telsiai (Lithuania) BIRKHAHN: Jaunjelgava/
Friedrichstadt (Latvia)LEVINOFF, ZELCOVIN: Kirovgorod [Elizovetograd] (Ukraine);
Courland (Latvia), Montreal & Ontario CANADA LEVIN, COHEN, KUTNER: Brest (Belarus),


MODERATOR NOTE: As per JewishGen policy, the above list was truncated at 6 lines.