Date   

Re: Sellers of wigs in shtetls #general

Ava Cohn <avatom@...>
 

Christine Usdin has asked regarding sheitlen (wigs), "what they were like and
made out of...Did all our Great Grandmothers wear wigs?"

Having analyzed myriad photos of Jewish women taken in the latter half of the
nineteenth century and early twentieth century, I have to answer that there is
not a simple answer to your question about sheitlen (plural in Yiddish of
sheitel/shaitel). The most concise answer is that it depended on where the
woman lived, the time period she lived and her personality as much as it did
on religious practices. Needless to say, there are those who agree and disagree
about wearing a sheitel, but that is not a genealogical discussion.


Before the nineteenth century, married women in general covered their hair with
shawls or veils. However, there were exceptions to the rule. I was able to find
a mezzotint of a Fanny von Arnstein done in Austria in 1804. In it, she is
wearing clothing fashionable in Vienna at the time and wore her hair uncovered
which according to the author of "The History of Jewish Costume", "she is said
to have incurred rabbinic censure."

According to the Yizkor book of Korczyna, "No married woman wore her own
hair...even sheitels or wigs were not worn".
See www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Korczyna/Kor041.html.

Even into the twentieth century, some women in some places continued to use a
shawl instead of a sheitel. Where sheitlen were worn, they were made mostly
of human hair with silk. Some may have been made with animal hair but under
no circumstances were they to be made >from anything used in idolatry.
Particularly in larger cities but in smaller shtetls as well, there was an
effort made to match the style of the sheitel with current dress styles and
in America, many married women stopped wearing their sheitel as they adopted a
more westernized look. On the other hand, many women wore the same sheitel
throughout their lives regardless of current fashion trends.

As an aside, my own grandmother told her children that she left Russia because
she had such lovely long hair and didn't want to have to cut it to wear a sheitel
once she was married. She, of course, never mentioned that the pogroms had
anything to do with her decision to come to America.

For more information about sheitlen, you might want to consult "Hide and Seek:
Jewish Women and Hair Covering", edited by Lynne Schreiber at
www.urimpublications.com

Hope this helps.

Ava Cohn
Long Grove, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sellers of wigs in shtetls #general

Ava Cohn <avatom@...>
 

Christine Usdin has asked regarding sheitlen (wigs), "what they were like and
made out of...Did all our Great Grandmothers wear wigs?"

Having analyzed myriad photos of Jewish women taken in the latter half of the
nineteenth century and early twentieth century, I have to answer that there is
not a simple answer to your question about sheitlen (plural in Yiddish of
sheitel/shaitel). The most concise answer is that it depended on where the
woman lived, the time period she lived and her personality as much as it did
on religious practices. Needless to say, there are those who agree and disagree
about wearing a sheitel, but that is not a genealogical discussion.


Before the nineteenth century, married women in general covered their hair with
shawls or veils. However, there were exceptions to the rule. I was able to find
a mezzotint of a Fanny von Arnstein done in Austria in 1804. In it, she is
wearing clothing fashionable in Vienna at the time and wore her hair uncovered
which according to the author of "The History of Jewish Costume", "she is said
to have incurred rabbinic censure."

According to the Yizkor book of Korczyna, "No married woman wore her own
hair...even sheitels or wigs were not worn".
See www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Korczyna/Kor041.html.

Even into the twentieth century, some women in some places continued to use a
shawl instead of a sheitel. Where sheitlen were worn, they were made mostly
of human hair with silk. Some may have been made with animal hair but under
no circumstances were they to be made >from anything used in idolatry.
Particularly in larger cities but in smaller shtetls as well, there was an
effort made to match the style of the sheitel with current dress styles and
in America, many married women stopped wearing their sheitel as they adopted a
more westernized look. On the other hand, many women wore the same sheitel
throughout their lives regardless of current fashion trends.

As an aside, my own grandmother told her children that she left Russia because
she had such lovely long hair and didn't want to have to cut it to wear a sheitel
once she was married. She, of course, never mentioned that the pogroms had
anything to do with her decision to come to America.

For more information about sheitlen, you might want to consult "Hide and Seek:
Jewish Women and Hair Covering", edited by Lynne Schreiber at
www.urimpublications.com

Hope this helps.

Ava Cohn
Long Grove, IL


Need Information about Klodzko, Poland #general

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

My rabbi recently acquired a Holocaust Torah scroll >from Klodzko, Poland for
our synagogue (Temple Beth Shalom of Arnold, MD). We would like to obtain a
list of the residents of Klodzko who perished in the Shoa. Does anyone know
how to obtain such a list, if possible, with dates of deportation or dates
of death? Our Congregation would like to say kaddish for these people.
Also, does anyone have any pre-war photos of Klodzko that you can share with
us? What Klodzko related documents are available the Polish archives? Does
anyone know of any living survivors >from Klodzko?

Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Please reply
privately.

B'shalom,

Dave
David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@earthlink.net
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need Information about Klodzko, Poland #general

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

My rabbi recently acquired a Holocaust Torah scroll >from Klodzko, Poland for
our synagogue (Temple Beth Shalom of Arnold, MD). We would like to obtain a
list of the residents of Klodzko who perished in the Shoa. Does anyone know
how to obtain such a list, if possible, with dates of deportation or dates
of death? Our Congregation would like to say kaddish for these people.
Also, does anyone have any pre-war photos of Klodzko that you can share with
us? What Klodzko related documents are available the Polish archives? Does
anyone know of any living survivors >from Klodzko?

Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Please reply
privately.

B'shalom,

Dave
David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@earthlink.net
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com


Re: Svir revision lists #belarus

Nancy Holden
 

1858 is online
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/svir

Also a list of those who went to Southern Ukraine
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine
Nancy Holden

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee Harrison" <leedh1@verizon.net>

"Does anyone know if the 1834, 1850 and 1858 revision lists for Svir,
Belarus have been translated into English
and, if so, are there links to access the information online?"

Thanks.

Lee Harrison
Sarasota, Fl


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Svir revision lists #belarus

Nancy Holden
 

1858 is online
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/svir

Also a list of those who went to Southern Ukraine
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine
Nancy Holden

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lee Harrison" <leedh1@verizon.net>

"Does anyone know if the 1834, 1850 and 1858 revision lists for Svir,
Belarus have been translated into English
and, if so, are there links to access the information online?"

Thanks.

Lee Harrison
Sarasota, Fl


Re: Information On Synagogue at 217 Forsyth St. Manhattan #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Marc Dver writes:

"I am trying to find information about a synagogue located at 217 Forsyth St. in
Manhattan circa 1900. I have a marriage certificate with the address but cannot
make out the name of the synagogue nor of the Rabbi."

The best source to locate the names of the shtebls and synagogues of the lower
east side is the "Lower East Side Tour Book" by Oscar Israelowitz. In the back
of the book is a section, by street name and number, listing even the smallest
of shuls. This book appears to be out of print, but is held by many public and
university libraries and is also in the collections of many Jewish Genealogical
Societies and JCCs.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Information On Synagogue at 217 Forsyth St. Manhattan #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Marc Dver writes:

"I am trying to find information about a synagogue located at 217 Forsyth St. in
Manhattan circa 1900. I have a marriage certificate with the address but cannot
make out the name of the synagogue nor of the Rabbi."

The best source to locate the names of the shtebls and synagogues of the lower
east side is the "Lower East Side Tour Book" by Oscar Israelowitz. In the back
of the book is a section, by street name and number, listing even the smallest
of shuls. This book appears to be out of print, but is held by many public and
university libraries and is also in the collections of many Jewish Genealogical
Societies and JCCs.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Naturalization of step-children #general

joyweave
 

I've come across a situation in which a man was naturalized in New York
City in 1892 and married a widow with children in 1893. When one of the
sons applied for a passport in 1911, he said he was naturalized under
his step-father's papers.
Would there have to be further papers filed in the courts for that to be
true or was it standard procedure for step-children who were not present
at the time of naturalization to be automatically "grandfathered" in?

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization of step-children #general

joyweave
 

I've come across a situation in which a man was naturalized in New York
City in 1892 and married a widow with children in 1893. When one of the
sons applied for a passport in 1911, he said he was naturalized under
his step-father's papers.
Would there have to be further papers filed in the courts for that to be
true or was it standard procedure for step-children who were not present
at the time of naturalization to be automatically "grandfathered" in?

Joy Weaver
Islip, NY USA


Letting go #general

Sara Lynns
 

In doing family research and uncovering relatives you've never met,
I've learned it's best to let go of the past and past hurts/grudges
that may have existed in the family.

Focus on what's important to you and let go of the rest.

Jacqueline Lerner Aderman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Letting go #general

Sara Lynns
 

In doing family research and uncovering relatives you've never met,
I've learned it's best to let go of the past and past hurts/grudges
that may have existed in the family.

Focus on what's important to you and let go of the rest.

Jacqueline Lerner Aderman


Thomas PANETH- or PENNETH - Argentina? #latinamerica

lahad gb <lahad_y@...>
 

Shalom friends,
I am looking for Thomas PANETH or PENNETH, born in Vienna Austria about
1925.
His mother was Ana nee DEUTSCH.
His grand parents were Ernst DEUTSCH and Rosalie (Sally) nee MONATH.
Thomas immigrated to South America, probably to Argentina.
Thomas converted and became Minister or some rank like that.
He maybe lives in a monastery.
I'll appreciate any help in finding his phone number, email or mail address.

We are related through the MONATH branch of the family.
Thanks,
Yoav Lahad,
Kibbutz Givat Brenner,
Israel
Lahad_y@gbrener.org.il


Latin America #LatinAmerica Thomas PANETH- or PENNETH - Argentina? #latinamerica

lahad gb <lahad_y@...>
 

Shalom friends,
I am looking for Thomas PANETH or PENNETH, born in Vienna Austria about
1925.
His mother was Ana nee DEUTSCH.
His grand parents were Ernst DEUTSCH and Rosalie (Sally) nee MONATH.
Thomas immigrated to South America, probably to Argentina.
Thomas converted and became Minister or some rank like that.
He maybe lives in a monastery.
I'll appreciate any help in finding his phone number, email or mail address.

We are related through the MONATH branch of the family.
Thanks,
Yoav Lahad,
Kibbutz Givat Brenner,
Israel
Lahad_y@gbrener.org.il


Protocol for new dna results #dna

Arnold Samlan
 

I am new to the world of genealogy through genetic testing. I recently
received my Y-DNA results using 37 markers, and found a number of matches.

My question: When is it appropriate to reach out to matches via email to
introduce myself (none have a surname match)? How close should the match
be?

Thanks,

Arnold D. Samlan
West Hempstead, NY
(researching Samlan, Friedlich, Kooperman, Brother)


Yekutiel SZNAJDERMAN #rabbinic

Ruth Wilnai <ruth@...>
 

Dear Researchers!
I am looking for resources about Rabbinical persons who lived in Pilica
Poland at the middle of the 19th century.

In 2002 I visited Zawiercie Cemetery and found the graves of several of
my Sznajderman family:
My great grandmother Ejga zee Sztatler, Sznajderman.
My great grand father Eliezer Sznajderman
Abram Moshe Sznajderman, who is my grandmother's brother.
Yisachar Sznajderman who is my great grandfather's brother.

The tombstone of my great grandfather was in bad shape, but his
brother's tombstone, Yisachar Dov, was standing intact.
(It took me a while to find out the link between my great grandfather,
Eliezer, and Yisachar Dov)
Now when I look at the photos I see that on the tombstone there is a
Inscription addressing Eliezer and Yisachar's father, Yekutiel Sznajderman:

The transiliation of the inscription is as follows in Hebrew:

Ma-ze-veth Zi-ka-ron
Ra-ba-ni Ha-na-gid Ha-ka-tzin (?)
Ha-no-heg Be-yo-sher U-be-emu-na
Yisachar Dov
Ben Ha-ra-ba-ni Ha-me-fo-ar
Mo-h Yitzhak Yekutiel
Sznajderman

The English Translation:

Memorial Tombstone
The Rabbinical, Leader, Officer (???)
Who was honest and loyal
Yisachar Dov
The son of the
Magnificent Rabbinical Leader
Our teacher and Rabbi
Yekutiel Sznajderman

According to the Sznajderman tree I built
Yekutiel Sznajderman was born in 1819, probably in Pilica, Poland.

My first question is: Does the inscription is a substential evidence
about Yekutiel Sznajderman importance? If yes, I would like, if
possible, to reaserch the history of the Magnificent Yekutiel
Sznajderman and to find out what was his contribution to his community.

Do you have any clue for me where to start?

I will appreciate any hint.

Thanks
Ruth Wilnai.
Palo Alto, CA
Researching Sznajderman, Sztatler, Kaluzynski, Szczekacz


DNA Research #DNA Protocol for new dna results #dna

Arnold Samlan
 

I am new to the world of genealogy through genetic testing. I recently
received my Y-DNA results using 37 markers, and found a number of matches.

My question: When is it appropriate to reach out to matches via email to
introduce myself (none have a surname match)? How close should the match
be?

Thanks,

Arnold D. Samlan
West Hempstead, NY
(researching Samlan, Friedlich, Kooperman, Brother)


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yekutiel SZNAJDERMAN #rabbinic

Ruth Wilnai <ruth@...>
 

Dear Researchers!
I am looking for resources about Rabbinical persons who lived in Pilica
Poland at the middle of the 19th century.

In 2002 I visited Zawiercie Cemetery and found the graves of several of
my Sznajderman family:
My great grandmother Ejga zee Sztatler, Sznajderman.
My great grand father Eliezer Sznajderman
Abram Moshe Sznajderman, who is my grandmother's brother.
Yisachar Sznajderman who is my great grandfather's brother.

The tombstone of my great grandfather was in bad shape, but his
brother's tombstone, Yisachar Dov, was standing intact.
(It took me a while to find out the link between my great grandfather,
Eliezer, and Yisachar Dov)
Now when I look at the photos I see that on the tombstone there is a
Inscription addressing Eliezer and Yisachar's father, Yekutiel Sznajderman:

The transiliation of the inscription is as follows in Hebrew:

Ma-ze-veth Zi-ka-ron
Ra-ba-ni Ha-na-gid Ha-ka-tzin (?)
Ha-no-heg Be-yo-sher U-be-emu-na
Yisachar Dov
Ben Ha-ra-ba-ni Ha-me-fo-ar
Mo-h Yitzhak Yekutiel
Sznajderman

The English Translation:

Memorial Tombstone
The Rabbinical, Leader, Officer (???)
Who was honest and loyal
Yisachar Dov
The son of the
Magnificent Rabbinical Leader
Our teacher and Rabbi
Yekutiel Sznajderman

According to the Sznajderman tree I built
Yekutiel Sznajderman was born in 1819, probably in Pilica, Poland.

My first question is: Does the inscription is a substential evidence
about Yekutiel Sznajderman importance? If yes, I would like, if
possible, to reaserch the history of the Magnificent Yekutiel
Sznajderman and to find out what was his contribution to his community.

Do you have any clue for me where to start?

I will appreciate any hint.

Thanks
Ruth Wilnai.
Palo Alto, CA
Researching Sznajderman, Sztatler, Kaluzynski, Szczekacz


Re: Svir revision lists #belarus

davefox73@...
 

The 1858 Svir revision list has been translated, but it does not appear in
the All Belarus Database or the Belarus Static Index. Don't know how it
fell through the cracks. I will forward the Excel file to David Feldman so
he can get it added.

Dave

David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@earthlink.net
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com

On 11/26/09 2:04 AM, Lee Harrison wrote:

Does anyone know if the 1834, 1850 and 1858 revision lists for Svir,
Belarus have been translated into English
and, if so, are there links to access the information online?


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Svir revision lists #belarus

davefox73@...
 

The 1858 Svir revision list has been translated, but it does not appear in
the All Belarus Database or the Belarus Static Index. Don't know how it
fell through the cracks. I will forward the Excel file to David Feldman so
he can get it added.

Dave

David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@earthlink.net
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com

On 11/26/09 2:04 AM, Lee Harrison wrote:

Does anyone know if the 1834, 1850 and 1858 revision lists for Svir,
Belarus have been translated into English
and, if so, are there links to access the information online?