Date   

More surname mysteries: RABINKER -or- BOBRITSKY #general

S. Brearey <sbrearey@...>
 

The recent discussions about family members with different surnames reminds
me about my own family mystery. While it is not the same situation, a totally
unfamiliar surname is used -- only once. My maternal GGF's passenger list record
shows an unknown surname, yet, when he was naturalized, there is no indication
that the name had been changed.

I have the naturalization paperwork of my great grandfather, Itzik BOBRITSKY,on
which it was stated that he was born in Tagantza, Russia. His wife,Feige(Fanny)
was born in Kanev. Their three sons were said to be born in Ekaterinaslav
(Dnipropetrovsk). These are all, of course, in the Ukraine.

I had previously searched the Baltimore passenger lists at NARA for the family's
1906 arrival (on the Gneisenau), but I was unable to find them. I had searched
all 70+ pages, quickly passing by the blocks of Magyars >from Hungary, Germans
from Germany, etc. I suppose that I was unable to find the family at that time
because I was concentrating on finding BOBRITSKY -- or something very similar.

I recently searched that specific Gneisenau passenger list again, and on page
nine I found: Itzik (transcribed as Hzik because of poor handwriting) --- get
this --- RABINKER, with wife Feige, and sons Michel ("Myer"), Jankel ("Robert
Samuel"), and Schome ("Morris"; my grandfather). This has to be the correct
family, as the ages are very close, Itzik's last residence is Taganza, "Russia,"
and on both the passenger list and the naturalization paperwork, Itzik is
described as having a physical defect of his left eye. (Coincidentally, the
person he listed as his US contact [his uncle] was a witness for Itzik's
youngest son's future father-in-law's naturalization.) Just to be sure,
I _did_ look at all the rest of the pages. I'm convinced that this is the
correct family.

I'm confused, however, because there are usually notations written on the
passenger list when one is naturalized, which would indicate that the arrival
was verified. Itzik's record had no such notations. Additionally, his
naturalization (in Philadelphia, in 1912) does not indicate that his name
had been changed *to* BOBRITSKY. In fact, that portion of the form is
specifically crossed out.

So, how did they get >from arriving as RABINKER, to naturalization as BOBRITSKY,
with no indication of a name change? Feige's maiden name was supposedly
KALLOW / KALLOWSKY (or something similar; perhaps KALOVSKY?), so they didn't
travel under her family name. Since Bremen passenger lists during this time
period no longer exist, I can't verify the name under which they sailed.

As for the name RABINKER: the handwriting on the passenger list is pretty clear,
although it looks as if the second letter was originally written as "U". However,
I can't find this name anywhere else. (I see that there is someone searching
RABINKE and I'll contact her.) Could it have been a misunderstanding of the
pronunciation; the passenger said "RABINKE" and the official heard "RABINKER"?
I searched http://stevemorse.org/phonetics/beider.php and found no matches for
RABINKER. Close matches for RABINKE were RABINKIJ, RABINKO, and RABENKO. When
I can get to the Library, I'll search Beider's book.

This BOBRITSKY family was eventually known as FRANKEL, but the prior RABINKER
has me thoroughly confused! I'm wondering if I should add RABINKE / RABINKER
to my research (as if I need more mysteries). Suggestions on where to go >from
here would be appreciated.

Many thanks,
Sharon SWERSKY Brearey
Philadelphia, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More surname mysteries: RABINKER -or- BOBRITSKY #general

S. Brearey <sbrearey@...>
 

The recent discussions about family members with different surnames reminds
me about my own family mystery. While it is not the same situation, a totally
unfamiliar surname is used -- only once. My maternal GGF's passenger list record
shows an unknown surname, yet, when he was naturalized, there is no indication
that the name had been changed.

I have the naturalization paperwork of my great grandfather, Itzik BOBRITSKY,on
which it was stated that he was born in Tagantza, Russia. His wife,Feige(Fanny)
was born in Kanev. Their three sons were said to be born in Ekaterinaslav
(Dnipropetrovsk). These are all, of course, in the Ukraine.

I had previously searched the Baltimore passenger lists at NARA for the family's
1906 arrival (on the Gneisenau), but I was unable to find them. I had searched
all 70+ pages, quickly passing by the blocks of Magyars >from Hungary, Germans
from Germany, etc. I suppose that I was unable to find the family at that time
because I was concentrating on finding BOBRITSKY -- or something very similar.

I recently searched that specific Gneisenau passenger list again, and on page
nine I found: Itzik (transcribed as Hzik because of poor handwriting) --- get
this --- RABINKER, with wife Feige, and sons Michel ("Myer"), Jankel ("Robert
Samuel"), and Schome ("Morris"; my grandfather). This has to be the correct
family, as the ages are very close, Itzik's last residence is Taganza, "Russia,"
and on both the passenger list and the naturalization paperwork, Itzik is
described as having a physical defect of his left eye. (Coincidentally, the
person he listed as his US contact [his uncle] was a witness for Itzik's
youngest son's future father-in-law's naturalization.) Just to be sure,
I _did_ look at all the rest of the pages. I'm convinced that this is the
correct family.

I'm confused, however, because there are usually notations written on the
passenger list when one is naturalized, which would indicate that the arrival
was verified. Itzik's record had no such notations. Additionally, his
naturalization (in Philadelphia, in 1912) does not indicate that his name
had been changed *to* BOBRITSKY. In fact, that portion of the form is
specifically crossed out.

So, how did they get >from arriving as RABINKER, to naturalization as BOBRITSKY,
with no indication of a name change? Feige's maiden name was supposedly
KALLOW / KALLOWSKY (or something similar; perhaps KALOVSKY?), so they didn't
travel under her family name. Since Bremen passenger lists during this time
period no longer exist, I can't verify the name under which they sailed.

As for the name RABINKER: the handwriting on the passenger list is pretty clear,
although it looks as if the second letter was originally written as "U". However,
I can't find this name anywhere else. (I see that there is someone searching
RABINKE and I'll contact her.) Could it have been a misunderstanding of the
pronunciation; the passenger said "RABINKE" and the official heard "RABINKER"?
I searched http://stevemorse.org/phonetics/beider.php and found no matches for
RABINKER. Close matches for RABINKE were RABINKIJ, RABINKO, and RABENKO. When
I can get to the Library, I'll search Beider's book.

This BOBRITSKY family was eventually known as FRANKEL, but the prior RABINKER
has me thoroughly confused! I'm wondering if I should add RABINKE / RABINKER
to my research (as if I need more mysteries). Suggestions on where to go >from
here would be appreciated.

Many thanks,
Sharon SWERSKY Brearey
Philadelphia, PA


Re: Need German/English Translation #galicia

Penny Herbst
 

Dear Friends:

Would someone be willing to translate some very short German letters that
are contained in a PDF file?

Many thanks for your kind consideration.

Penny Herbst
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Need German/English Translation #general

Penny Herbst
 

Dear Friends:

Would someone be willing to translate some very short German letters that
are contained in a PDF file?

Many thanks for your kind consideration.

Penny Herbst
Chicago

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Re: wigs/sheitels #general

Lee Hover <lhover@...>
 

As to who wore/discarded them: my Aunt told me that her mother (my GM) said
she tossed her sheitel in the ocean on the way over! Her comment on the
whole thing, apparently.

Lee MESSING Hover

LAPIN--Lithuania; MESSING--Ger, Praga, Warsaw all in Poland; KLEIN--Hungary;
FRIEDMAN--Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: wigs/sheitels #general

Lee Hover <lhover@...>
 

As to who wore/discarded them: my Aunt told me that her mother (my GM) said
she tossed her sheitel in the ocean on the way over! Her comment on the
whole thing, apparently.

Lee MESSING Hover

LAPIN--Lithuania; MESSING--Ger, Praga, Warsaw all in Poland; KLEIN--Hungary;
FRIEDMAN--Poland


Rabbi LUBANOV of Leningrad #rabbinic

A S Goldberg
 

Shavua tov

I would appreciate hearing f >from anyone who has information on the children
and current descendants of the late Rabbi LUBANOV of Leningrad.

Please respond to me direct at alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Thank you

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi LUBANOV of Leningrad #rabbinic

A S Goldberg
 

Shavua tov

I would appreciate hearing f >from anyone who has information on the children
and current descendants of the late Rabbi LUBANOV of Leningrad.

Please respond to me direct at alancomm@netmedia.net.il

Thank you

Abraham Goldberg
Jerusalem


Re: Protocol for new dna results #dna

David Shaw <genmail2@...>
 

Dear Rabbi Samlan,

A match at 37 markers (give or take a few markers) is exactly the
kind of match that most genealogists are looking for because at 37
markers, you're probably (not definitely but probably) related within
a "genealogical time frame," regardless of your last name (i.e.,
within the last few hundred years when records may be available to
back up the testing).

Sometimes, the 37-marker matches don't pan out upon higher resolution
testing (it has happened to me), but usually they turn out to be good
matches.

Many of us welcome matches >from people with as few as 12 or 25 markers,
depending on our particular interest, such as shared surname, geographical
location, etc.

Welcome. Now, I will go check my personal page to see whether you are
one of my matches!

David Shaw

---
From: RavADS@aol.com <RavADS@aol.com>
Date: Friday, November 27, 2009, 1:58 PM

I am new to the world of genealogy through genetic testing. I recently
received my Y-DNA results using 37 markers, and found a number of matches.

My question: When is it appropriate to reach out to matches via email to
introduce myself (none have a surname match)? How close should the match
be?

Thanks,

Arnold D. Samlan
West Hempstead, NY
(researching Samlan, Friedlich, Kooperman, Brother)


DNA Research #DNA Re: Protocol for new dna results #dna

David Shaw <genmail2@...>
 

Dear Rabbi Samlan,

A match at 37 markers (give or take a few markers) is exactly the
kind of match that most genealogists are looking for because at 37
markers, you're probably (not definitely but probably) related within
a "genealogical time frame," regardless of your last name (i.e.,
within the last few hundred years when records may be available to
back up the testing).

Sometimes, the 37-marker matches don't pan out upon higher resolution
testing (it has happened to me), but usually they turn out to be good
matches.

Many of us welcome matches >from people with as few as 12 or 25 markers,
depending on our particular interest, such as shared surname, geographical
location, etc.

Welcome. Now, I will go check my personal page to see whether you are
one of my matches!

David Shaw

---
From: RavADS@aol.com <RavADS@aol.com>
Date: Friday, November 27, 2009, 1:58 PM

I am new to the world of genealogy through genetic testing. I recently
received my Y-DNA results using 37 markers, and found a number of matches.

My question: When is it appropriate to reach out to matches via email to
introduce myself (none have a surname match)? How close should the match
be?

Thanks,

Arnold D. Samlan
West Hempstead, NY
(researching Samlan, Friedlich, Kooperman, Brother)


Rossler Family #poland

DR. Yoram Rossler <yrossler@...>
 

I am researching the ROSSLER family (pronounced as ROESSLER). My
grandparents and father lived in Bielsko Biala. Have no idea on previous
locations of the family.

My grandparents given names were Yehuda and Hanna-Zlata (maiden name ABUSH).
My father's name was Moshe. Looking for information on previous generations
and on the siblings of my grandfather.

Thanks
Dr. Yoram Rossler

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions of research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


JRI Poland #Poland Rossler Family #poland

DR. Yoram Rossler <yrossler@...>
 

I am researching the ROSSLER family (pronounced as ROESSLER). My
grandparents and father lived in Bielsko Biala. Have no idea on previous
locations of the family.

My grandparents given names were Yehuda and Hanna-Zlata (maiden name ABUSH).
My father's name was Moshe. Looking for information on previous generations
and on the siblings of my grandfather.

Thanks
Dr. Yoram Rossler

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions of research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


ITS files delivered but not yet accessible in Belgium #austria-czech

m.wyler@...
 

On October 14 the National Archives of Belgium (Archives Generales du
Royaume) in Brussels received data copies >from the archives of the
International Tracing Service (ITS) in Bad Arolsen. Following Israel, the
US, Poland and Luxembourg, Belgium is now also able of making use of the
extensive documentary holdings on Nazi persecution. More than a month after
there is not yet a plan to make these data accessible and as we all expect
to have access the data outside of ITS location which is not easily
accessible Brussels seems the perfect location. On the information we have
National Archives of Belgium have only planned to have one work station for
the use of this collection which seems to be short regarding the number of
request they may expect and the time of research needed by each request. We
do not know yet their policy regarding communication for people outside of
Belgium.
I thought that you Genners in Continental Europe and may be within the UK (
as the copy has not been asked yet if my information is accurate) might be
interested in letting Mr Velle, the Head of the Belgian Archives, know your
interest and expectancies in order that they adjust their plan in time.
The general email of the National archives in Belgium is
Archives.generales@arch.be or Mr Karel Velle Archives generals du Royaume
2-6 Rue de Ruysbroeck B - 1000 Bruxelles Belgium
For more information on ITS holdings and catalogue you can visit the ITS
http://www.its-arolsen.org/en/archives/collection/index.html
Manuela Wyler
http://www.jewishtraces.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ITS files delivered but not yet accessible in Belgium #austria-czech

m.wyler@...
 

On October 14 the National Archives of Belgium (Archives Generales du
Royaume) in Brussels received data copies >from the archives of the
International Tracing Service (ITS) in Bad Arolsen. Following Israel, the
US, Poland and Luxembourg, Belgium is now also able of making use of the
extensive documentary holdings on Nazi persecution. More than a month after
there is not yet a plan to make these data accessible and as we all expect
to have access the data outside of ITS location which is not easily
accessible Brussels seems the perfect location. On the information we have
National Archives of Belgium have only planned to have one work station for
the use of this collection which seems to be short regarding the number of
request they may expect and the time of research needed by each request. We
do not know yet their policy regarding communication for people outside of
Belgium.
I thought that you Genners in Continental Europe and may be within the UK (
as the copy has not been asked yet if my information is accurate) might be
interested in letting Mr Velle, the Head of the Belgian Archives, know your
interest and expectancies in order that they adjust their plan in time.
The general email of the National archives in Belgium is
Archives.generales@arch.be or Mr Karel Velle Archives generals du Royaume
2-6 Rue de Ruysbroeck B - 1000 Bruxelles Belgium
For more information on ITS holdings and catalogue you can visit the ITS
http://www.its-arolsen.org/en/archives/collection/index.html
Manuela Wyler
http://www.jewishtraces.org


Surname suffixes #lithuania

tia@...
 

Wonderful explanation by Howardas Margolis. As far as I know this is a
unique linguistic feature. I can't think of any other language or
country where the name of a person identifies his/her gender and marital
status.

I wonder whether there may not now be an effort to modify it, as it could
be considered sexist. Also some women may also not want to be identified
as single.

Ted Ashkenazy
Montreal

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This discussion group welcomes factual responses to
Ted's message -- i.e. other languages/countries that have gender or
marital status-based surname suffixes -- but discussion on whether or
not such suffixes may be sexist is off topic for this list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Surname suffixes #lithuania

tia@...
 

Wonderful explanation by Howardas Margolis. As far as I know this is a
unique linguistic feature. I can't think of any other language or
country where the name of a person identifies his/her gender and marital
status.

I wonder whether there may not now be an effort to modify it, as it could
be considered sexist. Also some women may also not want to be identified
as single.

Ted Ashkenazy
Montreal

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This discussion group welcomes factual responses to
Ted's message -- i.e. other languages/countries that have gender or
marital status-based surname suffixes -- but discussion on whether or
not such suffixes may be sexist is off topic for this list.


Re: Sellers of wigs in shtetls #general

Jean Perkin <jeanperkin@...>
 

According to my mother, her mother wore a simple little wig >from the time
she got married in Zaludok which was then Russian Poland. Looking at
photographs, it looks very much like human hair. I would hazard a guess
that the hair came >from the long tresses of young maidens when they got
married.

I have also seen a picture of a rebbetzin >from Zaludok wearing a wig which
was very high and very ornate. Presumably they had ladies whose profession
it was to make wigs, and they created them to the client's wishes.

I should imagine it was the norm for a Jewish marriage. In the 30s in Eretz
Yisrael, my other grandmother who was strictly religious and came >from a
rabbinical family did not wear a wig, just a kerchief (tichal). I was told
many religious women did not wear a wig there, because it was too hot. If
they did it was only in public, otherwise they just kept their head covered
when at home.

Jean Perkin

"usdine" <usdine@orange.fr> wrote in message

All information about the sellers of wigs in the XIX th century in the
shtetls will be welcome..


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sellers of wigs in shtetls #general

Jean Perkin <jeanperkin@...>
 

According to my mother, her mother wore a simple little wig >from the time
she got married in Zaludok which was then Russian Poland. Looking at
photographs, it looks very much like human hair. I would hazard a guess
that the hair came >from the long tresses of young maidens when they got
married.

I have also seen a picture of a rebbetzin >from Zaludok wearing a wig which
was very high and very ornate. Presumably they had ladies whose profession
it was to make wigs, and they created them to the client's wishes.

I should imagine it was the norm for a Jewish marriage. In the 30s in Eretz
Yisrael, my other grandmother who was strictly religious and came >from a
rabbinical family did not wear a wig, just a kerchief (tichal). I was told
many religious women did not wear a wig there, because it was too hot. If
they did it was only in public, otherwise they just kept their head covered
when at home.

Jean Perkin

"usdine" <usdine@orange.fr> wrote in message

All information about the sellers of wigs in the XIX th century in the
shtetls will be welcome..


Re: Information On Synagogue at 217 Forsyth St. Manhattan #general

Susan&David
 

There is another source for the names and addresses of local Jewish
institutions, including Manhattan synagogues, for the period 1899-1900
"The American Jewish Yearbook" full text available on -line at:
http://www.ajcarchives.org/main.php?GroupingId=40
I have searched through a number of subsequent volumes, but their
institution's lists appear to be limited to national institutions only.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Pamela Weisberger wrote:

The best source to locate the names of the shtebls and synagogues of the lower
east side is the "Lower East Side Tour Book" by Oscar Israelowitz...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Information On Synagogue at 217 Forsyth St. Manhattan #general

Susan&David
 

There is another source for the names and addresses of local Jewish
institutions, including Manhattan synagogues, for the period 1899-1900
"The American Jewish Yearbook" full text available on -line at:
http://www.ajcarchives.org/main.php?GroupingId=40
I have searched through a number of subsequent volumes, but their
institution's lists appear to be limited to national institutions only.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

Pamela Weisberger wrote:

The best source to locate the names of the shtebls and synagogues of the lower
east side is the "Lower East Side Tour Book" by Oscar Israelowitz...