Date   

Re: Rawa Mazowiecka #poland #lodz

Marla <mbudkow@...>
 

Dear Aubrey,

My relatives also originate in Rawa before eventually moving to Piotrkow.
My grandmother was Szajna Zlata Lesz. My great-grandmother was Ruchla Laja
Lesz. Ruchla's parents were Pinkus Wolf Lesz and Cypa Lewkowicz. Let me
know if you find a connection.

Sincerely,

Marla Cohen

-----Original Message-----

Subject: ROZENBAUM;KWIATOWSKI REMBALSKI ;LEWKOWICZ Rawa Mazowiecka
From: "AUBREY JACOBUS" <aajacobus@btinternet.com>

Very recently I traced my great grandmother's origin to Rawa
Mazowiecka -surname Raizl ROZENBAUM m Fajwel KWIATOWSKI

Perhaps those interested in this shtetl or surnames could contact me

Thank you

Aubrey Jacobus
London


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland RE: Rawa Mazowiecka #lodz #poland

Marla <mbudkow@...>
 

Dear Aubrey,

My relatives also originate in Rawa before eventually moving to Piotrkow.
My grandmother was Szajna Zlata Lesz. My great-grandmother was Ruchla Laja
Lesz. Ruchla's parents were Pinkus Wolf Lesz and Cypa Lewkowicz. Let me
know if you find a connection.

Sincerely,

Marla Cohen

-----Original Message-----

Subject: ROZENBAUM;KWIATOWSKI REMBALSKI ;LEWKOWICZ Rawa Mazowiecka
From: "AUBREY JACOBUS" <aajacobus@btinternet.com>

Very recently I traced my great grandmother's origin to Rawa
Mazowiecka -surname Raizl ROZENBAUM m Fajwel KWIATOWSKI

Perhaps those interested in this shtetl or surnames could contact me

Thank you

Aubrey Jacobus
London


Re: romanian military records #romania

lradu@...
 

Lisa,

There were no "partisan" units in Romania during WW2. After the war
started, Jews were no longer drafted. In 1940, when Romanian Army =
retreated
from Bassarabia/N Bukovina which were taken by Russia, there were =
several
incidents in which Jewish soldiers were shot by their Romanian =
"comrades",
the Dorohoi pogrom being the most known.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY
MODERATOR NOTE: Please do not use your reply button as that includes the entire
previous message/digest.


Romania SIG #Romania RE: romanian military records #romania

lradu@...
 

Lisa,

There were no "partisan" units in Romania during WW2. After the war
started, Jews were no longer drafted. In 1940, when Romanian Army =
retreated
from Bassarabia/N Bukovina which were taken by Russia, there were =
several
incidents in which Jewish soldiers were shot by their Romanian =
"comrades",
the Dorohoi pogrom being the most known.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY
MODERATOR NOTE: Please do not use your reply button as that includes the entire
previous message/digest.


Migration between Amsterdam and Podolia #dna

Judy Simon
 

My husband's paternal grandfather Jacob SIMON was born in Odessa in
1873. Since we have been unsuccessful in tracing Jacob's ancestors,
my husband had his Y-DNA tested, and over the last seven years has
collected a small group of very close matches with a common ancestor
who almost certainly lived in the mid-to-late 1700's. Two of these
matches have a paper trail back to Amsterdam: de KORTE, b.1824 and
ABRAHAMS, b.1777, and two have a paper trail back to the Podolia
region in the Ukraine: ZANG, 1825, Obertyn and MOROCHNIK, 1873,
Letichev, Podolia.

Assuming Gary and his four closest matches had a common ancestor in
Amsterdam in the mid-1700's, in which direction is the migration on
his paternal line most likely to have gone- >from Amsterdam to Podolia
or >from Podolia to Amsterdam? We know >from the paper trail that Levi
Abrahams left Holland in 1800 and moved to South Carolina, US; George
de Korte-Cohen left Amsterdam for Spitalfields in London in 1849, then
to the US in 1856. Would there have been any reason for a brother or
cousin in that family >from Amsterdam to move to Podolia or Odessa in
the early 1800's? Or is it more likely that the common ancestor was
in Podolia in the early 1700's and one branch of the family migrated
to Amsterdam?

Judy Simon, researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Rezekne and Daugavpils, Latvia); LEFKOWITZ,
KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area,
Poland); SIMON (Odessa and Mirayimpil, Ukraine); SWIERSKY, LAPIDUS
(Smorgon and Narach, Belarus).


DNA Research #DNA Migration between Amsterdam and Podolia #dna

Judy Simon
 

My husband's paternal grandfather Jacob SIMON was born in Odessa in
1873. Since we have been unsuccessful in tracing Jacob's ancestors,
my husband had his Y-DNA tested, and over the last seven years has
collected a small group of very close matches with a common ancestor
who almost certainly lived in the mid-to-late 1700's. Two of these
matches have a paper trail back to Amsterdam: de KORTE, b.1824 and
ABRAHAMS, b.1777, and two have a paper trail back to the Podolia
region in the Ukraine: ZANG, 1825, Obertyn and MOROCHNIK, 1873,
Letichev, Podolia.

Assuming Gary and his four closest matches had a common ancestor in
Amsterdam in the mid-1700's, in which direction is the migration on
his paternal line most likely to have gone- >from Amsterdam to Podolia
or >from Podolia to Amsterdam? We know >from the paper trail that Levi
Abrahams left Holland in 1800 and moved to South Carolina, US; George
de Korte-Cohen left Amsterdam for Spitalfields in London in 1849, then
to the US in 1856. Would there have been any reason for a brother or
cousin in that family >from Amsterdam to move to Podolia or Odessa in
the early 1800's? Or is it more likely that the common ancestor was
in Podolia in the early 1700's and one branch of the family migrated
to Amsterdam?

Judy Simon, researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Rezekne and Daugavpils, Latvia); LEFKOWITZ,
KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area,
Poland); SIMON (Odessa and Mirayimpil, Ukraine); SWIERSKY, LAPIDUS
(Smorgon and Narach, Belarus).


Migration between Amsterdam and Podolia #general

Judy Simon
 

My husband's paternal grandfather Jacob SIMON was born in Odessa in
1873. Since we have been unsuccessful in tracing Jacob's ancestors,
my husband had his Y-DNA tested, and over the last seven years has
collected a small group of very close matches with a common ancestor
who almost certainly lived in the mid-to-late 1700's. Two of these
matches have a paper trail back to Amsterdam: de KORTE, b.1824 and
ABRAHAMS, b.1777, and two have a paper trail back to the Podolia
region in the Ukraine: ZANG, 1825, Obertyn and MOROCHNIK, 1873,
Letichev, Podolia.

Assuming Gary and his four closest matches had a common ancestor in
Amsterdam in the mid-1700's, in which direction is the migration on
his paternal line most likely to have gone- >from Amsterdam to Podolia
or >from Podolia to Amsterdam? We know >from the paper trail that Levi
Abrahams left Holland in 1800 and moved to South Carolina, US; George
de Korte-Cohen left Amsterdam for Spitalfields in London in 1849, then
to the US in 1856. Would there have been any reason for a brother or
cousin in that family >from Amsterdam to move to Podolia or Odessa in
the early 1800's? Or is it more likely that the common ancestor was
in Podolia in the early 1700's and one branch of the family migrated
to Amsterdam?

Judy Simon, researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Rezekne and Daugavpils, Latvia); LEFKOWITZ,
KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area,
Poland); SIMON (Odessa and Mirayimpil, Ukraine); SWIERSKY, LAPIDUS
(Smorgon and Narach, Belarus).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Migration between Amsterdam and Podolia #general

Judy Simon
 

My husband's paternal grandfather Jacob SIMON was born in Odessa in
1873. Since we have been unsuccessful in tracing Jacob's ancestors,
my husband had his Y-DNA tested, and over the last seven years has
collected a small group of very close matches with a common ancestor
who almost certainly lived in the mid-to-late 1700's. Two of these
matches have a paper trail back to Amsterdam: de KORTE, b.1824 and
ABRAHAMS, b.1777, and two have a paper trail back to the Podolia
region in the Ukraine: ZANG, 1825, Obertyn and MOROCHNIK, 1873,
Letichev, Podolia.

Assuming Gary and his four closest matches had a common ancestor in
Amsterdam in the mid-1700's, in which direction is the migration on
his paternal line most likely to have gone- >from Amsterdam to Podolia
or >from Podolia to Amsterdam? We know >from the paper trail that Levi
Abrahams left Holland in 1800 and moved to South Carolina, US; George
de Korte-Cohen left Amsterdam for Spitalfields in London in 1849, then
to the US in 1856. Would there have been any reason for a brother or
cousin in that family >from Amsterdam to move to Podolia or Odessa in
the early 1800's? Or is it more likely that the common ancestor was
in Podolia in the early 1700's and one branch of the family migrated
to Amsterdam?

Judy Simon, researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Rezekne and Daugavpils, Latvia); LEFKOWITZ,
KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN, CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area,
Poland); SIMON (Odessa and Mirayimpil, Ukraine); SWIERSKY, LAPIDUS
(Smorgon and Narach, Belarus).


Cleveland as a port of entry #general

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

Hello. Samuel ZUKERMAN was married to my great aunt, Liba Weidenfeld.
He first lived in Akron, Ohio, and then moved to Olean, NY. I was told,
however, that he entered the US via Cleveland, Ohio. Is this possible?
I have never heard of Cleveland as a port of entry.

Thanks very much for your help!

Denise Azbill
Las Vegas, NV
Famaz1@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cleveland as a port of entry #general

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

Hello. Samuel ZUKERMAN was married to my great aunt, Liba Weidenfeld.
He first lived in Akron, Ohio, and then moved to Olean, NY. I was told,
however, that he entered the US via Cleveland, Ohio. Is this possible?
I have never heard of Cleveland as a port of entry.

Thanks very much for your help!

Denise Azbill
Las Vegas, NV
Famaz1@hotmail.com


Re: Halevi Levin #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Lisa Grayson asked whether Shmuel bar Shlomo Halevi Levin is
redundant...

My answer is usually, perhaps 99% of the time, but not always. A
hundred years ago, almost all people surnamed Levin were indeed Leviim.
But once in a while, they weren't.

For example, if a couple had a religious marriage, but were not
allowed to have a civil marriage, the children would have the mother's
name. Or somebody assumed another person's identity to avoid being
drafted. I'm sure that there were other scenarios, including often
unknown reasons.

I had an uncle surnamed Cohn, born in Poland before WWI, but he
wasn't a Kohen. I work with somebody surnamed Levy, and because of
intermarriage, she isn't Jewish.

Perhaps Lisa's relative (or his relatives) was proud of both being
a Levi and of his last name Levin, and wanted everybody to remember both.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Halevi Levin #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Lisa Grayson asked whether Shmuel bar Shlomo Halevi Levin is
redundant...

My answer is usually, perhaps 99% of the time, but not always. A
hundred years ago, almost all people surnamed Levin were indeed Leviim.
But once in a while, they weren't.

For example, if a couple had a religious marriage, but were not
allowed to have a civil marriage, the children would have the mother's
name. Or somebody assumed another person's identity to avoid being
drafted. I'm sure that there were other scenarios, including often
unknown reasons.

I had an uncle surnamed Cohn, born in Poland before WWI, but he
wasn't a Kohen. I work with somebody surnamed Levy, and because of
intermarriage, she isn't Jewish.

Perhaps Lisa's relative (or his relatives) was proud of both being
a Levi and of his last name Levin, and wanted everybody to remember both.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

lisa@publica.com (Lisa Grayson) writes:

According to a 1908 book, "A Century and a Half of Pittsburg (sic)
and Her People," supposedly two of Samuel's brothers were chief rabbis
in Russia (administrative rather than scholarly or pastoral positions,
I believe), and a nephew was a chief rabbi in Jerusalem.
If this is the case, the nephew should logically have been Meir Auerbach
or Shmuel Salant: see <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Rabbi>.
The two of them cover the whole time period >from 1860 to 1909 (and the
book was written in 1908); the nephew could have been somewhat older
than Samuel, but probably not enough older to be a "chief rabbi" before
1860.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Asher <aarbit@...>
 

Lisa,

The name on the tombstone is in the format "Hebrew name / secular
family name". For example, if Issie Smith's Hebrew name was Yitzchak
ben Avraham, his tombstone might say "Yitzchak ben Avraham Smith". If
Yitz was a cohen or levi, the corresponding title would be appended to
his Hebrew name, so the tombstone might say "Yitzchak ben Avraham
HaCohen Smith". This does not imply that his last name is "HaCohen
Smith".

In your case, the last name is not "HaLevi Levin". "HaLevi" is the
title at the end of the Hebrew name. "Levin" is the secular family
name.

Only a minority of tombstones have the family name appended to the
Hebrew name.

Asher Arbit
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

lisa@publica.com (Lisa Grayson) writes:

According to a 1908 book, "A Century and a Half of Pittsburg (sic)
and Her People," supposedly two of Samuel's brothers were chief rabbis
in Russia (administrative rather than scholarly or pastoral positions,
I believe), and a nephew was a chief rabbi in Jerusalem.
If this is the case, the nephew should logically have been Meir Auerbach
or Shmuel Salant: see <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Rabbi>.
The two of them cover the whole time period >from 1860 to 1909 (and the
book was written in 1908); the nephew could have been somewhat older
than Samuel, but probably not enough older to be a "chief rabbi" before
1860.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Asher <aarbit@...>
 

Lisa,

The name on the tombstone is in the format "Hebrew name / secular
family name". For example, if Issie Smith's Hebrew name was Yitzchak
ben Avraham, his tombstone might say "Yitzchak ben Avraham Smith". If
Yitz was a cohen or levi, the corresponding title would be appended to
his Hebrew name, so the tombstone might say "Yitzchak ben Avraham
HaCohen Smith". This does not imply that his last name is "HaCohen
Smith".

In your case, the last name is not "HaLevi Levin". "HaLevi" is the
title at the end of the Hebrew name. "Levin" is the secular family
name.

Only a minority of tombstones have the family name appended to the
Hebrew name.

Asher Arbit
Jerusalem


Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

lisa@publica.com (Lisa Grayson) writes:

...wouldn't every Levin
be ha-Levi? -- but I'm not sure.
No, not at all. There are plenty of Levins who are not of the tribe of Levi.
Some are not even Jewish (cf. one of the main characters in "Anna Karenina").
But probably the great majority of Levins are in fact of the tribe of Levi.

...Is "Halevi" a redundant part of Shmuel's
name? Or is it a clue that bears minding while I continue the search?
Technically, this "Ha-Levi" is referring to his father, not to him.
His Hebrew given name was Shmuel, his father's was Shlomo, who was a Levi;
his surname (which is not part of the Hebrew name at all) was Levin.
Of course since tribal designation is passed >from father to son, the
distinction here is rather moot. However, it does affect women: e.g.
my wife is "Devorah bat Binyamin Ha-Kohen", which means that her father
was a Kohen, not that she is.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

lisa@publica.com (Lisa Grayson) writes:

...wouldn't every Levin
be ha-Levi? -- but I'm not sure.
No, not at all. There are plenty of Levins who are not of the tribe of Levi.
Some are not even Jewish (cf. one of the main characters in "Anna Karenina").
But probably the great majority of Levins are in fact of the tribe of Levi.

...Is "Halevi" a redundant part of Shmuel's
name? Or is it a clue that bears minding while I continue the search?
Technically, this "Ha-Levi" is referring to his father, not to him.
His Hebrew given name was Shmuel, his father's was Shlomo, who was a Levi;
his surname (which is not part of the Hebrew name at all) was Levin.
Of course since tribal designation is passed >from father to son, the
distinction here is rather moot. However, it does affect women: e.g.
my wife is "Devorah bat Binyamin Ha-Kohen", which means that her father
was a Kohen, not that she is.
--
Robert Israel
israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Marc DVer <mdver@...>
 

Never rely on a surname to determine if a person is a kohen or levi. In
the old country people used to change surnames to avoid being drafted
into the Russian Army. There may have been other reasons to purposely
change a surname.

My specific research interest has to do with determining whether or not
my family are Levi'im. I won't go into the details in this forum, but
suffice it to say there are strong reasons on each side why the status
might have been purposely changed (despite a lack of Halachic
justification).

Marc DVer

On 18/10/2010 23:55, Lisa Grayson wrote:

I had thought that this was just a redundancy -- wouldn't every Levin
be ha-Levi? -- but I'm not sure.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Halevi Levin? #general

Marc DVer <mdver@...>
 

Never rely on a surname to determine if a person is a kohen or levi. In
the old country people used to change surnames to avoid being drafted
into the Russian Army. There may have been other reasons to purposely
change a surname.

My specific research interest has to do with determining whether or not
my family are Levi'im. I won't go into the details in this forum, but
suffice it to say there are strong reasons on each side why the status
might have been purposely changed (despite a lack of Halachic
justification).

Marc DVer

On 18/10/2010 23:55, Lisa Grayson wrote:

I had thought that this was just a redundancy -- wouldn't every Levin
be ha-Levi? -- but I'm not sure.