Date   

Searching information abmy Jewish family #poland #warsaw

pawelsek@...
 

Good morning,

I'm Polish with the origine jew. My grandmother had a
family name Braunszweig (Braunschweig / Braunszwajg), first
name Zofia. Her father was Edward Braunschweig. They live
d in Warsaw for 1944.

Last week, it is found that the parents of Edward Bra
unszweig were Feliks and Salomea (>from Weitzenblut), died
on 1914 and 1915,both deposed on the Warsaw Jewish Ceme
ntary.

How can I find more information about my Jewish family?


I can correspond in English or (much better) in French
and in Polish.

Here informations that I have for today:
- SALOMEIA BRAUNSCHWEIG, died in 1914 in Warsaw;
- her husband: FELIKS BRAUNSCHWEIG, died in 1915 in War
saw;
- their son: EDWARD BRAUNSZWEIG, died in 1944;
- son of Edward: ANTONI BRAUNSZWEIG, born in 1920, died
in Warsaw insurrection in 1944;
- daughter of Edward: ZOFIA BRAUNSZWEIG, born in 1924,
died in 1997 in Lublin.


Sincerely,

Pawel Sekowski,
Krakow, Poland and Paris, France


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Searching information abmy Jewish family #warsaw #poland

pawelsek@...
 

Good morning,

I'm Polish with the origine jew. My grandmother had a
family name Braunszweig (Braunschweig / Braunszwajg), first
name Zofia. Her father was Edward Braunschweig. They live
d in Warsaw for 1944.

Last week, it is found that the parents of Edward Bra
unszweig were Feliks and Salomea (>from Weitzenblut), died
on 1914 and 1915,both deposed on the Warsaw Jewish Ceme
ntary.

How can I find more information about my Jewish family?


I can correspond in English or (much better) in French
and in Polish.

Here informations that I have for today:
- SALOMEIA BRAUNSCHWEIG, died in 1914 in Warsaw;
- her husband: FELIKS BRAUNSCHWEIG, died in 1915 in War
saw;
- their son: EDWARD BRAUNSZWEIG, died in 1944;
- son of Edward: ANTONI BRAUNSZWEIG, born in 1920, died
in Warsaw insurrection in 1944;
- daughter of Edward: ZOFIA BRAUNSZWEIG, born in 1924,
died in 1997 in Lublin.


Sincerely,

Pawel Sekowski,
Krakow, Poland and Paris, France


JOWBR Year-End Update #warsaw #poland

bounce-2148569-772981@...
 

JewishGen is very proud to announce its 2010 year-end update
to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) Database.
The JOWBR Database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/
If you're a new user, we recommend that you take a look at the first
two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update is our largest to date and includes 170,000 new
records and 32,700 new photos. The database is adding 360 new
cemeteries along with updates or additions to an additional 213
cemeteries >from 21 countries. This brings JOWBR's holdings in
excess of 1.57 million records >from more than 3,050 cemeteries /
cemetery sections >from 47 countries!

Once again, you will see that the donors for this update
include a mix of individuals, Jewish genealogical societies,
historical societies and museums. We appreciate all our donor's
submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful group
of JewishGen volunteers. Of particular note in this update are
the following additions:

• Lodz, Poland. Thanks to a dedicated team of data entry
and validation volunteers, we are adding approximately 39,000
records to those that went live in June. JOWBR now includes
approximately 50,000 records >from the "Organization of Former
Residents of Lodz in Israel" burial registers. The final set of
records for surnames starting with the letters K, P, R, and S will
be added in our next update. These records will also be added to
the JRI-Poland database.
• Melbourne, Australia. Thanks to the Melbourne Chevra
Kadisha which has submitted over 29,000 records >from 49 cemeteries
in Melbourne and surrounding towns. We are especially grateful to
the Chevra Kadisha since this is JOWBR's first significant data
collection >from Australia.
• Wisconsin, USA. Thanks to the Jewish Museum Milwaukee
(http://www.jewishmuseummilwaukee.org) for their submission of
approximately 27,000 records >from 50 cemeteries throughout Wisconsin.
• South Africa. Thanks to Stan Hart for his work to submit
close to 17,000 records >from over 135 cemeteries throughout South
Africa. Stan hopes to add photos to these records in future JOWBR
updates.
• Virginia / Maryland, USA. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogy
Society of Greater Washington, Inc. (DC) and a team of volunteers
coordinated by Marlene Bishow, Ernie Fine and Harvey Kabaker for
their submission of 5,000 records and 4,800 photos >from Arlington
National Cemetery and more than 1,500 records >from the B'nai Israel
Congregation Cemetery in Oxon Hill, Maryland.
• Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, lead
contributor to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto'
Cemetery Project, for submitting and updating approximately 120
cemeteries with 5,000 records >from Bathurst Memorial, Lambton Mills,
and Mount Sinai cemeteries. In addition to the records, over 4,000
photos >from Dawes Road Cemetery are included in this update thanks
to the efforts of Robert Lubinski.
• Georgia, USA. Thanks to Ruth Einstein, Special Projects
Coordinator for The Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in
Atlanta, Georgia for her submission of 4,000 new and updated records
from 17 Atlanta area cemeteries.
• California, USA. Thanks to Peggy Hooper at California
Genealogy and History Archives
(http://www.calarchives4u.com/cemeteries/cem-index.htm) for
submitting 3,400 records with photos >from sections of Eden Memorial
Park, Temple Beth Israel, Home of Peace (LA), and Home of Peace (San
Diego) cemeteries. Eden Memorial photos were taken by Dr. William A.
Mann.
• Czeladz - Bedzin, Poland. Thanks to Jeff Cymbler for his
submission of over 3,200 records with 3,100 accompanying photos >from
this town's cemetery.
• Florida, USA.
Thanks to Susan Steinfeld, Cemetery Project Coordinator for
the Jewish Genealogy Society of Broward County, and her team for
their submission of more than 3,000 record and photos >from selected
sections in the Star of David Cemetery in Miami.
Thanks to Ina Getzoff, JOWBR Coordinator for the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, for her submission of 150
new records and 450 photos >from the South Florida National Cemetery.
• Petach Tikvah / Segulah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman
for her ongoing record refinement and 3,000 new photos. In total,
JOWBR includes close to 60,000 records and 17,000 photos >from this
cemetery.
• Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania. Thanks to Vivian Kahn, H-SIG
Coordinator, for her first installment of 2,950 records >from the
Sighetu Marmatiei cemetery register. Additional records are being
worked on for the next update.
• Roman, Romania. Thanks to Claudia Greif and Rosanne Leeson
for 2,100 records >from the Roman cemetery register >from Roman in
the Moldavia region of Romania.
• El Paso, Texas, USA. Thanks to Sandy Aaronson for her work
to update and photograph B'nai Zion and Temple Mt. Sinai cemeteries
in El Paso. Sandy has added 450 records and 2,100 photos.
• Ferndale, Michigan, USA. Thanks to Stuart Farber for his
submission of 2,000 records >from the Beth Abraham Cemetery
Association in Ferndale, Michigan.
• St. Joseph, Missouri, USA. Thanks to Deena Sandusky for
submitting more than 1,700 records >from the Adath Joseph and Shaare
Sholem Roches cemeteries in St. Joseph, Missouri.
• Latvia / Lithuania / Ukraine. Thanks to Christine Usdine
for permitting JOWBR to include various Latvian, Lithuanian and
Ukrainian cemetery records and photos >from her site at
http://usdine.free.fr/
Translations of those stones were provided by Sarah Mages.
• St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. A special thanks to Eileen Wegge,
8th grade public school teacher who during her Holocaust history
curriculum coordinated a cemetery indexing project with her students
at Chesed Shel Emes Cemetery in St. Paul.
• Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. Thanks to Gene Baruch for
indexing and photographing 1,000 stones at the Greensboro Hebrew
Cemetery.
• South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman,
president of the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina
(http://www.jhssc.org/) for her most recent submission of 1,000
additional records >from various South Carolina cemeteries.
• Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate
all your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted
information for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and
encourage you to make additional submissions. Whether you work on a
cemetery / cemetery section individually or consider a group project
for your local Society, temple or other group, it's your submissions
that help grow the JOWBR database and make it possible for
researchers and family members to find answers they otherwise might
not. Please also consider other organizations you may be affiliated
with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would consider
having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
NAltman@...
December 2010


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland JOWBR Year-End Update #poland #warsaw

bounce-2148569-772981@...
 

JewishGen is very proud to announce its 2010 year-end update
to the JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) Database.
The JOWBR Database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/
If you're a new user, we recommend that you take a look at the first
two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update is our largest to date and includes 170,000 new
records and 32,700 new photos. The database is adding 360 new
cemeteries along with updates or additions to an additional 213
cemeteries >from 21 countries. This brings JOWBR's holdings in
excess of 1.57 million records >from more than 3,050 cemeteries /
cemetery sections >from 47 countries!

Once again, you will see that the donors for this update
include a mix of individuals, Jewish genealogical societies,
historical societies and museums. We appreciate all our donor's
submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful group
of JewishGen volunteers. Of particular note in this update are
the following additions:

• Lodz, Poland. Thanks to a dedicated team of data entry
and validation volunteers, we are adding approximately 39,000
records to those that went live in June. JOWBR now includes
approximately 50,000 records >from the "Organization of Former
Residents of Lodz in Israel" burial registers. The final set of
records for surnames starting with the letters K, P, R, and S will
be added in our next update. These records will also be added to
the JRI-Poland database.
• Melbourne, Australia. Thanks to the Melbourne Chevra
Kadisha which has submitted over 29,000 records >from 49 cemeteries
in Melbourne and surrounding towns. We are especially grateful to
the Chevra Kadisha since this is JOWBR's first significant data
collection >from Australia.
• Wisconsin, USA. Thanks to the Jewish Museum Milwaukee
(http://www.jewishmuseummilwaukee.org) for their submission of
approximately 27,000 records >from 50 cemeteries throughout Wisconsin.
• South Africa. Thanks to Stan Hart for his work to submit
close to 17,000 records >from over 135 cemeteries throughout South
Africa. Stan hopes to add photos to these records in future JOWBR
updates.
• Virginia / Maryland, USA. Thanks to the Jewish Genealogy
Society of Greater Washington, Inc. (DC) and a team of volunteers
coordinated by Marlene Bishow, Ernie Fine and Harvey Kabaker for
their submission of 5,000 records and 4,800 photos >from Arlington
National Cemetery and more than 1,500 records >from the B'nai Israel
Congregation Cemetery in Oxon Hill, Maryland.
• Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, lead
contributor to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto'
Cemetery Project, for submitting and updating approximately 120
cemeteries with 5,000 records >from Bathurst Memorial, Lambton Mills,
and Mount Sinai cemeteries. In addition to the records, over 4,000
photos >from Dawes Road Cemetery are included in this update thanks
to the efforts of Robert Lubinski.
• Georgia, USA. Thanks to Ruth Einstein, Special Projects
Coordinator for The Breman Jewish Heritage & Holocaust Museum in
Atlanta, Georgia for her submission of 4,000 new and updated records
from 17 Atlanta area cemeteries.
• California, USA. Thanks to Peggy Hooper at California
Genealogy and History Archives
(http://www.calarchives4u.com/cemeteries/cem-index.htm) for
submitting 3,400 records with photos >from sections of Eden Memorial
Park, Temple Beth Israel, Home of Peace (LA), and Home of Peace (San
Diego) cemeteries. Eden Memorial photos were taken by Dr. William A.
Mann.
• Czeladz - Bedzin, Poland. Thanks to Jeff Cymbler for his
submission of over 3,200 records with 3,100 accompanying photos >from
this town's cemetery.
• Florida, USA.
Thanks to Susan Steinfeld, Cemetery Project Coordinator for
the Jewish Genealogy Society of Broward County, and her team for
their submission of more than 3,000 record and photos >from selected
sections in the Star of David Cemetery in Miami.
Thanks to Ina Getzoff, JOWBR Coordinator for the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, for her submission of 150
new records and 450 photos >from the South Florida National Cemetery.
• Petach Tikvah / Segulah, Israel. Thanks to Gilda Kurtzman
for her ongoing record refinement and 3,000 new photos. In total,
JOWBR includes close to 60,000 records and 17,000 photos >from this
cemetery.
• Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania. Thanks to Vivian Kahn, H-SIG
Coordinator, for her first installment of 2,950 records >from the
Sighetu Marmatiei cemetery register. Additional records are being
worked on for the next update.
• Roman, Romania. Thanks to Claudia Greif and Rosanne Leeson
for 2,100 records >from the Roman cemetery register >from Roman in
the Moldavia region of Romania.
• El Paso, Texas, USA. Thanks to Sandy Aaronson for her work
to update and photograph B'nai Zion and Temple Mt. Sinai cemeteries
in El Paso. Sandy has added 450 records and 2,100 photos.
• Ferndale, Michigan, USA. Thanks to Stuart Farber for his
submission of 2,000 records >from the Beth Abraham Cemetery
Association in Ferndale, Michigan.
• St. Joseph, Missouri, USA. Thanks to Deena Sandusky for
submitting more than 1,700 records >from the Adath Joseph and Shaare
Sholem Roches cemeteries in St. Joseph, Missouri.
• Latvia / Lithuania / Ukraine. Thanks to Christine Usdine
for permitting JOWBR to include various Latvian, Lithuanian and
Ukrainian cemetery records and photos >from her site at
http://usdine.free.fr/
Translations of those stones were provided by Sarah Mages.
• St. Paul, Minnesota, USA. A special thanks to Eileen Wegge,
8th grade public school teacher who during her Holocaust history
curriculum coordinated a cemetery indexing project with her students
at Chesed Shel Emes Cemetery in St. Paul.
• Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. Thanks to Gene Baruch for
indexing and photographing 1,000 stones at the Greensboro Hebrew
Cemetery.
• South Carolina Cemeteries. Thanks to Ann Hellman,
president of the Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina
(http://www.jhssc.org/) for her most recent submission of 1,000
additional records >from various South Carolina cemeteries.
• Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate
all your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted
information for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and
encourage you to make additional submissions. Whether you work on a
cemetery / cemetery section individually or consider a group project
for your local Society, temple or other group, it's your submissions
that help grow the JOWBR database and make it possible for
researchers and family members to find answers they otherwise might
not. Please also consider other organizations you may be affiliated
with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would consider
having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR -- Coordinator
NAltman@...
December 2010


Re: Galician burial society in NY, Cong Adas Israel... #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

louiskessler@... (Louis Kessler) writes:
Ron Schorr (rwwschorr@...) asked:
What does "Cong. Adas Israel Anshei Galicia Menach Sfard" mean?

"Adas" (other spellings: Adath, Edat) means "community of" and is related to
the Hebrew word for "witness".
"Anshei" means "men of", in this case Galicia distinguishing them >from the men
of someplace else.
"Menach" no idea. never heard of it. Maybe someone else out there has.
"Sfard" This does not mean they are of Sefardic ancestry but that they use a
Hasidic siddur which has Sefardic features.
I suspect that "Menach" is actually "Nusach", again referring to the form of
the siddur. See e.g. the Wikipedia article on "Nusach Sefard".

Robert Israel
israel@...
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Galician burial society in NY, Cong Adas Israel... #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

louiskessler@... (Louis Kessler) writes:
Ron Schorr (rwwschorr@...) asked:
What does "Cong. Adas Israel Anshei Galicia Menach Sfard" mean?

"Adas" (other spellings: Adath, Edat) means "community of" and is related to
the Hebrew word for "witness".
"Anshei" means "men of", in this case Galicia distinguishing them >from the men
of someplace else.
"Menach" no idea. never heard of it. Maybe someone else out there has.
"Sfard" This does not mean they are of Sefardic ancestry but that they use a
Hasidic siddur which has Sefardic features.
I suspect that "Menach" is actually "Nusach", again referring to the form of
the siddur. See e.g. the Wikipedia article on "Nusach Sefard".

Robert Israel
israel@...
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: Fanny and Toni #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

The name Fanny (and similar names like Fanya and Fani) is a newcomer.
We have a relatively complete set of birth records for Nezhin Ukraine
1860-1918. The first Fanny is born in 1891; there are 6 total in the 1890s
(out of roughly 2500 births), more in the decade 1900-1909; and even more
in the period 1910-1918, even though the total births in the latter period
has shrunk to about 1400.

By contrast, girls are named Feiga throughout the 59 year period.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Fanny and Toni #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

The name Fanny (and similar names like Fanya and Fani) is a newcomer.
We have a relatively complete set of birth records for Nezhin Ukraine
1860-1918. The first Fanny is born in 1891; there are 6 total in the 1890s
(out of roughly 2500 births), more in the decade 1900-1909; and even more
in the period 1910-1918, even though the total births in the latter period
has shrunk to about 1400.

By contrast, girls are named Feiga throughout the 59 year period.

Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA U.S.A.


From DRECHSLER to HARRIS, then where? #general

David W. Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

I'm researching the family of Schloime DRECHSLER who arrived in NY, along
with his brother Gershon, >from Siemiatycze, Poland in 1907.

In the 1910 Census, he has changed his name to David DRECKSLER and his
brother is now Irv Drecksler. They are living as lodgers in the same building
with their uncle and my grandfather Solomon HARRIS. I was told that the brothers
changed their names to David and Irv HARRIS and >from that point the path
disappears.

There is a possibility that my David Harris married Pauline MANDELOWITZ in
January 1912 in Brooklyn and they had two sons, Nathan and Israel. Israel
died at the age of about 4 years. Nathan Harris was born about 1914. Assuming
he married, I am trying to locate any of his children or grandchildren and
help would be appreciated.

Please reply directly.

David Harris
Silver Spring, MD
<dorsharris@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen From DRECHSLER to HARRIS, then where? #general

David W. Harris <dorsharris@...>
 

I'm researching the family of Schloime DRECHSLER who arrived in NY, along
with his brother Gershon, >from Siemiatycze, Poland in 1907.

In the 1910 Census, he has changed his name to David DRECKSLER and his
brother is now Irv Drecksler. They are living as lodgers in the same building
with their uncle and my grandfather Solomon HARRIS. I was told that the brothers
changed their names to David and Irv HARRIS and >from that point the path
disappears.

There is a possibility that my David Harris married Pauline MANDELOWITZ in
January 1912 in Brooklyn and they had two sons, Nathan and Israel. Israel
died at the age of about 4 years. Nathan Harris was born about 1914. Assuming
he married, I am trying to locate any of his children or grandchildren and
help would be appreciated.

Please reply directly.

David Harris
Silver Spring, MD
<dorsharris@...>


Looking for info on Markus (b1904) and/or Jonas (b1909) SCHEINBACH #general

Philip Trauring
 

I'm trying to find someone who might be descended >from or who might
otherwise know about two brothers, Markus (b1904) and Jonas (b1909)
SCHEINBACH, born in Kanczuga to Israel and Rosa (Horn) SCHEINBACH.

I found a passenger record for Markus SCHEINBACH (age 16) and an unknown
(to me) sister Szenidla (age 19) traveling to NY in 1920, which puts his
birth at the right time, and he lists his mother as living in Kanczuga. So
presumably this is the same Markus. Another record in 1923 shows Markus again
making the trip to NY, this time with his mother Rosa and brother Jonas. It
adds some additional information, that they last lived in Lezajsk, Poland and
that Rosa's brother was Fischel HORN was also >from Lezajsk. I know Israel
SCHEINBACH, Rosa's husband, died in 1910, so presumably she moved either to
her original hometown, or at least where her brother lived in between 1920
and 1923. According to Shtetlseeker, Lezajsk is 20 miles north of Kanczuga.

After the passenger records the trail seems to end, and I see no other
references to any of them. They could have changed their names.

Does anyone know about either Markus or Jonas SCHEINBACH?

Thank you,

Philip Trauring


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for info on Markus (b1904) and/or Jonas (b1909) SCHEINBACH #general

Philip Trauring
 

I'm trying to find someone who might be descended >from or who might
otherwise know about two brothers, Markus (b1904) and Jonas (b1909)
SCHEINBACH, born in Kanczuga to Israel and Rosa (Horn) SCHEINBACH.

I found a passenger record for Markus SCHEINBACH (age 16) and an unknown
(to me) sister Szenidla (age 19) traveling to NY in 1920, which puts his
birth at the right time, and he lists his mother as living in Kanczuga. So
presumably this is the same Markus. Another record in 1923 shows Markus again
making the trip to NY, this time with his mother Rosa and brother Jonas. It
adds some additional information, that they last lived in Lezajsk, Poland and
that Rosa's brother was Fischel HORN was also >from Lezajsk. I know Israel
SCHEINBACH, Rosa's husband, died in 1910, so presumably she moved either to
her original hometown, or at least where her brother lived in between 1920
and 1923. According to Shtetlseeker, Lezajsk is 20 miles north of Kanczuga.

After the passenger records the trail seems to end, and I see no other
references to any of them. They could have changed their names.

Does anyone know about either Markus or Jonas SCHEINBACH?

Thank you,

Philip Trauring


Re: Records of Jarmuloswky Bank? #general

Stephen Katz
 

In the December 29 digest, Ronnie Hess wrote:
"Does anyone know if there are records for the former Jarmulowsky Bank that
once was a successful operation at the turn of the century on New York's
Lower East Side and kept accounts for immigrants saving to bring their
relatives to New York? And if yes, where the records are housed. Many thanks."

A quick internet search has revealed a couple of things that, while perhaps
not directly answering your question, might give you some leads for further
inquiry.

First, if you go to
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2007-10/msg00400.html
[MODERATOR NOTE: shortened URL http://goo.gl/bNCkq ]
you will see what appears to be an archived jewishgen message >from a student
at Columbia University who was looking for information about the Bank's
founders for research that she was doing for Prof. Rebecca Kobrin at Columbia.

Second, bjpa.org/Publications/downloadPublication.cfm?PublicationID=4484
will lead you to an article (in pdf format) by Prof. Kobrin titled "Jewish
Immigrant 'Bankers', Financial Failure and the Shifting Contours", which
features the Jarmulowski Bank. I've quickly skimmed the article, and I did
not find anything saying where the Bank's records might be, although I might
have missed it. In any case, you might wish to contact Prof. Kobrin. The
Columbia web site (www.columbia.edu) lists her as being an Assistant
Professor of American Jewish History, and gives her e-mail address.

In addition to those suggestions, you might try contacting the New York
State Banking Department to see if they have the Bank's records:
http://www.banking.state.ny.us

Also, since the Bank is reported to have "failed", which might imply
bankruptcy, perhaps the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of
New York would have records of bankruptcy proceedings, which might shed some
light on where the Bank's records are: http://www.nysb.uscourts.gov.

Good luck on this interesting quest.

Stephen Katz
New York City

Researching (among others):
KATZ (Novograd-Volynsk, Ukraine, and Boston, Mass.);
TAPPER/TEPPER (Novograd-Volynsky, Ukraine0;
WEINER (Rovno/Rowno/Rivne, Ukraine, and Boston, Mass.);
HARRIS (Lithuania);
VITKIN/WITKIN (Kaunas, Ukraine, and Massachusetts)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records of Jarmuloswky Bank? #general

Stephen Katz
 

In the December 29 digest, Ronnie Hess wrote:
"Does anyone know if there are records for the former Jarmulowsky Bank that
once was a successful operation at the turn of the century on New York's
Lower East Side and kept accounts for immigrants saving to bring their
relatives to New York? And if yes, where the records are housed. Many thanks."

A quick internet search has revealed a couple of things that, while perhaps
not directly answering your question, might give you some leads for further
inquiry.

First, if you go to
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Soc/soc.genealogy.jewish/2007-10/msg00400.html
[MODERATOR NOTE: shortened URL http://goo.gl/bNCkq ]
you will see what appears to be an archived jewishgen message >from a student
at Columbia University who was looking for information about the Bank's
founders for research that she was doing for Prof. Rebecca Kobrin at Columbia.

Second, bjpa.org/Publications/downloadPublication.cfm?PublicationID=4484
will lead you to an article (in pdf format) by Prof. Kobrin titled "Jewish
Immigrant 'Bankers', Financial Failure and the Shifting Contours", which
features the Jarmulowski Bank. I've quickly skimmed the article, and I did
not find anything saying where the Bank's records might be, although I might
have missed it. In any case, you might wish to contact Prof. Kobrin. The
Columbia web site (www.columbia.edu) lists her as being an Assistant
Professor of American Jewish History, and gives her e-mail address.

In addition to those suggestions, you might try contacting the New York
State Banking Department to see if they have the Bank's records:
http://www.banking.state.ny.us

Also, since the Bank is reported to have "failed", which might imply
bankruptcy, perhaps the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of
New York would have records of bankruptcy proceedings, which might shed some
light on where the Bank's records are: http://www.nysb.uscourts.gov.

Good luck on this interesting quest.

Stephen Katz
New York City

Researching (among others):
KATZ (Novograd-Volynsk, Ukraine, and Boston, Mass.);
TAPPER/TEPPER (Novograd-Volynsky, Ukraine0;
WEINER (Rovno/Rowno/Rivne, Ukraine, and Boston, Mass.);
HARRIS (Lithuania);
VITKIN/WITKIN (Kaunas, Ukraine, and Massachusetts)


Re: Numerous dates of birth for the same man #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Jef Barnett followed up this topic with a question about his uncle, whose
date - and place - of birth varied. He has information >from four different
censuses, the Social Security Death Index, and his World War I draft registration.

I just wanted to comment that the type of record must be considered. Census
information used to be recorded by a census taker, not by ourselves and
mailed like we do today. The census taker also had no desire to make several
visits to a house or building to complete his task, and could get information
from a neighbor. ('Close' was good enough for goverment work back then, too.)
The SSDI information used to be provided by the individual (nowadays usually
by parents) but we should all remember that it has to be keyed into a
database after death, which is an opportunity for error.

I think that in general, the closer a document is created to an event it
mentions, both in time and location, the more likely it is to be correct.
But when we try to think of errors, which may have even been intentional, we
should all use our imaginations, and imagine ourselves living during the time
the documents were created. Both our ancestors and the people who recorded
events could be very creative.

Many types of documents should be considered as evidence that something
happened at the mentioned time, not proof.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Numerous dates of birth for the same man #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Jef Barnett followed up this topic with a question about his uncle, whose
date - and place - of birth varied. He has information >from four different
censuses, the Social Security Death Index, and his World War I draft registration.

I just wanted to comment that the type of record must be considered. Census
information used to be recorded by a census taker, not by ourselves and
mailed like we do today. The census taker also had no desire to make several
visits to a house or building to complete his task, and could get information
from a neighbor. ('Close' was good enough for goverment work back then, too.)
The SSDI information used to be provided by the individual (nowadays usually
by parents) but we should all remember that it has to be keyed into a
database after death, which is an opportunity for error.

I think that in general, the closer a document is created to an event it
mentions, both in time and location, the more likely it is to be correct.
But when we try to think of errors, which may have even been intentional, we
should all use our imaginations, and imagine ourselves living during the time
the documents were created. Both our ancestors and the people who recorded
events could be very creative.

Many types of documents should be considered as evidence that something
happened at the mentioned time, not proof.

Regards,

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Phone book of greater Hungary, 1943 #hungary

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Would it be all that impossible to have the entire directory's links
uploaded to H-Sig's Data page so we can always go there to refer to it,
rather than bookmarking yet another set of links to our own browsers?

Seems logical, doesn't it?

Isn't that what the Data page is for? Or should be for?

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France

On 28-Dec-10 11:48, "Gábor Hirsch" wrote:
As somebody pointed out, you hava to put the 43 at the end of the link and has the whole addrfess as one line:
http://www.archive.org/details/AVidekiHalozatokBeturendesTavbeszeloNevsora1943

you can get the phonebook in different formats, I found easiest the *.pdf the tk17q55.djvu I could look at with the irfanview nocost image programm. Probably most image programm can open it. The tk17q55_jp2.zip contans the pasges as compressed jpg images and the *.pdf files can be viewed with ADOBE reader, which is probably installed on every computer.

If you use the link, after ...Nevsora1943
you can add one of the following addition, to get part of phonebook, I wrote the name of the communities behind the bextension, so you are able to choose the proper extension:

/tk0q16.pdf Aba - Abony
/tk17q55.pdf Baja - Budszentmihály
/tk56q100.pdf Budszentmihaly - Dunavecse
/tk101q152.pdf Dusnok - Hajduszoboszlo Gyogyfurdo
/tk153q198.pdf Hajduszovat - Kaszapuszta
/tk199q244.pdf Katadfa - Komlodtotfalu
/tk245q306.pdf Komlosd - Munkacs (Rapaport Geza)
/tk307q374.pdf Munkacs / Murabarati - Pecs (Bende Jozefin)
/tk375q427.pdf Pecs (Benedek Jeno) - Sopron (Nagelreiter Ferencne)
/tk428q448.pdf Sopron ( Nagy Bela) - Szazhalombatta
/tk449q504.pdf Szebeny - Szond (Edi Janos)
/tk505qvegig.pdf Szotyor - Zsujta

so for Bekes and Bekescsaba:
http://ia700303.us.archive.org/17/items/AVidekiHalozatokBeturendesTavbeszeloNevsora1943/tk17q55.pdf

it worked for me, and hope it will work for you too.

Best regardas
Gabor Hirsch


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Phone book of greater Hungary, 1943 #hungary

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Would it be all that impossible to have the entire directory's links
uploaded to H-Sig's Data page so we can always go there to refer to it,
rather than bookmarking yet another set of links to our own browsers?

Seems logical, doesn't it?

Isn't that what the Data page is for? Or should be for?

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France

On 28-Dec-10 11:48, "Gábor Hirsch" wrote:
As somebody pointed out, you hava to put the 43 at the end of the link and has the whole addrfess as one line:
http://www.archive.org/details/AVidekiHalozatokBeturendesTavbeszeloNevsora1943

you can get the phonebook in different formats, I found easiest the *.pdf the tk17q55.djvu I could look at with the irfanview nocost image programm. Probably most image programm can open it. The tk17q55_jp2.zip contans the pasges as compressed jpg images and the *.pdf files can be viewed with ADOBE reader, which is probably installed on every computer.

If you use the link, after ...Nevsora1943
you can add one of the following addition, to get part of phonebook, I wrote the name of the communities behind the bextension, so you are able to choose the proper extension:

/tk0q16.pdf Aba - Abony
/tk17q55.pdf Baja - Budszentmihály
/tk56q100.pdf Budszentmihaly - Dunavecse
/tk101q152.pdf Dusnok - Hajduszoboszlo Gyogyfurdo
/tk153q198.pdf Hajduszovat - Kaszapuszta
/tk199q244.pdf Katadfa - Komlodtotfalu
/tk245q306.pdf Komlosd - Munkacs (Rapaport Geza)
/tk307q374.pdf Munkacs / Murabarati - Pecs (Bende Jozefin)
/tk375q427.pdf Pecs (Benedek Jeno) - Sopron (Nagelreiter Ferencne)
/tk428q448.pdf Sopron ( Nagy Bela) - Szazhalombatta
/tk449q504.pdf Szebeny - Szond (Edi Janos)
/tk505qvegig.pdf Szotyor - Zsujta

so for Bekes and Bekescsaba:
http://ia700303.us.archive.org/17/items/AVidekiHalozatokBeturendesTavbeszeloNevsora1943/tk17q55.pdf

it worked for me, and hope it will work for you too.

Best regardas
Gabor Hirsch


Viewmate Translation #hungary

Brian.Wiatrak@...
 

thank you so much for help on the hungarian newspaper article translation.
It was very helpful!
Brian Wiatrak


Hungary SIG #Hungary Viewmate Translation #hungary

Brian.Wiatrak@...
 

thank you so much for help on the hungarian newspaper article translation.
It was very helpful!
Brian Wiatrak