Date   

JGSO: Jan 23 #general

Toby Blake
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon

Jews of the Pacific Coast

Ellen Eisenberg, Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History at
Willamette University
Sunday, January 23, 2011 1:00 pm
Where: Congregation Ahavath Achim, 3225 SW Barbur Blvd., Portland, OR

Description: >from the California Gold Rush of 1849 to the explosion of population
centers in the Southwest in the 1980s, Jews have played a significant role in
shaping the Pacific West. In the process, they have reshaped themselves, as
individuals and as communities. Through their mercantile networks and cultural
innovations, their philanthropic institutions and political leadership, western
Jews created a distinctive identity. Using historical photographs >from her new book
Ellen Eisenberg will explore the nature of the Jewish experience in Seattle,
Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the small towns of the West. She will
explain the important differences among these cities, as well as highlighting the
ways in which the western Jewish experience has echoed and deviated >from the
familiar story of American Jewish history.

About our Speaker: Ellen Eisenberg
Ellen Eisenberg has taught in the History Department at Willamette University since
1990, and was appointed Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History in
2003. She holds a B.A. in American Studies >from Carleton College and a Ph.D. in
History >from the University of Pennsylvania.Her current scholarship centers on Jews
in the Pacific West and their relationships with other ethnic groups. Her
publications include Jewish Agricultural Colonies in New Jersey, 1882-1920;
chapters in the anthologies Jewish Life in the American West and California Jews,
and journal articles and monographs. The First to Cry Down Injustice? Western Jews
and Japanese Removal during WWII was a National Jewish Book Award finalist. Jews of
the Pacific Coast: Reinventing Community on America's Edge, co-authored with Ava
Kahn and Bill Toll, was released by the University of Washington Press earlier this
year.

Time: Doors open by 1:00 pm for expert assistance with your genealogy problems.
You are invited to send a short synopsis of your issue ahead of time to
jgsoregon@gmail.com. Program will start at 1:30.

Admission is free to members of JGSO, $5 donation requested >from non-members (can
be applied to cost of membership if you join at the time).

For more information contact Barbara Hershey, President/Program Chair at
jgsoregon@gmail.com. The JGSO website has information about the organization and
genealogy tools http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSO: Jan 23 #general

Toby Blake
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon

Jews of the Pacific Coast

Ellen Eisenberg, Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History at
Willamette University
Sunday, January 23, 2011 1:00 pm
Where: Congregation Ahavath Achim, 3225 SW Barbur Blvd., Portland, OR

Description: >from the California Gold Rush of 1849 to the explosion of population
centers in the Southwest in the 1980s, Jews have played a significant role in
shaping the Pacific West. In the process, they have reshaped themselves, as
individuals and as communities. Through their mercantile networks and cultural
innovations, their philanthropic institutions and political leadership, western
Jews created a distinctive identity. Using historical photographs >from her new book
Ellen Eisenberg will explore the nature of the Jewish experience in Seattle,
Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the small towns of the West. She will
explain the important differences among these cities, as well as highlighting the
ways in which the western Jewish experience has echoed and deviated >from the
familiar story of American Jewish history.

About our Speaker: Ellen Eisenberg
Ellen Eisenberg has taught in the History Department at Willamette University since
1990, and was appointed Dwight and Margaret Lear Professor of American History in
2003. She holds a B.A. in American Studies >from Carleton College and a Ph.D. in
History >from the University of Pennsylvania.Her current scholarship centers on Jews
in the Pacific West and their relationships with other ethnic groups. Her
publications include Jewish Agricultural Colonies in New Jersey, 1882-1920;
chapters in the anthologies Jewish Life in the American West and California Jews,
and journal articles and monographs. The First to Cry Down Injustice? Western Jews
and Japanese Removal during WWII was a National Jewish Book Award finalist. Jews of
the Pacific Coast: Reinventing Community on America's Edge, co-authored with Ava
Kahn and Bill Toll, was released by the University of Washington Press earlier this
year.

Time: Doors open by 1:00 pm for expert assistance with your genealogy problems.
You are invited to send a short synopsis of your issue ahead of time to
jgsoregon@gmail.com. Program will start at 1:30.

Admission is free to members of JGSO, $5 donation requested >from non-members (can
be applied to cost of membership if you join at the time).

For more information contact Barbara Hershey, President/Program Chair at
jgsoregon@gmail.com. The JGSO website has information about the organization and
genealogy tools http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~orjgs/.


Help finding lost relatives pays off... they are found! #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Just yesterday I posted a list of advice, ideas and links to help finding
lost relatives.

I must say that I omitted perhaps two of the most important secrets to
success that were the payoff for me.... 1) When you are stuck, discuss the
problem with others and 2) Don't overlook the little details.

As I began following up on the different suggestions, I wrote an email to
the phenomenal Renee Steinig who was one of the people who offered her help.
She had asked questions in her response to me that brought up other
questions and I sent her my answers, anxious to hear her response. I sent
them out to her at 1 am my time (in Israel), hoping that her response might
provide a new way of looking at things.

When I woke up at 7 am (and naturally checked my email right away - only
second to brushing my teeth), her detailed response not only provided new
ideas, she actually found my dad's second cousin for me! She didn't realize
it at the time but her help led me to the key to the entire family.

I know that you are anxious to hear what magic she used so that you can use
it too. It was exactly as I had listed in the previous email... she used a
variety of websites, moving back and forth between sites, as one piece of
information led to another.

Which brings me to the second secret I alluded to above. When she
re-reviewed one of the censuses, she noticed that one of the brothers had a
middle initial. Meyer S. Levy was now somewhat different >from the other
hundreds of Meyer Levys that were listed in the databases. She returned to
Ancestry.com and found a WWII draft record for Meyer S. with a matching
birth year and lo and behold, his next of kin was Isaac J. Levy, another
brother that I had been looking for!

Now Isaac wasn't only Isaac but he was Isaac J. and she found his draft card
too! His next of kin was his son Norman Levy.

Back to the censuses, she sought out an Isaac Levy with son Norman and found
them, along with the name of Isaac's wife, Esther, and their other 3
children, along with years of marriage and ages. With the year of marriage
she could then searching marriage records (I assume that it was the groom's
list search) and find Esther's maiden name.

The New York Times obituaries provided invaluable information whereas they
mentioned the names of the kids and married names of the daughters.
Norman's sister's married name now known to us, her obituary revealed her
children and city of residence. The telephone book gave me their addresses
and telephone numbers!

It looks quite simple on paper (or on email) but it is nothing less than amazing.

What is more, when I called this 80 or so year old woman, she revealed to me
that I was extremely lucky to find her of all the relatives since she is
really the only one interested in the extended family and the only one who
really knows the names of all the relatives. When her mother had died 17
years ago, she was left a large envelope of photos marked "Boston Levys" (my
branch of the family), but she never knew who the people were. Now I can
identify all the characters for her.

The conversation was emotional and excited and we plan to continue on skype
so that we can see each other too.

A great miracle has happened here.... After more than 20 years that I was
convinced that I would never know that side of my family, they were
"uncovered" in a week, but mostly in one night, while I slept!

Thanks again for all your help. (I really wanted to share the success with
all those who took the time to help.) Thanks again to Renee Steinig.
I hope that you all have learned a good lesson.... again, use friends and
give your children middle names!!!

Elizabeth Levy Mevassaret Zion, Israel


German SIG #Germany Help finding lost relatives pays off... they are found! #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Just yesterday I posted a list of advice, ideas and links to help finding
lost relatives.

I must say that I omitted perhaps two of the most important secrets to
success that were the payoff for me.... 1) When you are stuck, discuss the
problem with others and 2) Don't overlook the little details.

As I began following up on the different suggestions, I wrote an email to
the phenomenal Renee Steinig who was one of the people who offered her help.
She had asked questions in her response to me that brought up other
questions and I sent her my answers, anxious to hear her response. I sent
them out to her at 1 am my time (in Israel), hoping that her response might
provide a new way of looking at things.

When I woke up at 7 am (and naturally checked my email right away - only
second to brushing my teeth), her detailed response not only provided new
ideas, she actually found my dad's second cousin for me! She didn't realize
it at the time but her help led me to the key to the entire family.

I know that you are anxious to hear what magic she used so that you can use
it too. It was exactly as I had listed in the previous email... she used a
variety of websites, moving back and forth between sites, as one piece of
information led to another.

Which brings me to the second secret I alluded to above. When she
re-reviewed one of the censuses, she noticed that one of the brothers had a
middle initial. Meyer S. Levy was now somewhat different >from the other
hundreds of Meyer Levys that were listed in the databases. She returned to
Ancestry.com and found a WWII draft record for Meyer S. with a matching
birth year and lo and behold, his next of kin was Isaac J. Levy, another
brother that I had been looking for!

Now Isaac wasn't only Isaac but he was Isaac J. and she found his draft card
too! His next of kin was his son Norman Levy.

Back to the censuses, she sought out an Isaac Levy with son Norman and found
them, along with the name of Isaac's wife, Esther, and their other 3
children, along with years of marriage and ages. With the year of marriage
she could then searching marriage records (I assume that it was the groom's
list search) and find Esther's maiden name.

The New York Times obituaries provided invaluable information whereas they
mentioned the names of the kids and married names of the daughters.
Norman's sister's married name now known to us, her obituary revealed her
children and city of residence. The telephone book gave me their addresses
and telephone numbers!

It looks quite simple on paper (or on email) but it is nothing less than amazing.

What is more, when I called this 80 or so year old woman, she revealed to me
that I was extremely lucky to find her of all the relatives since she is
really the only one interested in the extended family and the only one who
really knows the names of all the relatives. When her mother had died 17
years ago, she was left a large envelope of photos marked "Boston Levys" (my
branch of the family), but she never knew who the people were. Now I can
identify all the characters for her.

The conversation was emotional and excited and we plan to continue on skype
so that we can see each other too.

A great miracle has happened here.... After more than 20 years that I was
convinced that I would never know that side of my family, they were
"uncovered" in a week, but mostly in one night, while I slept!

Thanks again for all your help. (I really wanted to share the success with
all those who took the time to help.) Thanks again to Renee Steinig.
I hope that you all have learned a good lesson.... again, use friends and
give your children middle names!!!

Elizabeth Levy Mevassaret Zion, Israel


AGAD archives. (also help translating letter I received from them) #galicia

Philip Rosinsky
 

Hello

I am planning a visit March 7th to Warsaw and would like to visit
AGAD. I wanted to research fonds 300 and 424 regarding BMD
records >from Eastern Galicia.

Do I need to order a certain section of these fonds or just the
fond in general? (I didn't see any specific section for the relevant
towns I'm researching.)

Is there anyone with experience at this archive that could advise
me on the best method to go by? I don't want to waste time in
Warsaw waiting for these records.

Could someone please help me understand the process of
ordering records in advance?

I tried ordering the files online but after submitting the request
was forwarded to a site that looked unrelated to the archive so I
wasn't sure if the order had worked.

I sent them a letter notifying them of my request (I translated it
with google) and received the following letter. (I tried translating
it with google but the result wasn't that clear.):

Szanowny Panie
uprzejmie informujrmy , ze zbiory Archiwum Glownego Akt
Dawnych sa ogolnie dostepne. Aby skorzystac z archiwaliow
nalezy przeslac z dwudniowym wyprzedzeniem wypelnione
rewersy on line na interesujace Pana jednostki archiwalne.
Inwentarze ksiag metrykalnych gmin wyznania mojzeszowego
i akt gmin wyznania mojzeszowego znajduja sie na naszej
stronie internetowej, w zakladce inwentarze. Wypelniony rewers
nalezy wyslac z zakladki Pracownia Naukowa. Szczegolowe
zasady korzystania i udostepniania zbiorow znajdzie Pan na
naszej stronie, w zakladce Pracownia Naukowa
Z powazaniem

Philip Rosinsky


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia AGAD archives. (also help translating letter I received from them) #galicia

Philip Rosinsky
 

Hello

I am planning a visit March 7th to Warsaw and would like to visit
AGAD. I wanted to research fonds 300 and 424 regarding BMD
records >from Eastern Galicia.

Do I need to order a certain section of these fonds or just the
fond in general? (I didn't see any specific section for the relevant
towns I'm researching.)

Is there anyone with experience at this archive that could advise
me on the best method to go by? I don't want to waste time in
Warsaw waiting for these records.

Could someone please help me understand the process of
ordering records in advance?

I tried ordering the files online but after submitting the request
was forwarded to a site that looked unrelated to the archive so I
wasn't sure if the order had worked.

I sent them a letter notifying them of my request (I translated it
with google) and received the following letter. (I tried translating
it with google but the result wasn't that clear.):

Szanowny Panie
uprzejmie informujrmy , ze zbiory Archiwum Glownego Akt
Dawnych sa ogolnie dostepne. Aby skorzystac z archiwaliow
nalezy przeslac z dwudniowym wyprzedzeniem wypelnione
rewersy on line na interesujace Pana jednostki archiwalne.
Inwentarze ksiag metrykalnych gmin wyznania mojzeszowego
i akt gmin wyznania mojzeszowego znajduja sie na naszej
stronie internetowej, w zakladce inwentarze. Wypelniony rewers
nalezy wyslac z zakladki Pracownia Naukowa. Szczegolowe
zasady korzystania i udostepniania zbiorow znajdzie Pan na
naszej stronie, w zakladce Pracownia Naukowa
Z powazaniem

Philip Rosinsky


Re: Two brothers with same name? #general

Dubin, David M. MD
 

Two things:
1- Marc Jacobson is right that the person's two names together are what constitutes
a name, so the names are not strictly the same. Some families shy away >from
repeating any part of a name, but many do not.
2- Abraham may not be the same as Abe, as it's likely that "Abe" was pronounced
"Abba". Now, Abba may ultimately derive >from Abraham, but in the Yiddish world, the
two names are distinct.Hope this helps.

David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ

Researching: GESTETNER, GOMPERTZ, HAUSER/LINK/ZUCKMAN/FELDMAN (Slovakia), STEINER
(Hungary), WEISS (Bratislava, Slovakia & Kochel, Germany), COHEN (Myszyniec area,
Poland), KATZ (Pultusk, Poland), WAJSTUCH (Pinczow, Poland), NUSYNOWICZ (BUSKO,
Poland), REDER/KLURGLUS (Mel'nitsa, Ukraine), HERSCHENHORN (Zamosc, Poland),
RAYNORMAN (Zamosc & Miedzerzyc Podlaski, Poland), HALPERN/KRONGOLD (Ustilug &
Ludmir - Vladimir Volynskij, Ukraine), WAJS(MAN) (Kremenec, Ukraine), BERGER/LERNER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Two brothers with same name? #general

Dubin, David M. MD
 

Two things:
1- Marc Jacobson is right that the person's two names together are what constitutes
a name, so the names are not strictly the same. Some families shy away >from
repeating any part of a name, but many do not.
2- Abraham may not be the same as Abe, as it's likely that "Abe" was pronounced
"Abba". Now, Abba may ultimately derive >from Abraham, but in the Yiddish world, the
two names are distinct.Hope this helps.

David Dubin
Teaneck, NJ

Researching: GESTETNER, GOMPERTZ, HAUSER/LINK/ZUCKMAN/FELDMAN (Slovakia), STEINER
(Hungary), WEISS (Bratislava, Slovakia & Kochel, Germany), COHEN (Myszyniec area,
Poland), KATZ (Pultusk, Poland), WAJSTUCH (Pinczow, Poland), NUSYNOWICZ (BUSKO,
Poland), REDER/KLURGLUS (Mel'nitsa, Ukraine), HERSCHENHORN (Zamosc, Poland),
RAYNORMAN (Zamosc & Miedzerzyc Podlaski, Poland), HALPERN/KRONGOLD (Ustilug &
Ludmir - Vladimir Volynskij, Ukraine), WAJS(MAN) (Kremenec, Ukraine), BERGER/LERNER


Kamenets Podolsky archives in Ukraine #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Rees Chapman asked: Does anybody know what the status of this (the Kamenets Podolsk
fire, smoke and water damaged) archive might be?

In August of 2009, whilst developing research about Kamenets Podolsk leading to the
launch of the ShtetLinks site for the city (which can be seen at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy/ ), I posted the following
on the Ukraine SIG Digest:

"I can advise that the Kamenets Podolsk (Kamianets-Podilskyi) archive is currently
stored at the address below:

Archives of Khmelnytskyi Oblast [Derzhavnyi arkhiv Khmelnytskoi oblasti]
99 Hrushevsky st.,
29000 Khmelnytskyi
Ukraine Republic

Tel: +38(0382) 76-47-39, 79-27-74

I have been informed by a senior archivist at the Central State Archive in Kiev
that the KP archives are partially restored and partially catalogued but are only
accessible through direct contact with the local archive (the data or references
are not on-line). I have written to the Khmelnytskyi archive a couple of times but
have not got a reply. I have not telephoned them - I do not speak Ukrainian or
Russian - but my guess is that this is the best way of getting a response.

Is there anyone within the group who has had success contacting this archive or can
advise of a reliable Ukrainian researcher who would undertake basic research?"

from this appeal I received a number of very helpful replies which confirmed that
individual 'local' researchers had been successfully commissioned by Genners to do
research into the Kamenets archives held in Khmelnytskyi, which they had had to
undertake by personally visiting the archives. However, at that time no external
requests (that is those >from outside the Ukraine) had managed to get material by
direct request via either land mail or email. For those interested in the names of
recommended Eastern European researchers the list at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm, is very useful.

That situation applied 18 months ago, so things may have improved.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kamenets Podolsky archives in Ukraine #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Rees Chapman asked: Does anybody know what the status of this (the Kamenets Podolsk
fire, smoke and water damaged) archive might be?

In August of 2009, whilst developing research about Kamenets Podolsk leading to the
launch of the ShtetLinks site for the city (which can be seen at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy/ ), I posted the following
on the Ukraine SIG Digest:

"I can advise that the Kamenets Podolsk (Kamianets-Podilskyi) archive is currently
stored at the address below:

Archives of Khmelnytskyi Oblast [Derzhavnyi arkhiv Khmelnytskoi oblasti]
99 Hrushevsky st.,
29000 Khmelnytskyi
Ukraine Republic

Tel: +38(0382) 76-47-39, 79-27-74

I have been informed by a senior archivist at the Central State Archive in Kiev
that the KP archives are partially restored and partially catalogued but are only
accessible through direct contact with the local archive (the data or references
are not on-line). I have written to the Khmelnytskyi archive a couple of times but
have not got a reply. I have not telephoned them - I do not speak Ukrainian or
Russian - but my guess is that this is the best way of getting a response.

Is there anyone within the group who has had success contacting this archive or can
advise of a reliable Ukrainian researcher who would undertake basic research?"

from this appeal I received a number of very helpful replies which confirmed that
individual 'local' researchers had been successfully commissioned by Genners to do
research into the Kamenets archives held in Khmelnytskyi, which they had had to
undertake by personally visiting the archives. However, at that time no external
requests (that is those >from outside the Ukraine) had managed to get material by
direct request via either land mail or email. For those interested in the names of
recommended Eastern European researchers the list at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/researchers.htm, is very useful.

That situation applied 18 months ago, so things may have improved.

Martin Davis - London (UK)


Help translating a gravestone ViewMate 17660 #germany

Michael Marx <mhmarx@...>
 

I have posted on view mate a picture of the gravestone of my great
grandfather Max HESS:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17660
The grave is in the Jewish cemetery in Mingolsheim, Baden, Germany.

I would appreciate a translation. I am curious why the tombstone does not
have the symbol of the Cohanim.

With thanks, Michael Marx mhmmarx@alum.mit.edu


German SIG #Germany Help translating a gravestone ViewMate 17660 #germany

Michael Marx <mhmarx@...>
 

I have posted on view mate a picture of the gravestone of my great
grandfather Max HESS:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=17660
The grave is in the Jewish cemetery in Mingolsheim, Baden, Germany.

I would appreciate a translation. I am curious why the tombstone does not
have the symbol of the Cohanim.

With thanks, Michael Marx mhmmarx@alum.mit.edu


Two Brothers with the Same Name #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Hi All,

There are two possibilities: One has already been posted, namely that two brothers
were named for two different family members, each having Abraham as part of their
name. The other possibilities is that these are not brothers but have another
family relationship. Often the father's name was used as a second name, especially
where several cousins had the same first name and the same family name. One famous
case is Rabbi Samson Repha'el Hirsch, whose middle name is his father's name. In
that case, you would have to go back and re-check the birth certificates of these
individuals. One possibiities is an orphaned child brought up by relatives as
another sibling...
All the best,
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Two Brothers with the Same Name #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Hi All,

There are two possibilities: One has already been posted, namely that two brothers
were named for two different family members, each having Abraham as part of their
name. The other possibilities is that these are not brothers but have another
family relationship. Often the father's name was used as a second name, especially
where several cousins had the same first name and the same family name. One famous
case is Rabbi Samson Repha'el Hirsch, whose middle name is his father's name. In
that case, you would have to go back and re-check the birth certificates of these
individuals. One possibiities is an orphaned child brought up by relatives as
another sibling...
All the best,
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem, Israel


Two Brothers Same Name #general

Varda Epstein <epavard@...>
 

Michael Kaplan wrote: <In researching my wife's ancestry I came across two brothers
who appear to share a name: Abraham Icek MANCZEK (b. 1872, d. 1932) and Szmul Abe
MANCZEK (b. 1879). Both brothere were born on Poland. Abraham was my wife's
grandfather, and he came to the United States. I have no further knowledge of
Szmul. I believe that in the Jewish tradition two brothers would not share a name.>

I have three similar cases in my mother's tree. In one case, there are two
brothers, born one after the other. The first died in infancy, so I suppose the
parents wanted a second chance to use that family name and gave it to the next son
down the line. This surprised me, because I would have thought the family would
avoid naming a child the same name as one who died early for "evil eye" reasons.
The couple did give that next son a different second name.

The father of those two sons was named Nachum Shlomo. He had a sister named
Nechama. Nachum and Nechama are masculine and feminine versions of the same name.
These two names share the same Hebrew root and meaning. I was surprised to find the
parents had given two siblings what are virtually the same name. They weren't twins
and I never discovered a reason for this unusual naming occurrence. Nachum Shlomo,
however, was always called Shlomo and maybe this was how the family avoided using
the same name (in practice) for both siblings. If I were to posit a reason for two
siblings with the same name, I'd guess they were named after deceased relatives
with those names. Perhaps one of those deceased relatives was on the maternal side,
the other on the paternal side. So they called Nachum Shlomo, Shlomo to avoid the
problem of calling them by the same name in practice. But that's just conjecture on
my part.

In the third instance (within the same tree), there were two brothers, one named
Gershon and one named Hirsch. In the Russian language, there is no "h" sound as
heard in "Hirsch" and a hard "g" is substituted for that sound. As a result,
Gershon and Hirsch were listed as Gersh and Girsch on the EIDB. When the two
brothers came to the States and adopted English names, they became "Harry" and
"Harold."

In the end, naming comes down to Jewish custom rather than Jewish law. Families can
have their own specific naming customs that may be specific to your own tree. The
reason behind an unusual naming may have died along with those who named the
individuals.
Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Two Brothers Same Name #general

Varda Epstein <epavard@...>
 

Michael Kaplan wrote: <In researching my wife's ancestry I came across two brothers
who appear to share a name: Abraham Icek MANCZEK (b. 1872, d. 1932) and Szmul Abe
MANCZEK (b. 1879). Both brothere were born on Poland. Abraham was my wife's
grandfather, and he came to the United States. I have no further knowledge of
Szmul. I believe that in the Jewish tradition two brothers would not share a name.>

I have three similar cases in my mother's tree. In one case, there are two
brothers, born one after the other. The first died in infancy, so I suppose the
parents wanted a second chance to use that family name and gave it to the next son
down the line. This surprised me, because I would have thought the family would
avoid naming a child the same name as one who died early for "evil eye" reasons.
The couple did give that next son a different second name.

The father of those two sons was named Nachum Shlomo. He had a sister named
Nechama. Nachum and Nechama are masculine and feminine versions of the same name.
These two names share the same Hebrew root and meaning. I was surprised to find the
parents had given two siblings what are virtually the same name. They weren't twins
and I never discovered a reason for this unusual naming occurrence. Nachum Shlomo,
however, was always called Shlomo and maybe this was how the family avoided using
the same name (in practice) for both siblings. If I were to posit a reason for two
siblings with the same name, I'd guess they were named after deceased relatives
with those names. Perhaps one of those deceased relatives was on the maternal side,
the other on the paternal side. So they called Nachum Shlomo, Shlomo to avoid the
problem of calling them by the same name in practice. But that's just conjecture on
my part.

In the third instance (within the same tree), there were two brothers, one named
Gershon and one named Hirsch. In the Russian language, there is no "h" sound as
heard in "Hirsch" and a hard "g" is substituted for that sound. As a result,
Gershon and Hirsch were listed as Gersh and Girsch on the EIDB. When the two
brothers came to the States and adopted English names, they became "Harry" and
"Harold."

In the end, naming comes down to Jewish custom rather than Jewish law. Families can
have their own specific naming customs that may be specific to your own tree. The
reason behind an unusual naming may have died along with those who named the
individuals.
Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


Re: How long from the Ukraine to Rotterdam in 1906? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Allan Jordan wrote
My great grandmother with her children left the central Ukraine -- >from the
area around the town of Bar or Litin -- in 1906 and sailed to America from
Rotterdam in April 1906. I am wondering what was involved in her trip?
Transportation was obviously accomplished by the railroad. There is for
orientation a link to the Russian Empire European part of railroad system at the
beginning of 20th century. http://1520mm.ru/intl/soft/files/2010/12/mapsross.jpg

As you can see system was already very well developed at the time of 1906
immigration of your ancestors. Immigrants >from the Baltic region (Lithuania,
Latvia, Estonia) and Belarus were travelling via Warsaw and Berlin, and >from
Eastern Ukraine via Galicia territory of the Austro-Hungarian Empire

To see detailed map of the modern Ukrainian railroads please visit this clickable
map. Please note that 80% of the current railroad system was already constructed
prior to WWI. http://www.railway.te.ua/map_all.htm

To calculate exact timing for the travel, one can actually check timetable for the
current travelling time, it did not change too much, probably 24 hours trip was
needed to complete the trip.

Railway cars were available in three classes, 1st, the most expensive 'soft class',
2nd, 'an intermediate's and 3rd, an 'economical'. For example tickets for travel
between Moscow and St Petersburg for a distance of 604 km cost in rubles: R16.00,
R9.60 and R6.40 for classes 1,2 and 3. (You can recalculate price for in Rubles per
1 km for the travelling distance >from Ukraine to Hamburg)

Again, for the orientation, there some wages for laborers in Russia at the
beginning of 20th century (Rubles/per month)Unskilled laborers: 20 - 35), highly
skilled laborers: 50-100, elementary school teacher: 25, feldsher: 37-55.

Those costs for the railway and for the steamer for their families were delivered
by fathers working hard in America. It took sometimes a few years to save money to
cover family trip to the States.

During travel nonperishable food was taken by passengers: kasha, boiled chicken and
eggs, bread, probably some local fruits and vegetables. Hot water and tea on the
train was available >from the conductor's samovar .

Alexander Sharon
Calngary, Alberta


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How long from the Ukraine to Rotterdam in 1906? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Allan Jordan wrote
My great grandmother with her children left the central Ukraine -- >from the
area around the town of Bar or Litin -- in 1906 and sailed to America from
Rotterdam in April 1906. I am wondering what was involved in her trip?
Transportation was obviously accomplished by the railroad. There is for
orientation a link to the Russian Empire European part of railroad system at the
beginning of 20th century. http://1520mm.ru/intl/soft/files/2010/12/mapsross.jpg

As you can see system was already very well developed at the time of 1906
immigration of your ancestors. Immigrants >from the Baltic region (Lithuania,
Latvia, Estonia) and Belarus were travelling via Warsaw and Berlin, and >from
Eastern Ukraine via Galicia territory of the Austro-Hungarian Empire

To see detailed map of the modern Ukrainian railroads please visit this clickable
map. Please note that 80% of the current railroad system was already constructed
prior to WWI. http://www.railway.te.ua/map_all.htm

To calculate exact timing for the travel, one can actually check timetable for the
current travelling time, it did not change too much, probably 24 hours trip was
needed to complete the trip.

Railway cars were available in three classes, 1st, the most expensive 'soft class',
2nd, 'an intermediate's and 3rd, an 'economical'. For example tickets for travel
between Moscow and St Petersburg for a distance of 604 km cost in rubles: R16.00,
R9.60 and R6.40 for classes 1,2 and 3. (You can recalculate price for in Rubles per
1 km for the travelling distance >from Ukraine to Hamburg)

Again, for the orientation, there some wages for laborers in Russia at the
beginning of 20th century (Rubles/per month)Unskilled laborers: 20 - 35), highly
skilled laborers: 50-100, elementary school teacher: 25, feldsher: 37-55.

Those costs for the railway and for the steamer for their families were delivered
by fathers working hard in America. It took sometimes a few years to save money to
cover family trip to the States.

During travel nonperishable food was taken by passengers: kasha, boiled chicken and
eggs, bread, probably some local fruits and vegetables. Hot water and tea on the
train was available >from the conductor's samovar .

Alexander Sharon
Calngary, Alberta


LONKA - Kaluszyn - Poland #general

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am writing on behalf of a Jean-Claude LONKA in France as he feels that his
written English would not enable him to express fully the contents of a posting.

All information received to this posting will be passed on to him.

LONKA - Kaluszyn - Poland.
Elie LONKA - patriach. His son was Yankel Kopel mentioned in the Duma elector
list 1907. Family were stonemasons/builders.

Yankel Kopel LONKA married Gental/Gella nee Epelbaum. Children - Joseph b 1920
in Warsaw, Chaim, Mendel, Elie, Reuben, Israel, Mirka Menura, Rachel. -

Kaluszyn.
Chaim (Jean-Claude's late father) believed he was the only survivor of the Shoah
until last year when Jean-Claude received information >from the USHM that his
uncle Joseph had not been murdered, in fact paperwork showed that he had been
deported to Mauthausen, liberated and then spent >from 1946-8 in Bad Reichenhall
Displaced Persons Camp, address 1L / 68 Bad Reichenhall, US zone. He also
attended the ORT school there to learn the trade of a locksmith.

On Feb. 8th 1948 an official form shows Joseph applying to emigrate to Palestine,
it was signed by a Dora Strassberg. However, there are no records in Israel
indicating that Joseph ever arrived. So where did he go?

Two cousins have been found - one in the USA where the surname was changed to LONKY
and another in Australia. Communication with the Australian cousin revealed that
yet another cousin lived in Israel, Meilich ,and his wife Ethel and Meilich's
brother Isaac all cousins are related through Jean-Claude's grand-fathers sibling
Abraham, all 3 are buried in the Herzlyia cemetery yet the Chevra Kadisha has no
information as to who arranged their funerals. The Australian cousin even has
photographs of this family unit.

Jean-Claude has written over 50 letters to organisations worldwide in the hope of
someone somewhere being able to assist him as to what happened to his Uncle Joseph,
who arranged the funerals of his cousins in Israel ( all Lonka families in the
Israeli tel. directory have been contacted, to no avail) and did any other members
of the LONKA family >from Kaluszyn survive. Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem have
also been thoroughly searched and a person called Ita HUS >from Petach Tikva gave
testimony to several members of the immediate family, however she cannot be traced,
even through the Chevra Kadisha. Again all HUS families have been contacted.

If anyone has knowledge of what happened to Joseph LONKA or any other members of
the LONKA family that may or may not have survived the Shoah please contact me
privately.

Thank you.
Patricia Wilson (Israel)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LONKA - Kaluszyn - Poland #general

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am writing on behalf of a Jean-Claude LONKA in France as he feels that his
written English would not enable him to express fully the contents of a posting.

All information received to this posting will be passed on to him.

LONKA - Kaluszyn - Poland.
Elie LONKA - patriach. His son was Yankel Kopel mentioned in the Duma elector
list 1907. Family were stonemasons/builders.

Yankel Kopel LONKA married Gental/Gella nee Epelbaum. Children - Joseph b 1920
in Warsaw, Chaim, Mendel, Elie, Reuben, Israel, Mirka Menura, Rachel. -

Kaluszyn.
Chaim (Jean-Claude's late father) believed he was the only survivor of the Shoah
until last year when Jean-Claude received information >from the USHM that his
uncle Joseph had not been murdered, in fact paperwork showed that he had been
deported to Mauthausen, liberated and then spent >from 1946-8 in Bad Reichenhall
Displaced Persons Camp, address 1L / 68 Bad Reichenhall, US zone. He also
attended the ORT school there to learn the trade of a locksmith.

On Feb. 8th 1948 an official form shows Joseph applying to emigrate to Palestine,
it was signed by a Dora Strassberg. However, there are no records in Israel
indicating that Joseph ever arrived. So where did he go?

Two cousins have been found - one in the USA where the surname was changed to LONKY
and another in Australia. Communication with the Australian cousin revealed that
yet another cousin lived in Israel, Meilich ,and his wife Ethel and Meilich's
brother Isaac all cousins are related through Jean-Claude's grand-fathers sibling
Abraham, all 3 are buried in the Herzlyia cemetery yet the Chevra Kadisha has no
information as to who arranged their funerals. The Australian cousin even has
photographs of this family unit.

Jean-Claude has written over 50 letters to organisations worldwide in the hope of
someone somewhere being able to assist him as to what happened to his Uncle Joseph,
who arranged the funerals of his cousins in Israel ( all Lonka families in the
Israeli tel. directory have been contacted, to no avail) and did any other members
of the LONKA family >from Kaluszyn survive. Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem have
also been thoroughly searched and a person called Ita HUS >from Petach Tikva gave
testimony to several members of the immediate family, however she cannot be traced,
even through the Chevra Kadisha. Again all HUS families have been contacted.

If anyone has knowledge of what happened to Joseph LONKA or any other members of
the LONKA family that may or may not have survived the Shoah please contact me
privately.

Thank you.
Patricia Wilson (Israel)

195241 - 195260 of 661986