Date   

1860's Immigration Records for Savannah, South Carolina #general

Meron LAVIE <lavie@...>
 

Hi all,

According to "family legend", my GGF immigrated >from Prussia to Savannah,
South Carolina around 1866-1867.

Does anyone know how I could try to search for any record/evidence of his
immigration? I can't find any on-line index of immigration records, or any
records of any organizations which may have aided him or taken him in after
his arrival.

TIA,

Meron Lavie


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1860's Immigration Records for Savannah, South Carolina #general

Meron LAVIE <lavie@...>
 

Hi all,

According to "family legend", my GGF immigrated >from Prussia to Savannah,
South Carolina around 1866-1867.

Does anyone know how I could try to search for any record/evidence of his
immigration? I can't find any on-line index of immigration records, or any
records of any organizations which may have aided him or taken him in after
his arrival.

TIA,

Meron Lavie


Re: Testing for relationships #dna

Judy Simon
 

On Sat, Apr 23, 2011 at 11:58 AM, Janet Akaha <Akaha@comcast.net> wrote:
My brother did Family Finder initially after convincing a likely but not
confirmed relative to also do Family Finder. Our likely relative is a
PERLZWEIG, and my grandmother was also a PERLZWEIG. Family finder has
pegged us as 4th cousins and our largest block is 14.73 cM on the 16th
chromosomes. Now *if* we can assume that this block came >from a common
PERLZWEIG ancestor, wouldn't it also follow that anyone who also overlaps us
at this exact location would also share that same ancestor?
Not necessarily. Each chromosome segment consists of material you
inherited >from your mother and your father. When someone matches you
on that segment, they are technically "half-identical" and hence, some
of us refer to matching segments as "half-identical" regions. Two
people can "share" the same segment with you, but they might not share
it with each other. Before you can conclude that two people who share
the same segment with you all have the same common ancestor, you must
first find out if they share that segment with each other. It could
happen that one of them is half-identical with you on the part you
inherited >from your father, and the other is half-identical with you
on the part you inherited >from your mother. On any given segment, if
each of them matches you *and* they match each other, then all three
of you have a common ancestor >from which you inherited that particular
segment.

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY
researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI, BAILENSON,
RAPPAPORT, PASSMAN >from Latvia; LEFKOWITZ, KELMER, OLSTEIN, MEZELSOR,
CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER >from the Lodz area, Poland


DNA Research #DNA Re: Testing for relationships #dna

Judy Simon
 

On Sat, Apr 23, 2011 at 11:58 AM, Janet Akaha <Akaha@comcast.net> wrote:
My brother did Family Finder initially after convincing a likely but not
confirmed relative to also do Family Finder. Our likely relative is a
PERLZWEIG, and my grandmother was also a PERLZWEIG. Family finder has
pegged us as 4th cousins and our largest block is 14.73 cM on the 16th
chromosomes. Now *if* we can assume that this block came >from a common
PERLZWEIG ancestor, wouldn't it also follow that anyone who also overlaps us
at this exact location would also share that same ancestor?
Not necessarily. Each chromosome segment consists of material you
inherited >from your mother and your father. When someone matches you
on that segment, they are technically "half-identical" and hence, some
of us refer to matching segments as "half-identical" regions. Two
people can "share" the same segment with you, but they might not share
it with each other. Before you can conclude that two people who share
the same segment with you all have the same common ancestor, you must
first find out if they share that segment with each other. It could
happen that one of them is half-identical with you on the part you
inherited >from your father, and the other is half-identical with you
on the part you inherited >from your mother. On any given segment, if
each of them matches you *and* they match each other, then all three
of you have a common ancestor >from which you inherited that particular
segment.

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY
researching BROZGOL, KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKI, SKUTELSKI, BAILENSON,
RAPPAPORT, PASSMAN >from Latvia; LEFKOWITZ, KELMER, OLSTEIN, MEZELSOR,
CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER >from the Lodz area, Poland


Re: question on 1910 census #general

Joel Weintraub
 

The question on whether the enumerators were instructed to canvas an
apartment house in a particular order probably won't be answered by looking
at the enumerator instructions on the IPUMS website. Generally, IPUMS only
shows that part of their instructions that were devoted to how to fill out
the census form (schedule). There is usually a large number of sections for
enumerators (responsibilities, legal requirements, etc.) that are not shown
on the website. You would need to find an original instruction book for
that. I have such books for 1890, 1930 and 1940, but not for 1910. I know
that for the 1930 census, instructions were given for doing city blocks (do
all 4 sides before moving to the next physical block), but not for doing
units within an apartment complex. Although apartment complexes are
mentioned in the full instructions (for 1930 and 1940), there are no
instructions for the sequence of visiting units.

However, consider this. I have reports of census takers (enumerators)
quitting after one day on the job in New York City because they found their
apartment complexes lacked elevators, and they could not do the walking up
and down stairs. So let's say you are one of those (elderly?) enumerators.
Are you going to walk up all those stairs to the top floor, exhausted, and
start your enumerations? Or are you going to do it at a slower pace,
working >from the ground floor up? I think the answer is obvious, but
whether that actually happened is another matter.

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
http://members.cox.net/census1940/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: question on 1910 census #general

Joel Weintraub
 

The question on whether the enumerators were instructed to canvas an
apartment house in a particular order probably won't be answered by looking
at the enumerator instructions on the IPUMS website. Generally, IPUMS only
shows that part of their instructions that were devoted to how to fill out
the census form (schedule). There is usually a large number of sections for
enumerators (responsibilities, legal requirements, etc.) that are not shown
on the website. You would need to find an original instruction book for
that. I have such books for 1890, 1930 and 1940, but not for 1910. I know
that for the 1930 census, instructions were given for doing city blocks (do
all 4 sides before moving to the next physical block), but not for doing
units within an apartment complex. Although apartment complexes are
mentioned in the full instructions (for 1930 and 1940), there are no
instructions for the sequence of visiting units.

However, consider this. I have reports of census takers (enumerators)
quitting after one day on the job in New York City because they found their
apartment complexes lacked elevators, and they could not do the walking up
and down stairs. So let's say you are one of those (elderly?) enumerators.
Are you going to walk up all those stairs to the top floor, exhausted, and
start your enumerations? Or are you going to do it at a slower pace,
working >from the ground floor up? I think the answer is obvious, but
whether that actually happened is another matter.

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
http://members.cox.net/census1940/


Re: Publishing a tree online #general

Shelly Crane
 

Dear Avigdor,

You bring up a very important issue. Unfortunately, it's true nothing is
confidential anymore and our identities can be stolen with great ease.
Having been a victim of this event, I can tell you it's a nightmare.

I agree that the likelihood of this happening >from sending out our family
trees is probably negligible. I also think the anxiety factor (real or
imaged) isn't part of the equation. In my opinion, the focus should be
more about allowing each person the right to make a decision for themselves
and their minor children, as to what information is made public. We can
judge another person's thoughts on the matter any way we want, but it's still
their decision to make.

My solution out of respect to everyone's right to choose, is only provide
deceased names and everyone else, without their expressed permission, is
left generic. I even include my siblings and their children in that category.
Without their permission, they are simply "living males/females," on my
tree.

Happy Passover
Shelly Levin
USA
Poland (Lomza/Suwalki Gubernia): DANOWSKI, ELSHON, FABRYTZKI, FAJNTUCH,
FROMSON, GABELMAN, JAZINSKI, KUREJWOWSKI, LANGUS, LIPOWICZ, MILEWICZ,
WITKOWSKI.
Ukraine (Kiev area): BLAZ, KVACHINSKI, LEFELMAN, SHIFMAN, VOIDNIK,
Anywhere: FLASZTERSTEIN


Re: Publishing a tree online #general

Kenneth Packer
 

Avigdor,

Thank you for sharing with us. At one point or another, all of us go
through something like this when we take our genealogy hobby seriously.
Sometimes we are seen by family as a saint, we are praised for our work and
dedication, and thanked for bringing a family together that has been lost to
time. In 20 years, I have gone >from 125 names on the tree to 1957 names.
And sometimes we are seen at the bad guys, the destroyer of status quo, and
the one who uncovers the history a few want to forget. The tree has grown
from, not only my work and research, but work and contributions of countless
family members who have shared their stories and helped in the research. I
see myself as the scribe that keeps it all in one spot and makes sense of
all the information, putting it in some organized fashion.

I have been greeted with open arms, as I try to meet as many of the new
cousins I have found, and I have been shunned by a very few who say, "I got
along before I met you and can get along without you now," and "I don't want
to be part of this because you put a person on the tree I no longer like or
are no longer associated with." Luckily the latter are in the minority. I
see my role as recording family history. I try to be sensitive. I don't
put a value on that history. I know most of it will be good and amazing and
some of it will be sad. But it is our history, and future generations
should know about it.

I am not writing a novel, a play, or a movie script. Our Family Tree and
Database is for family members only. And I only give it to family members.
Yes, because some of the information may be sensitive to a few, for now, I
choose not to put the tree on the internet, where it is public information
in one location. When family members want a copy of the tree and the
database, which takes over 250 pages to print, I ask for help to pay for the
printing and shipping. Most are willing to help, and are amazed by the book
they receive.

Keep going on your journey. Mine has been amazing.

Best wishes,

Ken Packer

Researching: PEKER, PACKER, BECKER, >from anywhere in the Ukraine, especially
towns within a 200 mile radius >from Kiev (Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan,
Brusilov, Khordorkev, Rudni, etc.).

Kenneth L. Packer
Washingtonville, NY 10992
(E-mail) packer18@earthlink.net


Re: Publishing a tree online #general

Daniel Kester
 

On 4/22/2011 10:15 AM, Avigdor Ben-Dov wrote:
I have assembled data on over 1000 family members and spouses with many
photos and finally published it online... Are people naturally paranoid?
I have published an extensive family tree online
(www.thekesters.net/Genealogy/Home.html) and have faced this issue. I
have chosen to include everyone, but I limit data for living people to
name and birth year.

I have found that the response depends on demographics: mainly age and
location.

Younger people (under 40) generally have no problem with it. This is
the "Facebook generation". They not only have no problem with having
information about themselves online; they expect it. They will email
me if they have been left off, asking to be added. The problems come
from the over-60 or over-70 year olds, who are used to more privacy in
their lives. Their concerns are two-fold: identity theft and general
privacy. I explain to them that any waiter who has seen their credit
card has more useful information for stealing their identity than can
be gotten >from a genealogical site. As far as the general issue of
personal privacy, this is 2011, not 1960. Like it or not, information
about us is all over the internet; it is unrealistic to pretend that we
can preserve online anonymity by not being included on genealogical
sites. That said, if someone does complain I will remove their names
right away. One factor preventing the age issue >from becoming much of a
problem is that the older people rarely find my site unless it is
pointed out to them; they don't search for themselves the way younger
people do.

As far as location, there is a difference between North Americans and
Europeans, with North Americans having much less of an issue with being
listed online than Europeans (I'm not sure where Israelis fit in). While
Americans will be paranoid about what the government knows about them,
they have less concerns about what the public knows. For Europeans it is
the reverse: they routinely share all kinds of personal details (such as
registering their televisions) with government bureaucracies, but recoil
at having the general public know much about them. Randy Schoenberg
(moderator of the Austro-Czech SIG) wrote a very interesting post about
this, which can be found here:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigsview~139258~public+privacy~332;7
(JewishGen log-in required) or do a search of the Austria-Czech SIG
archives for "Schoenberg privacy issues".

A third group with serious concerns about information being put online are
some Holocaust survivors. While I think their concerns are unfounded (in
the 2011 world), I understand where they are coming from, and will of
course not list them if they request that.

Despite upsetting the occasional person (and it is fairly rare) I continue
to post my data. The people who are very happy and excited to find it far
outnumber those who object. Posting the names of living persons allows
people to find themselves (through internet searches) and also allows them
to see who and where their relatives are.

Daniel Kester
Buffalo, NY, USA

geneo@thekesters.net
www.thekesters.net/Genealogy


seeking property records in Viseu de Jos & Viseu de Sus #romania

dkatz@...
 

Hello:
I am seeking records of real estate properties (home, business, land)
owned by my family in Viseu de Jos and Viseu de Sus prior to deportation
in 1944 . Any leads as to how to retrieve them will be greatly
appreciated.
Thank you.
D.

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen requires that all messages be signed with
your full name and place of residence (City, State, or Country).
Please do that in the future or your message will be deleted.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing a tree online #general

Shelly Crane
 

Dear Avigdor,

You bring up a very important issue. Unfortunately, it's true nothing is
confidential anymore and our identities can be stolen with great ease.
Having been a victim of this event, I can tell you it's a nightmare.

I agree that the likelihood of this happening >from sending out our family
trees is probably negligible. I also think the anxiety factor (real or
imaged) isn't part of the equation. In my opinion, the focus should be
more about allowing each person the right to make a decision for themselves
and their minor children, as to what information is made public. We can
judge another person's thoughts on the matter any way we want, but it's still
their decision to make.

My solution out of respect to everyone's right to choose, is only provide
deceased names and everyone else, without their expressed permission, is
left generic. I even include my siblings and their children in that category.
Without their permission, they are simply "living males/females," on my
tree.

Happy Passover
Shelly Levin
USA
Poland (Lomza/Suwalki Gubernia): DANOWSKI, ELSHON, FABRYTZKI, FAJNTUCH,
FROMSON, GABELMAN, JAZINSKI, KUREJWOWSKI, LANGUS, LIPOWICZ, MILEWICZ,
WITKOWSKI.
Ukraine (Kiev area): BLAZ, KVACHINSKI, LEFELMAN, SHIFMAN, VOIDNIK,
Anywhere: FLASZTERSTEIN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Publishing a tree online #general

Kenneth Packer
 

Avigdor,

Thank you for sharing with us. At one point or another, all of us go
through something like this when we take our genealogy hobby seriously.
Sometimes we are seen by family as a saint, we are praised for our work and
dedication, and thanked for bringing a family together that has been lost to
time. In 20 years, I have gone >from 125 names on the tree to 1957 names.
And sometimes we are seen at the bad guys, the destroyer of status quo, and
the one who uncovers the history a few want to forget. The tree has grown
from, not only my work and research, but work and contributions of countless
family members who have shared their stories and helped in the research. I
see myself as the scribe that keeps it all in one spot and makes sense of
all the information, putting it in some organized fashion.

I have been greeted with open arms, as I try to meet as many of the new
cousins I have found, and I have been shunned by a very few who say, "I got
along before I met you and can get along without you now," and "I don't want
to be part of this because you put a person on the tree I no longer like or
are no longer associated with." Luckily the latter are in the minority. I
see my role as recording family history. I try to be sensitive. I don't
put a value on that history. I know most of it will be good and amazing and
some of it will be sad. But it is our history, and future generations
should know about it.

I am not writing a novel, a play, or a movie script. Our Family Tree and
Database is for family members only. And I only give it to family members.
Yes, because some of the information may be sensitive to a few, for now, I
choose not to put the tree on the internet, where it is public information
in one location. When family members want a copy of the tree and the
database, which takes over 250 pages to print, I ask for help to pay for the
printing and shipping. Most are willing to help, and are amazed by the book
they receive.

Keep going on your journey. Mine has been amazing.

Best wishes,

Ken Packer

Researching: PEKER, PACKER, BECKER, >from anywhere in the Ukraine, especially
towns within a 200 mile radius >from Kiev (Korostyshev, Zhitomer, Koristan,
Brusilov, Khordorkev, Rudni, etc.).

Kenneth L. Packer
Washingtonville, NY 10992
(E-mail) packer18@earthlink.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing a tree online #general

Daniel Kester
 

On 4/22/2011 10:15 AM, Avigdor Ben-Dov wrote:
I have assembled data on over 1000 family members and spouses with many
photos and finally published it online... Are people naturally paranoid?
I have published an extensive family tree online
(www.thekesters.net/Genealogy/Home.html) and have faced this issue. I
have chosen to include everyone, but I limit data for living people to
name and birth year.

I have found that the response depends on demographics: mainly age and
location.

Younger people (under 40) generally have no problem with it. This is
the "Facebook generation". They not only have no problem with having
information about themselves online; they expect it. They will email
me if they have been left off, asking to be added. The problems come
from the over-60 or over-70 year olds, who are used to more privacy in
their lives. Their concerns are two-fold: identity theft and general
privacy. I explain to them that any waiter who has seen their credit
card has more useful information for stealing their identity than can
be gotten >from a genealogical site. As far as the general issue of
personal privacy, this is 2011, not 1960. Like it or not, information
about us is all over the internet; it is unrealistic to pretend that we
can preserve online anonymity by not being included on genealogical
sites. That said, if someone does complain I will remove their names
right away. One factor preventing the age issue >from becoming much of a
problem is that the older people rarely find my site unless it is
pointed out to them; they don't search for themselves the way younger
people do.

As far as location, there is a difference between North Americans and
Europeans, with North Americans having much less of an issue with being
listed online than Europeans (I'm not sure where Israelis fit in). While
Americans will be paranoid about what the government knows about them,
they have less concerns about what the public knows. For Europeans it is
the reverse: they routinely share all kinds of personal details (such as
registering their televisions) with government bureaucracies, but recoil
at having the general public know much about them. Randy Schoenberg
(moderator of the Austro-Czech SIG) wrote a very interesting post about
this, which can be found here:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigsview~139258~public+privacy~332;7
(JewishGen log-in required) or do a search of the Austria-Czech SIG
archives for "Schoenberg privacy issues".

A third group with serious concerns about information being put online are
some Holocaust survivors. While I think their concerns are unfounded (in
the 2011 world), I understand where they are coming from, and will of
course not list them if they request that.

Despite upsetting the occasional person (and it is fairly rare) I continue
to post my data. The people who are very happy and excited to find it far
outnumber those who object. Posting the names of living persons allows
people to find themselves (through internet searches) and also allows them
to see who and where their relatives are.

Daniel Kester
Buffalo, NY, USA

geneo@thekesters.net
www.thekesters.net/Genealogy


Romania SIG #Romania seeking property records in Viseu de Jos & Viseu de Sus #romania

dkatz@...
 

Hello:
I am seeking records of real estate properties (home, business, land)
owned by my family in Viseu de Jos and Viseu de Sus prior to deportation
in 1944 . Any leads as to how to retrieve them will be greatly
appreciated.
Thank you.
D.

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen requires that all messages be signed with
your full name and place of residence (City, State, or Country).
Please do that in the future or your message will be deleted.


Publishing a tree online #general

Trudy Barch
 

I asked my family before I put the information online. 2 ladies
immediately contacted me and said *No*. I already had identity theft in my
life and once is more than enough.
People are paranoid today. I respected their wishes and have not put my
database online. They said I could put names only that would be OK. Hence
I am not growing as fast as I would like. Instead I send a PDF file to
anyone that would like it. As was said, genealogy does not cause 'identity
theft' as all that information is already online but people are still
afraid.

Trudy Barch,
Chicagoland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Publishing a tree online #general

Trudy Barch
 

I asked my family before I put the information online. 2 ladies
immediately contacted me and said *No*. I already had identity theft in my
life and once is more than enough.
People are paranoid today. I respected their wishes and have not put my
database online. They said I could put names only that would be OK. Hence
I am not growing as fast as I would like. Instead I send a PDF file to
anyone that would like it. As was said, genealogy does not cause 'identity
theft' as all that information is already online but people are still
afraid.

Trudy Barch,
Chicagoland


Re: Publishing a tree online #general

David Syner
 

I have a tree on the web. I use password protection. So only family that
gets the password >from me can enter. *None* of the site is
searchable -- meaning that if any one google a persons names within my family
tree website it would not come up. All the information stays private.

David Syner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Publishing a tree online #general

David Syner
 

I have a tree on the web. I use password protection. So only family that
gets the password >from me can enter. *None* of the site is
searchable -- meaning that if any one google a persons names within my family
tree website it would not come up. All the information stays private.

David Syner


Re: Sarina Roffé Elected to JewishGen Board of Governors #rabbinic

Enid Elton <enid.elton@...>
 

Dear Sarina
Welcome to the Board

The Board of Governors of JewishGen is pleased to announce
that Sarina Roffé, a respected family historian and journalist with a
background in communications and nonprofit management, has been elected
unanimously to a position on its Board.
--
Enid Elton


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Sarina Roffé Elected to JewishGen Board of Governors #rabbinic

Enid Elton <enid.elton@...>
 

Dear Sarina
Welcome to the Board

The Board of Governors of JewishGen is pleased to announce
that Sarina Roffé, a respected family historian and journalist with a
background in communications and nonprofit management, has been elected
unanimously to a position on its Board.
--
Enid Elton

194901 - 194920 of 668861