Date   

Berkovic restaurant/radio Prague #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIGgers,

John Berkeley of Warwick, UK had questions about a Restaurant named Rosenbaum in Prague and Czech
Radio's archives recently.

My 1938, 1939 and 1940 Prague telephone books list under the rubric "Restaurace" the following:
"Rosenbaum" [Prague] I., Dlouha tr. 41. It is not listed in the directory for 1931, and I do not have
any for the interceding years. There is no listing in the 1941 directory. Thus, either Rosenbaum's
was dissolved in late 1940/early 1941 or it was the effect of the authorities excluding Jews >from
having telephones at the time.

Dlouha trida 41 became Dlouha 33 (Lange Gasse 33) after the Nazis renamed and renumbered
Prague's streets (in 1940/41). The house's conscription number (cislo popisne) in what was then
Praha I-Stare Mesto is 731. This is the famous Beit HaAm, a very large building complex that
exists to this day, and which was the home to numerous Zionist institutions in the pre-war
period and even during the so-called Protectorate (e.g., the Palaestina Amt/Palestinsky urad,
the Keren Kajemet Lejisrael, etc.)

As for hospitality services, Rosenbaum had competitors in the Beit HaAm itself, such as the
famous cafe and restaurant Aschermann (owner Armin Rado, later murdered at Sobibor-Ossowa).
Around the back of the complex at Hastalska 20, the Jewish Community organized a restaurant
in December 1940 for middle-class people called the Mittelstandskueche/Stredostavovska
kuchyne. The mission of the latter was to provide food at reasonable prices, but catering to a
wealthier clientele than the Volkskueche/Lidova kuchyne (located elsewhere), which served those
the Nazis had driven into abject poverty.

Regrettably, I do not know which floor housed the restaurant Rosenbaum, however.

The Beit HaAm served as a warehouse for looted Jewish books after the closure of the Zionist i
nstitutions and the deportation of their staff (ca. 1942). As part of the building, the restaurant
Rosenbaum may also have served that purpose at the time.

Today, the Beit HaAm building is once again a vibrant address with a tourist hostel, the art gallery
and cafe NoD, the club Roxy and at least two restaurants. Regrettably, there is no memorial there
of the people or institutions it once housed.

As for Czech Radio's archives -- they do exist and can be found at this web address:
http://www.rozhlas.cz/archiv/oarchivu

Shalom and all the best,

Rick Pinard
Prague


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Berkovic restaurant/radio Prague #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIGgers,

John Berkeley of Warwick, UK had questions about a Restaurant named Rosenbaum in Prague and Czech
Radio's archives recently.

My 1938, 1939 and 1940 Prague telephone books list under the rubric "Restaurace" the following:
"Rosenbaum" [Prague] I., Dlouha tr. 41. It is not listed in the directory for 1931, and I do not have
any for the interceding years. There is no listing in the 1941 directory. Thus, either Rosenbaum's
was dissolved in late 1940/early 1941 or it was the effect of the authorities excluding Jews >from
having telephones at the time.

Dlouha trida 41 became Dlouha 33 (Lange Gasse 33) after the Nazis renamed and renumbered
Prague's streets (in 1940/41). The house's conscription number (cislo popisne) in what was then
Praha I-Stare Mesto is 731. This is the famous Beit HaAm, a very large building complex that
exists to this day, and which was the home to numerous Zionist institutions in the pre-war
period and even during the so-called Protectorate (e.g., the Palaestina Amt/Palestinsky urad,
the Keren Kajemet Lejisrael, etc.)

As for hospitality services, Rosenbaum had competitors in the Beit HaAm itself, such as the
famous cafe and restaurant Aschermann (owner Armin Rado, later murdered at Sobibor-Ossowa).
Around the back of the complex at Hastalska 20, the Jewish Community organized a restaurant
in December 1940 for middle-class people called the Mittelstandskueche/Stredostavovska
kuchyne. The mission of the latter was to provide food at reasonable prices, but catering to a
wealthier clientele than the Volkskueche/Lidova kuchyne (located elsewhere), which served those
the Nazis had driven into abject poverty.

Regrettably, I do not know which floor housed the restaurant Rosenbaum, however.

The Beit HaAm served as a warehouse for looted Jewish books after the closure of the Zionist i
nstitutions and the deportation of their staff (ca. 1942). As part of the building, the restaurant
Rosenbaum may also have served that purpose at the time.

Today, the Beit HaAm building is once again a vibrant address with a tourist hostel, the art gallery
and cafe NoD, the club Roxy and at least two restaurants. Regrettably, there is no memorial there
of the people or institutions it once housed.

As for Czech Radio's archives -- they do exist and can be found at this web address:
http://www.rozhlas.cz/archiv/oarchivu

Shalom and all the best,

Rick Pinard
Prague


For placement in Viewmate in Austria/Czech SIG PLEASE #austria-czech

Caryn
 

Dear Fellow J-Genners,
These photos were in a collection of unidentified Prinz/Engel/Chlamtatsch family photos.
The first photo was taken in England.  The woman on the right is Sofi ENGEL, the woman on the left
is unidentified.  The second and third photos were taken in the same studio in Vienna but not  
necessarily at the same time.  There seems to be facial similarities between the older woman and the
young mother.  The PRINZ/CHLAMTATSCH family, originally >from Holics, Czechoslovakia, went to live in
Vienna before WWII.  

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19661

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19670

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19671

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Caryn Levinson


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech For placement in Viewmate in Austria/Czech SIG PLEASE #austria-czech

Caryn
 

Dear Fellow J-Genners,
These photos were in a collection of unidentified Prinz/Engel/Chlamtatsch family photos.
The first photo was taken in England.  The woman on the right is Sofi ENGEL, the woman on the left
is unidentified.  The second and third photos were taken in the same studio in Vienna but not  
necessarily at the same time.  There seems to be facial similarities between the older woman and the
young mother.  The PRINZ/CHLAMTATSCH family, originally >from Holics, Czechoslovakia, went to live in
Vienna before WWII.  

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19661

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19670

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=19671

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Caryn Levinson


Re: Mistake or name change #austria-czech

Charles Mahler
 

Hello everybody
Elisabeth Stamminger-Sonnenfeld asked: is Israel and Izidor the same first
name ?
In one of my families at least 3 men named Israel were called Isidore or
Isi. And I know several other people who changed their initial Jewish name
Israel to the less specific Isidore.
Best regards
Charles Mahler Antwerp
Searching: MAHLER, LICHTMANN, MARGULIES, INTRATOR


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: Mistake or name change #austria-czech

Charles Mahler
 

Hello everybody
Elisabeth Stamminger-Sonnenfeld asked: is Israel and Izidor the same first
name ?
In one of my families at least 3 men named Israel were called Isidore or
Isi. And I know several other people who changed their initial Jewish name
Israel to the less specific Isidore.
Best regards
Charles Mahler Antwerp
Searching: MAHLER, LICHTMANN, MARGULIES, INTRATOR


information on Volozhin (Belarus) Yeshiva #general

David Laskin
 

I am researching my family (HaKohen in Yiddish, Kaganovich in
Russian), Cohenim scribes who were associated with the great Yeshiva
in Volozhin. I have read (in Yaffa Eliach's "There Once was a World")
that "Down to the present day, [the Volozhin Yeshiva] members have
remained among the most prominent of the Jewish intellectual elite."
I am eager to hear >from anyone who has family or intellectual ties to
this renowned institution. David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen information on Volozhin (Belarus) Yeshiva #general

David Laskin
 

I am researching my family (HaKohen in Yiddish, Kaganovich in
Russian), Cohenim scribes who were associated with the great Yeshiva
in Volozhin. I have read (in Yaffa Eliach's "There Once was a World")
that "Down to the present day, [the Volozhin Yeshiva] members have
remained among the most prominent of the Jewish intellectual elite."
I am eager to hear >from anyone who has family or intellectual ties to
this renowned institution. David Laskin, Seattle, WA


1795 Ostroh (Ostrog), Ukraine Census #general

mel@...
 

For those who may have had ancestors in the Ukrainian town of Ostroh
(Ostrog), photographs have been taken of the *entire* 1795 census.

The 1795 Census occurred before surnames were adopted, so it may not be
useful unless you have data on your 19th century ancestors. It lists
the occupation of the head of each household and the names of all
household occupants. The census consists of 550 pages, both in Polish
and in Russian.

If you are interested in joining the Ostroh Translation Group, please
e-mail me for further info.

(Please do not make individual translation requests as it will not be
possible to honor them.)

Mel Werbach
mel@...

Researching:
VERBUKH, HORENSTEIN, KANFER, KOMISAR, KORENBLIT >from Volhynia, Podolia
and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine; VERBUKH >from Moldova; AUZENBERG, RUBINSKI,
LEWINOWSKI, ABRAMSKI, BRODOWICZ, SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki guberniya, Poland;
MISHURSKI, GOLDBERG, MENDELSON >from Kovne guberniya, Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1795 Ostroh (Ostrog), Ukraine Census #general

mel@...
 

For those who may have had ancestors in the Ukrainian town of Ostroh
(Ostrog), photographs have been taken of the *entire* 1795 census.

The 1795 Census occurred before surnames were adopted, so it may not be
useful unless you have data on your 19th century ancestors. It lists
the occupation of the head of each household and the names of all
household occupants. The census consists of 550 pages, both in Polish
and in Russian.

If you are interested in joining the Ostroh Translation Group, please
e-mail me for further info.

(Please do not make individual translation requests as it will not be
possible to honor them.)

Mel Werbach
mel@...

Researching:
VERBUKH, HORENSTEIN, KANFER, KOMISAR, KORENBLIT >from Volhynia, Podolia
and Kiev guberniyas, Ukraine; VERBUKH >from Moldova; AUZENBERG, RUBINSKI,
LEWINOWSKI, ABRAMSKI, BRODOWICZ, SEJNENSKI >from Suwalki guberniya, Poland;
MISHURSKI, GOLDBERG, MENDELSON >from Kovne guberniya, Lithuania


Re: Birth record Furth, Bavaria 1862 #germany

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

There is a research group at the Nuremburg Archives and Furth is next door
to Nuremburg. They have extensive records.

Try writing to this person with the details that you have:

Mr. Gerhard Jochem
Stadtarchiv Nuernberg
Marientorgraben 8
90402 Nurnberg Germany

Rgds, Alan Kolnik North Bethesda, Maryland alan.kolnik@...


German SIG #Germany Re: Birth record Furth, Bavaria 1862 #germany

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

There is a research group at the Nuremburg Archives and Furth is next door
to Nuremburg. They have extensive records.

Try writing to this person with the details that you have:

Mr. Gerhard Jochem
Stadtarchiv Nuernberg
Marientorgraben 8
90402 Nurnberg Germany

Rgds, Alan Kolnik North Bethesda, Maryland alan.kolnik@...


Latvia SIG #Latvia Venstpils/ Windau. Marriage records from 1888 to 1904 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Venstpils/ Windau. Marriage records from 1888 to 1904 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Conference Recording Announcement #southafrica

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

We've arranged with the well-regarded, experienced digital media company
Conference Resource LLC to record at least 121 conference sessions and sell
those recordings during and after the conference. The recordings will be in
the versatile MP3 format (that runs on PCs, Macs, and any MP3 audio device
with a USB port). They will be issued in a plastic case with a custom
printed label. There are two ways to purchase the sessions that have been
approved for recording:

- Individual Sessions: in CD format at $9.95 each if purchased during
the conference, or $11.95 plus shipping and handling (S&H) after the
conference

- Full Set of Sessions: in Flash Drive format at $134 each if purchased
prior to the conference, $149 at the conference, or the same price plus S&H
after the conference.

Why buy such recordings? By having them, you can benefit even more >from the
conference and advance your family history research, as follows:

If you're attending the full conference – you can take part in other
conference events and still have access to sessions that occurred on the
day(s) or hours that you did other things (such as researching your roots at
the Resource Center, attending SIG or BOF meetings, networking, visiting
vendors, or enjoying film screenings and discussions with directors of
award-winning films). What a great way to flexibly plan your conference
week!

If you're attending part of the conference -- you can purchase individual
sessions that matter to you and were held on the day(s) you couldn't attend,
and listen to them at your own convenience.

If you weren't able to attend any part of the conference -- you can purchase
and listen at your own convenience to the session(s) that matter most to
you, or to the entire set of recorded conference sessions.

And all these options share three other key benefits --
1. You'll have ALL the spoken text of the speaker(s) at the sessions you've
chosen to purchase. That way, if you attended a session that was recorded,
and the notes you took during the session weren't clear or if you missed
something -- you can just listen to the session again, and verify or fill-in
those facts!

2. Another plus is that you'll also be able to listen to a session and a
given speaker more than once, if a concept you've heard isn't somehow clear
but is very important to you.

3. You'll also have these sessions and/or the full set of recorded sessions
as a reference tool in advancing your research, whenever it becomes helpful
to do so.

This conference's organizers didn't create the concept of selling recorded
sessions -- this has been a favorite purchase of conference attendees for
quite a few years, it's considered so valuable!

Contact conference Resource LLC at www.myconferenceresource.com, or look for
their sales table at the conference.

Remember - Online registration ends on July 31. Last chance to sign up for
all meal events and Embassy visits!

Save $$$ over on-site registration.

Marlene Bishow
Vic Cohen
Sue Isman
Co-chairs, 31st IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.dc2011.org
dc2011_conference@...


Conference Recording Announcement #courland #latvia

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

We've arranged with the well-regarded, experienced digital media company
Conference Resource LLC to record at least 121 conference sessions and sell
those recordings during and after the conference. The recordings will be in
the versatile MP3 format (that runs on PCs, Macs, and any MP3 audio device
with a USB port). They will be issued in a plastic case with a custom
printed label. There are two ways to purchase the sessions that have been
approved for recording:

- Individual Sessions: in CD format at $9.95 each if purchased during
the conference, or $11.95 plus shipping and handling (S&H) after the
conference

- Full Set of Sessions: in Flash Drive format at $134 each if purchased
prior to the conference, $149 at the conference, or the same price plus S&H
after the conference.

Why buy such recordings? By having them, you can benefit even more >from the
conference and advance your family history research, as follows:

If you're attending the full conference – you can take part in other
conference events and still have access to sessions that occurred on the
day(s) or hours that you did other things (such as researching your roots at
the Resource Center, attending SIG or BOF meetings, networking, visiting
vendors, or enjoying film screenings and discussions with directors of
award-winning films). What a great way to flexibly plan your conference
week!

If you're attending part of the conference -- you can purchase individual
sessions that matter to you and were held on the day(s) you couldn't attend,
and listen to them at your own convenience.

If you weren't able to attend any part of the conference -- you can purchase
and listen at your own convenience to the session(s) that matter most to
you, or to the entire set of recorded conference sessions.

And all these options share three other key benefits --
1. You'll have ALL the spoken text of the speaker(s) at the sessions you've
chosen to purchase. That way, if you attended a session that was recorded,
and the notes you took during the session weren't clear or if you missed
something -- you can just listen to the session again, and verify or fill-in
those facts!

2. Another plus is that you'll also be able to listen to a session and a
given speaker more than once, if a concept you've heard isn't somehow clear
but is very important to you.

3. You'll also have these sessions and/or the full set of recorded sessions
as a reference tool in advancing your research, whenever it becomes helpful
to do so.

This conference's organizers didn't create the concept of selling recorded
sessions -- this has been a favorite purchase of conference attendees for
quite a few years, it's considered so valuable!

Contact conference Resource LLC at www.myconferenceresource.com, or look for
their sales table at the conference.

Remember - Online registration ends on July 31. Last chance to sign up for
all meal events and Embassy visits!

Save $$$ over on-site registration.

Marlene Bishow
Vic Cohen
Sue Isman
Co-chairs, 31st IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.dc2011.org
dc2011_conference@...


Conference Recording Announcement #southafrica

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

We've arranged with the well-regarded, experienced digital media company
Conference Resource LLC to record at least 121 conference sessions and sell
those recordings during and after the conference. The recordings will be in
the versatile MP3 format (that runs on PCs, Macs, and any MP3 audio device
with a USB port). They will be issued in a plastic case with a custom
printed label. There are two ways to purchase the sessions that have been
approved for recording:

- Individual Sessions: in CD format at $9.95 each if purchased during
the conference, or $11.95 plus shipping and handling (S&H) after the
conference

- Full Set of Sessions: in Flash Drive format at $134 each if purchased
prior to the conference, $149 at the conference, or the same price plus S&H
after the conference.

Why buy such recordings? By having them, you can benefit even more >from the
conference and advance your family history research, as follows:

If you're attending the full conference – you can take part in other
conference events and still have access to sessions that occurred on the
day(s) or hours that you did other things (such as researching your roots at
the Resource Center, attending SIG or BOF meetings, networking, visiting
vendors, or enjoying film screenings and discussions with directors of
award-winning films). What a great way to flexibly plan your conference
week!

If you're attending part of the conference -- you can purchase individual
sessions that matter to you and were held on the day(s) you couldn't attend,
and listen to them at your own convenience.

If you weren't able to attend any part of the conference -- you can purchase
and listen at your own convenience to the session(s) that matter most to
you, or to the entire set of recorded conference sessions.

And all these options share three other key benefits --
1. You'll have ALL the spoken text of the speaker(s) at the sessions you've
chosen to purchase. That way, if you attended a session that was recorded,
and the notes you took during the session weren't clear or if you missed
something -- you can just listen to the session again, and verify or fill-in
those facts!

2. Another plus is that you'll also be able to listen to a session and a
given speaker more than once, if a concept you've heard isn't somehow clear
but is very important to you.

3. You'll also have these sessions and/or the full set of recorded sessions
as a reference tool in advancing your research, whenever it becomes helpful
to do so.

This conference's organizers didn't create the concept of selling recorded
sessions -- this has been a favorite purchase of conference attendees for
quite a few years, it's considered so valuable!

Contact conference Resource LLC at www.myconferenceresource.com, or look for
their sales table at the conference.

Remember - Online registration ends on July 31. Last chance to sign up for
all meal events and Embassy visits!

Save $$$ over on-site registration.

Marlene Bishow
Vic Cohen
Sue Isman
Co-chairs, 31st IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.dc2011.org
dc2011_conference@...


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Conference Recording Announcement #latvia #courland

31st IAJGS Conference <dc2011_conference@...>
 

We've arranged with the well-regarded, experienced digital media company
Conference Resource LLC to record at least 121 conference sessions and sell
those recordings during and after the conference. The recordings will be in
the versatile MP3 format (that runs on PCs, Macs, and any MP3 audio device
with a USB port). They will be issued in a plastic case with a custom
printed label. There are two ways to purchase the sessions that have been
approved for recording:

- Individual Sessions: in CD format at $9.95 each if purchased during
the conference, or $11.95 plus shipping and handling (S&H) after the
conference

- Full Set of Sessions: in Flash Drive format at $134 each if purchased
prior to the conference, $149 at the conference, or the same price plus S&H
after the conference.

Why buy such recordings? By having them, you can benefit even more >from the
conference and advance your family history research, as follows:

If you're attending the full conference – you can take part in other
conference events and still have access to sessions that occurred on the
day(s) or hours that you did other things (such as researching your roots at
the Resource Center, attending SIG or BOF meetings, networking, visiting
vendors, or enjoying film screenings and discussions with directors of
award-winning films). What a great way to flexibly plan your conference
week!

If you're attending part of the conference -- you can purchase individual
sessions that matter to you and were held on the day(s) you couldn't attend,
and listen to them at your own convenience.

If you weren't able to attend any part of the conference -- you can purchase
and listen at your own convenience to the session(s) that matter most to
you, or to the entire set of recorded conference sessions.

And all these options share three other key benefits --
1. You'll have ALL the spoken text of the speaker(s) at the sessions you've
chosen to purchase. That way, if you attended a session that was recorded,
and the notes you took during the session weren't clear or if you missed
something -- you can just listen to the session again, and verify or fill-in
those facts!

2. Another plus is that you'll also be able to listen to a session and a
given speaker more than once, if a concept you've heard isn't somehow clear
but is very important to you.

3. You'll also have these sessions and/or the full set of recorded sessions
as a reference tool in advancing your research, whenever it becomes helpful
to do so.

This conference's organizers didn't create the concept of selling recorded
sessions -- this has been a favorite purchase of conference attendees for
quite a few years, it's considered so valuable!

Contact conference Resource LLC at www.myconferenceresource.com, or look for
their sales table at the conference.

Remember - Online registration ends on July 31. Last chance to sign up for
all meal events and Embassy visits!

Save $$$ over on-site registration.

Marlene Bishow
Vic Cohen
Sue Isman
Co-chairs, 31st IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.dc2011.org
dc2011_conference@...


Updates on the All Galicia Database from Gesher Galicia #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia recently announced the launch of our new search engine,
The All Galicia Database, and already people are making discoveries
which are taking their research in entirely new directions.

The database is at: http://www.search.geshergalicia.org and features
172,954 records >from 41 different data sources, covering everything
from birth, death, marriage and divorce records to phone books, school
and landowner records, all >from the former Austro-Hungarian province
of Galicia.

A few additions and clarifications are in order:

I forgot to thank one very important member of our team.=A0Tony Kahane
of London, England, coordinated the extraordinary indexing work for
Zbaraz, Ukraine which is still continuing.=A0 Kudos to Tony!

Surnames in birth records--why are some missing?

When searching birth records, you'll notice many results with "No
Surname" listed.=A0 Many Galician marriages were religious ones, not
civil, and therefore not recognized by the=A0 Austrian government.
Consequently, the child would be registered as illegitimate and no
surname noted in the record.=A0 By looking at the parents surnames, you
can deduce the child's, but sometimes the father is missing >from the
record, and only the mother -- and mother's surname -- is listed, so
be sure to also search based on the maiden name.=A0 Also keep in mind
that many Galician children ended up keeping the mother's maiden name,
adding to the confusion.

Can I search/sort by town field? Can I limit my searches to certain years?

There is no search button by town or year, but after searching by
surname, when the results come up, look at the left-hand column.
Under "Record Sources" it will display the databases that have those
names and the number of results. By clicking on the town or database
of interest, the results will then be sorted by town. Under the
left-hand "Year" heading you can choose to view records for a specific
year. And don't forget to click on the + plus sign to view the
drop-down details on each record. The icon to the far right of each
record tells you quickly the record type.

Coming soon will be the following completed indexes:

Birth records for Zbarazh -- 1897 and 1899
Cadastral (Property) Records for Rohatyn -- 1846
Land records for Buczacz -- 1879
Land records for Grzymalow -- 19th Century
Land records for Krystynopol -- 1784
Residents of apartment buildings in the Jewish Quarter of Lviv -- late
19th and early 20th Centuries
School records for Zbarazh -- 1911-12; 1912-13; 1913-14; 1927-28

We are in the process of indexing data >from property, voter and land
records already obtained by Gesher Galicia, along with the remainder
of the still-being-transcribed birth, marriage, and death records from
Lviv...and more!

If your town is not listed, consider leading a town indexing project.
All of our data transcriptions were coordinate by volunteers. If you
are motivated, but unclear on how to go about coordinating a project,
get in touch with me and I will forward your request to one of our
Gesher Galicia leaders who can provide you with guidance.

Why should you check the All Galicia Database and be curious about
Galician records if your family came >from Russia or Congress Poland,
or Bukovina, Hungary, Bohemia or Romania?

The Jewish population moved around a lot, even in the 19th century.
Historically there was always a relationship between Hungary and
Galicia. Families >from Czernovitz routinely traveled to places like
Lviv (Lwow, Lemberg) or Brody. Bohemia and Moravia were part of the
same Austro-Hungarian Empire as Galicia and people traversed the land
surprisingly often for trade, match-making, and business. Train travel
was relatively easy then and sometimes en route to America or England
families left their place of birth for a temporary way-station in
other cities.

Sally Bruckheimer just wrote, after searching the AGD that there are
usually no "clear answers in genealogy." She believed that her LINDER
family had been >from Odessa and Berdichev, but found many people with
that surname living in Lviv, 350 miles away, so now she has new paths
to explore. Check out your surnames on the All Galicia Database, and
see where it might lead you too!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
http://www.search.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Updates on the All Galicia Database from Gesher Galicia #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia recently announced the launch of our new search engine,
The All Galicia Database, and already people are making discoveries
which are taking their research in entirely new directions.

The database is at: http://www.search.geshergalicia.org and features
172,954 records >from 41 different data sources, covering everything
from birth, death, marriage and divorce records to phone books, school
and landowner records, all >from the former Austro-Hungarian province
of Galicia.

A few additions and clarifications are in order:

I forgot to thank one very important member of our team.=A0Tony Kahane
of London, England, coordinated the extraordinary indexing work for
Zbaraz, Ukraine which is still continuing.=A0 Kudos to Tony!

Surnames in birth records--why are some missing?

When searching birth records, you'll notice many results with "No
Surname" listed.=A0 Many Galician marriages were religious ones, not
civil, and therefore not recognized by the=A0 Austrian government.
Consequently, the child would be registered as illegitimate and no
surname noted in the record.=A0 By looking at the parents surnames, you
can deduce the child's, but sometimes the father is missing >from the
record, and only the mother -- and mother's surname -- is listed, so
be sure to also search based on the maiden name.=A0 Also keep in mind
that many Galician children ended up keeping the mother's maiden name,
adding to the confusion.

Can I search/sort by town field? Can I limit my searches to certain years?

There is no search button by town or year, but after searching by
surname, when the results come up, look at the left-hand column.
Under "Record Sources" it will display the databases that have those
names and the number of results. By clicking on the town or database
of interest, the results will then be sorted by town. Under the
left-hand "Year" heading you can choose to view records for a specific
year. And don't forget to click on the + plus sign to view the
drop-down details on each record. The icon to the far right of each
record tells you quickly the record type.

Coming soon will be the following completed indexes:

Birth records for Zbarazh -- 1897 and 1899
Cadastral (Property) Records for Rohatyn -- 1846
Land records for Buczacz -- 1879
Land records for Grzymalow -- 19th Century
Land records for Krystynopol -- 1784
Residents of apartment buildings in the Jewish Quarter of Lviv -- late
19th and early 20th Centuries
School records for Zbarazh -- 1911-12; 1912-13; 1913-14; 1927-28

We are in the process of indexing data >from property, voter and land
records already obtained by Gesher Galicia, along with the remainder
of the still-being-transcribed birth, marriage, and death records from
Lviv...and more!

If your town is not listed, consider leading a town indexing project.
All of our data transcriptions were coordinate by volunteers. If you
are motivated, but unclear on how to go about coordinating a project,
get in touch with me and I will forward your request to one of our
Gesher Galicia leaders who can provide you with guidance.

Why should you check the All Galicia Database and be curious about
Galician records if your family came >from Russia or Congress Poland,
or Bukovina, Hungary, Bohemia or Romania?

The Jewish population moved around a lot, even in the 19th century.
Historically there was always a relationship between Hungary and
Galicia. Families >from Czernovitz routinely traveled to places like
Lviv (Lwow, Lemberg) or Brody. Bohemia and Moravia were part of the
same Austro-Hungarian Empire as Galicia and people traversed the land
surprisingly often for trade, match-making, and business. Train travel
was relatively easy then and sometimes en route to America or England
families left their place of birth for a temporary way-station in
other cities.

Sally Bruckheimer just wrote, after searching the AGD that there are
usually no "clear answers in genealogy." She believed that her LINDER
family had been >from Odessa and Berdichev, but found many people with
that surname living in Lviv, 350 miles away, so now she has new paths
to explore. Check out your surnames on the All Galicia Database, and
see where it might lead you too!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
http://www.search.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org

191741 - 191760 of 671993