Date   

Re: Family missing from 1920 US census #general

Hilary Henkin
 

First, you might try the City Directories if you have access. That might
confirm an address in 1920.

Either way, you may have to resort to the laborious browsing process. I
had a similar situation (for Los Angeles), and here's what I did:

I printed out current maps of the area, enlarged enough to write on.

Instead of doing a "search", I *browsed* the pages. This involves finding
the census by state, then city, then enumeration district. The website
provides lists of the EDs and their boundaries; this is where the maps
were handy. I drew the boundaries for each ED, and was finally able to
determine the ED for the block I wanted.

With that information, I was able to find the specific census pages, and
went through them block by block. It was painstaking, but in a way fun,
because I could actually retrace the path the enumerators took as they
walked the blocks.

I did eventually find my person. His name was misspelled on the Census,
and I never did figure out how he was indexed, because it certainly
wasn't any spelling I thought of!

Hilary Henkin
North Hollywood, California

On 10/12/2011 10:00 AM, David Scriven wrote:
I've been taking advantage of the free access on Ancestry.com to
the 1920 US census to look for a POMERANZ family that lived at or
near 120 east 8 street, New York, NY. (the street no. may be in doubt)
The known family are
Elias b Aug 1907
Samuel b May 1911
Ruth b Dec 1912
Esther b Nov 1919
Annie (mother) b 1888
The father, Max or Mendel, was b 1879

I've done a search and I can't find a family that fits. Members of the
family have told me that Esther was born in, and grew up on, 8th street,
so I would expect to find them there. Samuel, Ruth and Esther's
birthdates I've confirmed using the Social Security Death Index. I tried
all the variants of Pomeranz I could think of and even tried entering
the names without a surname - no luck. My last shot would be to find the
page that covers 8th Street, but the census seems to be broken into
Assembly Districts and Districts and I have no idea which district east
8th street would be in.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Family missing from 1920 US census #general

Hilary Henkin
 

First, you might try the City Directories if you have access. That might
confirm an address in 1920.

Either way, you may have to resort to the laborious browsing process. I
had a similar situation (for Los Angeles), and here's what I did:

I printed out current maps of the area, enlarged enough to write on.

Instead of doing a "search", I *browsed* the pages. This involves finding
the census by state, then city, then enumeration district. The website
provides lists of the EDs and their boundaries; this is where the maps
were handy. I drew the boundaries for each ED, and was finally able to
determine the ED for the block I wanted.

With that information, I was able to find the specific census pages, and
went through them block by block. It was painstaking, but in a way fun,
because I could actually retrace the path the enumerators took as they
walked the blocks.

I did eventually find my person. His name was misspelled on the Census,
and I never did figure out how he was indexed, because it certainly
wasn't any spelling I thought of!

Hilary Henkin
North Hollywood, California

On 10/12/2011 10:00 AM, David Scriven wrote:
I've been taking advantage of the free access on Ancestry.com to
the 1920 US census to look for a POMERANZ family that lived at or
near 120 east 8 street, New York, NY. (the street no. may be in doubt)
The known family are
Elias b Aug 1907
Samuel b May 1911
Ruth b Dec 1912
Esther b Nov 1919
Annie (mother) b 1888
The father, Max or Mendel, was b 1879

I've done a search and I can't find a family that fits. Members of the
family have told me that Esther was born in, and grew up on, 8th street,
so I would expect to find them there. Samuel, Ruth and Esther's
birthdates I've confirmed using the Social Security Death Index. I tried
all the variants of Pomeranz I could think of and even tried entering
the names without a surname - no luck. My last shot would be to find the
page that covers 8th Street, but the census seems to be broken into
Assembly Districts and Districts and I have no idea which district east
8th street would be in.


ViewMate Russian translation help #general

Josh Yellon <jyellon@...>
 

Hello Everyone ,

I am seeking out translations for these four files which are written in
Russian.
These four files are for members of the Iworejkes family >from the town
of Gmina Brok and Ostrow Mazowieka.
What I would like to know is the names of all family members, dates of
birth, ages, and Town of origin.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Your help is always is greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.

Sincerely,

J Yellon

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20469
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20468
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20467
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20466

Josh Yellon
jyellon@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Russian translation help #general

Josh Yellon <jyellon@...>
 

Hello Everyone ,

I am seeking out translations for these four files which are written in
Russian.
These four files are for members of the Iworejkes family >from the town
of Gmina Brok and Ostrow Mazowieka.
What I would like to know is the names of all family members, dates of
birth, ages, and Town of origin.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Your help is always is greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.

Sincerely,

J Yellon

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20469
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20468
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20467
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20466

Josh Yellon
jyellon@gmail.com


Re: How to tell if someone was rejected from entering the US (1882, Castle Garden) #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Sally and others - Thanks very much for your stories. It helps
to combine the 2 versions of the story that I have. I.e., one
version being that the mother of the children stayed in America
for 5 years before going back, while the other version says that
she went back with the rejected child. I'm pretty sure that the
child that did go back, was the youngest child, who would have
been about 8 at the most, as I have a 2nd immigration record for
him. It would also explain his unusual personality and life
style, compared to his other siblings!
Thanks all.

Mark London
Natick, MA

sallybruc@yahoo.com wrote:

I have been watching this discussion of rejected immigrants with
interest, but I have something to contribute at this point. The
assumption is made that a returning child would have a parent
return with him/her, even the whole family if another parent could
not stay in the US with other children. Well, there is a big
difference between a 3 year old and a 16 year old, as well as
between the 19th century and the 21st.

Children of very young ages travelled alone, routinely, in the
19th century. My ggrandmother came to the US alone at age 8, first
class, travelling to people she never met, probably, as they had
been in the US a lot more than 8 years. Her mother had died and
father remarried, and I assume that she was sent to an uncle -
although the surname is different than either of her parents' - and
his wife.

I also know someone whose ancestral family was on a ship that had
just sailed when measles broke out. The ship went back to port and
put the sick kids off. This person's family felt bad for the 4 or 5
year old child left at the port alone, without knowing whatever
happened to him/her, but the family couldn't afford to give up the
many tickets for their large family in order to take care of the sick
child with no money and no help at that port. He was writing a story
of the situation, as the family still felt bad about it several
generations later.

So my thought is that a rejected child might end up being returned to
Europe alone, even at an 'elementary school' age. The family would
probably send a letter to family back home, perhaps with the child,
hoping that the child would make it back home - a horrible situation,
but there would be no easy solution for a poor family. The ship would
have been nearly empty, and it had an obligation to return rejected
immigrants, so the child would have been fed and kept safe (as much as
people did in the 19th century), at least while on ship. Hopefully one
of the emigration societies that helped on the way to port in Europe
would help the child there. In the case I mentioned, the family never
knew what happened to the sick child.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:How to tell if someone was rejected from entering the US (1882, Castle Garden) #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Sally and others - Thanks very much for your stories. It helps
to combine the 2 versions of the story that I have. I.e., one
version being that the mother of the children stayed in America
for 5 years before going back, while the other version says that
she went back with the rejected child. I'm pretty sure that the
child that did go back, was the youngest child, who would have
been about 8 at the most, as I have a 2nd immigration record for
him. It would also explain his unusual personality and life
style, compared to his other siblings!
Thanks all.

Mark London
Natick, MA

sallybruc@yahoo.com wrote:

I have been watching this discussion of rejected immigrants with
interest, but I have something to contribute at this point. The
assumption is made that a returning child would have a parent
return with him/her, even the whole family if another parent could
not stay in the US with other children. Well, there is a big
difference between a 3 year old and a 16 year old, as well as
between the 19th century and the 21st.

Children of very young ages travelled alone, routinely, in the
19th century. My ggrandmother came to the US alone at age 8, first
class, travelling to people she never met, probably, as they had
been in the US a lot more than 8 years. Her mother had died and
father remarried, and I assume that she was sent to an uncle -
although the surname is different than either of her parents' - and
his wife.

I also know someone whose ancestral family was on a ship that had
just sailed when measles broke out. The ship went back to port and
put the sick kids off. This person's family felt bad for the 4 or 5
year old child left at the port alone, without knowing whatever
happened to him/her, but the family couldn't afford to give up the
many tickets for their large family in order to take care of the sick
child with no money and no help at that port. He was writing a story
of the situation, as the family still felt bad about it several
generations later.

So my thought is that a rejected child might end up being returned to
Europe alone, even at an 'elementary school' age. The family would
probably send a letter to family back home, perhaps with the child,
hoping that the child would make it back home - a horrible situation,
but there would be no easy solution for a poor family. The ship would
have been nearly empty, and it had an obligation to return rejected
immigrants, so the child would have been fed and kept safe (as much as
people did in the 19th century), at least while on ship. Hopefully one
of the emigration societies that helped on the way to port in Europe
would help the child there. In the case I mentioned, the family never
knew what happened to the sick child.

Sally Bruckheimer
Piscataway, NJ


Translation requested for German/Yiddish document #general

imap
 

Hello all,

I posted a typed letter that I found in my mom's belongings after
she died, >from Leib Nussbaum, the nephew of my great-grandfather,
Barney Nussbaum >from January of 1948 >from a DP camp in Germany. There
also was a second letter that was handwritten and sent in May of
1948. I am very interested in a translation of this handwritten
letter. People were so very kind with the first letter, and >from
that, I learned that Leib's father was Moses, who must have been my
great-grandfather's brother. There are a number of people mentioned
in this second letter, and I am very much wanting to get all their
names so I can research more about my family. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

Pamela Faith Lerman

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20447
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20448

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation requested for German/Yiddish document #general

imap
 

Hello all,

I posted a typed letter that I found in my mom's belongings after
she died, >from Leib Nussbaum, the nephew of my great-grandfather,
Barney Nussbaum >from January of 1948 >from a DP camp in Germany. There
also was a second letter that was handwritten and sent in May of
1948. I am very interested in a translation of this handwritten
letter. People were so very kind with the first letter, and >from
that, I learned that Leib's father was Moses, who must have been my
great-grandfather's brother. There are a number of people mentioned
in this second letter, and I am very much wanting to get all their
names so I can research more about my family. Any help will be
greatly appreciated.

Pamela Faith Lerman

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20447
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20448

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


IGS seventh National Conference on Jewish Genealogy #belarus

msleag@...
 

Dear Friends

IGS is delighted to announce that the Seventh National Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will take place on Tuesday, 3 Kislev 5772, November 29,2011 at
Beit Hatfusot- The Museum of the Jewish People, Tel Aviv University.

The Hebrew Program's major theme will be: The Aliyah of children and
adolescents to Israel within the framework of "Youth Aliyah" and Youth
Movements in the Diaspora, while the English program's major theme will be:
Looking for Great Grandfather on the net.

See details and registration form on:
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/198/7818.asp

Join us for an interesting and rewarding day.

Dr. Lea Haber Gedalia
IGS Chairperson
info@isragen.org.il,


VM 20463 -- gravestone translation #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

I have posted a tombstone for a distant cousin, Isaac Lander, on Viewmate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=20463

I am hoping that there is something interesting there beside his father's
name, Solomon, but I am not holding my breath. Any help would be much
appreciated.

Sally Bruckheimer

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Belarus SIG #Belarus IGS seventh National Conference on Jewish Genealogy #belarus

msleag@...
 

Dear Friends

IGS is delighted to announce that the Seventh National Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will take place on Tuesday, 3 Kislev 5772, November 29,2011 at
Beit Hatfusot- The Museum of the Jewish People, Tel Aviv University.

The Hebrew Program's major theme will be: The Aliyah of children and
adolescents to Israel within the framework of "Youth Aliyah" and Youth
Movements in the Diaspora, while the English program's major theme will be:
Looking for Great Grandfather on the net.

See details and registration form on:
http://www.isragen.org.il/siteFiles/1/198/7818.asp

Join us for an interesting and rewarding day.

Dr. Lea Haber Gedalia
IGS Chairperson
info@isragen.org.il,


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VM 20463 -- gravestone translation #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

I have posted a tombstone for a distant cousin, Isaac Lander, on Viewmate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=20463

I am hoping that there is something interesting there beside his father's
name, Solomon, but I am not holding my breath. Any help would be much
appreciated.

Sally Bruckheimer

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Dachau Memorial Book #general

Lande
 

The Dachau Gedenkstaettte has just issued a memorial book, Gedenkbuch fuer
die Toten des Konzentrationslagers Dachau, listing the 33,205 Jews and
non-Jews who perished in Dachau, the first concentration camp. This massive
book, 1,312 pages, lists the victims' names, professions, nationalities,
dates and places of birth, last places of residence and dates of death.

This book is a useful reference tool to confirm or add to information
available in JewishGen's Holocaust Database collection.

At present, as far as I know, this book is only available in the United
States at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Dachau Memorial Book #general

Lande
 

The Dachau Gedenkstaettte has just issued a memorial book, Gedenkbuch fuer
die Toten des Konzentrationslagers Dachau, listing the 33,205 Jews and
non-Jews who perished in Dachau, the first concentration camp. This massive
book, 1,312 pages, lists the victims' names, professions, nationalities,
dates and places of birth, last places of residence and dates of death.

This book is a useful reference tool to confirm or add to information
available in JewishGen's Holocaust Database collection.

At present, as far as I know, this book is only available in the United
States at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


ViewMate -- gravestone translation #general

Robert Kraft <bobalicek@...>
 

have posted a picture of the gravestone of Louis Kraft in Kansas City, MO.
I would like to find out what his Hebrew name is as I am not
proficient in Hebrew.
Thanks and all the best
Bob Kraft
Belarus,Lithuania,Masaachusetts Kansas City Mo[ Kraft,Krawczinsky,Kravchik]

MODERATOR NOTE: The URL of the image is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=20455
Please respond privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate -- gravestone translation #general

Robert Kraft <bobalicek@...>
 

have posted a picture of the gravestone of Louis Kraft in Kansas City, MO.
I would like to find out what his Hebrew name is as I am not
proficient in Hebrew.
Thanks and all the best
Bob Kraft
Belarus,Lithuania,Masaachusetts Kansas City Mo[ Kraft,Krawczinsky,Kravchik]

MODERATOR NOTE: The URL of the image is
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=20455
Please respond privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Viewmate Translation Request - Headstones #general

Bram Hubbell
 

Hi,

I've posted four photographs of relatives' headstones with Hebrew
inscriptions for which I need translations. They are on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20442
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20443
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20444
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20445
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20446

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you in advance.

Peace,
Bram Hubbell
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate Translation Request - Headstones #general

Bram Hubbell
 

Hi,

I've posted four photographs of relatives' headstones with Hebrew
inscriptions for which I need translations. They are on ViewMate at
the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20442
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20443
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20444
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20445
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=20446

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you in advance.

Peace,
Bram Hubbell
New York, NY


Second Israel LitvakSIG Seminar reminder #southafrica

Carol Hoffman
 

The Second Israel LitvakSIG Seminar, LITVAKS SEARCHING THEIR ROOTS:
RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENTS, will be held Monday, 24 October 2011 at
the Association of Lithuanian Jews in Israel, 1 David HaMelech Blvd.,
Tel Aviv, >from 16:00 to 20:00. Some of the areas covered areas that
were considered Poland (Vilna/Vilna Gubernia or Suwalk Gubernia).
The program includes lectures by:
Rachel Levin-Rozenzweig -The Central Archive of the History of
Lithuanian Jewry, introduction and overview
Memory and Restoration
Rose Lerer Cohen - New Memorial Stones in the Forests
Ralph Salinger - Restoration and Fencing of an Old Shtetl Cemetery
(lectures in English)
Dorothy Leivers, LitvakSIG Board member and Coordinator District
Research Groups update (lecture in English)
80 NIS - non members of LitvakSIG, 50 NIS - members of LitvakSIG

Details and registration form, please contact Seminar Organizers
Rose Lerer Cohen rlerercohen@gmail.com
Carol Hoffman saftacarol@gmail.com


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Second Israel LitvakSIG Seminar reminder #southafrica

Carol Hoffman
 

The Second Israel LitvakSIG Seminar, LITVAKS SEARCHING THEIR ROOTS:
RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENTS, will be held Monday, 24 October 2011 at
the Association of Lithuanian Jews in Israel, 1 David HaMelech Blvd.,
Tel Aviv, >from 16:00 to 20:00. Some of the areas covered areas that
were considered Poland (Vilna/Vilna Gubernia or Suwalk Gubernia).
The program includes lectures by:
Rachel Levin-Rozenzweig -The Central Archive of the History of
Lithuanian Jewry, introduction and overview
Memory and Restoration
Rose Lerer Cohen - New Memorial Stones in the Forests
Ralph Salinger - Restoration and Fencing of an Old Shtetl Cemetery
(lectures in English)
Dorothy Leivers, LitvakSIG Board member and Coordinator District
Research Groups update (lecture in English)
80 NIS - non members of LitvakSIG, 50 NIS - members of LitvakSIG

Details and registration form, please contact Seminar Organizers
Rose Lerer Cohen rlerercohen@gmail.com
Carol Hoffman saftacarol@gmail.com

183561 - 183580 of 668810