Date   

names of women divorced or with marriages annulled #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

It was not uncommon in Jewish records in Tsarist Russia when a divorced woman
remarried to reference her as something like "Sarah, divorced wife of Chernigov
townsperson Moshe Pipik and daughter of Nezhin townsperson Shmuel Iofe." Often
the record is less complete, and sometimes it is unclear whether the surname
given is the maiden name or the married name.
I have never seen a record that stated that a woman (or a man) had been a party
to a marriage that had been annulled, which would be logical because the result
of an annulment is that the marriage never existed.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen names of women divorced or with marriages annulled #general

Herbert Lazerow
 

It was not uncommon in Jewish records in Tsarist Russia when a divorced woman
remarried to reference her as something like "Sarah, divorced wife of Chernigov
townsperson Moshe Pipik and daughter of Nezhin townsperson Shmuel Iofe." Often
the record is less complete, and sometimes it is unclear whether the surname
given is the maiden name or the married name.
I have never seen a record that stated that a woman (or a man) had been a party
to a marriage that had been annulled, which would be logical because the result
of an annulment is that the marriage never existed.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA


Re: Having trouble reading surname on marriage certificate. #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Thanks to all the replied. Someone managed to give me enough
information for me to find an ancestry.com family tree with the people
on the certificate (I don't know how I missed that). In any event, they
give the maiden name of the husband's mother as being Jennie Sadarsky).
- Mark

Mark London wrote:

Hi - Can anyone give me a good guess as to what the husband's mother's
maiden name is on this marriage certificate?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Having trouble reading surname on marriage certificate. #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Thanks to all the replied. Someone managed to give me enough
information for me to find an ancestry.com family tree with the people
on the certificate (I don't know how I missed that). In any event, they
give the maiden name of the husband's mother as being Jennie Sadarsky).
- Mark

Mark London wrote:

Hi - Can anyone give me a good guess as to what the husband's mother's
maiden name is on this marriage certificate?


Google "Restarts" Their Newspaper Archive #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Many of us who do newspaper research have used the Google archives for many
years. During the past year it has been more difficult --to find it on
their website because in May 2011 Google announced it was stopping its
archival project. Recently, Google has had a change of heart and their
archives may now be found at: http://news.google.com/newspapers .
Previously, Google stated they would not be providing any further features
or functionality to the Google News Archives and were no longer accepting
new microfilm or digital files for processing. The change of heart to start
more sites etc. is welcome.The site contains about 2,000 historic newspapers
predominately >from the United States and Canada. Google has also announced
a new digitiazation project with the Mons, Belgium (Mundaneum) Museum for
their archives.

More about this can be read in Genealogy In Time Magazine.
http://tinyurl.com/7sg253l or original URL:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/NewsStories/2012/Q1/a%20restarted%20google%20newspaper%20archive%20page1.html.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Searching for family members in the US #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Hi!

I need help in finding the current whereabouts of the following family
members, and/or their descendants:

1. Harry DINGFELDER (b. 1940?) and/ or his sister, Judith Ann
Dingfelder (b. 1944) who grew up in Racine,. Wisconsin

2. Elinor nee STEINDECKER, daughter of Otto Steindecker and Ethel
(original family name unknown). They married in 1927, probably NYC.

3. Bernard SELZ (b.1940 ) m. 1977 in NYC and/or his brother, Jean
Pierre Selz m. NYC 1974

Thank you in advance for your help!
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for family members in the US #general

Debbie Lifshitz
 

Hi!

I need help in finding the current whereabouts of the following family
members, and/or their descendants:

1. Harry DINGFELDER (b. 1940?) and/ or his sister, Judith Ann
Dingfelder (b. 1944) who grew up in Racine,. Wisconsin

2. Elinor nee STEINDECKER, daughter of Otto Steindecker and Ethel
(original family name unknown). They married in 1927, probably NYC.

3. Bernard SELZ (b.1940 ) m. 1977 in NYC and/or his brother, Jean
Pierre Selz m. NYC 1974

Thank you in advance for your help!
Debbie Lifschitz
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Google "Restarts" Their Newspaper Archive #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Many of us who do newspaper research have used the Google archives for many
years. During the past year it has been more difficult --to find it on
their website because in May 2011 Google announced it was stopping its
archival project. Recently, Google has had a change of heart and their
archives may now be found at: http://news.google.com/newspapers .
Previously, Google stated they would not be providing any further features
or functionality to the Google News Archives and were no longer accepting
new microfilm or digital files for processing. The change of heart to start
more sites etc. is welcome.The site contains about 2,000 historic newspapers
predominately >from the United States and Canada. Google has also announced
a new digitiazation project with the Mons, Belgium (Mundaneum) Museum for
their archives.

More about this can be read in Genealogy In Time Magazine.
http://tinyurl.com/7sg253l or original URL:
http://www.genealogyintime.com/NewsStories/2012/Q1/a%20restarted%20google%20newspaper%20archive%20page1.html.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Researching a family business? #general

Diane Jacobs
 

Allen,

Have you tried the Division of Old Records, 7th Floor of the Surrogate's
Court building at 31 Chambers Street, same as the Municipal Archives.

They have on computer business records and also court records. The clerks
Are helpful but always ask where else to look as you go through different
Databases.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: Aejordan@... [mailto:Aejordan@...]
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2012 11:23 AM
Anyone have any experience / tips on researching the history of a family
business?..


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Researching a family business? #general

Diane Jacobs
 

Allen,

Have you tried the Division of Old Records, 7th Floor of the Surrogate's
Court building at 31 Chambers Street, same as the Municipal Archives.

They have on computer business records and also court records. The clerks
Are helpful but always ask where else to look as you go through different
Databases.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

-----Original Message-----
From: Aejordan@... [mailto:Aejordan@...]
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2012 11:23 AM
Anyone have any experience / tips on researching the history of a family
business?..


Re: family business in Poland prior to war #general

Avigdor Ben-Dov <avigdorbd@...>
 

To the subject of family business, my father is listed in the Polish
Business Directory for Lomza Gubornia in 1929. Might I I find more
information about who and when worked with him or other informatiion
from government records? Was the business sold when my family
immigrated to the USA in 1939? and to whom? Was there a regulatory
authority and if so, where are their records now?
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: family business in Poland prior to war #general

Avigdor Ben-Dov <avigdorbd@...>
 

To the subject of family business, my father is listed in the Polish
Business Directory for Lomza Gubornia in 1929. Might I I find more
information about who and when worked with him or other informatiion
from government records? Was the business sold when my family
immigrated to the USA in 1939? and to whom? Was there a regulatory
authority and if so, where are their records now?
Avigdor Ben-Dov
Jerusalem


Why So Few Vital records from Buchach, Ukraine? #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi all,

I have lots of family >from Buchach, Ukraine (nee Buczacz, Galicia) who
definitely lived there >from at least the early 19th century until the late
19th century; yet I can find next to no records about them in any of the
JewishGen databases - despite the fact that I have very reliable information
about their names, years of birth, etc.

My g/f's family comes largely >from Rzeszow, Poland. One day, she asked if I
could try to find her relatives, so I went into those same JewishGen
databases. Within seconds I had scores of her relatives on my screen from
the early 19th century onward with unbelievable detail: names, dates of
birth, social security number, favorite color, preferred "easy-listening"
station - you name it. And not a relative was missing. This particularly
annoyed me because she isn't even into genealogy.

Now, aside >from my natural jealousy of her having far more dead relatives
than do I, I couldn't understand why the Rzeszow records were so complete,
but the Buchach records were so sparse. Did the Rzeszow town registrar have
OCD and the Buczacz town registrar was a functional illiterate?

Could it be that not all Buczacz microfilms have been entered into the
system?

I'd appreciate getting an explanation for this.
TIA,

Meron Lavie
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Why So Few Vital records from Buchach, Ukraine? #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi all,

I have lots of family >from Buchach, Ukraine (nee Buczacz, Galicia) who
definitely lived there >from at least the early 19th century until the late
19th century; yet I can find next to no records about them in any of the
JewishGen databases - despite the fact that I have very reliable information
about their names, years of birth, etc.

My g/f's family comes largely >from Rzeszow, Poland. One day, she asked if I
could try to find her relatives, so I went into those same JewishGen
databases. Within seconds I had scores of her relatives on my screen from
the early 19th century onward with unbelievable detail: names, dates of
birth, social security number, favorite color, preferred "easy-listening"
station - you name it. And not a relative was missing. This particularly
annoyed me because she isn't even into genealogy.

Now, aside >from my natural jealousy of her having far more dead relatives
than do I, I couldn't understand why the Rzeszow records were so complete,
but the Buchach records were so sparse. Did the Rzeszow town registrar have
OCD and the Buczacz town registrar was a functional illiterate?

Could it be that not all Buczacz microfilms have been entered into the
system?

I'd appreciate getting an explanation for this.
TIA,

Meron Lavie
Israel


Re: Do you ever leave someone off your tree? #general

Kenneth Packer
 

Debbie,
I agree, and always include all on the tree with appropriate notes. Over
the years I have had very few objections, but yes some. Even with the few
objections, I do what I believe is right, the complete recording of family
history. And I have lots of family that back me up and have helped on this
project.

I believe that several years ago, I did post my genealogy philosophy which
comes with a copy of the tree when family members order the tree, which now
has 2140 names. The tree stated with 125 names. It Only goes to family; it
is not a public document! It is not on the Internet. You will find my
philosophy paper below. It helps others know what and why I have been doing
this for the past 20 years. Hope my ideas help you and others communicate
what we do with family who may have some resistance.

I believe my paper on genealogy is relevant to this discussion that has had
some wonderful responses. Discussions such as these help us all to be
better at what we do. I hope we continue to share our ideas on this forum.
---Reprint---
Why Genealogy and Why a Family Database?
By: Ken Packer (#30)

When our children and grandchildren ask the questions: "Where did we come
from?" "Who were our ancestors?" "Did any of our family perish in the
Holocaust?" "Am I related to anyone famous?" "Has anyone in our family
ever been in jail?" "Is there a history of disease in our family that I
should know about?" "Where did I get my music and artistic talents?" "How
has religion affected our lives?" How will you answer these and other
questions?

As we grow, family traditions and history offer security and a sense of
uniqueness. Recounting the origins of our cherished traditions and history
gives a deeper understanding of why traditions are so special. In the past,
families often sat around and told stories for others to remember. With TV
and new forms of entertainment, story-telling has become a lost art and a
lost past-time. Just as we enjoy taking pictures and videos and re-looking
at the events we attended, a family genealogical history and database is
another way of looking at and remembering our history. Genealogy is more
than names and dates. It is the stories of our lives.

Our treasures lie in our knowledge. We are wealthier by gathering the rich
history that makes us who we are. Your family history is about who you are
and where you come from. We are all connected. We are family.

Family Historians want to know about the places where our ancestors lived,
their occupations and interests, what they ate and wore, how they traveled,
and many other aspects of their lives. The records, which throw light on
these things, are rich in information about our ancestors' lives. With this
material, the past - your past - begins to come to life. Family history,
however, is more than this, we discover the truth about old family legends,
stories, or mysteries. It is a record of our successes and failures, of our
joys and disappointments, and the forces that made us who we are. Nothing
is good or bad. It is not about secrets. It is history. It is what we
did. And keeping your family history alive, is very important.

If we don't record that history now, it may be lost forever. If you don't
do it, who will?

This database of family history is for our family. It is not a movie or a
TV script. It is not a book for others to read. It is meant for us and our
children. Since 1991, when the research began, it has grown >from 125 names
and their stories to a family tree of more than 2100 family members. It is
an amazing family that can be traced back to two brothers, Abraham and Chaim
Peker, who lived in Russia in the early 1800's. And the tree continues to
grow because of the efforts of family members who understand the importance
of history and staying connected. Hopefully someday our research will take
us back even farther.

We thank all for sharing and hope you will join us in this important
activity of recording living family history.
--------------End of Reprint-----------

Kenneth L. Packer
Washingtonville, NY 10992
(E-mail) packer18@...

-----Original Message-----
From: Debby Painter [mailto:gincig@...]
sent: Friday, March 16, 2012 12:19 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: Do you ever leave someone off your tree?

I agree that we are products of our family no matter the circumstances of
these relationships. There will always be people or situations that
families are not too proud of "acknowledging" but they are family
nevertheless. ...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Do you ever leave someone off your tree? #general

Kenneth Packer
 

Debbie,
I agree, and always include all on the tree with appropriate notes. Over
the years I have had very few objections, but yes some. Even with the few
objections, I do what I believe is right, the complete recording of family
history. And I have lots of family that back me up and have helped on this
project.

I believe that several years ago, I did post my genealogy philosophy which
comes with a copy of the tree when family members order the tree, which now
has 2140 names. The tree stated with 125 names. It Only goes to family; it
is not a public document! It is not on the Internet. You will find my
philosophy paper below. It helps others know what and why I have been doing
this for the past 20 years. Hope my ideas help you and others communicate
what we do with family who may have some resistance.

I believe my paper on genealogy is relevant to this discussion that has had
some wonderful responses. Discussions such as these help us all to be
better at what we do. I hope we continue to share our ideas on this forum.
---Reprint---
Why Genealogy and Why a Family Database?
By: Ken Packer (#30)

When our children and grandchildren ask the questions: "Where did we come
from?" "Who were our ancestors?" "Did any of our family perish in the
Holocaust?" "Am I related to anyone famous?" "Has anyone in our family
ever been in jail?" "Is there a history of disease in our family that I
should know about?" "Where did I get my music and artistic talents?" "How
has religion affected our lives?" How will you answer these and other
questions?

As we grow, family traditions and history offer security and a sense of
uniqueness. Recounting the origins of our cherished traditions and history
gives a deeper understanding of why traditions are so special. In the past,
families often sat around and told stories for others to remember. With TV
and new forms of entertainment, story-telling has become a lost art and a
lost past-time. Just as we enjoy taking pictures and videos and re-looking
at the events we attended, a family genealogical history and database is
another way of looking at and remembering our history. Genealogy is more
than names and dates. It is the stories of our lives.

Our treasures lie in our knowledge. We are wealthier by gathering the rich
history that makes us who we are. Your family history is about who you are
and where you come from. We are all connected. We are family.

Family Historians want to know about the places where our ancestors lived,
their occupations and interests, what they ate and wore, how they traveled,
and many other aspects of their lives. The records, which throw light on
these things, are rich in information about our ancestors' lives. With this
material, the past - your past - begins to come to life. Family history,
however, is more than this, we discover the truth about old family legends,
stories, or mysteries. It is a record of our successes and failures, of our
joys and disappointments, and the forces that made us who we are. Nothing
is good or bad. It is not about secrets. It is history. It is what we
did. And keeping your family history alive, is very important.

If we don't record that history now, it may be lost forever. If you don't
do it, who will?

This database of family history is for our family. It is not a movie or a
TV script. It is not a book for others to read. It is meant for us and our
children. Since 1991, when the research began, it has grown >from 125 names
and their stories to a family tree of more than 2100 family members. It is
an amazing family that can be traced back to two brothers, Abraham and Chaim
Peker, who lived in Russia in the early 1800's. And the tree continues to
grow because of the efforts of family members who understand the importance
of history and staying connected. Hopefully someday our research will take
us back even farther.

We thank all for sharing and hope you will join us in this important
activity of recording living family history.
--------------End of Reprint-----------

Kenneth L. Packer
Washingtonville, NY 10992
(E-mail) packer18@...

-----Original Message-----
From: Debby Painter [mailto:gincig@...]
sent: Friday, March 16, 2012 12:19 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: Do you ever leave someone off your tree?

I agree that we are products of our family no matter the circumstances of
these relationships. There will always be people or situations that
families are not too proud of "acknowledging" but they are family
nevertheless. ...


Viewmate Ketubah reading for Hebrew names of groom & groom's father #hungary

lewsails@...
 

I've posted my parents 1933 NYC ketubah at Viewmate 22087. I'm seeking only
the precise Hebrew names entered for my father, Henry Lester (the groom) and
my grand-father, Leo Lester. My father's Hebrew name is unknown; it could
be a variation of Hirsh or Chaim. There is no Hebrew text on his matzeva.
My grand-father Leo went by Leib Letzter (Ellis Island), Yehuda Leibish (on
his own ketubah) & Leibish ben Mordechi (metzeva). My great grandfather was
Mordechi Letzter. Thanks so much. Please respond to
lewsails@.... Lewis Lester, Oakland, Maine, USA.

Moderator: Please use Viewmate to respond.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Viewmate Ketubah reading for Hebrew names of groom & groom's father #hungary

lewsails@...
 

I've posted my parents 1933 NYC ketubah at Viewmate 22087. I'm seeking only
the precise Hebrew names entered for my father, Henry Lester (the groom) and
my grand-father, Leo Lester. My father's Hebrew name is unknown; it could
be a variation of Hirsh or Chaim. There is no Hebrew text on his matzeva.
My grand-father Leo went by Leib Letzter (Ellis Island), Yehuda Leibish (on
his own ketubah) & Leibish ben Mordechi (metzeva). My great grandfather was
Mordechi Letzter. Thanks so much. Please respond to
lewsails@.... Lewis Lester, Oakland, Maine, USA.

Moderator: Please use Viewmate to respond.


Re: Hungarian Birth Record Translation Help Needed! #hungary

Debbie Raff
 

I wouldn't concern yourself much about an illegitimate birth. I think I
once read that about 1/3 of Jewish births in Poland were illegitimate due to
folks marrying in a
religious ceremony, but not in a secular ceremony. Poland only recognized
secular ceremonies.

The same may be true in Hungary, as well.

My dad and his family were born in Poland. His brother is listed as an
illegitimate birth, although he used his father's surname. They did marry
in a secular ceremony just
before the birth of my father and my grandfather leaving for the U.S.
shortly thereafter.

Since there may be another page to this document according to Gabor Hirsch,
it may be possible that it includes a notation of a secular ceremony at a
later date.

Debbie Raff
California


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian Birth Record Translation Help Needed! #hungary

Debbie Raff
 

I wouldn't concern yourself much about an illegitimate birth. I think I
once read that about 1/3 of Jewish births in Poland were illegitimate due to
folks marrying in a
religious ceremony, but not in a secular ceremony. Poland only recognized
secular ceremonies.

The same may be true in Hungary, as well.

My dad and his family were born in Poland. His brother is listed as an
illegitimate birth, although he used his father's surname. They did marry
in a secular ceremony just
before the birth of my father and my grandfather leaving for the U.S.
shortly thereafter.

Since there may be another page to this document according to Gabor Hirsch,
it may be possible that it includes a notation of a secular ceremony at a
later date.

Debbie Raff
California

178081 - 178100 of 673576