Date   

Updated IAJGS Legislative Alert--Includes Information on SSDI, Kentucky, Maine and Virginia #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An updated IAJGS Legislative Alert has been posted to the IAJGS website:
www.iajgs.org and click on left hand green button "Legislation" then on
latest alert.

The alert contains information on the IAJGS statement for the record for the
US Senate Finance Committee Subcommittee on Fiscal Responsibility and
Economic Growth regarding our position on maintaining public access to the
Social Security Death Index (SSDI). On page one go to the first topic under
the "red box " entitled: Genealogical Community Under Attack: Potential Loss
of Access to Social Security Death Index (SSDI). There is also information
regarding the membership of the Subcommittee.

The genealogical community leadership as represented by the Records
Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) of which IAJGS is one of the voting
members--along with FGS and NGS, decided that it was time to be pragmatic
and start negotiating. We know >from the House Subcommittee hearing on
February 2nd that they and the Administration wanted no public access or as
Social Security Administrator Astrue said in his House testimony
genealogists could wait 75 years...while Senator Nelson's bill had a two
year wait (the year of death and the following year when people submit their
tax returns). This is a much more reasonable approach even though we
strongly believe there should be immediate public access-and genealogists
are not the cause of identity theft. It is obvious that the identity theft
issue makes good politics in an election year, and we-the genealogical
leadership--FGS, IAJGS and NGS decided after much consultation between
ourselves and talking with others that we would support the 2 year
compromise with the caveat that certain genealogists would be eligible for
certification for immediate access- such as forensic genealogists, heir
researchers etc. The RPAC statement on this position is posted at
www.fgs.org/rpac.

Other updates in this Legislative Alert dated March 28 include updates on
legislation that have been signed into law for Maine (LD 1627) regarding
marriage applications, and Virginia (SB660) reducing the wait period for
marriage, divorce and death records and more, and amended legislation still
in committee, Kentucky SB 54 regarding access to records and establishing a
waiting period of 70 years for marriage records. For these updates scroll
down to the state alphabetically in the report.

As we learn more about the SSDI issue, and as other legislative actions are
taken on access to vital records the legislative alert will be updated and
reported on this forum.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Updated IAJGS Legislative Alert--Includes Information on SSDI, Kentucky, Maine and Virginia #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An updated IAJGS Legislative Alert has been posted to the IAJGS website:
www.iajgs.org and click on left hand green button "Legislation" then on
latest alert.

The alert contains information on the IAJGS statement for the record for the
US Senate Finance Committee Subcommittee on Fiscal Responsibility and
Economic Growth regarding our position on maintaining public access to the
Social Security Death Index (SSDI). On page one go to the first topic under
the "red box " entitled: Genealogical Community Under Attack: Potential Loss
of Access to Social Security Death Index (SSDI). There is also information
regarding the membership of the Subcommittee.

The genealogical community leadership as represented by the Records
Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) of which IAJGS is one of the voting
members--along with FGS and NGS, decided that it was time to be pragmatic
and start negotiating. We know >from the House Subcommittee hearing on
February 2nd that they and the Administration wanted no public access or as
Social Security Administrator Astrue said in his House testimony
genealogists could wait 75 years...while Senator Nelson's bill had a two
year wait (the year of death and the following year when people submit their
tax returns). This is a much more reasonable approach even though we
strongly believe there should be immediate public access-and genealogists
are not the cause of identity theft. It is obvious that the identity theft
issue makes good politics in an election year, and we-the genealogical
leadership--FGS, IAJGS and NGS decided after much consultation between
ourselves and talking with others that we would support the 2 year
compromise with the caveat that certain genealogists would be eligible for
certification for immediate access- such as forensic genealogists, heir
researchers etc. The RPAC statement on this position is posted at
www.fgs.org/rpac.

Other updates in this Legislative Alert dated March 28 include updates on
legislation that have been signed into law for Maine (LD 1627) regarding
marriage applications, and Virginia (SB660) reducing the wait period for
marriage, divorce and death records and more, and amended legislation still
in committee, Kentucky SB 54 regarding access to records and establishing a
waiting period of 70 years for marriage records. For these updates scroll
down to the state alphabetically in the report.

As we learn more about the SSDI issue, and as other legislative actions are
taken on access to vital records the legislative alert will be updated and
reported on this forum.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


NYC Death Records after 1949 #general

Allan Karan
 

After not finding my answer at the JewishGen site, I hope I can find the
answer here.

Will the NYC Dept. of Heath at 125 Worth Street provide me with a death
certificate >from 1951 of my mother's uncle?

1. If so, what proof will I need since the surname will be different?
2. Also, can I make this request for genealogy research if my relationship
is not direct and not authorized to get a copy?
3. I plan to do this in person so I can bring proof of relationship if it
is required, but not sure what proof they will want?

BTW, I did try calling the NYC Dept. of Heath at 125 Worth Street, but got
great recordings of information that did not help, but speaking to a live
person was not one of their options.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Allan

Researching:
KARAN (CHARON, KHARON, KHARAKH, CHARACH) and KNIGER >from Kopyl; Grozovo;
Chepeli; Slutsk, Belarus, PERSKY >from Kremenchuk, Ukraine EPSTEIN from
Kobrin, Belarus

Allan S. Karan
White Plains, NY
akaran1@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Death Records after 1949 #general

Allan Karan
 

After not finding my answer at the JewishGen site, I hope I can find the
answer here.

Will the NYC Dept. of Heath at 125 Worth Street provide me with a death
certificate >from 1951 of my mother's uncle?

1. If so, what proof will I need since the surname will be different?
2. Also, can I make this request for genealogy research if my relationship
is not direct and not authorized to get a copy?
3. I plan to do this in person so I can bring proof of relationship if it
is required, but not sure what proof they will want?

BTW, I did try calling the NYC Dept. of Heath at 125 Worth Street, but got
great recordings of information that did not help, but speaking to a live
person was not one of their options.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Allan

Researching:
KARAN (CHARON, KHARON, KHARAKH, CHARACH) and KNIGER >from Kopyl; Grozovo;
Chepeli; Slutsk, Belarus, PERSKY >from Kremenchuk, Ukraine EPSTEIN from
Kobrin, Belarus

Allan S. Karan
White Plains, NY
akaran1@hotmail.com


Mary WARSHAW(b. 1930, Illinois), A Family "Scandal" #general

JBEEGUN@...
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

I'm trying to find traces of my great-great-aunt, Mary WARSHAW,
born 1903 in Illinois. Mary's parents were Isaac (Ike) and Anna
WARSHAW; the family had lived in Chicago, IL, and appears in the
1910-1930 censuses (in 1930, Anna was a widow). Its important to
mention that Mary's brother, Joseph, married a Mary who also
became Mary WARSHAW, and her traces are fully known.

Based on the Federal Censuses, Mary had lived with her family in
1910 and 1920 (in State St.) and had not lived with them in 1930.

According to stories told in the extended family, Mary married a
black man and following that was banned by her family. When
relatives are asked about her, it is as if she never existed,
people in the family would not talk about her scandal, hence no
traces of her.

Any help in getting more info about Mary would be much appreciated,

Yours,
Jackie Beegun
Lake Zurich, IL
jbeegun@dist50.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mary WARSHAW(b. 1930, Illinois), A Family "Scandal" #general

JBEEGUN@...
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

I'm trying to find traces of my great-great-aunt, Mary WARSHAW,
born 1903 in Illinois. Mary's parents were Isaac (Ike) and Anna
WARSHAW; the family had lived in Chicago, IL, and appears in the
1910-1930 censuses (in 1930, Anna was a widow). Its important to
mention that Mary's brother, Joseph, married a Mary who also
became Mary WARSHAW, and her traces are fully known.

Based on the Federal Censuses, Mary had lived with her family in
1910 and 1920 (in State St.) and had not lived with them in 1930.

According to stories told in the extended family, Mary married a
black man and following that was banned by her family. When
relatives are asked about her, it is as if she never existed,
people in the family would not talk about her scandal, hence no
traces of her.

Any help in getting more info about Mary would be much appreciated,

Yours,
Jackie Beegun
Lake Zurich, IL
jbeegun@dist50.net


Surname KUSPIAN #general

Barry S. Finkel
 

I have seen a death certificate that gives the maiden name for the
mother of one of my relatives as Pauline Leah KUSPIAN.
I cannot find that surname in Dr. Beider's books:

Poland
Russian Empire
Galicia

Has anyone seen that surname before? A Google search does not
show anything Jewish-related that I can find. Maybe the
informant for the death certificate did not know the spelling
of the surname. The family came >from the Grodno area.
Thanks.
--Barry Finkel
Chicago


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname KUSPIAN #general

Barry S. Finkel
 

I have seen a death certificate that gives the maiden name for the
mother of one of my relatives as Pauline Leah KUSPIAN.
I cannot find that surname in Dr. Beider's books:

Poland
Russian Empire
Galicia

Has anyone seen that surname before? A Google search does not
show anything Jewish-related that I can find. Maybe the
informant for the death certificate did not know the spelling
of the surname. The family came >from the Grodno area.
Thanks.
--Barry Finkel
Chicago


Visa and Entry Requirements in 1939 (pre World War II) #general

David Laskin
 

Thanks to the help of several Genners, I tracked down the documents
pertaining to my relative's arrival in NYC on July 11, 1939. But
several new questions have arisen. The "states immigrant inspector"
form notes that my relative, Shalom Tvi, intended to stay in the US
for 3 months and then return to Poland; nonetheless, he was detained
for 2 days before being released to join his American family. The
"record of aliens held for special inquiry" notes the reason for
detention was "no immigrant visa" and in pencil someone wrote in "Bond
3 months." I know >from family letters that my GGF had to pay $50 to
get Shalom Tvi in -- so that must be the "bond." I'd appreciate any
clarification of the "bond" requirement and purpose and the immigrant
visa requirement. I don't see why he was detained or why an immigrant
visa was required since Shalom Tvi clearly stated he was here for only
3 months and then intended to return to Poland. All of these details
are fascinating and important to me because Shalom Tvi survived the
war only because he happened to come to the US in July, 1939 and war
broke out before his visa expired. His wife and two of his children
and four of his grandchildren remained in Poland and were killed in
the Shoah. David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Visa and Entry Requirements in 1939 (pre World War II) #general

David Laskin
 

Thanks to the help of several Genners, I tracked down the documents
pertaining to my relative's arrival in NYC on July 11, 1939. But
several new questions have arisen. The "states immigrant inspector"
form notes that my relative, Shalom Tvi, intended to stay in the US
for 3 months and then return to Poland; nonetheless, he was detained
for 2 days before being released to join his American family. The
"record of aliens held for special inquiry" notes the reason for
detention was "no immigrant visa" and in pencil someone wrote in "Bond
3 months." I know >from family letters that my GGF had to pay $50 to
get Shalom Tvi in -- so that must be the "bond." I'd appreciate any
clarification of the "bond" requirement and purpose and the immigrant
visa requirement. I don't see why he was detained or why an immigrant
visa was required since Shalom Tvi clearly stated he was here for only
3 months and then intended to return to Poland. All of these details
are fascinating and important to me because Shalom Tvi survived the
war only because he happened to come to the US in July, 1939 and war
broke out before his visa expired. His wife and two of his children
and four of his grandchildren remained in Poland and were killed in
the Shoah. David Laskin, Seattle, WA


MOSTERT, VAN WYK, SMUTS, LOMBARD #general

Jeromy Mostert
 

Hi,

Could anyone tell me whether the following surnames have any Jewish
connection: MOSTERT, VAN WYK, SMUTS, LOMBARD.
I am >from South Africa and we are converting to Judaism and will be
interested to find out whether any of these surname have any Jewish
connection.
Where is a good place to start searching ones ancestors.

The most that I know is that my ancestors were the first Mosterts in the
Cape, South Africa - that was in the late 1600 - 1700's.

They were >from Holland.

The Smuts name is my mother's maiden name and we were related to Genl Jan
Christiaan Smuts.

And that is all I know.

Regards

Jeromy Mostert


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MOSTERT, VAN WYK, SMUTS, LOMBARD #general

Jeromy Mostert
 

Hi,

Could anyone tell me whether the following surnames have any Jewish
connection: MOSTERT, VAN WYK, SMUTS, LOMBARD.
I am >from South Africa and we are converting to Judaism and will be
interested to find out whether any of these surname have any Jewish
connection.
Where is a good place to start searching ones ancestors.

The most that I know is that my ancestors were the first Mosterts in the
Cape, South Africa - that was in the late 1600 - 1700's.

They were >from Holland.

The Smuts name is my mother's maiden name and we were related to Genl Jan
Christiaan Smuts.

And that is all I know.

Regards

Jeromy Mostert


Re: By Parentage #general

joyweave
 

Naturalized by parentage means that he was naturalized as a youth before
1924 when children could become citizens under their father's
naturalization. I'd assume that he was returning to the U.S. >from a
trip abroad, though even children who did not live in the U.S. could be
naturalized by parentage before 1924. (I'm making my assumption based
on the name "Irving" which would not likely be a given name in Europe).

I'm not sure what the P.P. number stands for (passport # ?), though I
see it on every one of the naturalized passengers in that column.

Joy Weaver


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: By Parentage #general

joyweave
 

Naturalized by parentage means that he was naturalized as a youth before
1924 when children could become citizens under their father's
naturalization. I'd assume that he was returning to the U.S. >from a
trip abroad, though even children who did not live in the U.S. could be
naturalized by parentage before 1924. (I'm making my assumption based
on the name "Irving" which would not likely be a given name in Europe).

I'm not sure what the P.P. number stands for (passport # ?), though I
see it on every one of the naturalized passengers in that column.

Joy Weaver


Drowning - how common - Death record - INGBERG #germany

Elizabeth Jackson
 

Hello members!

I am happy to see that my post of a death record for my Uncle
Joseph INGBERG has generated such interest (VeiwMate 22157)!

The story behind this record is thus (as told to me by my mother years
ago): Joseph was an excellent swimmer. He was >from Minden, but was living
in Hannover at the time studying a trade. He and a friend went swimming
(according to the record, in the River Ihme). Joseph got his leg or foot
caught in something and was unable to get himself free. His friend must
have tried to help, but was unsuccessful in saving Joseph.

The document I posted regarding Joseph INGBERG seems to indicate that
he was found dead on 24 July 1928, but his tombstone in the Jewish
Cemetery Minden indicates his death as 18 July 1928. The record goes
on to indicate that the deceased was last seen alive at 8:00 on 21
July. Clearly, the family had the body to bury and I would think
would have put the correct date of death on the tombstone. Does
anyone have any idea as to why the dates between the tombstone and
death record do not match? Or, am I reading the information on the
record incorrectly?

I am very intrigued by Ralph Baer's recent post stating "I have found a
half dozen death records of relatives who died in rivers in Germany
including a husband and wife who drowned in the Neckar 24 years apart
(1822 and 1846)." I was unfamiliar with any drownings other than that
of my Uncle and am surprised that one family would have so many
incidents of drowning. [*See Mod Note below]

There are certainly many rivers in Germany and it seems strange to me
that there would be so many drownings in one family. If anyone has any
knowledge of frequency of these incidents, I would be curious to know.

Thanks in advance for your comments and interest!

Elizabeth Jackson, Muskegon MI USA

MODERATOR NOTE: A review of Ralph Baer's GerSIG messages will show the
enormous extent of his research. The SIG message archives are at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
In view of the very large number of ancestors (and their death records)
found by Mr. Baer, perhaps 6 deaths by drowning is not so unusual.


German SIG #Germany Drowning - how common - Death record - INGBERG #germany

Elizabeth Jackson
 

Hello members!

I am happy to see that my post of a death record for my Uncle
Joseph INGBERG has generated such interest (VeiwMate 22157)!

The story behind this record is thus (as told to me by my mother years
ago): Joseph was an excellent swimmer. He was >from Minden, but was living
in Hannover at the time studying a trade. He and a friend went swimming
(according to the record, in the River Ihme). Joseph got his leg or foot
caught in something and was unable to get himself free. His friend must
have tried to help, but was unsuccessful in saving Joseph.

The document I posted regarding Joseph INGBERG seems to indicate that
he was found dead on 24 July 1928, but his tombstone in the Jewish
Cemetery Minden indicates his death as 18 July 1928. The record goes
on to indicate that the deceased was last seen alive at 8:00 on 21
July. Clearly, the family had the body to bury and I would think
would have put the correct date of death on the tombstone. Does
anyone have any idea as to why the dates between the tombstone and
death record do not match? Or, am I reading the information on the
record incorrectly?

I am very intrigued by Ralph Baer's recent post stating "I have found a
half dozen death records of relatives who died in rivers in Germany
including a husband and wife who drowned in the Neckar 24 years apart
(1822 and 1846)." I was unfamiliar with any drownings other than that
of my Uncle and am surprised that one family would have so many
incidents of drowning. [*See Mod Note below]

There are certainly many rivers in Germany and it seems strange to me
that there would be so many drownings in one family. If anyone has any
knowledge of frequency of these incidents, I would be curious to know.

Thanks in advance for your comments and interest!

Elizabeth Jackson, Muskegon MI USA

MODERATOR NOTE: A review of Ralph Baer's GerSIG messages will show the
enormous extent of his research. The SIG message archives are at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigspop
In view of the very large number of ancestors (and their death records)
found by Mr. Baer, perhaps 6 deaths by drowning is not so unusual.


If any of your relatives immigrated to Brazil (or even visited there)... #germany

Renee Steinig
 

The FamilySearch website now has over 400,000 searchable images of
Brazil Immigration Cards, 1900-1965.

These cards were issued by Brazilian consulates in countries of
origin, granting permission for travelers (visitors as well as
immigrants) to enter Brazil.

Each card includes a photo and this information: name, date and place
of birth, nationality, place of residence, marital status, parents'
names, occupation, names of children under 18 traveling with the
immigrant, passport number and county, and location of the consulate
where the card were issued.

A longer description of the cards is at

<https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Brazil_Immigration_Records_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)>

and they can be searched at

<https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/show#uri=http://www.familysearch.org/searchapi/search/collection/1932363>
(or tinyurl.com/Brazil-immcards ).

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany If any of your relatives immigrated to Brazil (or even visited there)... #germany

Renee Steinig
 

The FamilySearch website now has over 400,000 searchable images of
Brazil Immigration Cards, 1900-1965.

These cards were issued by Brazilian consulates in countries of
origin, granting permission for travelers (visitors as well as
immigrants) to enter Brazil.

Each card includes a photo and this information: name, date and place
of birth, nationality, place of residence, marital status, parents'
names, occupation, names of children under 18 traveling with the
immigrant, passport number and county, and location of the consulate
where the card were issued.

A longer description of the cards is at

<https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Brazil_Immigration_Records_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)>

and they can be searched at

<https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/show#uri=http://www.familysearch.org/searchapi/search/collection/1932363>
(or tinyurl.com/Brazil-immcards ).

Renee Stern Steinig, Dix Hills, New York, USA genmaven@gmail.com


Updated IAJGS Legislative Alert--Includes Information on SSDI, Kentucky, Maine and Virginia #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An updated IAJGS Legislative Alert has been posted to the IAJGS website:
www.iajgs.org and click on left hand green button "Legislation" then on
latest alert.

The alert contains information on the IAJGS statement for the record for the
US Senate Finance Committee Subcommittee on Fiscal Responsibility and
Economic Growth regarding our position on maintaining public access to the
Social Security Death Index (SSDI). On page one go to the first topic under
the "red box " entitled: Genealogical Community Under Attack: Potential Loss
of Access to Social Security Death Index (SSDI). There is also information
regarding the membership of the Subcommittee.

The genealogical community leadership as represented by the Records
Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) of which IAJGS is one of the voting
members--along with FGS and NGS, decided that it was time to be pragmatic
and start negotiating. We know >from the House Subcommittee hearing on
February 2nd that they and the Administration wanted no public access or as
Social Security Administrator Astrue said in his House testimony
genealogists could wait 75 years...while Senator Nelson's bill had a two
year wait (the year of death and the following year when people submit their
tax returns). This is a much more reasonable approach even though we
strongly believe there should be immediate public access-and genealogists
are not the cause of identity theft. It is obvious that the identity theft
issue makes good politics in an election year, and we-the genealogical
leadership--FGS, IAJGS and NGS decided after much consultation between
ourselves and talking with others that we would support the 2 year
compromise with the caveat that certain genealogists would be eligible for
certification for immediate access- such as forensic genealogists, heir
researchers etc. The RPAC statement on this position is posted at
www.fgs.org/rpac.

Other updates in this Legislative Alert dated March 28 include updates on
legislation that have been signed into law for Maine (LD 1627) regarding
marriage applications, and Virginia (SB660) reducing the wait period for
marriage, divorce and death records and more, and amended legislation still
in committee, Kentucky SB 54 regarding access to records and establishing a
waiting period of 70 years for marriage records. For these updates scroll
down to the state alphabetically in the report.

As we learn more about the SSDI issue, and as other legislative actions are
taken on access to vital records the legislative alert will be updated and
reported on this forum.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Updated IAJGS Legislative Alert--Includes Information on SSDI, Kentucky, Maine and Virginia #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

An updated IAJGS Legislative Alert has been posted to the IAJGS website:
www.iajgs.org and click on left hand green button "Legislation" then on
latest alert.

The alert contains information on the IAJGS statement for the record for the
US Senate Finance Committee Subcommittee on Fiscal Responsibility and
Economic Growth regarding our position on maintaining public access to the
Social Security Death Index (SSDI). On page one go to the first topic under
the "red box " entitled: Genealogical Community Under Attack: Potential Loss
of Access to Social Security Death Index (SSDI). There is also information
regarding the membership of the Subcommittee.

The genealogical community leadership as represented by the Records
Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC) of which IAJGS is one of the voting
members--along with FGS and NGS, decided that it was time to be pragmatic
and start negotiating. We know >from the House Subcommittee hearing on
February 2nd that they and the Administration wanted no public access or as
Social Security Administrator Astrue said in his House testimony
genealogists could wait 75 years...while Senator Nelson's bill had a two
year wait (the year of death and the following year when people submit their
tax returns). This is a much more reasonable approach even though we
strongly believe there should be immediate public access-and genealogists
are not the cause of identity theft. It is obvious that the identity theft
issue makes good politics in an election year, and we-the genealogical
leadership--FGS, IAJGS and NGS decided after much consultation between
ourselves and talking with others that we would support the 2 year
compromise with the caveat that certain genealogists would be eligible for
certification for immediate access- such as forensic genealogists, heir
researchers etc. The RPAC statement on this position is posted at
www.fgs.org/rpac.

Other updates in this Legislative Alert dated March 28 include updates on
legislation that have been signed into law for Maine (LD 1627) regarding
marriage applications, and Virginia (SB660) reducing the wait period for
marriage, divorce and death records and more, and amended legislation still
in committee, Kentucky SB 54 regarding access to records and establishing a
waiting period of 70 years for marriage records. For these updates scroll
down to the state alphabetically in the report.

As we learn more about the SSDI issue, and as other legislative actions are
taken on access to vital records the legislative alert will be updated and
reported on this forum.

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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