Date   

Kalosca and Kunszentmiklos #hungary

Israel P
 

Does anyone know what records are available for Kalosca and
Kunszentmiklos?

Are there indexing projects which would involve the records for either of
these towns?

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary Kalosca and Kunszentmiklos #hungary

Israel P
 

Does anyone know what records are available for Kalosca and
Kunszentmiklos?

Are there indexing projects which would involve the records for either of
these towns?

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking information about GROSS and EDEL families #general

Amy Fellner <amyf1010@...>
 

Hello, I am seeking information about the family of Sabina (nee GROSS) EDEL, who
emigrated >from Vienna with her husband and two sons (Kurt and Benjamin) in the
1930's. Sabina Gross was born in approximately 1900. The Gross family lived in Lvov
and surrounding area. She lived in Vienna after she married. Records may indicate
surname of Edel, Eidell, Udell, Adel, or comparable spellings. I would appreciate
your contacting me privately if you have any information about this family. Thanks
very much!

Amy Fellner
Gilbert, Arizona, USA
amyf1010@...


Angro, definition solved #hungary

steve725@...
 

Thanks to those of you who might have responded to my inquiry re "angro".

"Angro" seems to be a phonetic transcription of "en gros" in French, which
means "wholesale". With the word "colonial", it implies that the goods sold
are imported >from the "colonies", e.g. coffees, teas, spices, etc.


Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@...


Re: Hungarian colonial? #hungary

tom
 

"angro" in hungarian means wholesale, and is french loan word, "en gros".

i haven't heard the term "kolonial" used in hungarian in quite that
context before. i would expect it to be a geo-political term, rather
than in business. you might ask yiddish speakers what it would have
meant.

strictly speaking, hungary didn't have "colonies", although the
natives of slovakia, romania, yugoslavia, etc. might see things
differently, but such political discussions are beyond the scope of
this list.

....... tom klein, toronto

steve725@... wrote:

I'm translating a biography of Sabina Lakser, a Yiddish actress >from Iasi,
Romania.

It mentions in Yiddish that her father was the owner of a "angro-kolonial"
business. Can anyone with some familiarity with this term, or at least
"angro" let me know if this could somehow be translated as "Hungarian
colonial" business, or if not, what it might mean?


Seeking information about GROSS and EDEL families #general

Amy Fellner <amyf1010@...>
 

Hello, I am seeking information about the family of Sabina (nee GROSS) EDEL, who
emigrated >from Vienna with her husband and two sons (Kurt and Benjamin) in the
1930's. Sabina Gross was born in approximately 1900. The Gross family lived in Lvov
and surrounding area. She lived in Vienna after she married. Records may indicate
surname of Edel, Eidell, Udell, Adel, or comparable spellings. I would appreciate
your contacting me privately if you have any information about this family. Thanks
very much!

Amy Fellner
Gilbert, Arizona, USA
amyf1010@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Angro, definition solved #hungary

steve725@...
 

Thanks to those of you who might have responded to my inquiry re "angro".

"Angro" seems to be a phonetic transcription of "en gros" in French, which
means "wholesale". With the word "colonial", it implies that the goods sold
are imported >from the "colonies", e.g. coffees, teas, spices, etc.


Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com
blog: http://museumoffamilyhistory.blogspot.com
steve@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian colonial? #hungary

tom
 

"angro" in hungarian means wholesale, and is french loan word, "en gros".

i haven't heard the term "kolonial" used in hungarian in quite that
context before. i would expect it to be a geo-political term, rather
than in business. you might ask yiddish speakers what it would have
meant.

strictly speaking, hungary didn't have "colonies", although the
natives of slovakia, romania, yugoslavia, etc. might see things
differently, but such political discussions are beyond the scope of
this list.

....... tom klein, toronto

steve725@... wrote:

I'm translating a biography of Sabina Lakser, a Yiddish actress >from Iasi,
Romania.

It mentions in Yiddish that her father was the owner of a "angro-kolonial"
business. Can anyone with some familiarity with this term, or at least
"angro" let me know if this could somehow be translated as "Hungarian
colonial" business, or if not, what it might mean?


Conference in Paris #hungary

eliagil.roos@...
 

Join us at the

32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy

Paris, FRANCE

http://www.paris2012.eu

July 15-18, 2012 Paris Marriott Rive Gauche

A wonderful program is waiting for you.
Looking forward to meeting you,

Eliane Roos Schuhl

searching ERDELYI >from Baghos before 1920s


Hungary SIG #Hungary Conference in Paris #hungary

eliagil.roos@...
 

Join us at the

32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy

Paris, FRANCE

http://www.paris2012.eu

July 15-18, 2012 Paris Marriott Rive Gauche

A wonderful program is waiting for you.
Looking forward to meeting you,

Eliane Roos Schuhl

searching ERDELYI >from Baghos before 1920s


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Help reading street name on 1915 NY Census #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Linda and others.

If you ever have difficulty reading a street name, try looking on the pages before
or after. The writing may be more legible, or, other street names will clue you in
to the neighborhood. You can then search on a more modern online map for the street
name you are seeking. Of course there is the caveat the the name may have been
changed, or worse, redevelopment has plowed the street under new buildings.

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

FRENKEL: Plock, Poland; then FRANKEL: London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland, London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
LEDER/LEVY: Kalisz, Poland, LEVY (later LEADER): London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Austria-Hungary, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
WYTWORNIK: Plock, Poland


Re: Help reading street name on 1915 NY Census #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Linda and others.

If you ever have difficulty reading a street name, try looking on the pages before
or after. The writing may be more legible, or, other street names will clue you in
to the neighborhood. You can then search on a more modern online map for the street
name you are seeking. Of course there is the caveat the the name may have been
changed, or worse, redevelopment has plowed the street under new buildings.

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

FRENKEL: Plock, Poland; then FRANKEL: London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland, London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
LEDER/LEVY: Kalisz, Poland, LEVY (later LEADER): London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Austria-Hungary, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
WYTWORNIK: Plock, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: naturalization research - a NY primer #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

In addition to Allan Jordan's excellent summary of which courts handled
naturalizations in New York City, I want to add several points.

There are five different Supreme Courts in New York City, one for each borough.
Declarations and naturalizations were done at each of them, and each keeps their
own records. Obviously, the term 'Supreme Court' doesn't mean the same thing in
New York as it does in the rest of the United States.

For the federal courts, the Eastern District of New York is the counties of Kings
(Brooklyn), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau, and Suffolk. The Southern
District is New York (Manhattan) and Bronx Counties.



If a declaration was made in one court, the naturalization could still be done in
another court, even going >from Federal to State (or to another State or even
Territory), or vice versa. It was up to the immigrant to decide what to do where,
although most of the time they stuck with the same court. The second court usually
will have copies of the papers >from the first court, but not vice versa.

Finally, if you have the arrival record >from Ellis Island or another port and it
has a series of numbers squeezed into the space above or alongside the name, you
should look up what those numbers mean - they often mean that a naturalization was
done and allow you to determine which court did it. The page
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/Manifests/is a great place to start learning
this.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: naturalization research - a NY primer #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

In addition to Allan Jordan's excellent summary of which courts handled
naturalizations in New York City, I want to add several points.

There are five different Supreme Courts in New York City, one for each borough.
Declarations and naturalizations were done at each of them, and each keeps their
own records. Obviously, the term 'Supreme Court' doesn't mean the same thing in
New York as it does in the rest of the United States.

For the federal courts, the Eastern District of New York is the counties of Kings
(Brooklyn), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau, and Suffolk. The Southern
District is New York (Manhattan) and Bronx Counties.



If a declaration was made in one court, the naturalization could still be done in
another court, even going >from Federal to State (or to another State or even
Territory), or vice versa. It was up to the immigrant to decide what to do where,
although most of the time they stuck with the same court. The second court usually
will have copies of the papers >from the first court, but not vice versa.

Finally, if you have the arrival record >from Ellis Island or another port and it
has a series of numbers squeezed into the space above or alongside the name, you
should look up what those numbers mean - they often mean that a naturalization was
done and allow you to determine which court did it. The page
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/Manifests/is a great place to start learning
this.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Re: Naturalization documents #general

A. E. Jordan
 

BDrake@... writes:
Allen said that the naturalization documents don't have a lot of information, and
don't have place of origin.
Thanks for the kind words but let me clarify. Depends on the year.
Naturalizations >from the 1890s which is the time frame Bruce is talking about
rarely have lots of details. My comment to Bruce was you can never be sure till
you look but all the 1890s naturalizations I have seen are vague in content
rarely being specific on a place of birth, date of birth, parents' names, arrival
details, etc. Generally they only have statements renouncing the Tzar or Russia
or the Emperor of Germany or such and not specific cities of birth.

However in the 20th century this changed because the Federal Government
standardized the forms and asked all these questions. They also started requiring
authentication of the arrival details and checks of the passenger lists happened.
So the more current documents are more detailed than the early ones.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naturalization documents #general

A. E. Jordan
 

BDrake@... writes:
Allen said that the naturalization documents don't have a lot of information, and
don't have place of origin.
Thanks for the kind words but let me clarify. Depends on the year.
Naturalizations >from the 1890s which is the time frame Bruce is talking about
rarely have lots of details. My comment to Bruce was you can never be sure till
you look but all the 1890s naturalizations I have seen are vague in content
rarely being specific on a place of birth, date of birth, parents' names, arrival
details, etc. Generally they only have statements renouncing the Tzar or Russia
or the Emperor of Germany or such and not specific cities of birth.

However in the 20th century this changed because the Federal Government
standardized the forms and asked all these questions. They also started requiring
authentication of the arrival details and checks of the passenger lists happened.
So the more current documents are more detailed than the early ones.

Allan Jordan


Re: Suggestion when you can't determine original family surname #general

Steven Cooper <s.cooper@...>
 

I could not agree more.

I have solved many surname issues by finding siblings of my target. This is helpful
where the name is changed, spelled wrong or simply illegible. One find I had was
trying to decipher what looked like "shoemakov". My English illiterate GGfather
had simply had someone spell it more less phonetically...the real name, I finally
discovered through a sibling record, of his was "Shuchmacher"...lol. Still makes
me laugh

In US archives, I have found marriage certificates of siblings (especially where
naturalization records don't exist or can't be found) are a wonderful source of
proper maternal surnames. People had so many kids back then, you are bound to find
one with a legible, mostly accurate spelling.

As an aside, I research on the basis that some of the best information is found
with the most distant of relations. This has been my experience. Interrogate
third cousins, get their branch's records....there's gold in them thar documents.
Some of the best pictures I have of one line I just picked up >from a recent visit
to the UK where I met with my 3rd cousins and their parents and grandparents (the
latter group was actually pretty close to my direct line and had lots of
information I knew nothing about.

Happy hunting.
Steven L. Cooper
Sherwood Park, AB
Email: steve@...


From: cromrider@... [mailto:cromrider@...]
Ira--If you can't find anything directly on your grandfather, it is time to start
branching out laterally. Begin searching for your grandfather's relatives who
lived in this country and do the same for them.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Suggestion when you can't determine original family surname #general

Steven Cooper <s.cooper@...>
 

I could not agree more.

I have solved many surname issues by finding siblings of my target. This is helpful
where the name is changed, spelled wrong or simply illegible. One find I had was
trying to decipher what looked like "shoemakov". My English illiterate GGfather
had simply had someone spell it more less phonetically...the real name, I finally
discovered through a sibling record, of his was "Shuchmacher"...lol. Still makes
me laugh

In US archives, I have found marriage certificates of siblings (especially where
naturalization records don't exist or can't be found) are a wonderful source of
proper maternal surnames. People had so many kids back then, you are bound to find
one with a legible, mostly accurate spelling.

As an aside, I research on the basis that some of the best information is found
with the most distant of relations. This has been my experience. Interrogate
third cousins, get their branch's records....there's gold in them thar documents.
Some of the best pictures I have of one line I just picked up >from a recent visit
to the UK where I met with my 3rd cousins and their parents and grandparents (the
latter group was actually pretty close to my direct line and had lots of
information I knew nothing about.

Happy hunting.
Steven L. Cooper
Sherwood Park, AB
Email: steve@...


From: cromrider@... [mailto:cromrider@...]
Ira--If you can't find anything directly on your grandfather, it is time to start
branching out laterally. Begin searching for your grandfather's relatives who
lived in this country and do the same for them.


JGSLA - Monday, June 18 - "A Lithuanian Encounter" at Valley Beth Shalom, 7:30PM #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

You are invited to the June program of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los
Angeles:

"We Are Here: A Lithuanian Encounter" with author, Ellen Cassedy

Monday, June 18, 2012 7:30PM

Valley Beth Shalom Synagogue 15739 Ventura Blvd. Encino, CA 91436

Ellen Cassedy set off into the Jewish heartland of Lithuania to study Yiddish and
connect with her Jewish forebears. But once there, old certainties began to
dissolve, and what had begun as a personal journey of return soon expanded into a
larger quest. The result was her new book, "We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian
Holocaust." Ellen not only immersed herself in the nearly vanished culture of the
Jerusalem of the North, but also conducted groundbreaking research, speaking with
a brave cadre of Jews and non-Jews who were exhuming the complex truths of the
mid-20th Century, reaching out across age-old barriers, and attempting to build a
more tolerant future. Ellen's journey changed her outlook on bystanders, victims,
collaborators, rescuers and herself. Probing the terrain of memory, massacre, and
moral dilemmas, Cassedy asks: Can we honor our heritage without perpetuating the
fears and hatreds of the past? Her rich and deeply-felt account offers important
insights and hope.

Ellen Cassedy is the author of "We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust,"
a new book published by the University of Nebraska Press. The book begins with a
Jewish roots journey, then expands to explore how Lithuania today is engaging with
its Holocaust past, shining a spotlight on fragile efforts toward tolerance. Ellen
has explored the world of the Lithuanian Holocaust in the land of her Jewish
forebears for ten years. Her work has been published in Hadassah, The Forward,
Lilith, and other publications. She is a former columnist for the Philadelphia
Daily News. She lives near Washington, D.C. Michael Steinlauf, author of Bondage
to the Dead: Poland and the Memory of the Holocaust, says of the book: Pioneering
will reach out to all those who care about not replaying in this new century the
disasters of the century that has just ended.

A book signing will follow the presentation - For more information go
to: http://www.ellencassedy.com/ or
http://jgsla.org/meetings/upcoming/june-18-2012-we-are-here-a-lithuanian-encounter-
with-ellen-cassedy

JGSLA members are free. Guests $5.00. Traveling library available at 7:00PM.

Refreshments will be served.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA - Monday, June 18 - "A Lithuanian Encounter" at Valley Beth Shalom, 7:30PM #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

You are invited to the June program of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los
Angeles:

"We Are Here: A Lithuanian Encounter" with author, Ellen Cassedy

Monday, June 18, 2012 7:30PM

Valley Beth Shalom Synagogue 15739 Ventura Blvd. Encino, CA 91436

Ellen Cassedy set off into the Jewish heartland of Lithuania to study Yiddish and
connect with her Jewish forebears. But once there, old certainties began to
dissolve, and what had begun as a personal journey of return soon expanded into a
larger quest. The result was her new book, "We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian
Holocaust." Ellen not only immersed herself in the nearly vanished culture of the
Jerusalem of the North, but also conducted groundbreaking research, speaking with
a brave cadre of Jews and non-Jews who were exhuming the complex truths of the
mid-20th Century, reaching out across age-old barriers, and attempting to build a
more tolerant future. Ellen's journey changed her outlook on bystanders, victims,
collaborators, rescuers and herself. Probing the terrain of memory, massacre, and
moral dilemmas, Cassedy asks: Can we honor our heritage without perpetuating the
fears and hatreds of the past? Her rich and deeply-felt account offers important
insights and hope.

Ellen Cassedy is the author of "We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust,"
a new book published by the University of Nebraska Press. The book begins with a
Jewish roots journey, then expands to explore how Lithuania today is engaging with
its Holocaust past, shining a spotlight on fragile efforts toward tolerance. Ellen
has explored the world of the Lithuanian Holocaust in the land of her Jewish
forebears for ten years. Her work has been published in Hadassah, The Forward,
Lilith, and other publications. She is a former columnist for the Philadelphia
Daily News. She lives near Washington, D.C. Michael Steinlauf, author of Bondage
to the Dead: Poland and the Memory of the Holocaust, says of the book: Pioneering
will reach out to all those who care about not replaying in this new century the
disasters of the century that has just ended.

A book signing will follow the presentation - For more information go
to: http://www.ellencassedy.com/ or
http://jgsla.org/meetings/upcoming/june-18-2012-we-are-here-a-lithuanian-encounter-
with-ellen-cassedy

JGSLA members are free. Guests $5.00. Traveling library available at 7:00PM.

Refreshments will be served.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@...

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