Date   

ALHANATI Family of Larissa #general

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I am interested in learning more about the well-known ALHANATI family
of Larissa. I am familiar with Edras Moissis' book on Larissa and in
fact have it in my collection and I am also familiar with Raphael
Frezis' book on the community in Volos. It appears that they also
intermarried with my family based on recent discoveries through the
SAMI (SHAMI, spelled Shin Alef Mem Yud in Hebrew) family.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ALHANATI Family of Larissa #general

Michael Waas
 

Hi,

I am interested in learning more about the well-known ALHANATI family
of Larissa. I am familiar with Edras Moissis' book on Larissa and in
fact have it in my collection and I am also familiar with Raphael
Frezis' book on the community in Volos. It appears that they also
intermarried with my family based on recent discoveries through the
SAMI (SHAMI, spelled Shin Alef Mem Yud in Hebrew) family.

Best Regards,

Michael Waas
Miami, FL


Passenger records 1965? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Has anyone had luck in getting passenger ship records >from 1965 arrivals in
New York?

I know the National Archives only goes to the early 1950s and Ancestry has
spotty records to 1957 but where are the records after that?

Maybe they are at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services? Has anyone
found a way to get a copy?

Thanks

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passenger records 1965? #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Has anyone had luck in getting passenger ship records >from 1965 arrivals in
New York?

I know the National Archives only goes to the early 1950s and Ancestry has
spotty records to 1957 but where are the records after that?

Maybe they are at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services? Has anyone
found a way to get a copy?

Thanks

Allan Jordan


GRAINER - New York City #general

Gloria Geller
 

I'm seeking information about two uncles who lived in New York City between
early 1920s until their deaths.

Harry GRAINER lived in Brooklyn but is said to have run a concession in Penn
Station - possibly >from the 1940s to the 1960s. He died in 1974.

Max GRAINER was a medical doctor who lived in Manhattan and practiced
medicine there - early 1920s through to around 1970s. He had a private
practice as well as working for the Department of Health, likely Bellevue
Hospital. He died in 1984. Any suggestions as to possible sources of
information about medical doctors who have practiced in New York City would
be appreciated.

Respond to ggeller@teksavvy.com
Gloria Geller
AVRUTSKY, Talne, Ukraine; GRANOFSKY, Zvenigorodka, Ukraine; GELLER,
Khashevata, Ukraine


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GRAINER - New York City #general

Gloria Geller
 

I'm seeking information about two uncles who lived in New York City between
early 1920s until their deaths.

Harry GRAINER lived in Brooklyn but is said to have run a concession in Penn
Station - possibly >from the 1940s to the 1960s. He died in 1974.

Max GRAINER was a medical doctor who lived in Manhattan and practiced
medicine there - early 1920s through to around 1970s. He had a private
practice as well as working for the Department of Health, likely Bellevue
Hospital. He died in 1984. Any suggestions as to possible sources of
information about medical doctors who have practiced in New York City would
be appreciated.

Respond to ggeller@teksavvy.com
Gloria Geller
AVRUTSKY, Talne, Ukraine; GRANOFSKY, Zvenigorodka, Ukraine; GELLER,
Khashevata, Ukraine


Lithuanian Jewish Soldiers in the Russo-Japaneses War #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) has posted on its Shutterfly
website a list of 141 names of Jewish soldiers >from Lithuania who served in
the Tsarist army during the Russo-Japaniese War of 1904/1905. It is anticipated
that other LitvakSIG District Research Groups will do the same.

This list is extracted >from the book "Jews in the Russian Army", by
M. USOV (1911). The list was extracted by S. Katsev >from a more complete
list that was later microfilmed by the Mormon Church and >from which this
list is taken.

This list contains 131 different surnames. They came >from 57 towns in 16
Districts in what is now Lithuania and Belarus. Of the total victims, 13
were listed as wounded, 18 were listed as missing and, except for 11
others who were apparently unhurt, there were 99 listed as killed

The Russo-Japannese War was extremely unpopular with the entire Russian
population. It was assumed that an expected victory was an effort to
strengthen the power of the reactionary autocratic rule of Czar Nicholas II.
Russia's ignominious defeat at the hands of the Japanese led to the opposite
result. The direct results were the uprising called the Revolution of 1905
(actually >from 1904 to 1907), the strengthening of liberal political forces,
the establishment of the Duma, a popularly elected legistative assembly in
two following elections, and the lifting of many restriction on the Jews (12 of
whom were elected to the Duma). This was a mixed blessing for the Jews
because it set off a number of pogroms with many Jewish casualties. Although
Jews fought bravely in the war, as a whole they were accused of disloyalty
and there was resentment among the general population at the liberalization
in the treatment of the Jews.

One achievement of some Jewish organizations, such as the Bund, was that
they were able to effctively organize for self defense. Nevertheless, this
entire episode led to a massive wave of Jewish emigration, mainly to the
United States, and a very small number to Palestine.

Many thousands of Russian Jews fought in the Russo-Japanese War according
to an article by Boris Feldblyum which is referenced below. The FAST
Genealogical Service which he sponsors has linked to the article a list of
2943 Jewish soldiers >from all over Russia who were war victims.

Also referenced below is an article by YIVO on the connection of the War
and the Revolution and its aftermath.

"Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905. Database of Russian Army Jewish Soldiers
injured, killed or missing in action", by Boris Feldblyum (1998) can be
found at http://www.bfcollection.net/fast/rjmain.html
The article contains several links to the database, including one that
lists the surnames in alphabetical order, their Districts and towns. (I
have no connection with Feldblyum or FAST).

The YIVO article is "Russian Revolution of 1905" which can be found in the
YIVO Encyclopedia at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Russian_Revolution_of_1905

Alphabetical lists of the surnames, towns and Districts >from the list that
PDRG has posted are available to anyone on request to me at the email
address below. The complete PDRG list is available only to its members.

For more information about membershipin the Panevezys District Research
Group (PDRG) you may contact me at the email address
below or go to www.litvaksig.org

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian Jewish Soldiers in the Russo-Japaneses War #general

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) has posted on its Shutterfly
website a list of 141 names of Jewish soldiers >from Lithuania who served in
the Tsarist army during the Russo-Japaniese War of 1904/1905. It is anticipated
that other LitvakSIG District Research Groups will do the same.

This list is extracted >from the book "Jews in the Russian Army", by
M. USOV (1911). The list was extracted by S. Katsev >from a more complete
list that was later microfilmed by the Mormon Church and >from which this
list is taken.

This list contains 131 different surnames. They came >from 57 towns in 16
Districts in what is now Lithuania and Belarus. Of the total victims, 13
were listed as wounded, 18 were listed as missing and, except for 11
others who were apparently unhurt, there were 99 listed as killed

The Russo-Japannese War was extremely unpopular with the entire Russian
population. It was assumed that an expected victory was an effort to
strengthen the power of the reactionary autocratic rule of Czar Nicholas II.
Russia's ignominious defeat at the hands of the Japanese led to the opposite
result. The direct results were the uprising called the Revolution of 1905
(actually >from 1904 to 1907), the strengthening of liberal political forces,
the establishment of the Duma, a popularly elected legistative assembly in
two following elections, and the lifting of many restriction on the Jews (12 of
whom were elected to the Duma). This was a mixed blessing for the Jews
because it set off a number of pogroms with many Jewish casualties. Although
Jews fought bravely in the war, as a whole they were accused of disloyalty
and there was resentment among the general population at the liberalization
in the treatment of the Jews.

One achievement of some Jewish organizations, such as the Bund, was that
they were able to effctively organize for self defense. Nevertheless, this
entire episode led to a massive wave of Jewish emigration, mainly to the
United States, and a very small number to Palestine.

Many thousands of Russian Jews fought in the Russo-Japanese War according
to an article by Boris Feldblyum which is referenced below. The FAST
Genealogical Service which he sponsors has linked to the article a list of
2943 Jewish soldiers >from all over Russia who were war victims.

Also referenced below is an article by YIVO on the connection of the War
and the Revolution and its aftermath.

"Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905. Database of Russian Army Jewish Soldiers
injured, killed or missing in action", by Boris Feldblyum (1998) can be
found at http://www.bfcollection.net/fast/rjmain.html
The article contains several links to the database, including one that
lists the surnames in alphabetical order, their Districts and towns. (I
have no connection with Feldblyum or FAST).

The YIVO article is "Russian Revolution of 1905" which can be found in the
YIVO Encyclopedia at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Russian_Revolution_of_1905

Alphabetical lists of the surnames, towns and Districts >from the list that
PDRG has posted are available to anyone on request to me at the email
address below. The complete PDRG list is available only to its members.

For more information about membershipin the Panevezys District Research
Group (PDRG) you may contact me at the email address
below or go to www.litvaksig.org

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


"Book of Memory of Jewish Soldiers" #lithuania

Marilyn Robinson
 

Information was found on a Russian language forum, Patriotcenter Forum,
beginning at: http://forum.patriotcenter.ru/index.php?topic=34.0
(there are 54 pages).

There are names, varied information, original documents, etc. This site
gives information about individuals >from throughout the USSR.

Some names mentioned are:
KATZ, (Kursk region), TANKLEVSKY (Poltava region), KAPLAN
(Dnipropetrovsk), VEKSLER (Vilnius), IUKOVICHUS, KREYZMAN/KRAYZMAN
(Kiev), SHTITSELMAN (Odessa), SCHECHTMAN, HINOVSKY, TROHMAN, GRAMZUGER
(Vinnitsa region/Ukraine), IDOWU, KUZNETSOV

"Sobkor" also posted information at
http://www.angrapa.ru/forum/index.php?showtopic=311&st=360&gopid=123=
10&#entry12310 or http://tinyurl.com/czk7ss8

SHANE, GELFAND/GOLFAND, GURALNIK, FABRIKANT, MELSHIN (Odessa),
MELSHT/MELSHTINA, BYHOVSKY, BURSHTYN, YURISA, ZILBERMAN, TAVER, MICHAEL,
CHERNIK, RIVKIN, SHUHGALTER, BARIL (Khmelnik, Vinnitsa/Ukraine), PERCUS
(Altai Krai), ULYANOV, VILIS or MACHS/MACIEJ Vilis Gustovovich (Latvia),
VIGODSKY (Leningrad ?), NEMIROVSKY, LAZAREVIC, WEISER, KHANUKOV, GENDLER
(Vinnitsa region), GULERMAN, KIRILKO-BLEVIS, WEINER, ROHM/RUM (Estonia),
FILANOVSKY/FILONOVSKY, KLEDSKY/KLENSKY/KLECK (Minsk), FAINSHMIDT,
ETLINA, ELGORT, RAFALCHIK (Minsk, Belarus), KHOTIMLIANSKY (Kirovograd,
Ukraine), LISHMAN/LITZMAN, VALERIA (?) Filipowicz, BONISLAVOVICH
(Rzhev), BOLESLAVOVICH (Kalinin region), SCHNEIDERMAN (Ryasno, Gorky
District, Belarus), TIHOK ('Rivers Vileyka, Minsk, Belarus),
VINITSKY/VINETSKII/VINNITSA (Yaroslavl), BLIMEL (Krasnoarmeysk, Riga,
Latvia), GOIKHMAN/GOICHMAN, GUREWITSCH (Vilna--there is a photo),
KAZEROWITSCH (Lubava), KOCHAN, CHERNIN/TSCHERNIN (Slitheen), LEVEV
(Vitebsk), GOLD, FUKSMAN, ROZIN/RODIN (Smolensk region), DAMESHEK
(Moscow region), HOFFMAN, WOLFOWITZ, GANZBURG, ARONOV, VEYSGLUZ, ABZEL,
ZALKIND, MEDVEDEV or BATUMI, TABACHNIKOV, ROITBERG, FELDMAN, LIBEZ,
DREYNBAND, REDINSKY, TSIRLIN (Buzuluk, Chkalov region), EPELBAUM,
INTENBERG, et al.

Please visit the forum for additional information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "Book of Memory of Jewish Soldiers" #lithuania

Marilyn Robinson
 

Information was found on a Russian language forum, Patriotcenter Forum,
beginning at: http://forum.patriotcenter.ru/index.php?topic=34.0
(there are 54 pages).

There are names, varied information, original documents, etc. This site
gives information about individuals >from throughout the USSR.

Some names mentioned are:
KATZ, (Kursk region), TANKLEVSKY (Poltava region), KAPLAN
(Dnipropetrovsk), VEKSLER (Vilnius), IUKOVICHUS, KREYZMAN/KRAYZMAN
(Kiev), SHTITSELMAN (Odessa), SCHECHTMAN, HINOVSKY, TROHMAN, GRAMZUGER
(Vinnitsa region/Ukraine), IDOWU, KUZNETSOV

"Sobkor" also posted information at
http://www.angrapa.ru/forum/index.php?showtopic=311&st=360&gopid=123=
10&#entry12310 or http://tinyurl.com/czk7ss8

SHANE, GELFAND/GOLFAND, GURALNIK, FABRIKANT, MELSHIN (Odessa),
MELSHT/MELSHTINA, BYHOVSKY, BURSHTYN, YURISA, ZILBERMAN, TAVER, MICHAEL,
CHERNIK, RIVKIN, SHUHGALTER, BARIL (Khmelnik, Vinnitsa/Ukraine), PERCUS
(Altai Krai), ULYANOV, VILIS or MACHS/MACIEJ Vilis Gustovovich (Latvia),
VIGODSKY (Leningrad ?), NEMIROVSKY, LAZAREVIC, WEISER, KHANUKOV, GENDLER
(Vinnitsa region), GULERMAN, KIRILKO-BLEVIS, WEINER, ROHM/RUM (Estonia),
FILANOVSKY/FILONOVSKY, KLEDSKY/KLENSKY/KLECK (Minsk), FAINSHMIDT,
ETLINA, ELGORT, RAFALCHIK (Minsk, Belarus), KHOTIMLIANSKY (Kirovograd,
Ukraine), LISHMAN/LITZMAN, VALERIA (?) Filipowicz, BONISLAVOVICH
(Rzhev), BOLESLAVOVICH (Kalinin region), SCHNEIDERMAN (Ryasno, Gorky
District, Belarus), TIHOK ('Rivers Vileyka, Minsk, Belarus),
VINITSKY/VINETSKII/VINNITSA (Yaroslavl), BLIMEL (Krasnoarmeysk, Riga,
Latvia), GOIKHMAN/GOICHMAN, GUREWITSCH (Vilna--there is a photo),
KAZEROWITSCH (Lubava), KOCHAN, CHERNIN/TSCHERNIN (Slitheen), LEVEV
(Vitebsk), GOLD, FUKSMAN, ROZIN/RODIN (Smolensk region), DAMESHEK
(Moscow region), HOFFMAN, WOLFOWITZ, GANZBURG, ARONOV, VEYSGLUZ, ABZEL,
ZALKIND, MEDVEDEV or BATUMI, TABACHNIKOV, ROITBERG, FELDMAN, LIBEZ,
DREYNBAND, REDINSKY, TSIRLIN (Buzuluk, Chkalov region), EPELBAUM,
INTENBERG, et al.

Please visit the forum for additional information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Question about a book on Pecs, Hungary #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Dear Genners,

I am beginning to do research for a family friend on her family >from Pecs,
Hungary. I found a reference to her grandparents' marriage record in the
index to the following book:

The book is called Forrasok Pecs varos polgarosodasarol (1867-1921) and
there's an index to it at: http://tinyurl.com/8wsrpfz

It shows the following index entry:

157. Kempfner Lipot kereskedo es Spitzer Iren hazassagi szerzodese 377

I think 377 is the page number.

If anyone has a copy of this book, please email me.

Hopefully yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question about a book on Pecs, Hungary #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Dear Genners,

I am beginning to do research for a family friend on her family >from Pecs,
Hungary. I found a reference to her grandparents' marriage record in the
index to the following book:

The book is called Forrasok Pecs varos polgarosodasarol (1867-1921) and
there's an index to it at: http://tinyurl.com/8wsrpfz

It shows the following index entry:

157. Kempfner Lipot kereskedo es Spitzer Iren hazassagi szerzodese 377

I think 377 is the page number.

If anyone has a copy of this book, please email me.

Hopefully yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


WWII: Jews in Command of the Red Army #lithuania

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language site, Live Journal, at:
http://shaon.livejournal.com/63355.html
Information is >from Alexander Shulman (posted 4/26/08).

Some names include:

Infantry Commanders--

KREIZER, KOLPAKCHI, STERN, GORODINSKIY, DASHEVSKY, STELMACH, BIRMAN,
GOLOVCHINER, ROGOZNY, SIMINOVSKY, ANDREEV, BABICH, SMOLIN, LEVIN,
JANKOWSKI, LEBEDINSKY, TSUKAREV, BIRSTEYN, SHAFARENKO, STEIN, et al.

Air Force Commanders--

SMUSHKEVICH, SHEVELEV, RAFALOVICH, ZLATOTSVETOV (GODDFARB), HASHPER,
TSEYGIN, PLOTKIN, SWEERS, MOGILEV, BERMAN, GOBERMAN, et al.

Cavalry Commanders--

TSETLIN, BORISOV (SHISTER), NIDELEVICH, et al.

Armored Forces Commanders--

BINOVICH, HASIN, KOTIN, VAINRUB, SCHNEIDER, VISHMAN, SAFIRE, HASIN,
TEMNIK, EGUDKIN LIVSHITS, GOLDBERG, MINDLIN, KRICHMAN, PEHKOVSKY,
KLINFELD, OSKOTSKY, KAUFMAN, PAIKIN, EISENBERG, MOTZKIN, DWORKIN,
SHULKIN, et al.


Engineering & Signal Corps Commanders--

KOTLYAR, SHAPIRA, LOPATIN, SHIFRIN, SLAVIN, CHEMERIS, TSIRLIN, VAYZMAN,
TREGUB, GINZBURG, PRUSS, AGROSKIN, BRYNZON, et al.

Artillery Units Commanders--

BROVALSKY, RAYNIN, GUKOVSKY, PLASKOV, HUSID, GUREVICH, IDELSON,
LIFSHITS, MAHLIN, TRAHTENBERG, KURKOVSKY, SVET, REYTBURG, et al.

Please visit the site for additional information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania WWII: Jews in Command of the Red Army #lithuania

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language site, Live Journal, at:
http://shaon.livejournal.com/63355.html
Information is >from Alexander Shulman (posted 4/26/08).

Some names include:

Infantry Commanders--

KREIZER, KOLPAKCHI, STERN, GORODINSKIY, DASHEVSKY, STELMACH, BIRMAN,
GOLOVCHINER, ROGOZNY, SIMINOVSKY, ANDREEV, BABICH, SMOLIN, LEVIN,
JANKOWSKI, LEBEDINSKY, TSUKAREV, BIRSTEYN, SHAFARENKO, STEIN, et al.

Air Force Commanders--

SMUSHKEVICH, SHEVELEV, RAFALOVICH, ZLATOTSVETOV (GODDFARB), HASHPER,
TSEYGIN, PLOTKIN, SWEERS, MOGILEV, BERMAN, GOBERMAN, et al.

Cavalry Commanders--

TSETLIN, BORISOV (SHISTER), NIDELEVICH, et al.

Armored Forces Commanders--

BINOVICH, HASIN, KOTIN, VAINRUB, SCHNEIDER, VISHMAN, SAFIRE, HASIN,
TEMNIK, EGUDKIN LIVSHITS, GOLDBERG, MINDLIN, KRICHMAN, PEHKOVSKY,
KLINFELD, OSKOTSKY, KAUFMAN, PAIKIN, EISENBERG, MOTZKIN, DWORKIN,
SHULKIN, et al.


Engineering & Signal Corps Commanders--

KOTLYAR, SHAPIRA, LOPATIN, SHIFRIN, SLAVIN, CHEMERIS, TSIRLIN, VAYZMAN,
TREGUB, GINZBURG, PRUSS, AGROSKIN, BRYNZON, et al.

Artillery Units Commanders--

BROVALSKY, RAYNIN, GUKOVSKY, PLASKOV, HUSID, GUREVICH, IDELSON,
LIFSHITS, MAHLIN, TRAHTENBERG, KURKOVSKY, SVET, REYTBURG, et al.

Please visit the site for additional information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Lithuanian Jewish Soldiers in the Russo-Japaneses War #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) has posted on its Shutterfly
website a list of 141 names of Jewish soldiers >from Lithuania who served in
the Tsarist army during the Russo-Japaniese War of 1904/1905. It is
anticipated that other LitvakSIG District Research Groups will do the same.
This list is extracted >from the book "Jews in the Russian Army", by M.
USOV (1911). The list was extracted by S. Katsev >from a more complete list
that was later microfilmed by the Mormon Church and >from which this list
is taken. This list contains 131 different surnames. They came >from 57
towns in 16 Districts in what is now Lithuania and Belarus. Of the total
victims, 13 were listed as wounded, 18 were listed as missing and, except
for 11 others who were apparently unhurt, there were 99 listed as killed.

The Russo-Japanese War was extremely unpopular with the entire Russian
population. It was assumed that an expected victory was an effort to
strengthen the power of the reactionary autocratic rule of Czar Nicholas II.
Russia's ignominious defeat at the hands of the Japanese led to the opposite
result. The direct results were the uprising called the Revolution of 1905
(actually >from 1904 to 1907), the strengthening of liberal political forces,
the establishment of the Duma, a popularly elected legislative assembly in
two following elections, and the lifting of many restriction on the Jews
(12 of whom were elected to the Duma).

This was a mixed blessing for the Jews because it set off a number of
pogroms with many Jewish casualties. Although Jews fought bravely in the
war, as a whole they were accused of disloyalty and there was resentment
among the general population of the liberalization in the treatment of the
Jews. One achievement of some Jewish organizations, such as the Bund, was
that they were able to effctively organize for self defense. Nevertheless,
this entire episode led to a massive wave of Jewish emigration, mainly to
the United States, and a very small number to Palestine.

Many thousands of Russian Jews fought in the Russo-Japanese War according
to an article by Boris Feldblyum which is referenced below. The FAST
Genealogical Service which he sponsors has linked to the article a list
of 2943 Jewish soldiers >from all over Russia who were war victims.
Also referenced below is an article by YIVO on the connection of the War
and the Revolution and its aftermath.

"Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905. Database of Russian Army Jewish Soldiers
injured, killed or missing in action", by Boris Feldblyum (1998) can be
found at http://www.bfcollection.net/fast/rjmain.html The article contains
several links to the database, including one that lists the surnames in
alphabetical order, their Districts and towns. (I have no connection with
Feldblyum or FAST). The YIVO article is "Russian Revolution of 1905" which
can be found in the YIVO Encyclopedia at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Russian_Revolution_of_1905

Alphabetical lists of the surnames, towns and Districts >from the list that
PDRG has posted are available to anyone on request to me at the email
address below. The complete PDRG list is available only to those
who have contributed $100 to the work of PDRG in translating available
archival records >from Lithuania. All of the funds go directly to pay for
the translations, which are exclusively available to PDRG participants
in Excel format for at least 18 months before they become publicly
available on the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Contributions may be made
by credit card to www.litvaksig.org/contribute or by check to the address
listed there, and are income tax deductible for US taxpayers.

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuanian Jewish Soldiers in the Russo-Japaneses War #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) has posted on its Shutterfly
website a list of 141 names of Jewish soldiers >from Lithuania who served in
the Tsarist army during the Russo-Japaniese War of 1904/1905. It is
anticipated that other LitvakSIG District Research Groups will do the same.
This list is extracted >from the book "Jews in the Russian Army", by M.
USOV (1911). The list was extracted by S. Katsev >from a more complete list
that was later microfilmed by the Mormon Church and >from which this list
is taken. This list contains 131 different surnames. They came >from 57
towns in 16 Districts in what is now Lithuania and Belarus. Of the total
victims, 13 were listed as wounded, 18 were listed as missing and, except
for 11 others who were apparently unhurt, there were 99 listed as killed.

The Russo-Japanese War was extremely unpopular with the entire Russian
population. It was assumed that an expected victory was an effort to
strengthen the power of the reactionary autocratic rule of Czar Nicholas II.
Russia's ignominious defeat at the hands of the Japanese led to the opposite
result. The direct results were the uprising called the Revolution of 1905
(actually >from 1904 to 1907), the strengthening of liberal political forces,
the establishment of the Duma, a popularly elected legislative assembly in
two following elections, and the lifting of many restriction on the Jews
(12 of whom were elected to the Duma).

This was a mixed blessing for the Jews because it set off a number of
pogroms with many Jewish casualties. Although Jews fought bravely in the
war, as a whole they were accused of disloyalty and there was resentment
among the general population of the liberalization in the treatment of the
Jews. One achievement of some Jewish organizations, such as the Bund, was
that they were able to effctively organize for self defense. Nevertheless,
this entire episode led to a massive wave of Jewish emigration, mainly to
the United States, and a very small number to Palestine.

Many thousands of Russian Jews fought in the Russo-Japanese War according
to an article by Boris Feldblyum which is referenced below. The FAST
Genealogical Service which he sponsors has linked to the article a list
of 2943 Jewish soldiers >from all over Russia who were war victims.
Also referenced below is an article by YIVO on the connection of the War
and the Revolution and its aftermath.

"Russian-Japanese War of 1904-1905. Database of Russian Army Jewish Soldiers
injured, killed or missing in action", by Boris Feldblyum (1998) can be
found at http://www.bfcollection.net/fast/rjmain.html The article contains
several links to the database, including one that lists the surnames in
alphabetical order, their Districts and towns. (I have no connection with
Feldblyum or FAST). The YIVO article is "Russian Revolution of 1905" which
can be found in the YIVO Encyclopedia at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Russian_Revolution_of_1905

Alphabetical lists of the surnames, towns and Districts >from the list that
PDRG has posted are available to anyone on request to me at the email
address below. The complete PDRG list is available only to those
who have contributed $100 to the work of PDRG in translating available
archival records >from Lithuania. All of the funds go directly to pay for
the translations, which are exclusively available to PDRG participants
in Excel format for at least 18 months before they become publicly
available on the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Contributions may be made
by credit card to www.litvaksig.org/contribute or by check to the address
listed there, and are income tax deductible for US taxpayers.

Regards,
Bill Yoffee
Panevezys District Research Coordinator
kidsbks@verizon.net


Kretinga and Plunge Internal Passport Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

The Kretinga (Telsiai District) internal passport records, 1919-1940, have
been translated and are now available on the Telsiai District Research
Group (DRG) web site.

The remaining Kretinga district towns left to be translated are Salantai,
Gargzdai, and Skuodas. They are expected to be translated and made
available on the Telsiai DRG web site during the next 4 to 6 weeks.

We have just discovered a file containing Plunge internal passport
records. This is a great find because interest in Plunge records is
very high. The Plunge records will be translated after the records for
the remaining three towns listed above are translated.

While this is all very good news for researchers, contributions are needed
in order to pay for the translations. If you are already a contributor to
the Telsiai DRG, an additional contribution would be very much appreciated.
Any amount will be a big help.

If you are not already a contributor to the Telsiai DRG, and your
ancestors lived in that area, you definitely want to join and gain
access to the thousands of records already translated. There is a delay
of 18 months before the translated records are added to the All Lithuania
Database (ALD).

Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute - Scroll down to District Research and
select Telsiai. In the amount block, key in $100. You can use your credit
card as the site is secure. As soon as the Telsiai DRG Coordinatoris
notified of your contribution, you will be invited to join and access the
web site.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Kretinga and Plunge Internal Passport Records #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

The Kretinga (Telsiai District) internal passport records, 1919-1940, have
been translated and are now available on the Telsiai District Research
Group (DRG) web site.

The remaining Kretinga district towns left to be translated are Salantai,
Gargzdai, and Skuodas. They are expected to be translated and made
available on the Telsiai DRG web site during the next 4 to 6 weeks.

We have just discovered a file containing Plunge internal passport
records. This is a great find because interest in Plunge records is
very high. The Plunge records will be translated after the records for
the remaining three towns listed above are translated.

While this is all very good news for researchers, contributions are needed
in order to pay for the translations. If you are already a contributor to
the Telsiai DRG, an additional contribution would be very much appreciated.
Any amount will be a big help.

If you are not already a contributor to the Telsiai DRG, and your
ancestors lived in that area, you definitely want to join and gain
access to the thousands of records already translated. There is a delay
of 18 months before the translated records are added to the All Lithuania
Database (ALD).

Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute - Scroll down to District Research and
select Telsiai. In the amount block, key in $100. You can use your credit
card as the site is secure. As soon as the Telsiai DRG Coordinatoris
notified of your contribution, you will be invited to join and access the
web site.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Katowice included in Yizkor Book Project report, August 2012 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Katowice/Katowice.html

Shalom,

August has whizzed past but not without quite a lot to show,
Yizkor-Book-Project-wise. Quite a few new books have been added and we're
now talking on just over 700 books that appear in the Yizkor Book Project
with varying quantities of online translations within them.

Which reminds me - quite often I receive queries about why a particular
project has only a few translations and am also asked if there is a
subscription needed in order to see the full translation. Well the story is
that all the translations available online are the result of the hard work
of many people who just haven't managed to get to all the pages in all the
700 original books, which do include more than 200,000 pages of text. We
don't ask for money to see the translations - our aim is to make them freely
available to as many people as possible and if your community has only a few
pages translations online, the way to improve this situation is to get
involved in its translation project. If you would like to know how to do
this, either contact the coordinator on the main page of the particular
project or myself and we'd be happy to explain and elaborate.

August also saw additional entries about Bessarabia >from the Pinkas Romania
(Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania) being added to the project,
thanks to the initiative of Yefim Kogan. The Pinkasim series, by-the-way,
cover many communities, large and small which often are not to be found in
other Yizkor Books and so they are an important source for researchers. If
you are looking for a small community and haven't been able to find
information on it, this is the series to look at and if you need help with
this, just let me know.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the August figures go, during this last
month we have added these 7 new projects:

- Jozefow, Poland (Memorial book to the community of Jozefow and its
martyrs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jozefow/Jozefow.html

- Kostopil, Ukraine (Kostopol; the life and death of a community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kostopil/Kostopil.html

- Mateszalka, Hungary (Jews in Mateszalka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Mateszalka/Mateszalka.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Rakospalota, Hungary (History of the Rakospalota community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rakospalota/Rakospalota.html

- Tirgu Lapus, Romania (A golden album: Childhood memories, four generations
of the community of Targu-Lapus and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tirgu_lapus/tirgu_lapus.html

- Wloclawek, Poland (Wloclawek and vicinity; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wloclawek1/Wloclawek1.html

Added in 7 new entries:

- Alexandreni, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00334.html

- Artsyz, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00335.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00389.html

- Cimislia, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00393.html

- Izmayil, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00331.html

- Pirlita, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00388.html

- Vadul-Rascov, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00350.html

We have continued to update 26 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gorokhov, Ukraine (Horchiv Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gorokhov/gorokhov.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Katowice/Katowice.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Lipcani, Moldova (The community of Lipkany; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lipkany1/lipkany1.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Sacz, Poland (Sandzer Memorial Journal)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_sacz1/nowy_sacz1.html

- Raciaz, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Racionz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Raciaz/Raciaz.html

- Rzeszow, Poland (Rzeszow community; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rzeszow/rzeszow.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Zwolen, Poland (Zwolen Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/
Zwolen/Zwolen.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

Since the High Holidays are just round the corner, I would like to wish all
of you and your families the sweetest New Year - a new year of excellent
health, dreamed of peace and nice-to-have prosperity.

Shana Tova, Lance Ackerfeld Yizkor Book Project Manager


German SIG #Germany Katowice included in Yizkor Book Project report, August 2012 #germany

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Katowice/Katowice.html

Shalom,

August has whizzed past but not without quite a lot to show,
Yizkor-Book-Project-wise. Quite a few new books have been added and we're
now talking on just over 700 books that appear in the Yizkor Book Project
with varying quantities of online translations within them.

Which reminds me - quite often I receive queries about why a particular
project has only a few translations and am also asked if there is a
subscription needed in order to see the full translation. Well the story is
that all the translations available online are the result of the hard work
of many people who just haven't managed to get to all the pages in all the
700 original books, which do include more than 200,000 pages of text. We
don't ask for money to see the translations - our aim is to make them freely
available to as many people as possible and if your community has only a few
pages translations online, the way to improve this situation is to get
involved in its translation project. If you would like to know how to do
this, either contact the coordinator on the main page of the particular
project or myself and we'd be happy to explain and elaborate.

August also saw additional entries about Bessarabia >from the Pinkas Romania
(Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania) being added to the project,
thanks to the initiative of Yefim Kogan. The Pinkasim series, by-the-way,
cover many communities, large and small which often are not to be found in
other Yizkor Books and so they are an important source for researchers. If
you are looking for a small community and haven't been able to find
information on it, this is the series to look at and if you need help with
this, just let me know.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the August figures go, during this last
month we have added these 7 new projects:

- Jozefow, Poland (Memorial book to the community of Jozefow and its
martyrs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jozefow/Jozefow.html

- Kostopil, Ukraine (Kostopol; the life and death of a community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kostopil/Kostopil.html

- Mateszalka, Hungary (Jews in Mateszalka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Mateszalka/Mateszalka.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Rakospalota, Hungary (History of the Rakospalota community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rakospalota/Rakospalota.html

- Tirgu Lapus, Romania (A golden album: Childhood memories, four generations
of the community of Targu-Lapus and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tirgu_lapus/tirgu_lapus.html

- Wloclawek, Poland (Wloclawek and vicinity; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wloclawek1/Wloclawek1.html

Added in 7 new entries:

- Alexandreni, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00334.html

- Artsyz, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00335.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in
Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00389.html

- Cimislia, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00393.html

- Izmayil, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00331.html

- Pirlita, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00388.html

- Vadul-Rascov, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00350.html

We have continued to update 26 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gorokhov, Ukraine (Horchiv Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gorokhov/gorokhov.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Katowice, Poland (Katowice: the Rise and Decline of the Jewish community;
Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Katowice/Katowice.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Lipcani, Moldova (The community of Lipkany; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lipkany1/lipkany1.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs of
our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Sacz, Poland (Sandzer Memorial Journal)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_sacz1/nowy_sacz1.html

- Raciaz, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Racionz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Raciaz/Raciaz.html

- Rzeszow, Poland (Rzeszow community; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rzeszow/rzeszow.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Staszow, Poland (The Staszow book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/staszow/staszowh.html [Hebrew]

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Zwolen, Poland (Zwolen Memorial Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/
Zwolen/Zwolen.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

Since the High Holidays are just round the corner, I would like to wish all
of you and your families the sweetest New Year - a new year of excellent
health, dreamed of peace and nice-to-have prosperity.

Shana Tova, Lance Ackerfeld Yizkor Book Project Manager

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