Date   

CAP/ZIMMERMAN family #ukraine

COMCAST Pop
 

I am researching a branch of my family >from the town of Chudnov.
Family stories said that they were descendants of Peretz TZOP.
All of the passenger lists I have found for them have the last
name CAP. However, when they arrived here each of them changed
the name to ZIMMERMAN. I don't see an obvious connection in the
names. Does anyone have an idea of why they would have made that
change?

Mary-Jane Roth
Alexandria, VA

Researching:
GROISKOP/GROSSER: Labun Philadelphia
TEPPER: Miropol Baranivka Philadelphia
LIEBERMAN: Makhnovka
ROTH: Koisce
FRIED: Hungary
CAP/ZIMMERMAN: Chudnov Philadelphia


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine CAP/ZIMMERMAN family #ukraine

COMCAST Pop
 

I am researching a branch of my family >from the town of Chudnov.
Family stories said that they were descendants of Peretz TZOP.
All of the passenger lists I have found for them have the last
name CAP. However, when they arrived here each of them changed
the name to ZIMMERMAN. I don't see an obvious connection in the
names. Does anyone have an idea of why they would have made that
change?

Mary-Jane Roth
Alexandria, VA

Researching:
GROISKOP/GROSSER: Labun Philadelphia
TEPPER: Miropol Baranivka Philadelphia
LIEBERMAN: Makhnovka
ROTH: Koisce
FRIED: Hungary
CAP/ZIMMERMAN: Chudnov Philadelphia


Mogilev Podolskiy & Kamenets Podolskiy #ukraine

dawidowicz@...
 

Evan Fishman wrote: I'm wondering if there were any economic or sociological
connections between these two towns [Kamenets and Mogilev]. I believe
different branches of my maternal grandmother's family (LISNITZER) lived in
both towns so I'm curious what factors might have caused them to move from
Mogilev Podolskiy to Kamenets Podolskiy.

Kamenets was the 'capital' of the Podolia Governorate >from 1793 to 1917, of
the Ukrainian People's Republic >from 1917 to 1921, and of the Ukrainian SSR
from 1921 to 1925. Many of the main institutions of state and of religion
were based in the city; which had a large and active Jewish community. The
relations between Kamenets (now Kamyanets) and Mogilev (now Mohyliv) were
complex for both Jewish and non-Jewish residents. There were economic,
religious, social, political and administrative links; ranging >from trading
partnerships, to religious/canonical courts, to political organisations
(such as the links between various Zionist organisations and secular
political parties) to the provincial Judicial structure and - of course -
the apparatus for the ubiquitous conscription into the Imperial Russian Army
and the maintenance of the structure .

Evan does not give a date for his ancestors move >from Mogilev to Kamenets;
so it is hard to give more than a vague reason(well the Jewish people of
Podolia did move around for trading purposes, marriage etc). If however, for
instance, the move was around 1905, it was at that time that there were a
series of the most horrendous pogroms in and around Mogilev and although
Kamenets was not immune the anti-Jewish activities were well contained and,
at that period, Kamenets experienced a large inflow of Jewish families from
surrounding areas (see http://tinyurl.com/cosalrr) . This more or less
compensated for the outflow >from the town of, resident, Jews who emigrated
to other parts of Europe and the US.

Martin Davis
Town Leader: Kamenets Podolsk
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mogilev Podolskiy & Kamenets Podolskiy #ukraine

dawidowicz@...
 

Evan Fishman wrote: I'm wondering if there were any economic or sociological
connections between these two towns [Kamenets and Mogilev]. I believe
different branches of my maternal grandmother's family (LISNITZER) lived in
both towns so I'm curious what factors might have caused them to move from
Mogilev Podolskiy to Kamenets Podolskiy.

Kamenets was the 'capital' of the Podolia Governorate >from 1793 to 1917, of
the Ukrainian People's Republic >from 1917 to 1921, and of the Ukrainian SSR
from 1921 to 1925. Many of the main institutions of state and of religion
were based in the city; which had a large and active Jewish community. The
relations between Kamenets (now Kamyanets) and Mogilev (now Mohyliv) were
complex for both Jewish and non-Jewish residents. There were economic,
religious, social, political and administrative links; ranging >from trading
partnerships, to religious/canonical courts, to political organisations
(such as the links between various Zionist organisations and secular
political parties) to the provincial Judicial structure and - of course -
the apparatus for the ubiquitous conscription into the Imperial Russian Army
and the maintenance of the structure .

Evan does not give a date for his ancestors move >from Mogilev to Kamenets;
so it is hard to give more than a vague reason(well the Jewish people of
Podolia did move around for trading purposes, marriage etc). If however, for
instance, the move was around 1905, it was at that time that there were a
series of the most horrendous pogroms in and around Mogilev and although
Kamenets was not immune the anti-Jewish activities were well contained and,
at that period, Kamenets experienced a large inflow of Jewish families from
surrounding areas (see http://tinyurl.com/cosalrr) . This more or less
compensated for the outflow >from the town of, resident, Jews who emigrated
to other parts of Europe and the US.

Martin Davis
Town Leader: Kamenets Podolsk
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamyanets-Podilskyy


"General List of Socialists and Anarchists: Resisters to Bolshevik Regime (October 25,1917-end of 1930's)" #belarus

Marilyn Robinson
 

On a Russian language site at:
http://socialist.memo.ru/lists/slovnikreg/index.htm
(http://tinyurl.com/9qgh7cz),
there is a list of socialists/anarchists/other. (edited by: KN
Morozova, AB Roginskogo, IA Flige; compiled by: IS Zaikina, VV Iofe, KN
Morozov, II Osipova)

You can search the site alphabetically or by region. If you search by
region you need to keep in mind that the individual may have been born
elsewhere. There is some personal information, which may include
society/party that they have joined, birth date/year, date/year of
death, spouse's name (other family members names), pseudonym, etc. Some
names (but not all) include links to additional information. The list
includes Jews and non-Jews.

A few names are: ALTSCHUL/ALTSHULER, VENSHTEYN, WOLIN (aka
EICHENBAUM/EICHENBAUM-VOLIN), GEILIKMAN, HIRSCHFELD (MALKIN), GOLDBERG,
GONIKBERG/GONIGBERG, GUREVICH, KOGAN, ROZEHBLIT, FEINBERG, SHIFRIN,
ABRAMOV, ABRAMOVICH, ABRAMSKY/ABRAMSON, AVERBUKH, AGUNIN, ADELSON,
AYNGORN, AYNZAFT, ALUKER, ALPERT, ALTMAN, AMORA, MAGAZINER, MANDEL,
MANDELA, MANDELSHTAM, MARGULIS, RABIN, RABINOVICH (a lot of them),
RAVIKOVICH (aka ELYASBERG/RAVIKOVICH-ELYASBERG), RAIGORODSKII, REICHMAN,
RAKOWSKI, RAPIPORT,RAPOPORT, RATNER, RHINE, RIVKIN, ROSENBERG, ROZIN,
ROITMAN, ROTKIN, RUBIN, RUBINOV, MENCHIK, MERINGOF, TABACHNIK,
TAVROVSKY, TARNOPOLER/TARNOPOLSKY, TEPPER, TUROVSKY, CHECHIK, SHAPIRO (a
lot of them), SCHWARTZ, CHIZHEVSKY, SISKIN, YABROV, YAVLINSKY, JAFFE,
et al.

The list is also categorized by: "List of persons with questionable or
unclear affiliation" (ex. APTEKMAN, APFELBAUM, ARONSON); and "List of
persons belonging to the society, party has not been established" (ex.
FRIED, LURIE, MALKIN, HAGANAH).

Please view the website for more names and information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Belarus SIG #Belarus "General List of Socialists and Anarchists: Resisters to Bolshevik Regime (October 25,1917-end of 1930's)" #belarus

Marilyn Robinson
 

On a Russian language site at:
http://socialist.memo.ru/lists/slovnikreg/index.htm
(http://tinyurl.com/9qgh7cz),
there is a list of socialists/anarchists/other. (edited by: KN
Morozova, AB Roginskogo, IA Flige; compiled by: IS Zaikina, VV Iofe, KN
Morozov, II Osipova)

You can search the site alphabetically or by region. If you search by
region you need to keep in mind that the individual may have been born
elsewhere. There is some personal information, which may include
society/party that they have joined, birth date/year, date/year of
death, spouse's name (other family members names), pseudonym, etc. Some
names (but not all) include links to additional information. The list
includes Jews and non-Jews.

A few names are: ALTSCHUL/ALTSHULER, VENSHTEYN, WOLIN (aka
EICHENBAUM/EICHENBAUM-VOLIN), GEILIKMAN, HIRSCHFELD (MALKIN), GOLDBERG,
GONIKBERG/GONIGBERG, GUREVICH, KOGAN, ROZEHBLIT, FEINBERG, SHIFRIN,
ABRAMOV, ABRAMOVICH, ABRAMSKY/ABRAMSON, AVERBUKH, AGUNIN, ADELSON,
AYNGORN, AYNZAFT, ALUKER, ALPERT, ALTMAN, AMORA, MAGAZINER, MANDEL,
MANDELA, MANDELSHTAM, MARGULIS, RABIN, RABINOVICH (a lot of them),
RAVIKOVICH (aka ELYASBERG/RAVIKOVICH-ELYASBERG), RAIGORODSKII, REICHMAN,
RAKOWSKI, RAPIPORT,RAPOPORT, RATNER, RHINE, RIVKIN, ROSENBERG, ROZIN,
ROITMAN, ROTKIN, RUBIN, RUBINOV, MENCHIK, MERINGOF, TABACHNIK,
TAVROVSKY, TARNOPOLER/TARNOPOLSKY, TEPPER, TUROVSKY, CHECHIK, SHAPIRO (a
lot of them), SCHWARTZ, CHIZHEVSKY, SISKIN, YABROV, YAVLINSKY, JAFFE,
et al.

The list is also categorized by: "List of persons with questionable or
unclear affiliation" (ex. APTEKMAN, APFELBAUM, ARONSON); and "List of
persons belonging to the society, party has not been established" (ex.
FRIED, LURIE, MALKIN, HAGANAH).

Please view the website for more names and information.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Colman FINKELSTEIN, again #general

Paul Silverstone
 

Colman Finkelstein said in his naturalization application in Canada that
he arrived in America on the s.s. Arizona in December 1885. His wife
was named Chantze, they had no children at that time.

The manifest for this ship lists three Finkelsteins, the writing
interpreted as Kahmen, age 23, Chane, age 20, and Kalmar, age 15.
The odd thing is that all are listed as female, “spinsters”.
Was there some benefit, a cheaper ticket for instance, for a female?

I now believe that the teenager was actually his cousin, also named
Colman, who up to now has been otherwise unaccounted for. This Colman
I wrote about earlier. it appears that he used the name Calvin in America.

His sister's grandson, born in 1915, had the middle name Calvin.
Therefore it appears that the missing Colman/Calvin was born about 1870
and died before 1915. He arrived in Canada at age 15, had a son Earle,
and a wife Belle Atlas.
--
Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Colman FINKELSTEIN, again #general

Paul Silverstone
 

Colman Finkelstein said in his naturalization application in Canada that
he arrived in America on the s.s. Arizona in December 1885. His wife
was named Chantze, they had no children at that time.

The manifest for this ship lists three Finkelsteins, the writing
interpreted as Kahmen, age 23, Chane, age 20, and Kalmar, age 15.
The odd thing is that all are listed as female, “spinsters”.
Was there some benefit, a cheaper ticket for instance, for a female?

I now believe that the teenager was actually his cousin, also named
Colman, who up to now has been otherwise unaccounted for. This Colman
I wrote about earlier. it appears that he used the name Calvin in America.

His sister's grandson, born in 1915, had the middle name Calvin.
Therefore it appears that the missing Colman/Calvin was born about 1870
and died before 1915. He arrived in Canada at age 15, had a son Earle,
and a wife Belle Atlas.
--
Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@aya.yale.edu


Herman, Shepsenwohl and Oguroff families from Gorodok (Vileika, Vilna, near Minsk) #belarus

Anne Kenison
 

I have just learned >from her gravestone inscription and death certificate
that my great-grandfather Morris Oguroff's second wife Bessie (Basche), who died
in New York at about age 52 in 1921, was the daughter of one Isaac Herman.
Her gravestone refers to him as Yitzchak Yaakov (Isaac Jacob).

Morris Oguroff came >from Gorodok and arrived in New York 18 July 1903 with an
11-year old girl named Basche (b abt 1892), who disappeared >from records
after that. However, through Jewish Gen, I have met a descendent of Gorodok
Shepsenwohls who told me her whole family took the surname Herman when they
arrived in the US. Since she and I appear to have other families in common,
I have been assuming that Basche became a Herman, too, maybe a Bessie or Beckie.
as other Basches did.

Now, with the discovery that my step-great-grandmother was the daughter of a
Herman, I think I was probably on the right track, but I need to find more
documentation.

Bessie was born in Russia around 1870, so her father Isaac would have been
born a generation earlier. If he used the surname Herman, I am guessing that
he came to the US, and may have been a Shepsenwohl in Russia. The ancestry of
little Basche, supposedly (but not likely) a step-daughter of Morris Oguroff,
is still a mystery. Maybe she was the daughter of a brother of Bessie's.


I hope one of the many Shepsenwohl or other researchers may know something
about Isaac and his family that can help clarify the family relationships.

Any help would be very much appreciated.

Anne Kenison
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Herman, Shepsenwohl and Oguroff families from Gorodok (Vileika, Vilna, near Minsk) #belarus

Anne Kenison
 

I have just learned >from her gravestone inscription and death certificate
that my great-grandfather Morris Oguroff's second wife Bessie (Basche), who died
in New York at about age 52 in 1921, was the daughter of one Isaac Herman.
Her gravestone refers to him as Yitzchak Yaakov (Isaac Jacob).

Morris Oguroff came >from Gorodok and arrived in New York 18 July 1903 with an
11-year old girl named Basche (b abt 1892), who disappeared >from records
after that. However, through Jewish Gen, I have met a descendent of Gorodok
Shepsenwohls who told me her whole family took the surname Herman when they
arrived in the US. Since she and I appear to have other families in common,
I have been assuming that Basche became a Herman, too, maybe a Bessie or Beckie.
as other Basches did.

Now, with the discovery that my step-great-grandmother was the daughter of a
Herman, I think I was probably on the right track, but I need to find more
documentation.

Bessie was born in Russia around 1870, so her father Isaac would have been
born a generation earlier. If he used the surname Herman, I am guessing that
he came to the US, and may have been a Shepsenwohl in Russia. The ancestry of
little Basche, supposedly (but not likely) a step-daughter of Morris Oguroff,
is still a mystery. Maybe she was the daughter of a brother of Bessie's.


I hope one of the many Shepsenwohl or other researchers may know something
about Isaac and his family that can help clarify the family relationships.

Any help would be very much appreciated.

Anne Kenison
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


my trip to Moldova #bessarabia

Elise Goodman <elisesgoodman@...>
 

Dear Bessarabia SIG:

My father, Abraham SCHECTMAN was born in Otik (now Ataki) in
BESSARABIA (now Moldova) in the late 1880's and came to NY in 1909. I
have always wanted to see his town, and this year I convinced my
husband to join me.

I typed up notes about our trip and will go back to them and quote
from them whatever I think might interest members of this group.
We first went to St. Petersburg which was quite marvelous. Spent Kol
Nidre at what is supposedly the second largest synagogue in Europe.
Orthodox, so me upstairs, Arnold (my husband) downstairs. Women
seemed to say not a word though many held Russian/Hebrew siddurs. I
was pleased to note that the Kol Nidre melody was the same as I am
used to, and they also sang Avinu Malkenu to usual melody. The rest
of the davenning was totally unfamiliar.

"FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2012

Flew >from St. Petersburg to KISHENIEV, capital of Moldova. Met at
airport by our guide, Natasha Alhazov, who pointed out various
monuments on way to hotel in central K - place where Jews >from K
ghetto were all killed, etc.

(An aside, Natasha has a Phd in English, had a Fulbright at U. of
North Carolina, speaks fluent English, is very smart and funny and a
treat to be with. I highly recommend her to anyone looking for a guide
in Moldova or Moghilev-Podolsky in the Ukraine, or Odessa, etc. -
nalhazov@gmail.com).

At hotel, Stella de Lux, N and I sat down with all the research that
had been collected by Alla, our Moldovan archivist and Alex Dunai,
our Ukrainian archivist and me.

I got my most of my info >from the Jewish Geneology website database
put together by the Bessarabian Special Interest Group (thank you
Phyllis Berenson and Yefim Kogan for helping me navigate through it).
Tried to figure out info >from the 1700?s through most recent times.
Data base organized according to records kept during mostly the
Russian Empire time: Vital records on births, deaths, marriages,
divorce and perhaps most important records called Revisions, which
were most carefully done for taxation and recruitment (into the
czarist army) purposes.

Unfortunately, the material that Alex had collected (and he was very
thorough) did not arrive until after I had left NY. I had my computer
with me and e-mailed what he (and his wife, who works with him) had
sent to me on to Natasha, who very kindly printed out all the material
and brought it with her to the airport. It was very confusing to have
to put all the material together so last minute before we left for
Ataki. Alla sent me mostly material >from Revision lists - all the
vitals >from Ataki seemed to be burned or lost or whatever .

Bessarabia was part of the Russian Empire and part of the Settlement
of Pale which was where ordinary Jews were allowed to live.

Bessarabia then became part of Romania, and after the 1917 revolution,
became part of the USSR. It became the independent country of Moldova
when the USSR broke up, around 1990.

(Aside: we were looking for Schectmans, which was my father's real
last name. My maiden name is Simon becase my father bought a visa or
passport or boat ticket >from a man named Simon, and kept that last
name in the US. My grandfather was Yehudah Leib Schectman., mother was
Raise. My father's older brother (and first born of Yehudah Leib)
was Duvid. Next sibling down >from my father, Avrum, was Elia, then
sister D?vora, brother Fischel (my Uncle Philip, only sibling who came
to US), and youngest brother Mordechai Josef, who supposedly died
young of consumption.

After a short nap on Friday, N took us on a walk around K. Supposedly
the poorest country in Europe, and it looked it (as did most of
Moldova). Lots of walnut trees and bought some shelled walnuts on a
street corner and delicious pears. Also bought a small hanging made of
hand loomed black wool, embroidered with natural dyed colored wools.
Made until around the 1960?s in the countryside, but no longer
crafted.

George Soros has a foundation in K. As you might expect, many of the
Jewish institutions in Moldvoa (synagogues, cemetaries, memorial
statues mostly relating to the Holocaust), are supported by overseas,
rich Jews.

Friday evening, Natasha (who is not Jewish but who volunteers and
works for many Jewish organizations), took us to the only synagogue
left in Kisheniev. In my father?s time there were were over 33. The
synagogue was tiny and rather decrepit, and run by a Chabad
Lubovitcher organization. Some of the men were in Orthodox dress,
some in tee shirts and kipas. Some woman gave me an English/Hebrew
sidur and helped me figure out where in the service they were. Poor
Arnold had only a Russian/Hebrew sidur and had no idea where the
service was. Very little singing, quite boring. The man who led
services was a rabbi who lived in K, was a converted Jew. During the
services there were folded screens between the men and women. When
the rabbi gave his sermon (in Russian and therefore very long and
boring) they removed the screens so the women could see the rabbi -
and then put them back when (end of) services began again. There were
about 25 men; 15 women. A few children - not many - ran across the
room occasionally.

After services, we took Natasha and husband Edward (who brought a box
of chocolates for my birthday) to very good restaurant. Lots of
vineyards in Moldova and known in area for their wines. I had the
most delicious mammaligia, corn flour based, with sour cream and
grated cheese. Mammaligia is a Romanian name for what Italians call
polenta. My mother used to make it often, and serve it with farmer
cheese.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29:

Driver Sasha, under 30, spent a year in Philly when he was 13, and was
sweet and thoughtful. He often works with Natasha, and he and she
arrived at hotel around 8:30 AM and we took off toward Ataki, which
is about four hours northwest of Kisheniev.

We stopped on the way in BALTSI, the second largest city in Moldova,
which before the Holocaust was 50% Jewish. The stop was planned
because my research showed that one of my father's younger brothers,
Elia Skechtman (spelled many different ways in this report because
spelled different ways in data bases and in Cyrillic, etc), had two
children born there, Yitzhak Meer (born 1910) and daughter, Sluba
Liba, born 1909.

We went to the only synagogue in the city, very small, sad looking
(about 20 men there, maybe one or two women.) They hadn?t started
shabbat sevices yet. They had a very simple sukkah in the yard
(Sukkot started Sunday night).

A contact of Natasha?s, the keeper of the cemetary, took us there, but
would not enter with us because it was Shabbat. Cemetary had opened
in 1877. He had brought with him a list of names of people in cemetary
and had looked up which one or ones that were Schechtmans.

There were two Schechtman tombstones: #10798 - Piortah (Peter), son
of Yitzchak, born 1921- died 1965. Doubt that he is a relative.
Earlier tombstones carved in Hebrew; later ones (like Peter?s) carved
in Russian (Cyrillic alphabet). Dedication: To dear husband, father,
grandfather. Memory of you always in our hearts. From: Wife,
children, grandchildren, relatives. He was one of the lucky to
survive the Holocaust. Another tombstone, in Hebrew, earlier, neither
Arnold nor I could decifer because without the vowels, neither of us
has a easy time reading Hebrew.

Was supposed to meet a 60 year old woman named Schechtman, Raise
Korpel Schechtman, lives on Hotinskya #10, apt. 58, 0-231-603-11. Was
told we could reach her late at night. But we didn?t meet her.

from synagogue, we then met a friend of N?s, Paulina, who had been the
principal of a high school and was now retired on a pension of about
$60 a month - very little, even for Moldova. She now also worked for
a Jewish organization in town that provided money and food for Jews
who had no means of support. Job provided additional support for her.
Most of her family had made Aliyah - indeed most of Jews in Moldova
and Uklaine had either left by then for Israel or US. She has daughter
in Baltsi and so is reluctant to leave. Had lunch with her.

After Baltsi, we left for ATAKI, another two hours. As we grew close
to Ataki area, it was clear that it was very agricultural (as is most
of Moldova, N told us.) Quite pretty fields, filled with acres of
corn - by now, mostly all dried, piled together, waiting for pick up
by horse-drawn carts. Also passed lots of sunflower fields, which
really tickled me because I often saw my father nibbling sunflower
seeds. Now I know where the taste for those seeds came >from (and why
I kept a jar of those seeds around for years, never eating them, but
never throwing them out.) N. says they are best when fresh - that is
from that season?s sunflowers. Tried to pick them >from our sunflowers
this summer, but wasn?t able to. Will try again next summer.

Saw many horse drawn carts in the fields, but no machines. Like from
long ago. Can?t make much money >from agriculture that way.

We had been told that Ataki was a gypsy town - told in a very
derogatory way. As we approached the town we saw huge houses -
mansions - in dreadful but expensive taste. Were told that outsiders
believe the gypsies make their large amounts of money running drugs.

No Jews left in Ataki (town now of about 8500). In my father's time
was 90% Jewish. Were lucky to meet a woman who works for the mayor and
she took us about. She showed us where the old market was - now
rather the center of town with trucks and various other vehicles. My
father's brother Philip, the only other member of the family to come
to US, and whom I had interviewed in the1980's, said the market
separated the old Otick >from the new Otick, and they lived in the new
Otick, fairly close to the Dnieste River (which separates Moldova from
the Ukaine). My father had told me that he used to skate across the
Dnieste to a town he called Molive (now called Moghilov-Podolsky, and
now in Ukraine) to work in a fabric store. Uncle Philip remembers
skating on the river too, but Charlie Klein (who I think I remember
my father talking about) was the best skater. They also used to swim
in the river in the summer.

Now, because a dam has been built up stream, no one swims (too cold
they say) and the river doesn?t freeze in the winter time (global
warmng?).

N was reluctant to take photos of the gypy mansions; Sasha said they
would throw stones at us. There were a few houses >from the Jewish
times and we took photos of them. Uncle Philip had described his
house in my interview with him, and seeing the old houses I could
really visualize what my father's home had looked like.

Uncle Philip remembered three synagogues, and we visited the one they
probably attended, the largest one. It was a total wreck. Had been
turned into some kind of cultural center in Soviet times (no religious
life had been allowed), and then was a big fire in the 1980?s which
burned all the supporting logs. Had clearly been two stories, with a
front entrance and a back one (proably for the women.) Asked my
cousin Rochelle, who is a Hebrew scholar, to translate the one
lettered part. (Will try to put photo in.) She emailed me:


There are too many ambiguous letters in the first two lines after the
painted word "Beit" for me to give a definite answer:
you would benefit >from more geographical and historical context for a
building inscription.
Even "Beit" may be another word like an abbreviation for "B' Yom
Hahu": "in that day".
The other painted word, at left, regularly follows a date and is the
abbreviation for "Of the Small Reckoning":"Le perek Katan".
On the third line,  the second word >from the right is Hebrew for "In
the Year" : "B'shnat";so the remainder of the
line, going left, spells out the letters of the year in a word-play
acrostic phrase  (Gematria is the style of abbreviation).
Alternatively, and possibly more logically, the "Gematria" word-play
for the date is on the second line, immediately followed with the
phrase "Leperek Katan."
It is probably a quote >from scripture. ?

One of the Bronfmans (grandfather was born in Ataki) of the liquor
billionaires declined to provide funds to rebulid synagogue. Since no
Jews in town, thought it pointless.

We passed what is now a field near a more modern building, and woman
told us it was where the Jews gathered to dance.

One gypsy woman (lots of gold-covered teeth), asuuming we were Jews,
said the Jews were gone, now gypsies there (nasty tone) but asked us
in to yard of her not-too-large house. Rugs hanging on line in yard.

We then drove to near by town of Volchinitz (my father's oldest
brother Duvid had married a woman >from that town) where the Jews from
Ataki were buried. A couple, not Jewish, were paid to take care of it
- though it was rather a shambles.

BUT, we found what maybe the grave of my grandfather. The couple had
a list of names of people buried there - the list was typed in Hebew,
and handwritten next to each name was the name in written Cyrillic.
Hard to read the tombstone. We should have brought paper to make a
rubbing. Tried with small sheets of white paper and one pencil, but
didn?t work. Below is what my cousin Rochelle could decipher >from too
sunny photo. In Hebew typewritten it did say Yehudah Leib, but says
son of Shimon, and Yehudah Leib was the son of Yisrael Fischel
Schecktman, so not sure if my family. But one other plus was that
someone had painted on the tombstone 1922, and Yehudah Leib died that
year. Talked to Rochelle about this and we figured that maybe the
tombstone did have the year of his death, but not easy to read, so
maybe someone (a government official) read the stone and wrote on it
1922.

She e-mailed me:


1?Here is buried
2 Married gentleman
3 Yehudah Leib (honorific like: the great)
4 Schectman who died
5 Let his soul be bound up in the garland of life?

Rochelle tells me that this stone was carved in Art Deco or Art
Nouveau letters, carvings that were used after 1900. Also thinks was
done by an upwardly mobile stone cutter in a kind of stone that
seemed fancier than bluestone, but which cracked.

It is confusing about about naming in Russia (of Jews, at least).
Often a person?s name was given family name first, then given name
and then the name of that person?s father. But,for example, we
learned that someone called Srul might call himself Yisrael, because
the word srul in Romanian (or Russian) means shit and of course Jews
were sensitive to that.

So maybe we will find out that though the tombstone says Shmuel, it
was really another way of saying Yisrael.

Also found another stone (blue stone, which lasted well - sturdy)
which Nikolai (cemetary keeper) says was another Schechtman. Carved
earlier , not in Art Deco. Rochelle says this one has a Jewish star
and then reads:

?Here is buried
the lady (daled lamed)
Wife of?..
4
5
6 Died
7 Let her soul be bound up in the garland of life?

Could this be my grandmother, Raise Schechtman, who died in 1917?

After visiting Ataki, we crossed the river on what had probably been a
wooden bridge, but was now metal and the border crossing between
Moldova and Ukraine. We had some info that some of the family moved
from Ataki to Molive at the time of WW I. The wooden bridge was
probably the one my father crossed in the summertime to get to work in
the next town, which he called Molive, now called MOGHILOV-PODOLSKY.
Uncle Philip (and probably my father) went to cheder in Ataki, but
said he crossed there to go to what I thought (>from audio tape) was
Karelitz school. Turns out that the word was probably Cyrillac school
- so the family sent Philip there to learn to read and write Russian.

Border crossing took us a couple of hours - which is quite usual, we
were told. it is now said that many people preferred to be part of the
USSR instead of being independent because of so many ways in which
independence is a problem. Had good health insurance under USSR, none
of the border problems, etc.

Came into M-P (which I will now call it) to office of Leonid
Shmuelevich Brechman, who is in charge of all things Jewish in M-P.
Probably around 250 Jews in a town of around 28,000(?). Jews live
among gentiles, no longer ghettoized. He was born in the ghetto in M-P
in the 1940?s, and his mother escaped with him. Most Jews have left
for Israel or US, but he feels he has a responsibility to stay for
those that are still there. His office is very clean and organized.
Walls of photos - some of people who were killed fighting the
fascists, wall of photos of those who survived the Holocaust.

His office was on a street (Vladimir Stavsikaya ) which used to be
called Melnikoff St. Research shows that in 1926, a man named Elia
Schectman had a hardware store on 72/2 Melnikoff Street. This Elia
may have been one of my father's younger brothers. He lived (as of
1926) on 17 Bazarnaya Street, which was and is the market street.
Uncle Philip said that Elia had married a woman >from Molive and we
assume he may have moved there >from Ataki. But, research shows an Elia
Schectman had two children born in Baltsi (Yitzchak Meer - 1910, and
Sluba Liba - 1909), so have to think this through and figure out when
this Elia left Atkai for Baltsi and then for MP.

Also on Stavsikaya St. was a textile building that was built in 1909 (
the year my father arrived in NY), but where an earlier textile
building had stood in which my father probably worked.

We also walked on a street which had been called 1st Pozharnaya
Street, which meant First Fire Street. Records show that on this
street lived a Chanah Schectman, daughter of Yosif, who maybe married
Srul (Yisrael) Schectman, who was son of Duvid Schectman. Srul
operated a bakery shop on next street (parallel to First Fire Street),
and also lived on the street the bakery was on.

Another piece of info says that a Duvid Schectman, born in 1862, in
M-P, was a baker, and lived on Andreev Street (which no longer
exists). So we have to put all these Schectmans together in some way
after we get back to NY.

Leonid took us to the synagogue - no service going on- old and crummy,
but well kept. Seperate room with cloths on tables, which is where
women sat during service.

Leonid took a torah out of the ark (there were two in it) and let me
touch it with a sidur which I then kissed. Outside was a simple but
attractive sukkah (succot was to start that evening), decorated with
Israeli flags and draped red paper of some sort.

Walking through town, Leonid showed us various memorials - to those
who died in the ghetto during WW II, soldiers who died fighting
against the fascists (among which were names of many Jews, a
Schectman, although it was said no Jews fought against the fascists.),
Christians who helped save Jews, etc.

We walked through a large and interesting market and then drove to the
400 year old cemetary.

There, we saw the grave of Srul (Yisrael) Schectman, Davidovich (son
of David). He was the baker whose street we walked in M-P. He had 12
children, one in Israel. He loved pigeons. His tombstone reads in
Cyrillac: ?Our dear father, your memory will always stay in our
hearts. Your children and grandchildren. May 28, 1906-Sept,
19,1968.? There is a small stone for Tzalig, son of Srul. Stone for
Chava Schectman, daughter of Tzalig, June 20, 1905-Aug. 13, 1965.
?Beloved mother, we will always keep your bright memory. Mourning
husband, children, grandchildren, relatives,? clearly Srul's wife, who
predeceased him.

David Schectman, ben Srul, his son, aged about 70, who was born in M-P
and now lives in LA , comes back to see the town and the tomb of his
father. He was director of a hardware store in MP. He calls Leonid
about once a month and Leonid will put him in touch with me. He may
be the one living descendant I was hoping to find. There was another
Schectman grave site, but Leonid says when David comes, he does not
visit that one. But maybe that one IS a Schectman we are related
to???? Also, David was in touch with some Schectmans in Israel whom
he decided was not part of his family, but Leonid will try and put me
in touch with them.

We were then supposed to drive to Odessa, but it was a very long
drive >from M-P, and another two days with Natasha and Sasha, with
whom we?d about talked ourselves out, so we decided to drive back to
Kisheniev and leave for Moscow earlier."

That's about it. Tried to put photos in, but sorry couldn't figure
out how to do it!

If anyone wants to know more, feel free to call or e-mail. Please do
not reply to this e-mail address because it's not the one I use. (See
address below). I had to write the e-mail on Google (instead of Mac
Mail) in order to write in the plain text that is the one SIG
accepts.

Elise
New York, New York


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia my trip to Moldova #bessarabia

Elise Goodman <elisesgoodman@...>
 

Dear Bessarabia SIG:

My father, Abraham SCHECTMAN was born in Otik (now Ataki) in
BESSARABIA (now Moldova) in the late 1880's and came to NY in 1909. I
have always wanted to see his town, and this year I convinced my
husband to join me.

I typed up notes about our trip and will go back to them and quote
from them whatever I think might interest members of this group.
We first went to St. Petersburg which was quite marvelous. Spent Kol
Nidre at what is supposedly the second largest synagogue in Europe.
Orthodox, so me upstairs, Arnold (my husband) downstairs. Women
seemed to say not a word though many held Russian/Hebrew siddurs. I
was pleased to note that the Kol Nidre melody was the same as I am
used to, and they also sang Avinu Malkenu to usual melody. The rest
of the davenning was totally unfamiliar.

"FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2012

Flew >from St. Petersburg to KISHENIEV, capital of Moldova. Met at
airport by our guide, Natasha Alhazov, who pointed out various
monuments on way to hotel in central K - place where Jews >from K
ghetto were all killed, etc.

(An aside, Natasha has a Phd in English, had a Fulbright at U. of
North Carolina, speaks fluent English, is very smart and funny and a
treat to be with. I highly recommend her to anyone looking for a guide
in Moldova or Moghilev-Podolsky in the Ukraine, or Odessa, etc. -
nalhazov@gmail.com).

At hotel, Stella de Lux, N and I sat down with all the research that
had been collected by Alla, our Moldovan archivist and Alex Dunai,
our Ukrainian archivist and me.

I got my most of my info >from the Jewish Geneology website database
put together by the Bessarabian Special Interest Group (thank you
Phyllis Berenson and Yefim Kogan for helping me navigate through it).
Tried to figure out info >from the 1700?s through most recent times.
Data base organized according to records kept during mostly the
Russian Empire time: Vital records on births, deaths, marriages,
divorce and perhaps most important records called Revisions, which
were most carefully done for taxation and recruitment (into the
czarist army) purposes.

Unfortunately, the material that Alex had collected (and he was very
thorough) did not arrive until after I had left NY. I had my computer
with me and e-mailed what he (and his wife, who works with him) had
sent to me on to Natasha, who very kindly printed out all the material
and brought it with her to the airport. It was very confusing to have
to put all the material together so last minute before we left for
Ataki. Alla sent me mostly material >from Revision lists - all the
vitals >from Ataki seemed to be burned or lost or whatever .

Bessarabia was part of the Russian Empire and part of the Settlement
of Pale which was where ordinary Jews were allowed to live.

Bessarabia then became part of Romania, and after the 1917 revolution,
became part of the USSR. It became the independent country of Moldova
when the USSR broke up, around 1990.

(Aside: we were looking for Schectmans, which was my father's real
last name. My maiden name is Simon becase my father bought a visa or
passport or boat ticket >from a man named Simon, and kept that last
name in the US. My grandfather was Yehudah Leib Schectman., mother was
Raise. My father's older brother (and first born of Yehudah Leib)
was Duvid. Next sibling down >from my father, Avrum, was Elia, then
sister D?vora, brother Fischel (my Uncle Philip, only sibling who came
to US), and youngest brother Mordechai Josef, who supposedly died
young of consumption.

After a short nap on Friday, N took us on a walk around K. Supposedly
the poorest country in Europe, and it looked it (as did most of
Moldova). Lots of walnut trees and bought some shelled walnuts on a
street corner and delicious pears. Also bought a small hanging made of
hand loomed black wool, embroidered with natural dyed colored wools.
Made until around the 1960?s in the countryside, but no longer
crafted.

George Soros has a foundation in K. As you might expect, many of the
Jewish institutions in Moldvoa (synagogues, cemetaries, memorial
statues mostly relating to the Holocaust), are supported by overseas,
rich Jews.

Friday evening, Natasha (who is not Jewish but who volunteers and
works for many Jewish organizations), took us to the only synagogue
left in Kisheniev. In my father?s time there were were over 33. The
synagogue was tiny and rather decrepit, and run by a Chabad
Lubovitcher organization. Some of the men were in Orthodox dress,
some in tee shirts and kipas. Some woman gave me an English/Hebrew
sidur and helped me figure out where in the service they were. Poor
Arnold had only a Russian/Hebrew sidur and had no idea where the
service was. Very little singing, quite boring. The man who led
services was a rabbi who lived in K, was a converted Jew. During the
services there were folded screens between the men and women. When
the rabbi gave his sermon (in Russian and therefore very long and
boring) they removed the screens so the women could see the rabbi -
and then put them back when (end of) services began again. There were
about 25 men; 15 women. A few children - not many - ran across the
room occasionally.

After services, we took Natasha and husband Edward (who brought a box
of chocolates for my birthday) to very good restaurant. Lots of
vineyards in Moldova and known in area for their wines. I had the
most delicious mammaligia, corn flour based, with sour cream and
grated cheese. Mammaligia is a Romanian name for what Italians call
polenta. My mother used to make it often, and serve it with farmer
cheese.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29:

Driver Sasha, under 30, spent a year in Philly when he was 13, and was
sweet and thoughtful. He often works with Natasha, and he and she
arrived at hotel around 8:30 AM and we took off toward Ataki, which
is about four hours northwest of Kisheniev.

We stopped on the way in BALTSI, the second largest city in Moldova,
which before the Holocaust was 50% Jewish. The stop was planned
because my research showed that one of my father's younger brothers,
Elia Skechtman (spelled many different ways in this report because
spelled different ways in data bases and in Cyrillic, etc), had two
children born there, Yitzhak Meer (born 1910) and daughter, Sluba
Liba, born 1909.

We went to the only synagogue in the city, very small, sad looking
(about 20 men there, maybe one or two women.) They hadn?t started
shabbat sevices yet. They had a very simple sukkah in the yard
(Sukkot started Sunday night).

A contact of Natasha?s, the keeper of the cemetary, took us there, but
would not enter with us because it was Shabbat. Cemetary had opened
in 1877. He had brought with him a list of names of people in cemetary
and had looked up which one or ones that were Schechtmans.

There were two Schechtman tombstones: #10798 - Piortah (Peter), son
of Yitzchak, born 1921- died 1965. Doubt that he is a relative.
Earlier tombstones carved in Hebrew; later ones (like Peter?s) carved
in Russian (Cyrillic alphabet). Dedication: To dear husband, father,
grandfather. Memory of you always in our hearts. From: Wife,
children, grandchildren, relatives. He was one of the lucky to
survive the Holocaust. Another tombstone, in Hebrew, earlier, neither
Arnold nor I could decifer because without the vowels, neither of us
has a easy time reading Hebrew.

Was supposed to meet a 60 year old woman named Schechtman, Raise
Korpel Schechtman, lives on Hotinskya #10, apt. 58, 0-231-603-11. Was
told we could reach her late at night. But we didn?t meet her.

from synagogue, we then met a friend of N?s, Paulina, who had been the
principal of a high school and was now retired on a pension of about
$60 a month - very little, even for Moldova. She now also worked for
a Jewish organization in town that provided money and food for Jews
who had no means of support. Job provided additional support for her.
Most of her family had made Aliyah - indeed most of Jews in Moldova
and Uklaine had either left by then for Israel or US. She has daughter
in Baltsi and so is reluctant to leave. Had lunch with her.

After Baltsi, we left for ATAKI, another two hours. As we grew close
to Ataki area, it was clear that it was very agricultural (as is most
of Moldova, N told us.) Quite pretty fields, filled with acres of
corn - by now, mostly all dried, piled together, waiting for pick up
by horse-drawn carts. Also passed lots of sunflower fields, which
really tickled me because I often saw my father nibbling sunflower
seeds. Now I know where the taste for those seeds came >from (and why
I kept a jar of those seeds around for years, never eating them, but
never throwing them out.) N. says they are best when fresh - that is
from that season?s sunflowers. Tried to pick them >from our sunflowers
this summer, but wasn?t able to. Will try again next summer.

Saw many horse drawn carts in the fields, but no machines. Like from
long ago. Can?t make much money >from agriculture that way.

We had been told that Ataki was a gypsy town - told in a very
derogatory way. As we approached the town we saw huge houses -
mansions - in dreadful but expensive taste. Were told that outsiders
believe the gypsies make their large amounts of money running drugs.

No Jews left in Ataki (town now of about 8500). In my father's time
was 90% Jewish. Were lucky to meet a woman who works for the mayor and
she took us about. She showed us where the old market was - now
rather the center of town with trucks and various other vehicles. My
father's brother Philip, the only other member of the family to come
to US, and whom I had interviewed in the1980's, said the market
separated the old Otick >from the new Otick, and they lived in the new
Otick, fairly close to the Dnieste River (which separates Moldova from
the Ukaine). My father had told me that he used to skate across the
Dnieste to a town he called Molive (now called Moghilov-Podolsky, and
now in Ukraine) to work in a fabric store. Uncle Philip remembers
skating on the river too, but Charlie Klein (who I think I remember
my father talking about) was the best skater. They also used to swim
in the river in the summer.

Now, because a dam has been built up stream, no one swims (too cold
they say) and the river doesn?t freeze in the winter time (global
warmng?).

N was reluctant to take photos of the gypy mansions; Sasha said they
would throw stones at us. There were a few houses >from the Jewish
times and we took photos of them. Uncle Philip had described his
house in my interview with him, and seeing the old houses I could
really visualize what my father's home had looked like.

Uncle Philip remembered three synagogues, and we visited the one they
probably attended, the largest one. It was a total wreck. Had been
turned into some kind of cultural center in Soviet times (no religious
life had been allowed), and then was a big fire in the 1980?s which
burned all the supporting logs. Had clearly been two stories, with a
front entrance and a back one (proably for the women.) Asked my
cousin Rochelle, who is a Hebrew scholar, to translate the one
lettered part. (Will try to put photo in.) She emailed me:


There are too many ambiguous letters in the first two lines after the
painted word "Beit" for me to give a definite answer:
you would benefit >from more geographical and historical context for a
building inscription.
Even "Beit" may be another word like an abbreviation for "B' Yom
Hahu": "in that day".
The other painted word, at left, regularly follows a date and is the
abbreviation for "Of the Small Reckoning":"Le perek Katan".
On the third line,  the second word >from the right is Hebrew for "In
the Year" : "B'shnat";so the remainder of the
line, going left, spells out the letters of the year in a word-play
acrostic phrase  (Gematria is the style of abbreviation).
Alternatively, and possibly more logically, the "Gematria" word-play
for the date is on the second line, immediately followed with the
phrase "Leperek Katan."
It is probably a quote >from scripture. ?

One of the Bronfmans (grandfather was born in Ataki) of the liquor
billionaires declined to provide funds to rebulid synagogue. Since no
Jews in town, thought it pointless.

We passed what is now a field near a more modern building, and woman
told us it was where the Jews gathered to dance.

One gypsy woman (lots of gold-covered teeth), asuuming we were Jews,
said the Jews were gone, now gypsies there (nasty tone) but asked us
in to yard of her not-too-large house. Rugs hanging on line in yard.

We then drove to near by town of Volchinitz (my father's oldest
brother Duvid had married a woman >from that town) where the Jews from
Ataki were buried. A couple, not Jewish, were paid to take care of it
- though it was rather a shambles.

BUT, we found what maybe the grave of my grandfather. The couple had
a list of names of people buried there - the list was typed in Hebew,
and handwritten next to each name was the name in written Cyrillic.
Hard to read the tombstone. We should have brought paper to make a
rubbing. Tried with small sheets of white paper and one pencil, but
didn?t work. Below is what my cousin Rochelle could decipher >from too
sunny photo. In Hebew typewritten it did say Yehudah Leib, but says
son of Shimon, and Yehudah Leib was the son of Yisrael Fischel
Schecktman, so not sure if my family. But one other plus was that
someone had painted on the tombstone 1922, and Yehudah Leib died that
year. Talked to Rochelle about this and we figured that maybe the
tombstone did have the year of his death, but not easy to read, so
maybe someone (a government official) read the stone and wrote on it
1922.

She e-mailed me:


1?Here is buried
2 Married gentleman
3 Yehudah Leib (honorific like: the great)
4 Schectman who died
5 Let his soul be bound up in the garland of life?

Rochelle tells me that this stone was carved in Art Deco or Art
Nouveau letters, carvings that were used after 1900. Also thinks was
done by an upwardly mobile stone cutter in a kind of stone that
seemed fancier than bluestone, but which cracked.

It is confusing about about naming in Russia (of Jews, at least).
Often a person?s name was given family name first, then given name
and then the name of that person?s father. But,for example, we
learned that someone called Srul might call himself Yisrael, because
the word srul in Romanian (or Russian) means shit and of course Jews
were sensitive to that.

So maybe we will find out that though the tombstone says Shmuel, it
was really another way of saying Yisrael.

Also found another stone (blue stone, which lasted well - sturdy)
which Nikolai (cemetary keeper) says was another Schechtman. Carved
earlier , not in Art Deco. Rochelle says this one has a Jewish star
and then reads:

?Here is buried
the lady (daled lamed)
Wife of?..
4
5
6 Died
7 Let her soul be bound up in the garland of life?

Could this be my grandmother, Raise Schechtman, who died in 1917?

After visiting Ataki, we crossed the river on what had probably been a
wooden bridge, but was now metal and the border crossing between
Moldova and Ukraine. We had some info that some of the family moved
from Ataki to Molive at the time of WW I. The wooden bridge was
probably the one my father crossed in the summertime to get to work in
the next town, which he called Molive, now called MOGHILOV-PODOLSKY.
Uncle Philip (and probably my father) went to cheder in Ataki, but
said he crossed there to go to what I thought (>from audio tape) was
Karelitz school. Turns out that the word was probably Cyrillac school
- so the family sent Philip there to learn to read and write Russian.

Border crossing took us a couple of hours - which is quite usual, we
were told. it is now said that many people preferred to be part of the
USSR instead of being independent because of so many ways in which
independence is a problem. Had good health insurance under USSR, none
of the border problems, etc.

Came into M-P (which I will now call it) to office of Leonid
Shmuelevich Brechman, who is in charge of all things Jewish in M-P.
Probably around 250 Jews in a town of around 28,000(?). Jews live
among gentiles, no longer ghettoized. He was born in the ghetto in M-P
in the 1940?s, and his mother escaped with him. Most Jews have left
for Israel or US, but he feels he has a responsibility to stay for
those that are still there. His office is very clean and organized.
Walls of photos - some of people who were killed fighting the
fascists, wall of photos of those who survived the Holocaust.

His office was on a street (Vladimir Stavsikaya ) which used to be
called Melnikoff St. Research shows that in 1926, a man named Elia
Schectman had a hardware store on 72/2 Melnikoff Street. This Elia
may have been one of my father's younger brothers. He lived (as of
1926) on 17 Bazarnaya Street, which was and is the market street.
Uncle Philip said that Elia had married a woman >from Molive and we
assume he may have moved there >from Ataki. But, research shows an Elia
Schectman had two children born in Baltsi (Yitzchak Meer - 1910, and
Sluba Liba - 1909), so have to think this through and figure out when
this Elia left Atkai for Baltsi and then for MP.

Also on Stavsikaya St. was a textile building that was built in 1909 (
the year my father arrived in NY), but where an earlier textile
building had stood in which my father probably worked.

We also walked on a street which had been called 1st Pozharnaya
Street, which meant First Fire Street. Records show that on this
street lived a Chanah Schectman, daughter of Yosif, who maybe married
Srul (Yisrael) Schectman, who was son of Duvid Schectman. Srul
operated a bakery shop on next street (parallel to First Fire Street),
and also lived on the street the bakery was on.

Another piece of info says that a Duvid Schectman, born in 1862, in
M-P, was a baker, and lived on Andreev Street (which no longer
exists). So we have to put all these Schectmans together in some way
after we get back to NY.

Leonid took us to the synagogue - no service going on- old and crummy,
but well kept. Seperate room with cloths on tables, which is where
women sat during service.

Leonid took a torah out of the ark (there were two in it) and let me
touch it with a sidur which I then kissed. Outside was a simple but
attractive sukkah (succot was to start that evening), decorated with
Israeli flags and draped red paper of some sort.

Walking through town, Leonid showed us various memorials - to those
who died in the ghetto during WW II, soldiers who died fighting
against the fascists (among which were names of many Jews, a
Schectman, although it was said no Jews fought against the fascists.),
Christians who helped save Jews, etc.

We walked through a large and interesting market and then drove to the
400 year old cemetary.

There, we saw the grave of Srul (Yisrael) Schectman, Davidovich (son
of David). He was the baker whose street we walked in M-P. He had 12
children, one in Israel. He loved pigeons. His tombstone reads in
Cyrillac: ?Our dear father, your memory will always stay in our
hearts. Your children and grandchildren. May 28, 1906-Sept,
19,1968.? There is a small stone for Tzalig, son of Srul. Stone for
Chava Schectman, daughter of Tzalig, June 20, 1905-Aug. 13, 1965.
?Beloved mother, we will always keep your bright memory. Mourning
husband, children, grandchildren, relatives,? clearly Srul's wife, who
predeceased him.

David Schectman, ben Srul, his son, aged about 70, who was born in M-P
and now lives in LA , comes back to see the town and the tomb of his
father. He was director of a hardware store in MP. He calls Leonid
about once a month and Leonid will put him in touch with me. He may
be the one living descendant I was hoping to find. There was another
Schectman grave site, but Leonid says when David comes, he does not
visit that one. But maybe that one IS a Schectman we are related
to???? Also, David was in touch with some Schectmans in Israel whom
he decided was not part of his family, but Leonid will try and put me
in touch with them.

We were then supposed to drive to Odessa, but it was a very long
drive >from M-P, and another two days with Natasha and Sasha, with
whom we?d about talked ourselves out, so we decided to drive back to
Kisheniev and leave for Moscow earlier."

That's about it. Tried to put photos in, but sorry couldn't figure
out how to do it!

If anyone wants to know more, feel free to call or e-mail. Please do
not reply to this e-mail address because it's not the one I use. (See
address below). I had to write the e-mail on Google (instead of Mac
Mail) in order to write in the plain text that is the one SIG
accepts.

Elise
New York, New York


Success Stories - October Issue #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the four inspiring stories in the latest issue
of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" oval button on our website or by following this
link: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

In this issue, cousins Todd Halpern and Harry Green find each other
via JewishGen's Family Finder and work together to expand their family
connections. With help >from the Holocaust and War Victims Tracing
Service of the Red Cross, Jack Weinstein searches for his uncle for
14 years. Sam Glaser finds some of his mother's old letters in a
photo album, letters that eventually lead him to previously unknown
cousins. And Marla Raucher Osborn treats us to an essay on sorting
out the family tree relationships when cousins have married cousins
over multiple generations.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We are sure you will be moved
by these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success
stories to us at: success@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


marriages of Ukrainian couples in the Slany matrick book #austria-czech

morav@...
 

Hello,

While researching my family >from around the Slany area of CZ I came
across a bunch of marriage records in matrick book number 1861 - pages
(images) 134-140, late 1915 to early 1917, for Ukrainian/Galician
middle aged couples. Does anyone have any idea what this is about? I
guess that they were probably fleeing persecution in the Ukraine, but
why the weddings and why Slany?

Thank you.


--
Philip Moravcik, Honolulu


Missing digests from JewishGen during last week #austria-czech

Dick Plotz
 

We apologize for the problems delivering digests >from JewishGen and
hosted lists to many subscribers during the last week. Our mail server
was mistakenly placed on a database that many mail providers use to
block senders of unwanted mail. We managed to get the listing removed
Saturday, and we expect delivery to be back to normal within a couple
of days.

If you have missed digests during this time, please go to the
JewishGen Support Center at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm > and follow the
instructions in section 3.8, "How do I retrieve old messages?" to
request that your missing digests be resent.

Dick Plotz
Manager of Mailing Lists
JewishGen, Inc.


Neighbors Who Disappeared Exhibit in Kalamazoo, MI #austria-czech

Joseph Hirschfield
 

On Saturday, November 17, 2012 the Congregation of Moses in Kalamazoo, MI
will commemorate the 70th anniversary of the destruction of the Jewish
community in Milevsko, Czechoslovakia. Joseph Hirschfield will present some of
his research on the town and the Jewish history in Milevsko.

As part of the memorial, selected panels of the "Neighbors Who
Disappeared" exhibit will be on display at Congregation of Moses during the entire
month of November. The exhibit was prepared by Czech grammar and high school
students as an educational effort to encourage young people to research the
Jewish residents who formerly resided in their towns. The full exhibit has
been shown throughout the world.

Towns which are covered by the exhibit are Lostice, Stribro, Mastov,
Ostrava, Liten, Morina, Beroun, Szeged, Litomysl, and Krnov.

Please contact me privately if you would like additional information or
anticipate viewing the exhibit or attending the service.

Joseph Hirschfield
Portage, MI


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Success Stories - October Issue #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the four inspiring stories in the latest issue
of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine. You can access these stories
from the "About Us" oval button on our website or by following this
link: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/.

In this issue, cousins Todd Halpern and Harry Green find each other
via JewishGen's Family Finder and work together to expand their family
connections. With help >from the Holocaust and War Victims Tracing
Service of the Red Cross, Jack Weinstein searches for his uncle for
14 years. Sam Glaser finds some of his mother's old letters in a
photo album, letters that eventually lead him to previously unknown
cousins. And Marla Raucher Osborn treats us to an essay on sorting
out the family tree relationships when cousins have married cousins
over multiple generations.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel,
Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster. We are sure you will be moved
by these stories and we encourage you to submit your own success
stories to us at: success@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech marriages of Ukrainian couples in the Slany matrick book #austria-czech

morav@...
 

Hello,

While researching my family >from around the Slany area of CZ I came
across a bunch of marriage records in matrick book number 1861 - pages
(images) 134-140, late 1915 to early 1917, for Ukrainian/Galician
middle aged couples. Does anyone have any idea what this is about? I
guess that they were probably fleeing persecution in the Ukraine, but
why the weddings and why Slany?

Thank you.


--
Philip Moravcik, Honolulu


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Missing digests from JewishGen during last week #austria-czech

Dick Plotz
 

We apologize for the problems delivering digests >from JewishGen and
hosted lists to many subscribers during the last week. Our mail server
was mistakenly placed on a database that many mail providers use to
block senders of unwanted mail. We managed to get the listing removed
Saturday, and we expect delivery to be back to normal within a couple
of days.

If you have missed digests during this time, please go to the
JewishGen Support Center at
< http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Support.htm > and follow the
instructions in section 3.8, "How do I retrieve old messages?" to
request that your missing digests be resent.

Dick Plotz
Manager of Mailing Lists
JewishGen, Inc.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Neighbors Who Disappeared Exhibit in Kalamazoo, MI #austria-czech

Joseph Hirschfield
 

On Saturday, November 17, 2012 the Congregation of Moses in Kalamazoo, MI
will commemorate the 70th anniversary of the destruction of the Jewish
community in Milevsko, Czechoslovakia. Joseph Hirschfield will present some of
his research on the town and the Jewish history in Milevsko.

As part of the memorial, selected panels of the "Neighbors Who
Disappeared" exhibit will be on display at Congregation of Moses during the entire
month of November. The exhibit was prepared by Czech grammar and high school
students as an educational effort to encourage young people to research the
Jewish residents who formerly resided in their towns. The full exhibit has
been shown throughout the world.

Towns which are covered by the exhibit are Lostice, Stribro, Mastov,
Ostrava, Liten, Morina, Beroun, Szeged, Litomysl, and Krnov.

Please contact me privately if you would like additional information or
anticipate viewing the exhibit or attending the service.

Joseph Hirschfield
Portage, MI

154321 - 154340 of 663861