Date   

Help in finding information on Greenberg relatives from Khomne Brod #ukraine

nk
 

Hello,

My maternal grandfather, Yisroel Greenberg, was born in Khomne Brod.
His parents were Meir and Edis, I do not know Edis's maiden name. They
had about 13 children. Yisroel immigrated to Winnipeg, Canada, around
1915, leaving his wife Chane Rochel (maiden name Nightside, she died in
Winnipeg about 1920 and was not my grandmother) and their son Elchanan
in Khomne Brod, until Yisroel could pay for them to join him about a
year later.

I have yet to find any documents (including ship manifest for Yisroel)
on my family. I would be most interested in finding the names of my
grandfather's siblings and the maiden name of my ggm Edis, and siblings
of my great grandparents.

I would appreciate hearing >from you if you have any suggestions on how
to proceed. Thank you for your time.

Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Researching:

Greenberg - Khomne Brod, Ukraine
Karlik, Lavintman - Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
Zelbovich, Zilber - Ponidel, Lithuania
Korb, Levin - Skopishok, Lithuania


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Help in finding information on Greenberg relatives from Khomne Brod #ukraine

nk
 

Hello,

My maternal grandfather, Yisroel Greenberg, was born in Khomne Brod.
His parents were Meir and Edis, I do not know Edis's maiden name. They
had about 13 children. Yisroel immigrated to Winnipeg, Canada, around
1915, leaving his wife Chane Rochel (maiden name Nightside, she died in
Winnipeg about 1920 and was not my grandmother) and their son Elchanan
in Khomne Brod, until Yisroel could pay for them to join him about a
year later.

I have yet to find any documents (including ship manifest for Yisroel)
on my family. I would be most interested in finding the names of my
grandfather's siblings and the maiden name of my ggm Edis, and siblings
of my great grandparents.

I would appreciate hearing >from you if you have any suggestions on how
to proceed. Thank you for your time.

Michele Zell Kanter
Skokie, IL

Researching:

Greenberg - Khomne Brod, Ukraine
Karlik, Lavintman - Kitay Gorod, Ukraine
Zelbovich, Zilber - Ponidel, Lithuania
Korb, Levin - Skopishok, Lithuania


Southeast Poland Jewish Roots - Lublin Area #ukraine

genealogykid20@...
 

There is a new page on Facebook for southeast Poland researchers

http://www.facebook.com/SEPolandJewishRoots

The goal of the page is to raise awareness about the Jewish community
in southeast Poland in pre-war Europe.

Many of our southeast Poland communities have shtetl memorial sites as
well. For example, see the links at the top of
http://chelm.freeyellow.com/zamosc.html

Thanks for your interest.

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Southeast Poland Jewish Roots - Lublin Area #ukraine

genealogykid20@...
 

There is a new page on Facebook for southeast Poland researchers

http://www.facebook.com/SEPolandJewishRoots

The goal of the page is to raise awareness about the Jewish community
in southeast Poland in pre-war Europe.

Many of our southeast Poland communities have shtetl memorial sites as
well. For example, see the links at the top of
http://chelm.freeyellow.com/zamosc.html

Thanks for your interest.

Aaron Biterman
Washington DC


Brichany, Brichun #bessarabia

ENeuwirth <tovim13@...>
 

Hello Bessarabians,

I am quite new to this. My grandmother's maiden name was Donitz/Donetz
and she said she came >from the above town, although sometimes of
course she said Kishinev.
I see that there are two towns with the same name and wonder if
anyone can enlighten me as to how to determine where the family came
from.

Thanks

Elizabeth Neuwirth
U.S. tovim13@gmail.com

DONETZ, Brichun
ORENSTEIN

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Brichany, Brichun #bessarabia

ENeuwirth <tovim13@...>
 

Hello Bessarabians,

I am quite new to this. My grandmother's maiden name was Donitz/Donetz
and she said she came >from the above town, although sometimes of
course she said Kishinev.
I see that there are two towns with the same name and wonder if
anyone can enlighten me as to how to determine where the family came
from.

Thanks

Elizabeth Neuwirth
U.S. tovim13@gmail.com

DONETZ, Brichun
ORENSTEIN

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender


IGRA lecture/webinar #general

Garri Regev
 

The next IGRA meeting will be on Wednesday, January 30th, 2013 in the
AACI Glassman Family Center 37 Pierre Koenig St. 4th floor, Jerusalem.
We welcome you to join us at 18:30 with any questions and will be
available to renew or take out new memberships in IGRA for 2013 (120
NIS individuals, 160 NIS couples). Our lecturer will be Pamela
Weisberger and everyone will come away with new information >from her
lecture. The lecture begins at 19:00.

IMPORTANT: The AACI has notified us that the elevator is under repair
and may not be working that evening. Please be prepared and leave
time to walk up the stairs if necessary.

For those not able to be with us in person, the lecture will be
broadcast as a webinar: Reserve your place now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/663992270

Chutes & Ladders: Innovative Approaches to Genealogy

Game on, genealogists! Are you eager to connect the dots, score
points and populate the branches of your family tree? In this
interactive lecture you'll learn how to navigate your genealogical
'game board' using imaginative strategies and unusual databases. Scale
brick walls in a single bound by manipulating Google, Internet
Archive, Facebook, Acris, Geni, ProQuest and Zabasearch. Locate M.I.A.
relatives through real estate, court and bank records. Discover
treasures in rare book, auction and cartography sites. Go directly to
jail to uncover a family scandal (or mug shot!) Explore historical
newspapers and learn the 'Rosetta Stone' technique of searching in
foreign languages. Like hunting for the afikomen on Seder night, the
genealogical prizes you seek are often nearby, but well hidden. We'll
travel >from the U.S. to overseas archives in a single bound. Get out
your detective's notepad and hone your powers of deduction to find the
missing pieces of your family's jigsaw puzzle! This talk will be more
enlightening (and fun) than a barrel of monkeys. Everybody wins!

Garri Regev
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA lecture/webinar #general

Garri Regev
 

The next IGRA meeting will be on Wednesday, January 30th, 2013 in the
AACI Glassman Family Center 37 Pierre Koenig St. 4th floor, Jerusalem.
We welcome you to join us at 18:30 with any questions and will be
available to renew or take out new memberships in IGRA for 2013 (120
NIS individuals, 160 NIS couples). Our lecturer will be Pamela
Weisberger and everyone will come away with new information >from her
lecture. The lecture begins at 19:00.

IMPORTANT: The AACI has notified us that the elevator is under repair
and may not be working that evening. Please be prepared and leave
time to walk up the stairs if necessary.

For those not able to be with us in person, the lecture will be
broadcast as a webinar: Reserve your place now at:
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/663992270

Chutes & Ladders: Innovative Approaches to Genealogy

Game on, genealogists! Are you eager to connect the dots, score
points and populate the branches of your family tree? In this
interactive lecture you'll learn how to navigate your genealogical
'game board' using imaginative strategies and unusual databases. Scale
brick walls in a single bound by manipulating Google, Internet
Archive, Facebook, Acris, Geni, ProQuest and Zabasearch. Locate M.I.A.
relatives through real estate, court and bank records. Discover
treasures in rare book, auction and cartography sites. Go directly to
jail to uncover a family scandal (or mug shot!) Explore historical
newspapers and learn the 'Rosetta Stone' technique of searching in
foreign languages. Like hunting for the afikomen on Seder night, the
genealogical prizes you seek are often nearby, but well hidden. We'll
travel >from the U.S. to overseas archives in a single bound. Get out
your detective's notepad and hone your powers of deduction to find the
missing pieces of your family's jigsaw puzzle! This talk will be more
enlightening (and fun) than a barrel of monkeys. Everybody wins!

Garri Regev
Jerusalem, Israel


Cemetery research in Basavilbaso, Argentina #general

Maida Dacher
 

Hi Genners:

Can someone, please, tell me where I can write for information to the
Cemetery in Basavilbaso, Argentina? I am researching my grandmothers
maiden name and I found someone with her last name buried there.

Her name was Esther Iofer and her date of death was January 31, 1920.
The cemetery I D numbe is AARG-02363.

Thanks so much for your help.

Maida Dacher
Sherman Oaks, CA

Researching IOFER in Krasnoyarsk, Irkutsk, Siberia, Lithuania.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery research in Basavilbaso, Argentina #general

Maida Dacher
 

Hi Genners:

Can someone, please, tell me where I can write for information to the
Cemetery in Basavilbaso, Argentina? I am researching my grandmothers
maiden name and I found someone with her last name buried there.

Her name was Esther Iofer and her date of death was January 31, 1920.
The cemetery I D numbe is AARG-02363.

Thanks so much for your help.

Maida Dacher
Sherman Oaks, CA

Researching IOFER in Krasnoyarsk, Irkutsk, Siberia, Lithuania.


SEMLER family from Warsaw brick wall #general

Linda Epstein
 

Dear Genners,

I am looking to locate the following SEMLER family >from Warsaw. They
arrived in New York on 22 Dec 1913 aboard the S.S. George Washington.

SEMLER, Rikel: age 30, married
SEMLER, Srul: age 11
SEMLER, Hinke: age 7
SEMLER, Chaje: age 4
SEMLER, Gittel: age 6 months

Their nearest relative in Warsaw was Rikel's brother-in-law, Abram DLEISKY (?).
They were going to their husband/father, Schloime SEMLER on Willetts Street
in New York City.

I can find no mention of the family after their arrival. The children were
all naturalized between 1941-1942. There are naturalization notations on
the manifest next to each name. The naturalizations appear to have taken
place in one of the boroughs of New York. A search by USCIS for Srul
SEMLER's naturalization was fruitless. I tried to find a death certificate
for either Schloime or Rikel on ItalianGen but could not find one. The only
conclusion that I can come to is that the family used a surname other than
SEMLER or SEMMLER. As I don't not know Rikel's maiden name, that is not a
search option at this point.

If you recognize the family, or have any suggestions on how to proceed,
please let me know.

Thank you,
Linda Epstein
Florida

SEMLER/SEMMLER: Rzeszow, Poland; SEMEL/SEMMEL: Pilzno, Poland
OPESKIN/APESKIN, SHUR, KUPER, LAPIDES: Lithuania; CHODOSCH: Myadel, Belarus
FILMUS: Ukraine, Moldova; SINGER, HASS: Husiatyn, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SEMLER family from Warsaw brick wall #general

Linda Epstein
 

Dear Genners,

I am looking to locate the following SEMLER family >from Warsaw. They
arrived in New York on 22 Dec 1913 aboard the S.S. George Washington.

SEMLER, Rikel: age 30, married
SEMLER, Srul: age 11
SEMLER, Hinke: age 7
SEMLER, Chaje: age 4
SEMLER, Gittel: age 6 months

Their nearest relative in Warsaw was Rikel's brother-in-law, Abram DLEISKY (?).
They were going to their husband/father, Schloime SEMLER on Willetts Street
in New York City.

I can find no mention of the family after their arrival. The children were
all naturalized between 1941-1942. There are naturalization notations on
the manifest next to each name. The naturalizations appear to have taken
place in one of the boroughs of New York. A search by USCIS for Srul
SEMLER's naturalization was fruitless. I tried to find a death certificate
for either Schloime or Rikel on ItalianGen but could not find one. The only
conclusion that I can come to is that the family used a surname other than
SEMLER or SEMMLER. As I don't not know Rikel's maiden name, that is not a
search option at this point.

If you recognize the family, or have any suggestions on how to proceed,
please let me know.

Thank you,
Linda Epstein
Florida

SEMLER/SEMMLER: Rzeszow, Poland; SEMEL/SEMMEL: Pilzno, Poland
OPESKIN/APESKIN, SHUR, KUPER, LAPIDES: Lithuania; CHODOSCH: Myadel, Belarus
FILMUS: Ukraine, Moldova; SINGER, HASS: Husiatyn, Poland


Re: families from LYUBCHA and EISHYSHOK #general

Jrbaston
 

Dear Naomi:

First, translations of birth, marriage and death records >from Eisiskes (the
current name) >from 1891-1939 were done under the auspices of LitvakSIG,
and they may be searched by surname and town (use the spelling Eisiskes)
in the All Lithuania Database. Access this database >from the LitvakSIG
home page for the best search options _www.litvaksig.org_
(http://www.litvaksig.org)

In addition to the vital records, the All Lithuania Database also contains
the translation of the Eisiskes 1904 Family List, which I purchased privately
and had translated and donated to the All Lithuania Database. It may also be
search there.lThere are translations of other Census-type records >from Eisiskes and other
nearby towns in the Lida DIstrict in the All Lithuania Database. They were
translated under the auspices of LitvakSIG's Lida District Research Group.

Second, if you have not read the book, "There Once Was a World" by Yaffa
Eliach," you should do so. It is a history of Eishishok and she includes
material on Nechamiah der feldsher. If you cannot find it in a library
in the UK it is available at deep remaindered prices online.

Please feel free to write me privately if you have any additional
questions, or are interested in becoming part of the Lida District
Research Group to help get additional records translated.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group

From: "Naomi Leon" <_info@researchroots.co.uk_
Dear Genners,

I am currently researching the Zuchowitzky/ Shuchavitzki/ Virshuvski/
Astramski families >from Lyubcha (Belarus) and Eishyshok (Lithuania).
The family later became SUCHOFF when they came to NY. I would be grateful
for any help you can provide with the following queries:
snip....


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: families from LYUBCHA and EISHYSHOK #general

Jrbaston
 

Dear Naomi:

First, translations of birth, marriage and death records >from Eisiskes (the
current name) >from 1891-1939 were done under the auspices of LitvakSIG,
and they may be searched by surname and town (use the spelling Eisiskes)
in the All Lithuania Database. Access this database >from the LitvakSIG
home page for the best search options _www.litvaksig.org_
(http://www.litvaksig.org)

In addition to the vital records, the All Lithuania Database also contains
the translation of the Eisiskes 1904 Family List, which I purchased privately
and had translated and donated to the All Lithuania Database. It may also be
search there.lThere are translations of other Census-type records >from Eisiskes and other
nearby towns in the Lida DIstrict in the All Lithuania Database. They were
translated under the auspices of LitvakSIG's Lida District Research Group.

Second, if you have not read the book, "There Once Was a World" by Yaffa
Eliach," you should do so. It is a history of Eishishok and she includes
material on Nechamiah der feldsher. If you cannot find it in a library
in the UK it is available at deep remaindered prices online.

Please feel free to write me privately if you have any additional
questions, or are interested in becoming part of the Lida District
Research Group to help get additional records translated.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group

From: "Naomi Leon" <_info@researchroots.co.uk_
Dear Genners,

I am currently researching the Zuchowitzky/ Shuchavitzki/ Virshuvski/
Astramski families >from Lyubcha (Belarus) and Eishyshok (Lithuania).
The family later became SUCHOFF when they came to NY. I would be grateful
for any help you can provide with the following queries:
snip....


Re: no match with my sister #dna

Bob Leiser <robert.leiser@...>
 

While that may nicely explain this issue, it does raise another
concern. The test appeared to find no match between two siblings.
This was clearly just wrong, so Arnold challenged it, and further
examination revealed that there was an anomaly. Thus, the test is
capable of Misses; finding no match when there is indeed a match.

We then have to ask "How many misses may have occurred in the past?"
Arnold only challenged this because he knew it was wrong, but in
most cases people do not have this knowledge - that's why they're
doing the test. When the test reveals no match, they don't challenge
it, because they don't have the same high expectation of a match, so
a number of Misses may have gone un-noticed.

I'm sure there would be serious cost implications in doing this
second check on every test, but taking off a commercial hat and
putting on a scientific one, surely this scope for Misses isn't good
enough in a scientific endeavour? At the very least we should know
the probability of a Miss occurring for this reason.

Bob Leiser
in Glasgow.

On 26 Jan 2013, at 11:06, Arnold Chamove wrote:

I wrote to FTDNA and they replied below, so it is all now quite clear:

" Your sister and you should be identical on the mtdna test if you shared
the same mother. It's possible that you or she has a heteroplasmy that we
detected."

Subsequent to the above message, they said,

"I've had the sample (yours) rescored. You in fact DO have a .1C insertion
at base pair 572/573."


DNA Research #DNA Re: no match with my sister #dna

Bob Leiser <robert.leiser@...>
 

While that may nicely explain this issue, it does raise another
concern. The test appeared to find no match between two siblings.
This was clearly just wrong, so Arnold challenged it, and further
examination revealed that there was an anomaly. Thus, the test is
capable of Misses; finding no match when there is indeed a match.

We then have to ask "How many misses may have occurred in the past?"
Arnold only challenged this because he knew it was wrong, but in
most cases people do not have this knowledge - that's why they're
doing the test. When the test reveals no match, they don't challenge
it, because they don't have the same high expectation of a match, so
a number of Misses may have gone un-noticed.

I'm sure there would be serious cost implications in doing this
second check on every test, but taking off a commercial hat and
putting on a scientific one, surely this scope for Misses isn't good
enough in a scientific endeavour? At the very least we should know
the probability of a Miss occurring for this reason.

Bob Leiser
in Glasgow.

On 26 Jan 2013, at 11:06, Arnold Chamove wrote:

I wrote to FTDNA and they replied below, so it is all now quite clear:

" Your sister and you should be identical on the mtdna test if you shared
the same mother. It's possible that you or she has a heteroplasmy that we
detected."

Subsequent to the above message, they said,

"I've had the sample (yours) rescored. You in fact DO have a .1C insertion
at base pair 572/573."


Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

tom
 

I'm sorry if you misunderstood my message. (due to some well-meaning
editing by the moderator, part of the original question, which I
referred to, was deleted >from my reply.)

In her original message (see below), Beth Galleto had written: "that
a small number of births came >from a community called budzyno-bolki",
and therefore, she asked: "is it reasonable to assume that BOLKER
means '>from bolki'?"

'bolki' would be Polish, presumably, being a place name in Poland.
and "-er" is perfectly normal suffix in yiddish (and german) as
Beth's question had (originally) pointed out. There are plenty of
similar name formations, such as BERLINER or WIENER. (but not
MOSKOVITZ or WEINER, by the way. :-) )


....... tom klein, toronto

Dick & Martha Forsyth <theforsyths@verizon.net> wrote:

What do you mean, Tom? "Bolki" in what language? If Slavic (where it
means "pains"), that is not a normal word-formation, I don't think I've
ever run across -er as a suffix and would't even have a guess as to what
it meant. (I was a Slavic major and Russian teacher for many years,
though now "my" language is Bulgarian.)

Beth Galleto <galleto@pacbell.net> wrote:

My family name BOLKER apparently originated in Poland in the area of
Przasnysz. The earliest mention of this name seems to be in registrations
of births and marriages >from 1832 to 1866, in which the name is spelled
BOLKJER or BOLKIER. The oldest records describe the family as being from
Makow. Makow Mazowiecki is 15 miles southeast of Przasnysz. The LDS has
microfilmed birth records >from Makow >from 1808 to 1811, and I just finished
looking at all the births indicated as Jewish in these records. While these
records have some surnames, most of them identify people with patronymics.
I didn't find any births that I could definitely identify as being from
my family, but I noticed that a small number of births came >from a
community called Budzyno-Bolki, which can be found by looking at the
JewishGen Localities map of Makow at a particular magnification. It is a
little over a mile north of Makow. Is it reasonable to assume that Bolker
means ">from Bolki" in the same way that the name Lubliner would mean
">from Lublin" or Krakower would mean ">from Krakow"?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

tom
 

I'm sorry if you misunderstood my message. (due to some well-meaning
editing by the moderator, part of the original question, which I
referred to, was deleted >from my reply.)

In her original message (see below), Beth Galleto had written: "that
a small number of births came >from a community called budzyno-bolki",
and therefore, she asked: "is it reasonable to assume that BOLKER
means '>from bolki'?"

'bolki' would be Polish, presumably, being a place name in Poland.
and "-er" is perfectly normal suffix in yiddish (and german) as
Beth's question had (originally) pointed out. There are plenty of
similar name formations, such as BERLINER or WIENER. (but not
MOSKOVITZ or WEINER, by the way. :-) )


....... tom klein, toronto

Dick & Martha Forsyth <theforsyths@verizon.net> wrote:

What do you mean, Tom? "Bolki" in what language? If Slavic (where it
means "pains"), that is not a normal word-formation, I don't think I've
ever run across -er as a suffix and would't even have a guess as to what
it meant. (I was a Slavic major and Russian teacher for many years,
though now "my" language is Bulgarian.)

Beth Galleto <galleto@pacbell.net> wrote:

My family name BOLKER apparently originated in Poland in the area of
Przasnysz. The earliest mention of this name seems to be in registrations
of births and marriages >from 1832 to 1866, in which the name is spelled
BOLKJER or BOLKIER. The oldest records describe the family as being from
Makow. Makow Mazowiecki is 15 miles southeast of Przasnysz. The LDS has
microfilmed birth records >from Makow >from 1808 to 1811, and I just finished
looking at all the births indicated as Jewish in these records. While these
records have some surnames, most of them identify people with patronymics.
I didn't find any births that I could definitely identify as being from
my family, but I noticed that a small number of births came >from a
community called Budzyno-Bolki, which can be found by looking at the
JewishGen Localities map of Makow at a particular magnification. It is a
little over a mile north of Makow. Is it reasonable to assume that Bolker
means ">from Bolki" in the same way that the name Lubliner would mean
">from Lublin" or Krakower would mean ">from Krakow"?


Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Dick & Martha Forsyth wrote:
What do you mean, Tom? "Bolki" in what language? If Slavic (where it
means "pains"), that is not a normal word-formation, I don't think I've
ever run across -er as a suffix and would't even have a guess as to what
it meant. (I was a Slavic major and Russian teacher for many years,
though now "my" language is Bulgarian.)
-er in Yiddish/German, as adjective of inhabitance or origine.
cf the names: Hamburger, Warchauer, Wiener, Lotzer[?].

Perhaps an originating >from Belki, Ukraine,
before WWI that was Bilke, Hungary,
so "Bilker" ablauting to "Bolker"?

Belki/Bilke Jewish Population:
628 (in 1880), 1,081 (in 1921)

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Dick & Martha Forsyth wrote:
What do you mean, Tom? "Bolki" in what language? If Slavic (where it
means "pains"), that is not a normal word-formation, I don't think I've
ever run across -er as a suffix and would't even have a guess as to what
it meant. (I was a Slavic major and Russian teacher for many years,
though now "my" language is Bulgarian.)
-er in Yiddish/German, as adjective of inhabitance or origine.
cf the names: Hamburger, Warchauer, Wiener, Lotzer[?].

Perhaps an originating >from Belki, Ukraine,
before WWI that was Bilke, Hungary,
so "Bilker" ablauting to "Bolker"?

Belki/Bilke Jewish Population:
628 (in 1880), 1,081 (in 1921)

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>

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