Date   

Photos at New York Cemeteries #general

Ar Brown <arbrown2@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I have a request for someone to take photos of 3 head stones (in the same section)
in the Mt. Zion Cemetery in Queens, New York and 1 in the Ellmont/Beth David
Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.

If anyone can help me, please email me and I will give you names and
grave site locations.

Thank you in advance.

Arlynne Brown
Searching for GOLDBERG in Vienna,Austria/New York City, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photos at New York Cemeteries #general

Ar Brown <arbrown2@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I have a request for someone to take photos of 3 head stones (in the same section)
in the Mt. Zion Cemetery in Queens, New York and 1 in the Ellmont/Beth David
Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.

If anyone can help me, please email me and I will give you names and
grave site locations.

Thank you in advance.

Arlynne Brown
Searching for GOLDBERG in Vienna,Austria/New York City, NY


Berthold Beitz, Righteous Among the Nations, dies at 99 #germany

Yvonne Stern <yvstern@...>
 

German industrialist Berthold Beitz died July 30th at 99

Berthold Beitz, who was honored for saving hundreds of Jews
in occupied Poland during World War II and became one of
post-war West Germany's leading industrialists, has died at 99.
Quoted from:

http://www.omaha.com/article/20130731/AP15/307319927

"Together with his wife he saved the lives of hundreds of Jews
In 2000, the Jewish Council awarded Beitz its highest honor,
the Leo-Baeck Award.

In 1973, Beitz was given the Righteous Among the Nations
honorific by the Israeli Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum -
the highest honor given to a Gentile, or non-Jew, for saving Jews.

He also played a role in world sports as a member of the
International Olympic Committee >from 1972 to 1988,
the last four years as an IOC vice president.
He was also a member of the board of directors of the organizing
committee for the 1972 Olympics in Munich. Those games were
overshadowed by the deaths of 11 members of the Israeli
delegation in an attack by Palestinian gunmen.

Beitz was born on September 26, 1913, in Zemmin in eastern
Germany. He studied to become a banker and took a position
at an oil field in occupied Poland in 1939.
He saved many of the Jewish workers there >from the Nazis' death
camps, sometimes by even hiding them together with his wife
at his home. The couple had three daughters.
In August 1942, he saved 250 Jews >from being deported to the
Belzec death camp by claiming they were indispensable to keep
up production, according to Yad Vashem's biography of Beitz.

Asked after the end of the Third Reich about his personal motivation,
Beitz said, according to Yad Vashem, "There was no anti-Fascism,
no resistance. We watched >from morning to evening as close as you
can get what was happening to the Jews. ...
When you see a woman with her child in her arms being shot,
and you yourself have a child, then your response is bound to
be completely different."

Read complete article at
http://www.omaha.com/article/20130731/AP15/307319927

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil yvstern@uol.com.br


German SIG #Germany Berthold Beitz, Righteous Among the Nations, dies at 99 #germany

Yvonne Stern <yvstern@...>
 

German industrialist Berthold Beitz died July 30th at 99

Berthold Beitz, who was honored for saving hundreds of Jews
in occupied Poland during World War II and became one of
post-war West Germany's leading industrialists, has died at 99.
Quoted from:

http://www.omaha.com/article/20130731/AP15/307319927

"Together with his wife he saved the lives of hundreds of Jews
In 2000, the Jewish Council awarded Beitz its highest honor,
the Leo-Baeck Award.

In 1973, Beitz was given the Righteous Among the Nations
honorific by the Israeli Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum -
the highest honor given to a Gentile, or non-Jew, for saving Jews.

He also played a role in world sports as a member of the
International Olympic Committee >from 1972 to 1988,
the last four years as an IOC vice president.
He was also a member of the board of directors of the organizing
committee for the 1972 Olympics in Munich. Those games were
overshadowed by the deaths of 11 members of the Israeli
delegation in an attack by Palestinian gunmen.

Beitz was born on September 26, 1913, in Zemmin in eastern
Germany. He studied to become a banker and took a position
at an oil field in occupied Poland in 1939.
He saved many of the Jewish workers there >from the Nazis' death
camps, sometimes by even hiding them together with his wife
at his home. The couple had three daughters.
In August 1942, he saved 250 Jews >from being deported to the
Belzec death camp by claiming they were indispensable to keep
up production, according to Yad Vashem's biography of Beitz.

Asked after the end of the Third Reich about his personal motivation,
Beitz said, according to Yad Vashem, "There was no anti-Fascism,
no resistance. We watched >from morning to evening as close as you
can get what was happening to the Jews. ...
When you see a woman with her child in her arms being shot,
and you yourself have a child, then your response is bound to
be completely different."

Read complete article at
http://www.omaha.com/article/20130731/AP15/307319927

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil yvstern@uol.com.br


Re: [rom-sig] Genealogic research in Oradea Romania #hungary

drpst@...
 

-----Message d'origine-----
From: Alexandre Farkas
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 8:24 PM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] Genealogic research in Oradea Romania

...So, my question is : How could I prepare my "genealogist trip" in
Oradea in October ? I have the dadress of the archives center in
Oradea, and the list of available collections :

http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/index.php?lan=0&jud=79...

[PS] Hello.

As Beth Long pointed out, the study room at the Oradea Archives is closed
until sometime in 2014 (confirmed by phone this morning).

Until then, they answer written requests submitted either in their office or
by mail or email. The request should contain as many relevant data as
possible (name, religion, town, approximate date of the event...). If the
research is successful, a fee of 45 RON and an excise stamp of 2 RON are to
be payed in order to get a copy. They strongly suggest to give someone local
a notarised power of attorney to make the payment and collect the copy.

If you follow Bob Friedman's advice and visit the Jewish Community, there
might be someone there willing to help you with this.

Best regards.

Peter Stern
Chartres, France


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: [rom-sig] Genealogic research in Oradea Romania #hungary

drpst@...
 

-----Message d'origine-----
From: Alexandre Farkas
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 8:24 PM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] Genealogic research in Oradea Romania

...So, my question is : How could I prepare my "genealogist trip" in
Oradea in October ? I have the dadress of the archives center in
Oradea, and the list of available collections :

http://www.arhivelenationale.ro/index.php?lan=0&jud=79...

[PS] Hello.

As Beth Long pointed out, the study room at the Oradea Archives is closed
until sometime in 2014 (confirmed by phone this morning).

Until then, they answer written requests submitted either in their office or
by mail or email. The request should contain as many relevant data as
possible (name, religion, town, approximate date of the event...). If the
research is successful, a fee of 45 RON and an excise stamp of 2 RON are to
be payed in order to get a copy. They strongly suggest to give someone local
a notarised power of attorney to make the payment and collect the copy.

If you follow Bob Friedman's advice and visit the Jewish Community, there
might be someone there willing to help you with this.

Best regards.

Peter Stern
Chartres, France


ViewMate headstone inscription #hungary

gluckpast@...
 

I have been hoping to locate the grave of my great-grandmother Shifra
Gluck nee Wiezel, wife of Meyer Hersh Gluck of Velika
Kopania/Vorosmarth, who died around 1932-36 in Chust. An image of a
headstone bearing her given name has been posted on ViewMate at the
following address:-

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM28329

However, as there appears to be no reference to either her father's
family name or a year of birth, I should be grateful to anyone who can
comment or offer any suggestions or advice regarding the inscription
in the light of local practice at the time.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

John Berkeley (previously Berkovic)
Warwick, UK


Hungary SIG #Hungary ViewMate headstone inscription #hungary

gluckpast@...
 

I have been hoping to locate the grave of my great-grandmother Shifra
Gluck nee Wiezel, wife of Meyer Hersh Gluck of Velika
Kopania/Vorosmarth, who died around 1932-36 in Chust. An image of a
headstone bearing her given name has been posted on ViewMate at the
following address:-

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM28329

However, as there appears to be no reference to either her father's
family name or a year of birth, I should be grateful to anyone who can
comment or offer any suggestions or advice regarding the inscription
in the light of local practice at the time.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,

John Berkeley (previously Berkovic)
Warwick, UK


WOLPERT from Kuliai and Plunge #lithuania

Jules Feldman
 

In searching for my relative Mones son of Zalman WOLPERT of Kuliai and
Plunge in the All Lithuanian Data Base, I found many WOLPERT entries in
Kuliai - the WOLPERTs were apparently a big family in the shtetl.
In fact there were 3 Mones WOLPERTs in Kuliai - sons of Yehuda, Leib and
Zalman.
Anyone with a connection to this family?

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania WOLPERT from Kuliai and Plunge #lithuania

Jules Feldman
 

In searching for my relative Mones son of Zalman WOLPERT of Kuliai and
Plunge in the All Lithuanian Data Base, I found many WOLPERT entries in
Kuliai - the WOLPERTs were apparently a big family in the shtetl.
In fact there were 3 Mones WOLPERTs in Kuliai - sons of Yehuda, Leib and
Zalman.
Anyone with a connection to this family?

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods or resources may be shared with
the list.


Great Interview With Sergey Kanovich, Founder of MACEVA #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Fellow Litvaks,

An excellent interview with Sergey Kanovich, founder of the MACEVA Cemetery
Project can be read at this link:

http://www.lithuaniatribune.com/46264/echoes-from-a-silent-past-restoring-an
d-preserving-jewish-cemeteries-in-lithuania-201346264/

Tiny url: http://tinyurl.com/lqugrlr

Enjoy,

Eden Joachim


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Great Interview With Sergey Kanovich, Founder of MACEVA #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Fellow Litvaks,

An excellent interview with Sergey Kanovich, founder of the MACEVA Cemetery
Project can be read at this link:

http://www.lithuaniatribune.com/46264/echoes-from-a-silent-past-restoring-an
d-preserving-jewish-cemeteries-in-lithuania-201346264/

Tiny url: http://tinyurl.com/lqugrlr

Enjoy,

Eden Joachim


Re: Will the real Cisow please stand up! #galicia

Bette Stoop Mas <bette_sscf@...>
 

Judi Wagner wrote:

"I am trying to find the correct Cisow for my husband's maternal
grandmother's family, the RECHTER's and the HALPERN's. I know we
have family >from the towns of Bolechow (Bolekov) and also Dolina
(Dolyna), but where oh where is Cisow? There seem to be a few towns
with that name now, all spelled differently."

JewishGen Gazetteer lists coordinates for Bolekhiv 4904/2352 and
Dolyna 4858/2401. Neither Locality Page lists a nearby Jewish
community that could be Cisow.

In JewishGen Gazetteer, search twice for (sounds like) Cisow in
Ukraine, asking for the distance and direction >from each
latitude/longitude. Results include a town with the exact spelling
Cisow, now called Tisov, located at 4903/2347 or 3.9 miles WSW of
Bolekhiv and 12 miles WNW of Dolyna. Radius searches by location
within 30 miles of each latitude/longitude list the same results.
Cisow/Tisov is a populated place that did not have a significant Jewish
community and is not included in the Jewish Communities Database.

In the 1929 Polish Business Directory Project (Town Search
< http://jri-poland.org/bizdir/bd1929.htm >) search for
(Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex) Cisow. Note that the exact spelling of
Cisow includes the diacritical accent mark over the "o." Results include
Cisow in Dolina district, Stanislawow province on page 1472. The
article for Cisow near Dolina and Bolechow includes businesses owned
by Chaim Rechter (horse trading) and H. Halpern (tailoring).

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Will the real Cisow please stand up! #galicia

Bette Stoop Mas <bette_sscf@...>
 

Judi Wagner wrote:

"I am trying to find the correct Cisow for my husband's maternal
grandmother's family, the RECHTER's and the HALPERN's. I know we
have family >from the towns of Bolechow (Bolekov) and also Dolina
(Dolyna), but where oh where is Cisow? There seem to be a few towns
with that name now, all spelled differently."

JewishGen Gazetteer lists coordinates for Bolekhiv 4904/2352 and
Dolyna 4858/2401. Neither Locality Page lists a nearby Jewish
community that could be Cisow.

In JewishGen Gazetteer, search twice for (sounds like) Cisow in
Ukraine, asking for the distance and direction >from each
latitude/longitude. Results include a town with the exact spelling
Cisow, now called Tisov, located at 4903/2347 or 3.9 miles WSW of
Bolekhiv and 12 miles WNW of Dolyna. Radius searches by location
within 30 miles of each latitude/longitude list the same results.
Cisow/Tisov is a populated place that did not have a significant Jewish
community and is not included in the Jewish Communities Database.

In the 1929 Polish Business Directory Project (Town Search
< http://jri-poland.org/bizdir/bd1929.htm >) search for
(Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex) Cisow. Note that the exact spelling of
Cisow includes the diacritical accent mark over the "o." Results include
Cisow in Dolina district, Stanislawow province on page 1472. The
article for Cisow near Dolina and Bolechow includes businesses owned
by Chaim Rechter (horse trading) and H. Halpern (tailoring).

Bette Stoop Mas
Florida, USA


Free Webinar - Thursday, August 1 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

At the beginning of every month, I give a free webinar: Introduction to Genetic
Genealogy at Family Tree DNA.

If you're not sure what genealogical DNA testing can do for you or which of the
different types of tests would be beneficial for you, consider attending this
webinar. You can either attend live or view a recording of the webinar anytime
during the month.

Here are the details for the August webinar:

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, August 1, 2013
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 5pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording instead!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar, please visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one should I order?
How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a geneticist to
understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn about the
history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn about the
different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn about resources
that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will
be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner,
Family Tree DNA.

*Exclusive Discount Coupon >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of all Relative Roots webinars receive an exclusive, limited-time
discount coupon >from Family Tree DNA, which can be used to order select new test
kits and upgrades. So if you missed the summer sale, this is another opportunity
to save on your DNA test order. The coupon will be provided at the end of the
webinar and expires 7 days after the live webinar.

*What is a Webinar?*

A "webinar" is a web-based seminar. Rather than traveling to attend a presentation
in person, you attend >from the comfort of your own home. View the presentation
using your own computer and internet connection, and listen via your computer's
speakers or by phone. You can type questions to the presenter at any time during
the presentation, or you can ask questions by voice at the end of the presentation
if time permits.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Free Webinar - Thursday, August 1 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #general

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

At the beginning of every month, I give a free webinar: Introduction to Genetic
Genealogy at Family Tree DNA.

If you're not sure what genealogical DNA testing can do for you or which of the
different types of tests would be beneficial for you, consider attending this
webinar. You can either attend live or view a recording of the webinar anytime
during the month.

Here are the details for the August webinar:

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Thursday, August 1, 2013
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 5pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording instead!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar, please visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one should I order?
How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a geneticist to
understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn about the
history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn about the
different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn about resources
that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy experience. Focus will
be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by JewishGen's DNA testing partner,
Family Tree DNA.

*Exclusive Discount Coupon >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of all Relative Roots webinars receive an exclusive, limited-time
discount coupon >from Family Tree DNA, which can be used to order select new test
kits and upgrades. So if you missed the summer sale, this is another opportunity
to save on your DNA test order. The coupon will be provided at the end of the
webinar and expires 7 days after the live webinar.

*What is a Webinar?*

A "webinar" is a web-based seminar. Rather than traveling to attend a presentation
in person, you attend >from the comfort of your own home. View the presentation
using your own computer and internet connection, and listen via your computer's
speakers or by phone. You can type questions to the presenter at any time during
the presentation, or you can ask questions by voice at the end of the presentation
if time permits.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


IGRA Added Four New Databases #general

Garri Regev
 

IGRA (The Israel Genealogy Research Association) - www.genealogy.org.il - has
released four new databases in time for the upcoming International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in Boston including 16,000 new listings: Graduates of Gymnasia
Herzilia 1918-1948, List of Names in the Register of Adult Jews in Petah Tikva
1936, Marriage Certificates Jezreel Valley 1931-1941 and Voter List Tel Aviv 1922.
Check out the promo (http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/new-databoston-2013) and
visit the AID (All Israel Databases) section on our website.

Garri Regev
President,IGRA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA Added Four New Databases #general

Garri Regev
 

IGRA (The Israel Genealogy Research Association) - www.genealogy.org.il - has
released four new databases in time for the upcoming International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in Boston including 16,000 new listings: Graduates of Gymnasia
Herzilia 1918-1948, List of Names in the Register of Adult Jews in Petah Tikva
1936, Marriage Certificates Jezreel Valley 1931-1941 and Voter List Tel Aviv 1922.
Check out the promo (http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/new-databoston-2013) and
visit the AID (All Israel Databases) section on our website.

Garri Regev
President,IGRA


Emigration to Eretz Yisroel 1921-1941 Partial #general

William Yoffee
 

Emigation to Eretz-Yisroel 1921-1941 PARTIAL

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) of LitvakSIG is posting on its
Shutterfly website a list of 665 names of persons who were registered to
make Aliya to Eretz Yisroel (Palestine at the time) between 1921 and 1941.
Nearly all of these persons appeared to be residents of Lithuania, although
a small number of them were born elsewhere (eg. Poland, Latvia, Romania,
Austria). These names are recorded in File 588 of the Lithuanian Central
Vilnius Archives (LCVA). They are the first group of as many as 3500 or more
names of persons contained in this file, most of whose data remain to be
translated by LitvakSIG. Readers of this Digest may recall that several
months ago the PDRG posted on its Shutterfly website a list of 1362 names of
persons who were listed in LCVA File 1664 by the Palestine Office as actual
or prospective emigrants >from a number of European countries to Palestine in
the years 1929 to 1940. These data will be found in the Data section in the
Non-Shtetl Specific Files.

In addition to given name and surname, the information recorded for the
individuals includes relationship to the head of the family, sex, age, place
of birth in a few cases, marital status, and address in Lithuania. Almost
one-third (201) came >from Kaunas. Only 34 came >from Vilnius, all between
1937 and 1940. Also listed is the date (presumably of registration),
whether or not a photo is in the file, destination in some cases, and
comments for many individuals about which more will be noted later. Ages
ranged >from age 1 to age 79. The largest number were between age 17 and age
40 (404). Only 100 were younger than age 17, and only 80 were older than age
40. No age was given for 81 persons. Occupations are listed for only 235
persons, which included physicians, dentists, lawyers, housewives,
mechanics, electricians and carpenters, and included 53 farmers/agriculture
specialists, and 36 students. As for religious officials, there were only 2
rabbis and 1 shochet. As could be expected, because of the rise of National
Socialism in Germany and increasing Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, the
number of emigrants in this group peaked in the years 1933 and 1934 (215),
in 1935 and 1936 (159) and between 1937 and 1939 (153). In 1940, after the
German occupation of western Poland there were 24 emigrants and in 1941,
when the Germans invaded the Soviet territory, there was only one emigrant
recorded among this group.

The Comments section as a whole is interesting for what it reveals about the
situations in which the emigrants who were registered found themselves. It
is not clear whether some of the comments were noted at the time of
registration or later. Some comments do, however refer to events around the
registration dates. For example, a number of refugees >from Poland obtained
visas for Palestine in 1939, the year that the British White Paper
restricted immigration. Many individuals were noted to have close relatives
already living in Palestine. Some appeared to have been sponsored by
Zionist organizations in Palestine. Some individuals in years leading up to
the start of hostilities made trips into Germany. In some cases individuals
had obtained visas to a number of other countries which presumably they
visited before making Aliya. Some had already made Aliya but had returned
to Lithuania for a visit, presumably to relatives they left behind. While
comments were not made in every case, it certainly seems that they are
relevant to the situations of those individuals about whom they were made.

An alphabetical list of Jewish surnames of individuals who were recorded is
available to anyone on request to me at the email address below. An
alphabetical list of towns is also available. Also, for further information
about the anticipated progress of this project, please contact me at my
email address.

Bill Yoffee

Panevezys District Research Coordinator

kidsbks@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Emigration to Eretz Yisroel 1921-1941 Partial #general

William Yoffee
 

Emigation to Eretz-Yisroel 1921-1941 PARTIAL

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) of LitvakSIG is posting on its
Shutterfly website a list of 665 names of persons who were registered to
make Aliya to Eretz Yisroel (Palestine at the time) between 1921 and 1941.
Nearly all of these persons appeared to be residents of Lithuania, although
a small number of them were born elsewhere (eg. Poland, Latvia, Romania,
Austria). These names are recorded in File 588 of the Lithuanian Central
Vilnius Archives (LCVA). They are the first group of as many as 3500 or more
names of persons contained in this file, most of whose data remain to be
translated by LitvakSIG. Readers of this Digest may recall that several
months ago the PDRG posted on its Shutterfly website a list of 1362 names of
persons who were listed in LCVA File 1664 by the Palestine Office as actual
or prospective emigrants >from a number of European countries to Palestine in
the years 1929 to 1940. These data will be found in the Data section in the
Non-Shtetl Specific Files.

In addition to given name and surname, the information recorded for the
individuals includes relationship to the head of the family, sex, age, place
of birth in a few cases, marital status, and address in Lithuania. Almost
one-third (201) came >from Kaunas. Only 34 came >from Vilnius, all between
1937 and 1940. Also listed is the date (presumably of registration),
whether or not a photo is in the file, destination in some cases, and
comments for many individuals about which more will be noted later. Ages
ranged >from age 1 to age 79. The largest number were between age 17 and age
40 (404). Only 100 were younger than age 17, and only 80 were older than age
40. No age was given for 81 persons. Occupations are listed for only 235
persons, which included physicians, dentists, lawyers, housewives,
mechanics, electricians and carpenters, and included 53 farmers/agriculture
specialists, and 36 students. As for religious officials, there were only 2
rabbis and 1 shochet. As could be expected, because of the rise of National
Socialism in Germany and increasing Anti-Semitism in Eastern Europe, the
number of emigrants in this group peaked in the years 1933 and 1934 (215),
in 1935 and 1936 (159) and between 1937 and 1939 (153). In 1940, after the
German occupation of western Poland there were 24 emigrants and in 1941,
when the Germans invaded the Soviet territory, there was only one emigrant
recorded among this group.

The Comments section as a whole is interesting for what it reveals about the
situations in which the emigrants who were registered found themselves. It
is not clear whether some of the comments were noted at the time of
registration or later. Some comments do, however refer to events around the
registration dates. For example, a number of refugees >from Poland obtained
visas for Palestine in 1939, the year that the British White Paper
restricted immigration. Many individuals were noted to have close relatives
already living in Palestine. Some appeared to have been sponsored by
Zionist organizations in Palestine. Some individuals in years leading up to
the start of hostilities made trips into Germany. In some cases individuals
had obtained visas to a number of other countries which presumably they
visited before making Aliya. Some had already made Aliya but had returned
to Lithuania for a visit, presumably to relatives they left behind. While
comments were not made in every case, it certainly seems that they are
relevant to the situations of those individuals about whom they were made.

An alphabetical list of Jewish surnames of individuals who were recorded is
available to anyone on request to me at the email address below. An
alphabetical list of towns is also available. Also, for further information
about the anticipated progress of this project, please contact me at my
email address.

Bill Yoffee

Panevezys District Research Coordinator

kidsbks@verizon.net

137941 - 137960 of 665460