Date   

Name changes at Port of Phila? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear All:
I've been looking at the manifests of the Hamburg-Amerika steamer Pisa, which
arrived at Philadelphia on 2 Mar 1912. They seem to have been filled out by whoever
did the corresponding Hamburg passenger list--very similar handwriting, very few
spelling variants--but they also contain more than the usual number of changes,
especially to names.

These are not name changes entered at the time of naturalization--they're all in
the same hand. They're not major changes: Meische and Mosche become Moische;
Chayem becomes Chaim; Pietruschka becomes Petronella; and RUBASCHKIN becomes
RUBASCHKINE. In each case the name is struck through and rewritten.

These changes occur on only two pages of the manifest: images 17-18 and 19-20 at
the pay site. Other things are also changed--a few occupations, for instance.

Now, why would this happen? Was an inexperienced inspector given these pages to
work? They don't seem to be signed off by an inspector,the way other pages or group
of pages with similar handwriting for the notes are.

Or could the ship's doctor have gotten bored? The passage >from Hamburg took an
unusually long time, >from Feb. 7/8 until Mar. 2, and there's no indication that the
ship put in at any other port during that time.

Finally: would someone >from Vitebsk have been more likely to pronounce the given
name Moshe as Moishe or Meishe? I associate the former with Polish Yiddish,
the latter with Lithuanian Yiddish; but this is certainly not my field.
(My people would have said Mausche.)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name changes at Port of Phila? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear All:
I've been looking at the manifests of the Hamburg-Amerika steamer Pisa, which
arrived at Philadelphia on 2 Mar 1912. They seem to have been filled out by whoever
did the corresponding Hamburg passenger list--very similar handwriting, very few
spelling variants--but they also contain more than the usual number of changes,
especially to names.

These are not name changes entered at the time of naturalization--they're all in
the same hand. They're not major changes: Meische and Mosche become Moische;
Chayem becomes Chaim; Pietruschka becomes Petronella; and RUBASCHKIN becomes
RUBASCHKINE. In each case the name is struck through and rewritten.

These changes occur on only two pages of the manifest: images 17-18 and 19-20 at
the pay site. Other things are also changed--a few occupations, for instance.

Now, why would this happen? Was an inexperienced inspector given these pages to
work? They don't seem to be signed off by an inspector,the way other pages or group
of pages with similar handwriting for the notes are.

Or could the ship's doctor have gotten bored? The passage >from Hamburg took an
unusually long time, >from Feb. 7/8 until Mar. 2, and there's no indication that the
ship put in at any other port during that time.

Finally: would someone >from Vitebsk have been more likely to pronounce the given
name Moshe as Moishe or Meishe? I associate the former with Polish Yiddish,
the latter with Lithuanian Yiddish; but this is certainly not my field.
(My people would have said Mausche.)

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA


Re: Contact a Researcher #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Liz Miller asked:
Does anyone know how to contact Yuri Dorn? I believe that he has information on
the cemetery in Kraisk?Your help is appreciated.


Liz...try our Eastern European Researcher DataBase...its composed of references by
fellow 'genners...and i believe Yuri is one of the researchers
http://www.jewishgen.org/Infofiles/researchers.htm

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Contact a Researcher #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Liz Miller asked:
Does anyone know how to contact Yuri Dorn? I believe that he has information on
the cemetery in Kraisk?Your help is appreciated.


Liz...try our Eastern European Researcher DataBase...its composed of references by
fellow 'genners...and i believe Yuri is one of the researchers
http://www.jewishgen.org/Infofiles/researchers.htm

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education
Family Web site: kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/kramer.htm


The Future of Jewish Genealogy? #general

Michael Goldstein
 

Let us know what you think about the future of Jewish Genealogy and the IAJGS*.
Answer this short survey at http://bit.ly/16Ur33G by Oct 4!

The survey is being conducted by the IAJGS. The information you provide will be
used to improve and augment the services we offer.

Marlis Humphrey
President IAJGS

*The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) is an
independent non-profit 501(c)(3) umbrella organization coordinating the activities
and annual conference of more than 70 national and local Jewish genealogical
societies around the world. Learn more at www.iajgs.org and "like" us on Facebook
at https://www.facebook.com/IAJGSjewishgenealogy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Future of Jewish Genealogy? #general

Michael Goldstein
 

Let us know what you think about the future of Jewish Genealogy and the IAJGS*.
Answer this short survey at http://bit.ly/16Ur33G by Oct 4!

The survey is being conducted by the IAJGS. The information you provide will be
used to improve and augment the services we offer.

Marlis Humphrey
President IAJGS

*The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) is an
independent non-profit 501(c)(3) umbrella organization coordinating the activities
and annual conference of more than 70 national and local Jewish genealogical
societies around the world. Learn more at www.iajgs.org and "like" us on Facebook
at https://www.facebook.com/IAJGSjewishgenealogy.


Success story (was "Fake death record?") #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

30 months ago, I posted the message here below in the discussion list. Despite the
few testimonies of fake/mistaken records I received, I was still very frustrated.

Few weeks ago, after enjoying incredible new data >from Lodz Book of Residents, I
realized such Book existed for the town of Mogielnica. I placed an order to the
PSA branch holding the Book, and few time and few dollars later, I received the
page for my family.

First, for the first time, I had the proof that my great-grandmother,was the
daughter of her father Haim Josek (which was not that obvious!). Second, it
appeared that Haim Josek was incorrectly reported as dead. In the column dedicated
to comments, the death record reference was crossed out and a comment added:
"moved to Warka".

The birth of my great-grandmother was not probably not declared in Warka, as many
others, and this is why I could not find the record. However, according to the law,
her birth was declared in the city where her parents registered, ie Mogielnica.

Conclusion: these Books of Residents are a true gold mine. And to ensure to make
them available to the all the researchers, and not only through individuals
initiatives like mine, financial contribution is key. I would be more than glad to
contribute.

Note: to learn more about Books of Residents, see http://jri-poland.org/bor.htm

Regards,

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France

Original message
I've been searching my family for 15 years and never faced such a puzzle. My great-
great-grandfather Haim Josek Goldstein is supposed to be dead in 1923, probably in
Lodz (according to my grandmother who is a very consistent source of information).
His daugther, my great-grandmother, is supposed to be born in 1897. The problem is
that I've just found his death record in Mogielnica, his hometown, in 1891! There
is no doubt about his identity as the record mentioned his wife. Also,I found birth
records for his 3 sons who were born between 1885 and 1890 in Mogielnica too. No
track of my great-grandmother birth record...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success story (was "Fake death record?") #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

30 months ago, I posted the message here below in the discussion list. Despite the
few testimonies of fake/mistaken records I received, I was still very frustrated.

Few weeks ago, after enjoying incredible new data >from Lodz Book of Residents, I
realized such Book existed for the town of Mogielnica. I placed an order to the
PSA branch holding the Book, and few time and few dollars later, I received the
page for my family.

First, for the first time, I had the proof that my great-grandmother,was the
daughter of her father Haim Josek (which was not that obvious!). Second, it
appeared that Haim Josek was incorrectly reported as dead. In the column dedicated
to comments, the death record reference was crossed out and a comment added:
"moved to Warka".

The birth of my great-grandmother was not probably not declared in Warka, as many
others, and this is why I could not find the record. However, according to the law,
her birth was declared in the city where her parents registered, ie Mogielnica.

Conclusion: these Books of Residents are a true gold mine. And to ensure to make
them available to the all the researchers, and not only through individuals
initiatives like mine, financial contribution is key. I would be more than glad to
contribute.

Note: to learn more about Books of Residents, see http://jri-poland.org/bor.htm

Regards,

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France

Original message
I've been searching my family for 15 years and never faced such a puzzle. My great-
great-grandfather Haim Josek Goldstein is supposed to be dead in 1923, probably in
Lodz (according to my grandmother who is a very consistent source of information).
His daugther, my great-grandmother, is supposed to be born in 1897. The problem is
that I've just found his death record in Mogielnica, his hometown, in 1891! There
is no doubt about his identity as the record mentioned his wife. Also,I found birth
records for his 3 sons who were born between 1885 and 1890 in Mogielnica too. No
track of my great-grandmother birth record...


Request for Photos of Graves at Mt. Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens #general

Bob Yuran
 

If, at the time you are assisting Mr. Pickholtz with his request for pictures of
graves at Mt. Zion Cemetery, you could also capture a few for me, I would be most
grateful. The graves I am intersted in are:

David Yuran at 17-35R
Schaye Hirsch Yuran at 38-32R
Celia Juran at 35R
Moses Juran at 0007-D4L
Abraham Juran (no location on Mt. Zion website, so I certainly
wouldn't expect extra effort)

Bob Yuran
Jupiter, FL

bob.yuran@...

Researching: Juran, Yuran, Youran, Uran (Solotwina, Nadworna)
Weiss, Nachbar (Kolomyia)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Request for Photos of Graves at Mt. Zion Cemetery, Maspeth, Queens #general

Bob Yuran
 

If, at the time you are assisting Mr. Pickholtz with his request for pictures of
graves at Mt. Zion Cemetery, you could also capture a few for me, I would be most
grateful. The graves I am intersted in are:

David Yuran at 17-35R
Schaye Hirsch Yuran at 38-32R
Celia Juran at 35R
Moses Juran at 0007-D4L
Abraham Juran (no location on Mt. Zion website, so I certainly
wouldn't expect extra effort)

Bob Yuran
Jupiter, FL

bob.yuran@...

Researching: Juran, Yuran, Youran, Uran (Solotwina, Nadworna)
Weiss, Nachbar (Kolomyia)


Last Names Used As Middle Names (continued) #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

This week I asked the question on this venue, "Why would a man use a ast name as a
middle name" and used a few examples, such as"Tobias Guttman UNTERBERGER, Mendel
Balsam UNTERBERGER". The names, and others were found in a legal notice published
in the Brooklyn Eagle in 1937 in reference to people mentioned in my great aunt,
Minnie Unterberger KAPELNER'S will---she died in 1933.

Pamela Weisberger, and similarly Mark Halperin, suggested that, "In Galicia, where
most marriages were religious only, not civil, the couple was not considered
married, their children were considered illegitimate and often they had to take the
ir mothers name as their surname, but kept the father's name as a middle name,
later to make it their surname." But the published legal notice was in the second
quarter of the 20th C., 1937. Would this method of name giving still have been used
by then; or would this simply have been a matter of habit, carried forward?

Marilyn Robinson
Florida

Searching: Unterberger (Galicia), Kapelner (Galicia, Austria),Shtuz/Schultz
(Galicia, Austria, Ulanow), Yudin (Sharkovshchina),Luria/Lurie/Levine (Lodz,
Warsaw), Reichman (Warsaw)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Last Names Used As Middle Names (continued) #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

This week I asked the question on this venue, "Why would a man use a ast name as a
middle name" and used a few examples, such as"Tobias Guttman UNTERBERGER, Mendel
Balsam UNTERBERGER". The names, and others were found in a legal notice published
in the Brooklyn Eagle in 1937 in reference to people mentioned in my great aunt,
Minnie Unterberger KAPELNER'S will---she died in 1933.

Pamela Weisberger, and similarly Mark Halperin, suggested that, "In Galicia, where
most marriages were religious only, not civil, the couple was not considered
married, their children were considered illegitimate and often they had to take the
ir mothers name as their surname, but kept the father's name as a middle name,
later to make it their surname." But the published legal notice was in the second
quarter of the 20th C., 1937. Would this method of name giving still have been used
by then; or would this simply have been a matter of habit, carried forward?

Marilyn Robinson
Florida

Searching: Unterberger (Galicia), Kapelner (Galicia, Austria),Shtuz/Schultz
(Galicia, Austria, Ulanow), Yudin (Sharkovshchina),Luria/Lurie/Levine (Lodz,
Warsaw), Reichman (Warsaw)


Sub-Carpathia SIG [ Survey Results ] #subcarpathia

Marshall Katz
 

Dear Sub-Carpathia researchers,

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to everyone who responded to the
survey, which exceeded all expectations. In the near future, I will begin
to contact volunteers.

Understanding that some of you may wish to complete the survey at a later
date, the survey form will remain available at the link I provided in my
earlier e-mails and a link to the survey is now available at the
Sub-Carpathia SIG "Portal" web site.

For those planning on visiting their ancestral village(s) or town(s) in
Sub-Carpathia in 2014, now is the time to make arrangements for
transportation and guides, whose schedules fill up quickly. Each year, the
number of people---Jewish and non-Jewish alike---visiting Sub-Carpathia
increases. It is important to note that April-June 2014 is the 70th anniversary
of the deportations. Contact me privately for detailed information on travel
to Sub-Carpathia Ukraine.

The results of the survey through 30 September may be viewed here:

< http://www.jotform.com/report/32351463151041 >

Respectfully,
Marshall Katz
Sub-Carpathia SIG coordinator


Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Sub-Carpathia SIG [ Survey Results ] #subcarpathia

Marshall Katz
 

Dear Sub-Carpathia researchers,

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to everyone who responded to the
survey, which exceeded all expectations. In the near future, I will begin
to contact volunteers.

Understanding that some of you may wish to complete the survey at a later
date, the survey form will remain available at the link I provided in my
earlier e-mails and a link to the survey is now available at the
Sub-Carpathia SIG "Portal" web site.

For those planning on visiting their ancestral village(s) or town(s) in
Sub-Carpathia in 2014, now is the time to make arrangements for
transportation and guides, whose schedules fill up quickly. Each year, the
number of people---Jewish and non-Jewish alike---visiting Sub-Carpathia
increases. It is important to note that April-June 2014 is the 70th anniversary
of the deportations. Contact me privately for detailed information on travel
to Sub-Carpathia Ukraine.

The results of the survey through 30 September may be viewed here:

< http://www.jotform.com/report/32351463151041 >

Respectfully,
Marshall Katz
Sub-Carpathia SIG coordinator


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Yizkor Book Project, September 2013 #subcarpathia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although September was chockablock with Jewish festivals and our minds and
time were generally located in other directions, we at the Yizkor Book
Project did manage to "squeeze out" quite a number of new entries and
updates, as you will see.

Hopefully, you saw the announcement a few days ago sent to the various
forums regarding the latest books that were recently published as part of
our Yizkor Books in Print Project so I won't repeat the list. If, however,
you are interested in seeing what is available and what this particular
project is all about, please go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

In recent times, we have begun the first steps in setting up Translation
Fund projects for the following books:

Gorlice, Poland - "Sefer Gorlice; ha-kehila be-vinyana u-ve-hurbana"
(Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the community)
Zolochiv, Ukraine - "Der Untergang fun Zloczow" (The Downfall of Zloczow)

Sometime soon these funds will appear amongst the other funds already
running at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that these funds have been set up in order to raise money to allow for
the professional translation of these books and to enable all of us to read
this unique material concerning our communities and families that were
decimated during the Holocaust. For those of you who are US citizens,
donations to these funds are also tax deductible.

Now to facts and figures for September, during this last month we have added
one new project:

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

Added in 8 new entries:

- Dragomiresti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar161.html

- Janovice nad Uhlavou, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh391.html

- Ieud, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar188.html

- Mirovice & Mirotice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of
Bohemia in the past and present)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh403.html

- Novoselytsya, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania,
Volume II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00368.html

- Sacel, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar171.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00382.html

- Soroca, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00372.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Babruysk, Belarus (Memorial book of the community of Bobruisk and its
surroundings) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bobruisk/bysktoc1.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kishinev/kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dzyarzhynsk (Koidanov), Belarus (Koidanov; Memorial Volume of the Martyrs
of Koidanov) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dzyarzhynsk/Dzyarzhynsk.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Hrubieszow/Hrubieszow.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Michalovce, Slovakia (The Book of Michalovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Michalovce/Michalovce.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostroh, Ukraine (Ostrog book; a memorial to the Ostrog holy community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostroh/Ostroh.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ozeryany, Ukraine (Memorial book, Jezierzany and surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozeryany/Ozeryany.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

At this time, I would like to wish all of you and your families that you can
also look forward to a very sweet year in your personal and professional
lives.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Looking for Lehman/Louis GROSS from Altdorf, Baden, Germany #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Keren Weiner wrote:
am looking for information on Louis GROSS of Altdorf, Baden,Germany(near
Schmieheim). Louis was born "Lehman GROSS" in Altdorf November 20, 1843
There are some Gross [Groß] people mentioned here in the 1920's, like Jakob Groß
and Bernhard Groß, in 1809 there were already 52 Jewish families there:

<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/altdorf_synagoge.htm>

or translated:

<http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alemannia-judaica.de%2Faltdorf_synagoge.htm>
(MODERATOR: http://tinyurl.com/kbvp76k )
Perhaps a start?

<http://www.szgenes.com/lucke_meyer/p38.htm>

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Looking for Lehman/Louis GROSS from Altdorf, Baden, Germany #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Keren Weiner wrote:
am looking for information on Louis GROSS of Altdorf, Baden,Germany(near
Schmieheim). Louis was born "Lehman GROSS" in Altdorf November 20, 1843
There are some Gross [Groß] people mentioned here in the 1920's, like Jakob Groß
and Bernhard Groß, in 1809 there were already 52 Jewish families there:

<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/altdorf_synagoge.htm>

or translated:

<http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=de&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alemannia-judaica.de%2Faltdorf_synagoge.htm>
(MODERATOR: http://tinyurl.com/kbvp76k )
Perhaps a start?

<http://www.szgenes.com/lucke_meyer/p38.htm>

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names #galicia

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Marilyn Robinson wrote:
Why would a man use a last name as a middle name. I thought that a middle name
would be based on the father's first name (patronym)? Could it be the mother's
maiden name? For example,I have a few male names >from a list who possibly are
from the Krakow or Tarnow area:
Tobias Guttman Unterberger,
Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger
Mendel Balsam Unterberger
Zalmen Zeger Unterberger
I would say these are not "middle names" in the [strange] US sense. These did and
do not exist in Europe.

Since there were many Guttman families, "Guttman of Unterberg" [~~the good man of
the town below the mountain] was used to dissuade confusion. So "Guttman
Unterberger" probably is the family name.

"Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger" This is a special case, as "Naftali" was too
Jewish to be allowed, and "Hirsch" [= a deer] was the logical kinui, as “Naphtali
is a deer sent forth” German: "Naphthali ist ein schneller Hirsch" (Breishies/
Bereshit/Genesis 49:21), so this perhaps is not "Naftali ben Hirsch", but his
civil forename was Hirch, while his Jewish one was Naftali, "Weiser Unterberger"
being the family name.

Say "Zalmen Zeger Unterberger" would mean: "Zalmen" "Zeger Unterberger" or could
be patronimic: "Zalmen ben Zeger" "Unterberger" or with Arameic "bar": "Zalmen bar
Zeger" "Unterberger", But also here "Zeger" could be a diminuative [or kinui] of
Zalmen [= Solomon]. the German? civil authorities not allowing the ben/bar, while
they allowed the German equivalent "Mendelsohn" for "ben Mendel".

All this "probably" and imho.

Many Jewish and non-Jewish ignoble family names started out to be just a
specification [ job, location, physical sign, religion, etc.] for the person
himself, not for the family. The son having another "last" name, and siblings
having different ones.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Last Names Used As Middle Names #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Marilyn Robinson wrote:
Why would a man use a last name as a middle name. I thought that a middle name
would be based on the father's first name (patronym)? Could it be the mother's
maiden name? For example,I have a few male names >from a list who possibly are
from the Krakow or Tarnow area:
Tobias Guttman Unterberger,
Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger
Mendel Balsam Unterberger
Zalmen Zeger Unterberger
I would say these are not "middle names" in the [strange] US sense. These did and
do not exist in Europe.

Since there were many Guttman families, "Guttman of Unterberg" [~~the good man of
the town below the mountain] was used to dissuade confusion. So "Guttman
Unterberger" probably is the family name.

"Naftali Hirsch Weiser Unterberger" This is a special case, as "Naftali" was too
Jewish to be allowed, and "Hirsch" [= a deer] was the logical kinui, as “Naphtali
is a deer sent forth” German: "Naphthali ist ein schneller Hirsch" (Breishies/
Bereshit/Genesis 49:21), so this perhaps is not "Naftali ben Hirsch", but his
civil forename was Hirch, while his Jewish one was Naftali, "Weiser Unterberger"
being the family name.

Say "Zalmen Zeger Unterberger" would mean: "Zalmen" "Zeger Unterberger" or could
be patronimic: "Zalmen ben Zeger" "Unterberger" or with Arameic "bar": "Zalmen bar
Zeger" "Unterberger", But also here "Zeger" could be a diminuative [or kinui] of
Zalmen [= Solomon]. the German? civil authorities not allowing the ben/bar, while
they allowed the German equivalent "Mendelsohn" for "ben Mendel".

All this "probably" and imho.

Many Jewish and non-Jewish ignoble family names started out to be just a
specification [ job, location, physical sign, religion, etc.] for the person
himself, not for the family. The son having another "last" name, and siblings
having different ones.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>