Date   

Wajsenberg #general

mark
 

Dear Genners.
I am looking for the relatives of Mrs.Perl Wajsenberg Axelrod >from Canada.

Wajsenberg Mark
mark306@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Private respnses only, please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wajsenberg #general

mark
 

Dear Genners.
I am looking for the relatives of Mrs.Perl Wajsenberg Axelrod >from Canada.

Wajsenberg Mark
mark306@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Private respnses only, please


Viewmate Translation Request - German #general

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear Genners

I would be most grateful for a transcription and translation of these documents
relating to my GreatGrandfather's Marriage and Death. They can be found via the
Viewmate links below.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30129
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30128
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30127

Your help will be greatly appreciated.
Steven EMANUEL
Blackwater, UK id185680

Researching (among others) LOEWENSTEIN Laufenselden, Mainz

MODERATOR NOTE: Please use the viewmate response form or respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate Translation Request - German #general

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Dear Genners

I would be most grateful for a transcription and translation of these documents
relating to my GreatGrandfather's Marriage and Death. They can be found via the
Viewmate links below.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30129
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30128
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=30127

Your help will be greatly appreciated.
Steven EMANUEL
Blackwater, UK id185680

Researching (among others) LOEWENSTEIN Laufenselden, Mainz

MODERATOR NOTE: Please use the viewmate response form or respond privately


Jewish surnames in Galicia #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

I recall some time ago that someone posted a message in answer to a question
about why census records showed a son or daughter bearing the mother's
surname and not the father's. I vaguely recall the answer had to do with the
extent to which the authorities did or did not recognize Jewish marriages
and that when censuses were done, that was why the mother's maiden name was
sometimes used. But I am hardly sure I'm remembering that right, so if
someone could refresh my memory, I'd appreciate it.

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, Md.

MODERATOR: You can also check the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives for
all the discussions there have been on this issue. The Archives are a wonderful
source and the archived messages date >from 1993-present!

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, TURKENITCH


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish surnames in Galicia #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

I recall some time ago that someone posted a message in answer to a question
about why census records showed a son or daughter bearing the mother's
surname and not the father's. I vaguely recall the answer had to do with the
extent to which the authorities did or did not recognize Jewish marriages
and that when censuses were done, that was why the mother's maiden name was
sometimes used. But I am hardly sure I'm remembering that right, so if
someone could refresh my memory, I'd appreciate it.

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, Md.

MODERATOR: You can also check the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives for
all the discussions there have been on this issue. The Archives are a wonderful
source and the archived messages date >from 1993-present!

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, TURKENITCH


IGRA celebrates 8 nights of Chanukah #general

Garri Regev
 

IGRA will be releasing new databases each night of Chanukah.
(www.genealogy.org.il)

We have selected databases >from a variety of time periods, covering
many topics, involving additional communities and in a mixture of
languages.

A slide show has been prepared giving you a peek at what will be
released. (http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/igra-chanukah-2013)

Special thanks to our volunteers who have worked to make these
resources available and to our coordinators Rose Feldman, Carol
Hoffman and Daniel Horowitz.

We hope that you'll find records of interest and encourage you to read
about the various Ottoman, British and Israeli resources we are
bringing to you.

Happy Chanukah!!

Garri Regev
President, IGR


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA celebrates 8 nights of Chanukah #general

Garri Regev
 

IGRA will be releasing new databases each night of Chanukah.
(www.genealogy.org.il)

We have selected databases >from a variety of time periods, covering
many topics, involving additional communities and in a mixture of
languages.

A slide show has been prepared giving you a peek at what will be
released. (http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/igra-chanukah-2013)

Special thanks to our volunteers who have worked to make these
resources available and to our coordinators Rose Feldman, Carol
Hoffman and Daniel Horowitz.

We hope that you'll find records of interest and encourage you to read
about the various Ottoman, British and Israeli resources we are
bringing to you.

Happy Chanukah!!

Garri Regev
President, IGR


Searching SITTNER, Hultschin, Czechoslovakia #general

Wagner Nicole <nicoleclaire.w@...>
 

Hi Good Evening my Name is Nicole and i am somewhat new to the usage of the
JewishGen , i am finding it a little complicated so could you the Help of those
"who are Vetrains " here . In past years since the death of my Grandmother i have
developed an extreme interest in our Family History and the importance in learning
as much as i can for future generations to come. i Located some "broken " info my
grandfather in the past looked into family research and have started off by
building our family tree on Ancestry .com but i am sure there are some mistakes in
the further generations. I have this desperate need to find out more about the
family and to learn who and where we might have living relatives. If any one might
have information Regarding our Family History - The Sittner family is my main
research but would love to find out more on further branches. so Tips ideas , or
any useful info would be great.

The Sittners - that some came >from Hultschin what is now known to be
Czechoslovakia Born to Siegfreid Sittner and Antonia Sittner Were as far as i know
2 children ( perhaps more but i know not of ) Ernestine Sittner - Bodlaender
( whom survived the Holocuast and was found in camp inmates list in Theresienstadt)
Paul Sittner

Prior to the War Moved to Berlin - Germany / Amsterdam - Netherlands & >from there
my great grand percents Paul & Regina Sittner Nee Perl were transferred to
Auschwitz , My grand Father Gerhard ( Gerry ) & sister Edith Moved to South Africa
& Elder Brother Herbert had moved to Australia with his wife Clara. My Grandfather
Gerahard Married in South Africa My Grandmother Eve Sittner nee Bleiesen That is a
quick re-cap of the family tree " i would be more than grateful to receive someone
assistance / info if exists.
Thanks again

Nicole Wagner

MODERATOR NOTE: A great resource for newbies to JewishGen can be found on the
JewishGen website: under the button "Get Started" choose "first timer."


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching SITTNER, Hultschin, Czechoslovakia #general

Wagner Nicole <nicoleclaire.w@...>
 

Hi Good Evening my Name is Nicole and i am somewhat new to the usage of the
JewishGen , i am finding it a little complicated so could you the Help of those
"who are Vetrains " here . In past years since the death of my Grandmother i have
developed an extreme interest in our Family History and the importance in learning
as much as i can for future generations to come. i Located some "broken " info my
grandfather in the past looked into family research and have started off by
building our family tree on Ancestry .com but i am sure there are some mistakes in
the further generations. I have this desperate need to find out more about the
family and to learn who and where we might have living relatives. If any one might
have information Regarding our Family History - The Sittner family is my main
research but would love to find out more on further branches. so Tips ideas , or
any useful info would be great.

The Sittners - that some came >from Hultschin what is now known to be
Czechoslovakia Born to Siegfreid Sittner and Antonia Sittner Were as far as i know
2 children ( perhaps more but i know not of ) Ernestine Sittner - Bodlaender
( whom survived the Holocuast and was found in camp inmates list in Theresienstadt)
Paul Sittner

Prior to the War Moved to Berlin - Germany / Amsterdam - Netherlands & >from there
my great grand percents Paul & Regina Sittner Nee Perl were transferred to
Auschwitz , My grand Father Gerhard ( Gerry ) & sister Edith Moved to South Africa
& Elder Brother Herbert had moved to Australia with his wife Clara. My Grandfather
Gerahard Married in South Africa My Grandmother Eve Sittner nee Bleiesen That is a
quick re-cap of the family tree " i would be more than grateful to receive someone
assistance / info if exists.
Thanks again

Nicole Wagner

MODERATOR NOTE: A great resource for newbies to JewishGen can be found on the
JewishGen website: under the button "Get Started" choose "first timer."


Re: German language orthography of names Re: When did spelling of names become important? #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Am 27.11.2013 11:30, schrieb Renate Rosenau:
I could not find out if this included the spelling of names, but the
spelling of names declared by parents for birth certificates was binding for
official use.
Names were never affected by any spelling reform of agreement, that is
why you have MAYER, MEYER, MAIER, MEIER etc. even the recommendations
for changes in the German orthography (latest version in 2006) does
not include names. The rule book says under § 3.2, page 11:
"Eigennamen sind nicht aufgeführt" (proper names are not listed).

With kind regards, Fritz Neubauer, North Germany fritz.neubauer@...


German SIG #Germany Re: German language orthography of names Re: When did spelling of names become important? #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Am 27.11.2013 11:30, schrieb Renate Rosenau:
I could not find out if this included the spelling of names, but the
spelling of names declared by parents for birth certificates was binding for
official use.
Names were never affected by any spelling reform of agreement, that is
why you have MAYER, MEYER, MAIER, MEIER etc. even the recommendations
for changes in the German orthography (latest version in 2006) does
not include names. The rule book says under § 3.2, page 11:
"Eigennamen sind nicht aufgeführt" (proper names are not listed).

With kind regards, Fritz Neubauer, North Germany fritz.neubauer@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine The 1910 Tarnopol Jewish Census Project #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia proudly announces the completion of the indexing of the
Tarnopol 1910 Jewish Census (Spis ludnosci zydowskiej miasta Tarnopol
1910 r. ) the last official Galician census conducted by the Austrian
government. The data is being proofread and should be uploaded to the
All Galicia Database in early January. Detailed information about the
project and sample annotated images and indices can be found here:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/

Although the Austrian Empire - and the Polish government, which
followed after the collapse of the Empire - conducted censuses over an
eighty-two year period, very few original enumerations with names have
survived. Tarnopol, a large city about 128 miles east of Lemberg
(Lwow, Lviv,) attracted residents >from all over Galicia, and even
further afield, so the 1910 census is one of the more important
records of its kind for Galician researchers. Containing almost
14,000 names, it enumerates every Jewish resident living in Tarnopol
in 1910, along with information on people who had moved away
permanently or were studying in other locales, provided by family
members. Entire households are listed together with house numbers,
professions, and ages, with relationships clearly delineated.

Categories and comments covered are:

- old house number
- current street name and address
- place of birth (often district and town)
- gender
- relationships
- when the individual moved to Tarnopol, if not born there
- town and administrative district where registered (or where
relocation occurred - important because often the births of children
from one family could be registered in different places.)
- occupation (Polish with English translation
- listing religious marriages, versus civil marriages in the terms "ritual =
wife"
- disposition of children who were orphans
- details on former residents who had emigrated >from Galicia to other
countries, or were attending schools elsewhere, provided by their
family members who were required to say whether a resident was
"present" or "absent"
- profession or "status," including details like "widow" or "widower"

Researchers will find some women enumerated as "ritual wife,"
clarifying that there was a religious marriage, but that the woman did
not share her husband's surname. (Since no marriage record would be
found for this couple, the census provides proof of the religious
marriage.) Dual surnames are provided for children, along with adults
--heading their own families -- whose parents had not participated in
a civil marriage. In these pages it is common to find people born
elsewhere and moved to Tarnopol, and, conversely, those families who
had already left the city for other countries, so this census should
provide clues as to the migration of your relatives. It lists many
people who "were absent" to "America" or "New York, America." Other
locales where residents moved (sometimes listed as cities, other times
as countries) are: Cologne, Frankfurt, Russia, Germany, Vienna, Lwow,
Prague, London, England, Switzerland, Argentina and Jerusalem.
Original places of birth are >from all over Galicia, as well as towns
in Germany, Romania, Vienna, New York, Kiev, Warsaw district and
Hungary. House numbers are cross-referenced with a street address.

In the "occupation" category, besides the expected entries --including
merchants, tinsmiths, tailors, innkeepers, lawyers, and doctors,
tradesman -- we find "students in Vienna" at seminaries, including
"cesarski krolewski" (imperial-royal; similar to
"kaiserlich-k=F6niglich", k.k.) and children listed as "residents of the
Jewish orphanage." As researchers begin to study this census there are
sure to be more illuminating findings that could be the key to
unlocking a family mystery or discovering relatives previously
unaccounted for and lost to time. Gesher Galica has indexed all
pertinent information >from this census, so the database will be quite
extensive.

Starting with the 1900 census, the birthdate column was expanded to
include year, month and day of birth. Despite this change, the 1910
census is not consistant in this area and often only the year is
given. Taking into account the fact that males wishing to evade
military service military service might have provided inaccaurate
answers, and the fact that some census takers mights have requested
documentation which many Jews would not have, the birthdates provided
should not be regarded as definitive, an attitude most genealogists
are already well aware of. Nevertheless, the listings of place of
birth and districts where one was registered should be of great help
to researchers in determining where a single family might have lived
over many years.

Keep in mind that as recently as ten years ago this census was
inaccessible to researchers. It is a wonderful accomplishment -- not
only that it is now available in searchable form -- but that it can
stand as a testimony to the many Jewish residents of Tarnopol who
perished in the Shoah and whose names are represented in its pages.
Almost 90 percent of the Galician population perished in the
Holocaust, and many of the residents of Tarnopol, which suffered
devastation in both World Wars, are memorialized in this enumeration.

Gesher Galicia will be making the images and Excel files available to
qualified researchers starting in a few weeks, with the database to
follow accessible to all. To learn more details, go to the project
web page. This census project is one facet of our "Galician Archival
Records Project," which can be read about here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/. If you experience
genealogical success in studying the 1910 Tarnopol Census, please let
us know so we can report on your findings and celebrate them as well.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/


The 1910 Tarnopol Jewish Census Project #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia proudly announces the completion of the indexing of the
Tarnopol 1910 Jewish Census (Spis ludnosci zydowskiej miasta Tarnopol
1910 r. ) the last official Galician census conducted by the Austrian
government. The data is being proofread and should be uploaded to the
All Galicia Database in early January. Detailed information about the
project and sample annotated images and indices can be found here:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/

Although the Austrian Empire - and the Polish government, which
followed after the collapse of the Empire - conducted censuses over an
eighty-two year period, very few original enumerations with names have
survived. Tarnopol, a large city about 128 miles east of Lemberg
(Lwow, Lviv,) attracted residents >from all over Galicia, and even
further afield, so the 1910 census is one of the more important
records of its kind for Galician researchers. Containing almost
14,000 names, it enumerates every Jewish resident living in Tarnopol
in 1910, along with information on people who had moved away
permanently or were studying in other locales, provided by family
members. Entire households are listed together with house numbers,
professions, and ages, with relationships clearly delineated.

Categories and comments covered are:

- old house number
- current street name and address
- place of birth (often district and town)
- gender
- relationships
- when the individual moved to Tarnopol, if not born there
- town and administrative district where registered (or where
relocation occurred - important because often the births of children
from one family could be registered in different places.)
- occupation (Polish with English translation
- listing religious marriages, versus civil marriages in the terms "ritual =
wife"
- disposition of children who were orphans
- details on former residents who had emigrated >from Galicia to other
countries, or were attending schools elsewhere, provided by their
family members who were required to say whether a resident was
"present" or "absent"
- profession or "status," including details like "widow" or "widower"

Researchers will find some women enumerated as "ritual wife,"
clarifying that there was a religious marriage, but that the woman did
not share her husband's surname. (Since no marriage record would be
found for this couple, the census provides proof of the religious
marriage.) Dual surnames are provided for children, along with adults
--heading their own families -- whose parents had not participated in
a civil marriage. In these pages it is common to find people born
elsewhere and moved to Tarnopol, and, conversely, those families who
had already left the city for other countries, so this census should
provide clues as to the migration of your relatives. It lists many
people who "were absent" to "America" or "New York, America." Other
locales where residents moved (sometimes listed as cities, other times
as countries) are: Cologne, Frankfurt, Russia, Germany, Vienna, Lwow,
Prague, London, England, Switzerland, Argentina and Jerusalem.
Original places of birth are >from all over Galicia, as well as towns
in Germany, Romania, Vienna, New York, Kiev, Warsaw district and
Hungary. House numbers are cross-referenced with a street address.

In the "occupation" category, besides the expected entries --including
merchants, tinsmiths, tailors, innkeepers, lawyers, and doctors,
tradesman -- we find "students in Vienna" at seminaries, including
"cesarski krolewski" (imperial-royal; similar to
"kaiserlich-k=F6niglich", k.k.) and children listed as "residents of the
Jewish orphanage." As researchers begin to study this census there are
sure to be more illuminating findings that could be the key to
unlocking a family mystery or discovering relatives previously
unaccounted for and lost to time. Gesher Galica has indexed all
pertinent information >from this census, so the database will be quite
extensive.

Starting with the 1900 census, the birthdate column was expanded to
include year, month and day of birth. Despite this change, the 1910
census is not consistant in this area and often only the year is
given. Taking into account the fact that males wishing to evade
military service military service might have provided inaccaurate
answers, and the fact that some census takers mights have requested
documentation which many Jews would not have, the birthdates provided
should not be regarded as definitive, an attitude most genealogists
are already well aware of. Nevertheless, the listings of place of
birth and districts where one was registered should be of great help
to researchers in determining where a single family might have lived
over many years.

Keep in mind that as recently as ten years ago this census was
inaccessible to researchers. It is a wonderful accomplishment -- not
only that it is now available in searchable form -- but that it can
stand as a testimony to the many Jewish residents of Tarnopol who
perished in the Shoah and whose names are represented in its pages.
Almost 90 percent of the Galician population perished in the
Holocaust, and many of the residents of Tarnopol, which suffered
devastation in both World Wars, are memorialized in this enumeration.

Gesher Galicia will be making the images and Excel files available to
qualified researchers starting in a few weeks, with the database to
follow accessible to all. To learn more details, go to the project
web page. This census project is one facet of our "Galician Archival
Records Project," which can be read about here:
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/garp/. If you experience
genealogical success in studying the 1910 Tarnopol Census, please let
us know so we can report on your findings and celebrate them as well.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.geshergalicia.org
http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/tarnopol-1910-census/


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Odessa project - donations still needed #ukraine

Yoni Kupchik
 

Dear friends,

I'm writing to update on the project I introduced about a month ago of
obtaining indexes of vital records >from the archives of Odessa. We are
now beginning the process of obtaining those indexes thanks to the
donations received so far. This is a large-scale project and it turns
out that there are more documents than I expected - thousands of pages
of indexes full of names!

We still need more funds to complete the project. If you want to
contribute to this project please enter this page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22
and donate any amount to the 'Odessa Document Acquisition and
Translation Projects'. Any donation counts, even Hanukkah Gelt :-)
Happy Hanukkah,

Yoni Kupchik
Charleston, SC

KUPCHIK - Orgeyev (Bessarabia); GORODETSKY - Teleneshty (Bessarabia)
OKS - Sudilkov, Odessa (Ukraine)
SITNITSKY - Kanev area, Ekaterinoslav area, and other regions in
Ukraine; SHABADASH - Kharkov and other regions (Ukraine)
DORIN Odessa (Ukraine), Bessarabia; SHKODNIK - Khoshchevatoye, Odessa
and other towns between Odessa and Uman (Ukraine)
GLUZMAN - Odessa, Krivoye Ozero (Ukraine)
KOSOY - Dobroye and Kherson area, Chigirin and Kiev area (Ukraine)
RABINOVICH - Novi Bug? (Ukraine)


Odessa project - donations still needed #ukraine

Yoni Kupchik
 

Dear friends,

I'm writing to update on the project I introduced about a month ago of
obtaining indexes of vital records >from the archives of Odessa. We are
now beginning the process of obtaining those indexes thanks to the
donations received so far. This is a large-scale project and it turns
out that there are more documents than I expected - thousands of pages
of indexes full of names!

We still need more funds to complete the project. If you want to
contribute to this project please enter this page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22
and donate any amount to the 'Odessa Document Acquisition and
Translation Projects'. Any donation counts, even Hanukkah Gelt :-)
Happy Hanukkah,

Yoni Kupchik
Charleston, SC

KUPCHIK - Orgeyev (Bessarabia); GORODETSKY - Teleneshty (Bessarabia)
OKS - Sudilkov, Odessa (Ukraine)
SITNITSKY - Kanev area, Ekaterinoslav area, and other regions in
Ukraine; SHABADASH - Kharkov and other regions (Ukraine)
DORIN Odessa (Ukraine), Bessarabia; SHKODNIK - Khoshchevatoye, Odessa
and other towns between Odessa and Uman (Ukraine)
GLUZMAN - Odessa, Krivoye Ozero (Ukraine)
KOSOY - Dobroye and Kherson area, Chigirin and Kiev area (Ukraine)
RABINOVICH - Novi Bug? (Ukraine)


Zerlina Celli MEIER from Zimmersrode #germany

Richard <r.d.oppenheimer@...>
 

Hello GerSIG'ers,

I am searching for additional information on Zerlina Celli MEIER, married to
Gustav LILIENSTEIN Gossfelden, Near Marburg, Hesse.
She was born 30 August 1897 in Zimmersrode Hesse, and died in Sobibor in
June 1942.

Best regards, Richard D. Oppenheimer r.d.oppenheimer@...


German SIG #Germany Zerlina Celli MEIER from Zimmersrode #germany

Richard <r.d.oppenheimer@...>
 

Hello GerSIG'ers,

I am searching for additional information on Zerlina Celli MEIER, married to
Gustav LILIENSTEIN Gossfelden, Near Marburg, Hesse.
She was born 30 August 1897 in Zimmersrode Hesse, and died in Sobibor in
June 1942.

Best regards, Richard D. Oppenheimer r.d.oppenheimer@...


Re: When did spelling of names become important? #germany

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Germany was much better than the US about consistent spelling in the
19th and early 20th centuries. But names are not the same as other
words, especially Jewish names.

My gg grandmother, in a tiny town in Nassau, had 20 kids whose births
were registered. On the registrations, her name is listed 20 different
ways: Rachel, Regina, Reis, .... The spelling is not the problem, but
the fact is that the Jews used different names and diminutives in everyday
life.

Today, if somebody spelled my name Salley or Sallie, I would object,
but back then I don't think that mattered to people, so long as the name
had the same sound, and that the name was among those the person used.
Certainly Elli and Elly are the same name, spelled differently.

Even the daughter of Rachel, Regina, Reis, above, who was mostly known
as Rachel, was Regina on her marriage record. Go figure. When I
searched by mail, decades ago, at the NYC Municipal Archives, they
couldn't find the marriage record; but when I went to NYC, I found it
right away. Her husband, Bernhard most of the time in NYC, was Barnett
on one page and Baruch on the other. But his last name was very odd.
His birth record in Amsterdam said Baruch, and his name in London was Barnett.

People just didn't have the same attitude towards their names.
In the US, spelling was quite variable, but that was not the biggest
problem for genealogists.

Sally Bruckheimer, Princeton, NJ sallybruc@...


German SIG #Germany Re: When did spelling of names become important? #germany

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

Germany was much better than the US about consistent spelling in the
19th and early 20th centuries. But names are not the same as other
words, especially Jewish names.

My gg grandmother, in a tiny town in Nassau, had 20 kids whose births
were registered. On the registrations, her name is listed 20 different
ways: Rachel, Regina, Reis, .... The spelling is not the problem, but
the fact is that the Jews used different names and diminutives in everyday
life.

Today, if somebody spelled my name Salley or Sallie, I would object,
but back then I don't think that mattered to people, so long as the name
had the same sound, and that the name was among those the person used.
Certainly Elli and Elly are the same name, spelled differently.

Even the daughter of Rachel, Regina, Reis, above, who was mostly known
as Rachel, was Regina on her marriage record. Go figure. When I
searched by mail, decades ago, at the NYC Municipal Archives, they
couldn't find the marriage record; but when I went to NYC, I found it
right away. Her husband, Bernhard most of the time in NYC, was Barnett
on one page and Baruch on the other. But his last name was very odd.
His birth record in Amsterdam said Baruch, and his name in London was Barnett.

People just didn't have the same attitude towards their names.
In the US, spelling was quite variable, but that was not the biggest
problem for genealogists.

Sally Bruckheimer, Princeton, NJ sallybruc@...

136741 - 136760 of 671872