Date   

Thank you again: Finding Itic Yankel SRULOVICI #general

Amy B Cohen
 

I again have to thank this group for their assistance, this time for
helping me in my search for Itic Yankel Srulovici, my great-great
aunt's husband, who came with her and their children >from Romania, but
whom I could not find any evidence of after he left Ellis Island.

I received so many helpful suggestions and tips >from so many different
people. I have now called NARA to order the file on Itic, and
although I have not heard back >from them yet, I am hoping to soon. (I
called a week ago to speak to someone, but no one has yet returned my
call---is that unusual?)

Once I get the file, I will report back to let those who helped me
know what I have found.

I am so grateful to you all for your help.

Amy Cohen


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thank you again: Finding Itic Yankel SRULOVICI #general

Amy B Cohen
 

I again have to thank this group for their assistance, this time for
helping me in my search for Itic Yankel Srulovici, my great-great
aunt's husband, who came with her and their children >from Romania, but
whom I could not find any evidence of after he left Ellis Island.

I received so many helpful suggestions and tips >from so many different
people. I have now called NARA to order the file on Itic, and
although I have not heard back >from them yet, I am hoping to soon. (I
called a week ago to speak to someone, but no one has yet returned my
call---is that unusual?)

Once I get the file, I will report back to let those who helped me
know what I have found.

I am so grateful to you all for your help.

Amy Cohen


Posen City Registration Cards--they're up through R! #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Last summer we learned of the existence of images of the residence
registration index cards >from the city of Posen/Poznan. The Polish State
Archive image web site had uploaded images of the cards alphabetized A
through L and the first part of M.

I just noticed that the rest of M plus N through R have been uploaded.

The cards are cataloged in groups of 500 to 1000 images each. (Some
cards have info on both sides!)

As many have remarked, the site gives excellent images (and lots of
them) but is not particularly user-friendly, especially for us who don't
know much Polish. The collection in question (Posnan Archive 474:
Records of the City of Posen) is cataloged on the site in such a way to
make it nearly impossible to find what one wants among the over 26,000
items, all of which are listed despite about 97% of them not being on
line (yet).

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/53/474/0/str/146/100?ps=True#tabJednostki
gets you to the list of those groups. Scroll about halfway down to start
with A.
That page and the next 9 link to a summary page for each group (click on
any column in the row you want).

>from there, click on "Digital Copies" to the right of the red arrow
with the call number in it.

That will get you to a page of 15 thumbnails. You can set the page size
as high as 100 thumbnails.

Click on one of them to see a medium-sized image. You can page through
these fairly quickly. The image display has a feature that will give you
an enlarged version in a separate window.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG
Prussian Poland coordinator, JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Posen City Registration Cards--they're up through R! #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Last summer we learned of the existence of images of the residence
registration index cards >from the city of Posen/Poznan. The Polish State
Archive image web site had uploaded images of the cards alphabetized A
through L and the first part of M.

I just noticed that the rest of M plus N through R have been uploaded.

The cards are cataloged in groups of 500 to 1000 images each. (Some
cards have info on both sides!)

As many have remarked, the site gives excellent images (and lots of
them) but is not particularly user-friendly, especially for us who don't
know much Polish. The collection in question (Posnan Archive 474:
Records of the City of Posen) is cataloged on the site in such a way to
make it nearly impossible to find what one wants among the over 26,000
items, all of which are listed despite about 97% of them not being on
line (yet).

http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/53/474/0/str/146/100?ps=True#tabJednostki
gets you to the list of those groups. Scroll about halfway down to start
with A.
That page and the next 9 link to a summary page for each group (click on
any column in the row you want).

>from there, click on "Digital Copies" to the right of the red arrow
with the call number in it.

That will get you to a page of 15 thumbnails. You can set the page size
as high as 100 thumbnails.

Click on one of them to see a medium-sized image. You can page through
these fairly quickly. The image display has a feature that will give you
an enlarged version in a separate window.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG
Prussian Poland coordinator, JRI-Poland


Thanks + STORCH / STORCK from Gorlice #general

gen
 

I believe I've thanked individually the many responders to last
week's STORCH / STORCK post, but if any replies got lost or I
missed anyone, please know how grateful I am.

No one recognized the families. Several people hunted without
luck for Regina's obit in 1965, which could include where daughter
Shirley was living then, and husband's name if married.
Looking over my public tree on Ancestry, Renee Steinig found
missing 1915 census entry with transcription errors (Lehl for
Lilly, Charleie for Charlie, Ann for Aron - I've entered
corrections on Ancestry). And Johanna Becker found missing 1930
census entry with birthplaces reversed on census (he was born in
Austria, not Hungary, and she in Hungary, not Austria).

And so on to my next query:

The following STORCH members of my family are >from Gorlice:

-- Samuel / Osias? STORCH, arrived sometime before wife & children ?
-- Sime SOLOMON, b. 1848, arrived 1891 NY, with following children:
-- --- Rubin STORCH, b. 1879
-- --- Herman / Chaim STORCH, b. 1881
-- --- Henry / Enoch STORCH, b. 1884
-- --- Tillie / Matilda / Zipora STORCH, b. 1890

I would love to find any descendants of other STORCHs or SOLOMONs >from
Gorlice, including but not limited to the following:

-- --- "Reindel" STORCH, b. 1871, arrived 1891 NY
Name "Reindel" found only on departure & arrival records

-- --- Jack / Jake / Jakob STORCH, b. 1892, arrived 1911 NY
Per passenger record, contact back home = father Moses
Wolf, in Gorlice
Spent first few years in USA in Ohio, before returning to
NYC
In another family tree on Ancestry; no response in 5
months, not logged on in a year

-- --- Morris / Mojzesz STORCH, b. 1890 Gorlice, arrived 1941 San
Francisco with family:
-- --- Erna / Estera DEUTELBAUM, b. 1895 Mokrawries
-- --- --- Adolph D STORCH, b. 1920 Leipzig, d. 1978, I have interview notes
-- --- --- Margot L STORCH, b. 1922 Leipzig, m. Henry J BAMBERGER
-- --- --- Victor J STORCH, b. 1925 Leipzig, d. 2012, obit on Find-a-Grave
Obit contains names & relationships; working on finding
locations & contact info
In another family tree on Ancestry; no response in 5 days,
not logged on in a year

Nancy Schlegel
Northern California

STORCH / SOLOMON (Gorlice, Galicia);
SCHWARTZ / KUGEL / REICH ("Wolhein", Galicia)

Public tree on Ancestry; copies on Geni, WikiTree, FamilySearch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks + STORCH / STORCK from Gorlice #general

gen
 

I believe I've thanked individually the many responders to last
week's STORCH / STORCK post, but if any replies got lost or I
missed anyone, please know how grateful I am.

No one recognized the families. Several people hunted without
luck for Regina's obit in 1965, which could include where daughter
Shirley was living then, and husband's name if married.
Looking over my public tree on Ancestry, Renee Steinig found
missing 1915 census entry with transcription errors (Lehl for
Lilly, Charleie for Charlie, Ann for Aron - I've entered
corrections on Ancestry). And Johanna Becker found missing 1930
census entry with birthplaces reversed on census (he was born in
Austria, not Hungary, and she in Hungary, not Austria).

And so on to my next query:

The following STORCH members of my family are >from Gorlice:

-- Samuel / Osias? STORCH, arrived sometime before wife & children ?
-- Sime SOLOMON, b. 1848, arrived 1891 NY, with following children:
-- --- Rubin STORCH, b. 1879
-- --- Herman / Chaim STORCH, b. 1881
-- --- Henry / Enoch STORCH, b. 1884
-- --- Tillie / Matilda / Zipora STORCH, b. 1890

I would love to find any descendants of other STORCHs or SOLOMONs >from
Gorlice, including but not limited to the following:

-- --- "Reindel" STORCH, b. 1871, arrived 1891 NY
Name "Reindel" found only on departure & arrival records

-- --- Jack / Jake / Jakob STORCH, b. 1892, arrived 1911 NY
Per passenger record, contact back home = father Moses
Wolf, in Gorlice
Spent first few years in USA in Ohio, before returning to
NYC
In another family tree on Ancestry; no response in 5
months, not logged on in a year

-- --- Morris / Mojzesz STORCH, b. 1890 Gorlice, arrived 1941 San
Francisco with family:
-- --- Erna / Estera DEUTELBAUM, b. 1895 Mokrawries
-- --- --- Adolph D STORCH, b. 1920 Leipzig, d. 1978, I have interview notes
-- --- --- Margot L STORCH, b. 1922 Leipzig, m. Henry J BAMBERGER
-- --- --- Victor J STORCH, b. 1925 Leipzig, d. 2012, obit on Find-a-Grave
Obit contains names & relationships; working on finding
locations & contact info
In another family tree on Ancestry; no response in 5 days,
not logged on in a year

Nancy Schlegel
Northern California

STORCH / SOLOMON (Gorlice, Galicia);
SCHWARTZ / KUGEL / REICH ("Wolhein", Galicia)

Public tree on Ancestry; copies on Geni, WikiTree, FamilySearch


Re: Sephardi surname OLIVIA #general

Nardo Bonomi
 

Dear Researchers

One of the names we had been looking for was OLIVIA
Jews in Sicily were an high percentage of the population before the
expulsion of 1492.
After this expulsion some Sicilian Jews escaped, some converted stayed in
the island and secretly practiced Judaism (Anusim).
There was a rebellion in Palermo in 1516 ascribed to the reactions of some
converted Jews.
Petro de Oliva or La Oliva "neofito giudaizzante" ["newly converted
Judaizing"] participated to this rising of the former-Jews.
On the Jews in Sicily see my page:
http://www.italian-family-history.com/jewish/Sicilia.html
Most of Sicilian Jews were of Sephardic origin

Nardo Bonomi Braverman
Greve in Chianti - Firenze - Italy

Researching on:
BRAVERMAN >from Mogilev Podolsky (Podolya)
GROBMAN >from Gaysin
LUFT and GRUNBLATT >from Ukraine
OCCHIPINTI anywhere

-----Messaggio originale-----
From: David Edelman
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 6:21 AM

Dear fellow genres;
I don't know if any of you have ever tried this, but my wife and I had
tried simply googling the last names in our families. One of the names
we had been looking for was OLIVIA. This website I had looked at was
very fascinating, if true. It indecated the Olivia's were Sephardic in
origin, with the name coming >from the fruit olive, as they were the
original, Israeli olive cultivators. It may be true, but my question
is, how to find a verifiabe connection after so many brick walls?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sephardi surname OLIVIA #general

Nardo Bonomi
 

Dear Researchers

One of the names we had been looking for was OLIVIA
Jews in Sicily were an high percentage of the population before the
expulsion of 1492.
After this expulsion some Sicilian Jews escaped, some converted stayed in
the island and secretly practiced Judaism (Anusim).
There was a rebellion in Palermo in 1516 ascribed to the reactions of some
converted Jews.
Petro de Oliva or La Oliva "neofito giudaizzante" ["newly converted
Judaizing"] participated to this rising of the former-Jews.
On the Jews in Sicily see my page:
http://www.italian-family-history.com/jewish/Sicilia.html
Most of Sicilian Jews were of Sephardic origin

Nardo Bonomi Braverman
Greve in Chianti - Firenze - Italy

Researching on:
BRAVERMAN >from Mogilev Podolsky (Podolya)
GROBMAN >from Gaysin
LUFT and GRUNBLATT >from Ukraine
OCCHIPINTI anywhere

-----Messaggio originale-----
From: David Edelman
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 6:21 AM

Dear fellow genres;
I don't know if any of you have ever tried this, but my wife and I had
tried simply googling the last names in our families. One of the names
we had been looking for was OLIVIA. This website I had looked at was
very fascinating, if true. It indecated the Olivia's were Sephardic in
origin, with the name coming >from the fruit olive, as they were the
original, Israeli olive cultivators. It may be true, but my question
is, how to find a verifiabe connection after so many brick walls?


Declaring ethnicity of Ellis Island passengers #general

Alex Woodle
 

Dear Cousins,

When one does a search for Ellis Island passengers whether
using Steve Morse’s One-Step pages or the Ellis Island website,
what criteria were used to determine whether someone was Jewish
or not?

In earlier passages, manifests had a "nationality" category,
yet the "Passenger Record" will say "Hebrew", even though there
is no indication of ethnicity declared on the manifest.

Later manifests added race or people as a category and some
declared they were Hebrews.

Was there additional information? Was an ethnicity declared
based upon the surname by the volunteers when these records
were compiled?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Declaring ethnicity of Ellis Island passengers #general

Alex Woodle
 

Dear Cousins,

When one does a search for Ellis Island passengers whether
using Steve Morse’s One-Step pages or the Ellis Island website,
what criteria were used to determine whether someone was Jewish
or not?

In earlier passages, manifests had a "nationality" category,
yet the "Passenger Record" will say "Hebrew", even though there
is no indication of ethnicity declared on the manifest.

Later manifests added race or people as a category and some
declared they were Hebrews.

Was there additional information? Was an ethnicity declared
based upon the surname by the volunteers when these records
were compiled?

Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


ViewMate translation request - Polish and Russian #general

avraham997@...
 

I've posted a vital record in russian for which I need a direct
translation.
Its a marriage record between Clinker josek and - Hochberg Esther malke
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31908

a record >from Burch david clinker

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31906

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much
Avrahm lapa
israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The first record listed is in Polish. The second
is in Russian.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Polish and Russian #general

avraham997@...
 

I've posted a vital record in russian for which I need a direct
translation.
Its a marriage record between Clinker josek and - Hochberg Esther malke
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31908

a record >from Burch david clinker

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31906

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much
Avrahm lapa
israel

MODERATOR NOTE: The first record listed is in Polish. The second
is in Russian.


Re: Jewish Genealogy Library #general

Roger Lustig
 

Michelle:
That's a really tough question, and getting tougher all the time.

But first, some general questions:
* How many of your members use the library?
* When, how often and for how long?
* How useful are the Orange County libraries and other
publicly accessible ones nearby?
* What regions or special topics have your members been
particularly interested in?

---
One reason choosing books is more difficult is that more and more
books are appearing on-line or being supplanted by other on-line
resources -- and who knows what's next?

For instance, in the past a good European gazetteer -- or one for
each of several countries -- would have been considered essential.
Now we have the "JewishGen Gazetteer" and "JewishGen Communities
Database", plus several other sites online, and lots of historical
ones to download. (http://fbc.pionier.net.pl/, the Polish Digital
Libraries federation, has two of these just for Silesia! One >from
the 1840s, one >from the 1860s, and both are breathtakingly detailed,
down to the numbers of livestock in each village.)

I looked at the library shelflist on your JGS's web site.
(Only about 75 different books there, not counting multiple editions,
etc. -- wonder what the others are) One of the books there --
Dubnow's history of Jews in Poland & Russia -- is available as
a GoogleBook. So is Graetz's history of the Jews, English edition
(5vv.).
---
My specialty is Germany. I see about 8 books specifically devoted
to that region, and can't argue with the inclusion of any of them.
The only regional one is Edward Luft's Posen-surname book.
There, too, the companion volume is on line (at dLibra):
Heppner & Herzberg's book on the Jewish communities of Posen
(in German). If there's interest in other regional books,
the key works (all in German) include Paul Arnsberg on Hessen,
R. Bernhard Brilling on Middle Silesia (the most erudite and
historically aware of all of these, I'd say); Gerhard Salinger's
recent books on Pomerania and West Prussian communities; and
so on.

For research in what once was East Germany and Prussia east
of the Oder (i.e., now Poland) the 9-volume set of archival
inventories of Judaica by Jersch-Wenzel et al. is indispensable
but also prohibitively expensive. UCLA has the whole set, I think.
USC has the E. German parts, UCSD the Polish ones.

A few items are out of date. Ellmann-Krueger & Luft's guide to
German library resources has been superseded by Ellmann-Krueger's
far more extensive, very searchable CD-ROM bibliography.

---
One general-genealogy book I've often used is Christina K Schaefer's
"Guide to Naturalization Records of the US". But even here --
it's 16 years old -- many of the papers in question are online now;
-- I've generally used it at the FHL in Salt Lake City, which must
have 30 copies on various shelves.

There's another book with a similar topic, by Loretto Dennis Szucs.
I don't know it. It was published a year after Schaefer's.
One needs Schaefer or something similar for the how and why of
the records, but the FHL online catalog will point one to the
microfilm numbers, etc.
---
What's not on line so much is modern works of general history,
cultural information, etc. -- assuming one wants to go beyond
the Wikipedia level. But here you'll need to find out what your
readership/membership is interested in, working on, wanting to
know more about -- and what the local libraries don't have
enough of.

Best,
Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/22/2014 11:53 PM, Michelle Sandler wrote:
What are the 100 best books for a Jewish Genealogy Library?
The Orange County JGS has started a library and I want to
make sure I have the right books in the collection.
We have 115 books in the library and all of Avotaynu magazine.
Book and magazine donations gratefully excepted.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish Genealogy Library #general

Roger Lustig
 

Michelle:
That's a really tough question, and getting tougher all the time.

But first, some general questions:
* How many of your members use the library?
* When, how often and for how long?
* How useful are the Orange County libraries and other
publicly accessible ones nearby?
* What regions or special topics have your members been
particularly interested in?

---
One reason choosing books is more difficult is that more and more
books are appearing on-line or being supplanted by other on-line
resources -- and who knows what's next?

For instance, in the past a good European gazetteer -- or one for
each of several countries -- would have been considered essential.
Now we have the "JewishGen Gazetteer" and "JewishGen Communities
Database", plus several other sites online, and lots of historical
ones to download. (http://fbc.pionier.net.pl/, the Polish Digital
Libraries federation, has two of these just for Silesia! One >from
the 1840s, one >from the 1860s, and both are breathtakingly detailed,
down to the numbers of livestock in each village.)

I looked at the library shelflist on your JGS's web site.
(Only about 75 different books there, not counting multiple editions,
etc. -- wonder what the others are) One of the books there --
Dubnow's history of Jews in Poland & Russia -- is available as
a GoogleBook. So is Graetz's history of the Jews, English edition
(5vv.).
---
My specialty is Germany. I see about 8 books specifically devoted
to that region, and can't argue with the inclusion of any of them.
The only regional one is Edward Luft's Posen-surname book.
There, too, the companion volume is on line (at dLibra):
Heppner & Herzberg's book on the Jewish communities of Posen
(in German). If there's interest in other regional books,
the key works (all in German) include Paul Arnsberg on Hessen,
R. Bernhard Brilling on Middle Silesia (the most erudite and
historically aware of all of these, I'd say); Gerhard Salinger's
recent books on Pomerania and West Prussian communities; and
so on.

For research in what once was East Germany and Prussia east
of the Oder (i.e., now Poland) the 9-volume set of archival
inventories of Judaica by Jersch-Wenzel et al. is indispensable
but also prohibitively expensive. UCLA has the whole set, I think.
USC has the E. German parts, UCSD the Polish ones.

A few items are out of date. Ellmann-Krueger & Luft's guide to
German library resources has been superseded by Ellmann-Krueger's
far more extensive, very searchable CD-ROM bibliography.

---
One general-genealogy book I've often used is Christina K Schaefer's
"Guide to Naturalization Records of the US". But even here --
it's 16 years old -- many of the papers in question are online now;
-- I've generally used it at the FHL in Salt Lake City, which must
have 30 copies on various shelves.

There's another book with a similar topic, by Loretto Dennis Szucs.
I don't know it. It was published a year after Schaefer's.
One needs Schaefer or something similar for the how and why of
the records, but the FHL online catalog will point one to the
microfilm numbers, etc.
---
What's not on line so much is modern works of general history,
cultural information, etc. -- assuming one wants to go beyond
the Wikipedia level. But here you'll need to find out what your
readership/membership is interested in, working on, wanting to
know more about -- and what the local libraries don't have
enough of.

Best,
Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/22/2014 11:53 PM, Michelle Sandler wrote:
What are the 100 best books for a Jewish Genealogy Library?
The Orange County JGS has started a library and I want to
make sure I have the right books in the collection.
We have 115 books in the library and all of Avotaynu magazine.
Book and magazine donations gratefully excepted.


Benjamin MINTZ MK #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for the descendants of Member of Israeli Keneset, Binyamin
MINTZ who died in 1961.
I only know of a son Yeshaya Eliezer Mintz whose son was Binyamin
COHEN, born in 1963 and with whom I was in touch with a decade ago.
Any help appreciated

--
Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Benjamin MINTZ MK #general

Neil@...
 

Looking for the descendants of Member of Israeli Keneset, Binyamin
MINTZ who died in 1961.
I only know of a son Yeshaya Eliezer Mintz whose son was Binyamin
COHEN, born in 1963 and with whom I was in touch with a decade ago.
Any help appreciated

--
Neil Rosenstein


[UK] Websites: Geograph Photographs Great Britain; Wellcome Library and Wellcome Images #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

A site, new to me at least, is "Geograph" whose intent is to photograph
every square kilometer of Britain and Ireland., making it a companion to
Google Earth. Thus far there are 3,805,890 images covering 270,948 grid
squares, about 81.6% of the total area to be covered. It is a free site.
Go to: http://www.geograph.org.uk/ and click on "search on the left and
then type in where you are looking for. In addition to the photograph of the
place you put in the search box, the grid number appears as does the date
and name of the photographer. There is also the opportunity to look at grid
maps which also has an interactive feature. This feature covers: England,
Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The
photographs are of current vintage and not historical , although some of the
modern photographs are of historical areas. The site includes photographic
collections >from various places of interest.

Also available on another free website, Wellcome Library's collection of
London health reports, the site has over 100,00 historic images which
include reports made by health officers., While names of people are not
included, if you know addresses they are included and you may find out not
only about the health of the nation at a particular time (typhus, scarlet
fever outbreaks, etc.) but what may have occurred in your family's home.
The London medical reports span 1848-1972. To research the searchable
medical reports go to: http://wellcomelibrary.org/moh/ .

Wellcome Library also has over 100,000 images at their site:
http://wellcomeimages.org/ . On the search box to the right click on the
dropdown box to historical images and insert your search word in the box. As
an example, I tried "synagogue" and three historical images appeared

Thank you to Peter Calver and his Lost Cousins newsletter for informing of
us about these websites.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [UK] Websites: Geograph Photographs Great Britain; Wellcome Library and Wellcome Images #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

A site, new to me at least, is "Geograph" whose intent is to photograph
every square kilometer of Britain and Ireland., making it a companion to
Google Earth. Thus far there are 3,805,890 images covering 270,948 grid
squares, about 81.6% of the total area to be covered. It is a free site.
Go to: http://www.geograph.org.uk/ and click on "search on the left and
then type in where you are looking for. In addition to the photograph of the
place you put in the search box, the grid number appears as does the date
and name of the photographer. There is also the opportunity to look at grid
maps which also has an interactive feature. This feature covers: England,
Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The
photographs are of current vintage and not historical , although some of the
modern photographs are of historical areas. The site includes photographic
collections >from various places of interest.

Also available on another free website, Wellcome Library's collection of
London health reports, the site has over 100,00 historic images which
include reports made by health officers., While names of people are not
included, if you know addresses they are included and you may find out not
only about the health of the nation at a particular time (typhus, scarlet
fever outbreaks, etc.) but what may have occurred in your family's home.
The London medical reports span 1848-1972. To research the searchable
medical reports go to: http://wellcomelibrary.org/moh/ .

Wellcome Library also has over 100,000 images at their site:
http://wellcomeimages.org/ . On the search box to the right click on the
dropdown box to historical images and insert your search word in the box. As
an example, I tried "synagogue" and three historical images appeared

Thank you to Peter Calver and his Lost Cousins newsletter for informing of
us about these websites.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


[Netherlands] Netherlands Newspapers Free On-Line #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

For those researching the Netherlands, this site may be of interest:
https://www.wiewaswie.nl/ . It is only in Dutch- there is no English
version, but one can use Google Translate for translation or use Chrome
browser which automatically translates the website headings, not the
documents. You can search and view newspapers, books, magazine and radio
news bulletins. "Personen zoeken" means search people and I placed into
the search box "Jewish sounding " names and for example came back with a
number of hits. By clicking on the returned names a summary of the
information is shown. If you click on the actual record you are prompted to
register with name and email address.

Thank you to Peter Calver and his Lost Cousins Newsletter for alerting us to
this interesting site.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [Netherlands] Netherlands Newspapers Free On-Line #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

For those researching the Netherlands, this site may be of interest:
https://www.wiewaswie.nl/ . It is only in Dutch- there is no English
version, but one can use Google Translate for translation or use Chrome
browser which automatically translates the website headings, not the
documents. You can search and view newspapers, books, magazine and radio
news bulletins. "Personen zoeken" means search people and I placed into
the search box "Jewish sounding " names and for example came back with a
number of hits. By clicking on the returned names a summary of the
information is shown. If you click on the actual record you are prompted to
register with name and email address.

Thank you to Peter Calver and his Lost Cousins Newsletter for alerting us to
this interesting site.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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