Date   

D-M Soundex #poland

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Bialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com


JRI Poland #Poland D-M Soundex #poland

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Bialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com


ViewMate Translations - Russian and German #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Your help in translating vital records >from Ciechanow, Przasnysz and
Chernivtsi is appreciated.
The direct links are below.

Russian:

Birth 1877, Simche Hillel DUCZYMINER, Ciechanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31476

Marriage 1898, Simche Hillel DUCZYMINER and CHOROSZ, Ciechanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31478

Death 1890, Abram DUCZYMINER, Przasnysz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31483


German:

Death1890, Chana JACHIMOWICZ, Chernivtsi (Czernowicz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32007

Birth 1888, Anna JACHIMOWICZ, Chernivtsi (Czernowicz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32008

Please respond through ViewMate or directly to my email
esjoachim@....

Thank you,
Eden Joachim


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate Translations - Russian and German #poland

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Your help in translating vital records >from Ciechanow, Przasnysz and
Chernivtsi is appreciated.
The direct links are below.

Russian:

Birth 1877, Simche Hillel DUCZYMINER, Ciechanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31476

Marriage 1898, Simche Hillel DUCZYMINER and CHOROSZ, Ciechanow
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31478

Death 1890, Abram DUCZYMINER, Przasnysz
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM31483


German:

Death1890, Chana JACHIMOWICZ, Chernivtsi (Czernowicz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32007

Birth 1888, Anna JACHIMOWICZ, Chernivtsi (Czernowicz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32008

Please respond through ViewMate or directly to my email
esjoachim@....

Thank you,
Eden Joachim


back to the topic of whether there were Jewish officers in the Czarist army. . . #lithuania

Judith Singer
 

In the course of researching something else, I happened to come a
wikipedia article about Joseph Trumpeldor, who in 1906 became the
first Jew in the Czarist army to receive an officer's commission.

Trumpeldor was born outside the Pale in Pyatigorsk, Russia and was
both intensely Russian and intensely Jewish. He volunteered for the
Russian army in 1902 and participated in the Russo-Japanese War.
Trumpeldor lost his left arm to shrapnel during the siege of Port
Arthur by the Japanese and spent a hundred days in the hospital
recovering. He then chose to return to army duty, reportedly
responding when questioned about the sense of this decision, "but I
still have another arm to give to the motherland." When Port Arthur
surrendered, Trumpeldor was a prisoner of the Japanese. He occupied
his time until release printing a newspaper on Jewish affairs and
organized history, geography and literature classes. Trumpeldor
subsequently received four decorations for bravery including the Cross
of St. George, making him the most decorated Jewish soldier in Russia,
and then his historic officer's commission in 1906.

Trumpeldor was also an ardent Zionist and settled in Israel in 1912.
He volunteered to fight for the British in World War I and survived
even the disastrous battle of Gallipoli and at the end of the war
returned to Israel. Almost immediately thereafter, Arabs, encouraged
by the British, began attacking Jewish settlements. Haganah was
formed in 1919 to defend Jewish settlers against these Arab attacks.
Of course, Trumpeldor volunteered once again. He died in 1920 when
Arabs attacked the Jewish town of Tel Chai. Trumpeldor was mortally
wounded and died with the words "Ein Davar, tov lamut be-arzeinu," or
"it is good to die for one's country."

Note: Most on-line information on Trumpeldor does not mention that he
became an officer in the Czar's army. Of the half-dozen sites I
checked, only Wikipedia and jbuff.com mention it.

Judith Singer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please confine any public responses to the question
of Jewish officers in the Czar's Army.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania back to the topic of whether there were Jewish officers in the Czarist army. . . #lithuania

Judith Singer
 

In the course of researching something else, I happened to come a
wikipedia article about Joseph Trumpeldor, who in 1906 became the
first Jew in the Czarist army to receive an officer's commission.

Trumpeldor was born outside the Pale in Pyatigorsk, Russia and was
both intensely Russian and intensely Jewish. He volunteered for the
Russian army in 1902 and participated in the Russo-Japanese War.
Trumpeldor lost his left arm to shrapnel during the siege of Port
Arthur by the Japanese and spent a hundred days in the hospital
recovering. He then chose to return to army duty, reportedly
responding when questioned about the sense of this decision, "but I
still have another arm to give to the motherland." When Port Arthur
surrendered, Trumpeldor was a prisoner of the Japanese. He occupied
his time until release printing a newspaper on Jewish affairs and
organized history, geography and literature classes. Trumpeldor
subsequently received four decorations for bravery including the Cross
of St. George, making him the most decorated Jewish soldier in Russia,
and then his historic officer's commission in 1906.

Trumpeldor was also an ardent Zionist and settled in Israel in 1912.
He volunteered to fight for the British in World War I and survived
even the disastrous battle of Gallipoli and at the end of the war
returned to Israel. Almost immediately thereafter, Arabs, encouraged
by the British, began attacking Jewish settlements. Haganah was
formed in 1919 to defend Jewish settlers against these Arab attacks.
Of course, Trumpeldor volunteered once again. He died in 1920 when
Arabs attacked the Jewish town of Tel Chai. Trumpeldor was mortally
wounded and died with the words "Ein Davar, tov lamut be-arzeinu," or
"it is good to die for one's country."

Note: Most on-line information on Trumpeldor does not mention that he
became an officer in the Czar's army. Of the half-dozen sites I
checked, only Wikipedia and jbuff.com mention it.

Judith Singer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please confine any public responses to the question
of Jewish officers in the Czar's Army.


JGSLA "A Hundred Germanies" with Roger Lustig on Monday, March 3, 2014 #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to:

"A Hundred Germanies: A Hundred Jewish Histories" with GerSIG
coordinator, Roger Lustig

Monday, March 3, 2014 ~7:30 PM
Santa Monica Synagogue
1448 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404

"The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy nor Roman Nor German" - Voltaire

Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and
defined what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture--dating back to the real Romans--and hundreds of Jewish
communities, large and small. Until 1871, Germany's Jews were subjects
of dozens of different states, each with different laws and attitudes
toward its Jews. Napoleon emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led
Prussia to do likewise; but as soon as he was gone, the many German
states--most with new boundaries--returned their Jews to one or another
special legal status. Those legal statuses, combined with different
forms of government in the various states, make the researcher's job
more complicated, as the same information--birth, change of residence,
etc.--might be kept by different authorities in different ways. Roger
will review where the larger Jewish congregations and rural
communities lived, how to determine which states ruled them at a given
time, and examples of how family histories are recorded across longer
periods, especially where boundaries and governments were changing.

Roger Lustig is a consultant and family-history researcher based in
Princeton, NJ. He specializes in German Jewish history, focusing on
the parts of Prussia that became Polish in the 20th Century. A native
speaker of German, he has done research in libraries and archives in
Germany and Poland, and is the research coordinator of GerSIG.
(www.jewishgen.org/gersig/)

Roger's talk will be followed by a short IAJGS 2014 Conference preview
by Hal Bookbinder.

JGSLA members free, non-members & guests $5.00. No reservations necessary.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA "A Hundred Germanies" with Roger Lustig on Monday, March 3, 2014 #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to:

"A Hundred Germanies: A Hundred Jewish Histories" with GerSIG
coordinator, Roger Lustig

Monday, March 3, 2014 ~7:30 PM
Santa Monica Synagogue
1448 18th Street, Santa Monica, CA 90404

"The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy nor Roman Nor German" - Voltaire

Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and
defined what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture--dating back to the real Romans--and hundreds of Jewish
communities, large and small. Until 1871, Germany's Jews were subjects
of dozens of different states, each with different laws and attitudes
toward its Jews. Napoleon emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led
Prussia to do likewise; but as soon as he was gone, the many German
states--most with new boundaries--returned their Jews to one or another
special legal status. Those legal statuses, combined with different
forms of government in the various states, make the researcher's job
more complicated, as the same information--birth, change of residence,
etc.--might be kept by different authorities in different ways. Roger
will review where the larger Jewish congregations and rural
communities lived, how to determine which states ruled them at a given
time, and examples of how family histories are recorded across longer
periods, especially where boundaries and governments were changing.

Roger Lustig is a consultant and family-history researcher based in
Princeton, NJ. He specializes in German Jewish history, focusing on
the parts of Prussia that became Polish in the 20th Century. A native
speaker of German, he has done research in libraries and archives in
Germany and Poland, and is the research coordinator of GerSIG.
(www.jewishgen.org/gersig/)

Roger's talk will be followed by a short IAJGS 2014 Conference preview
by Hal Bookbinder.

JGSLA members free, non-members & guests $5.00. No reservations necessary.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 2 Meeting- Speaker Roger Lustig #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV) [California] will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with and
located at Temple Adat Elohim, on Sunday, March 2, 2014 1:30-3:30 p.m.at
Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Program: A Hundred Germanies A Hundred Jewish Histories

" The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy, nor Roman, nor German." -Voltaire
Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and it defined
what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture-dating back to the real Romans-and hundreds of Jewish communities,
large and small.

Until 1871 Germany's Jews were subjects of dozens of different states, each
with different laws and attitudes toward its Jewish population. Napoleon
emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led Prussia to do likewise for almost
all the rest; but as soon as he was gone, the many German states-most with
new boundaries-returned their Jews to one or another special legal status.

Those legal statuses, make the researcher's job more complicated, because
the same type of information-birth, change of residence, etc.-might be kept
by different authorities and in different ways. Roger will review where the
larger Jewish congregations and rural communities lived in Germany, and how
to determine which states ruled over them at a given time using examples of
how family histories are recorded across longer periods and crossing
boundaries.

Speaker: Roger Lustig is a genealogical researcher based in Princeton, NJ.
Since 2002 he has specialized in the Jewish families of Prussian Poland,
especially Upper Silesia and West Prussia. He has worked in archives in the
US, Germany and Poland He is the research coordinator for GerSIG .

Our schmoozing corner starts 20 minutes before the program (1:10 p.m.)
facilitated Debra Kay Blatt JGSCV founding member and Secretary. We will
have Categories A -D of our traveling library available beginning at 1:00 PM
to shortly after the meeting. The list of books which are in the JGSCV
traveling library is located on our website www.jgscv.org under
library-traveling.

If you have not yet joined or renewed your membership for 2014 this is an
ideal time to do so. Membership forms will be available at the registration
desk at the meeting and are available on our website under membership-the
link for the form is at the bottom of the page.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information, including directions to the meeting please see the
JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen

President, JGSCV


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County March 2 Meeting- Speaker Roger Lustig #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County
(JGSCV) [California] will hold a general meeting, co-sponsored with and
located at Temple Adat Elohim, on Sunday, March 2, 2014 1:30-3:30 p.m.at
Temple Adat Elohim 2420 E. Hillcrest Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

The Program: A Hundred Germanies A Hundred Jewish Histories

" The Holy Roman Empire is neither holy, nor Roman, nor German." -Voltaire
Yet the "Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" was German, and it defined
what "German" meant. It was also the home of an ancient Jewish
culture-dating back to the real Romans-and hundreds of Jewish communities,
large and small.

Until 1871 Germany's Jews were subjects of dozens of different states, each
with different laws and attitudes toward its Jewish population. Napoleon
emancipated most of Germany's Jews and led Prussia to do likewise for almost
all the rest; but as soon as he was gone, the many German states-most with
new boundaries-returned their Jews to one or another special legal status.

Those legal statuses, make the researcher's job more complicated, because
the same type of information-birth, change of residence, etc.-might be kept
by different authorities and in different ways. Roger will review where the
larger Jewish congregations and rural communities lived in Germany, and how
to determine which states ruled over them at a given time using examples of
how family histories are recorded across longer periods and crossing
boundaries.

Speaker: Roger Lustig is a genealogical researcher based in Princeton, NJ.
Since 2002 he has specialized in the Jewish families of Prussian Poland,
especially Upper Silesia and West Prussia. He has worked in archives in the
US, Germany and Poland He is the research coordinator for GerSIG .

Our schmoozing corner starts 20 minutes before the program (1:10 p.m.)
facilitated Debra Kay Blatt JGSCV founding member and Secretary. We will
have Categories A -D of our traveling library available beginning at 1:00 PM
to shortly after the meeting. The list of books which are in the JGSCV
traveling library is located on our website www.jgscv.org under
library-traveling.

If you have not yet joined or renewed your membership for 2014 this is an
ideal time to do so. Membership forms will be available at the registration
desk at the meeting and are available on our website under membership-the
link for the form is at the bottom of the page.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information, including directions to the meeting please see the
JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Looking forward to seeing you at the meeting!

Jan Meisels Allen

President, JGSCV


D-M Soundex #general

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Blialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen D-M Soundex #general

Israel P
 

I did a "sounds like" search on JRI-Poland for the surname Blialystoker and
was surprised to get only two results. Later in the day, a visiting young
cousin had a look and got 1425 results. Why the difference? He searched
"Bialystocker."

I had always been under the impression that the soundex functions did not
distinguish between "k" and "ck."

I ran this by Gary Mokotoff (the "M" in "D-M") and he confirmed that in fact
the two are different.

I figure I can't be the only person who didn't know this. This has been a
public service announcement.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem
blogging weekly at http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com


Does anyone know what this inscription is, on a German synagogue? #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Somewhat off topic. Does anyone know the meaning of the Hebrew
inscription, on the link below? It's on a building that used to be a
German synagogue. It's near Frankfurt. I can get more information, if
necessary.

https://scontent-a-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1/1911707_10202204489887967_1235774625_n.jpg

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/k6rp4fb)

Thanks.

Mark London
Natick, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Does anyone know what this inscription is, on a German synagogue? #general

Mark London <mrl@...>
 

Somewhat off topic. Does anyone know the meaning of the Hebrew
inscription, on the link below? It's on a building that used to be a
German synagogue. It's near Frankfurt. I can get more information, if
necessary.

https://scontent-a-lga.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/t1/1911707_10202204489887967_1235774625_n.jpg

( MOD: http://tinyurl.com/k6rp4fb)

Thanks.

Mark London
Natick, MA


"Historical Maps of the Habsburg Empire" - MAPIRE a new cartography site #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

The site offers a selection of historical maps >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire geo-referenced with present day maps (on
Google or OpenStreetMap) providing layering technology for researchers
to compare the past with the present.

Completed is the second military survey of Habsburg Empire and in
progress are the first and third surveys and cadastral surveys of
Croatia and Hungary. Project participants are the Austrian State
Archives (Osterreichisches Staatsarchiv,) Arcanum in Budapest.

There were two types of maps >from that time period: the military
surveys (typically scaled 1 to 28.800) and the more detailed cadastral
maps (scaled 1 to 2.880,) with both of them covering the entire
territory. The original manuscript map sheets of the military surveys
can be found in the Austrian National Archives, but cadastral
(extremely details property maps on the town level) are found in
various archives of the successor states. For example, cadastral maps
for the province of Galicia are held the following regional or
historical archives: Krakow, Przemsyl, Rzeszow in Poland and Lviv and
Ternopil in Ukraine. (Examples of Galician cadastral maps can be
found in Gesher Galicia's map room: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

To use the site, scroll down. When you see the passing selection of
maps, click "complete view" on one that interests you. You can also
scroll further and choose "Complete View" to see the entire Empire in
context, or choose to focus on the following territories:

Bohemia
Bukovina
Coastal Zone
Croatia
Dalmatia
Galicia
Illyria
Lichtenstein
Lombardy
Modena
Moravia
Parma
Silesia
Slavonia
Styria
Salzberg
Tyrol
Venice
Vorarlberg

Click on the area and then start zooming in. You can adjust the
"opacity" using the slider bar at the top of the page to switch views
between the historical map layered with the current GIS map. This
feature is very useful for those researching historical place names
that may not show up on current maps.

The Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey (1806-1809) has
outstanding quality and while not a cadastral survey, when you zoom in
at the closest range you will be able to view plots of land and
buildings, especially ones detailed along the banks of rivers that ran
through these communities.

Arcanum, based in Budapest, specializes in digitization projects, and
has already covered the entire collection of maps of the City Archives
of Budapest, the hand-written map collection of the Hungarian National
Library, and the cadastral maps of Hungarian Archives and Croatia.

A more thorough explanation of these maps can be found in the
"Digitized Maps of the Habsburg Empire" paper here:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/static/pdf/mkf_booklet.pdf

Or the "Digitizing and Geo-Referencing of the Historical Cadastral
Maps (1856-60) of Hungary" here:

http://www.academia.edu/3614065/Digitizing_and_georeferencing_of_the_historical_cadastral_maps_1856-60_of_Hungary

The MAPIRE site is also available in German and Hungarian.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Hungary SIG #Hungary "Historical Maps of the Habsburg Empire" - MAPIRE a new cartography site #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

Announcing a new cartography website, "Historical Maps of the Hapsburg
Empire" or MAPIRE at:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/en/

The site offers a selection of historical maps >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire geo-referenced with present day maps (on
Google or OpenStreetMap) providing layering technology for researchers
to compare the past with the present.

Completed is the second military survey of Habsburg Empire and in
progress are the first and third surveys and cadastral surveys of
Croatia and Hungary. Project participants are the Austrian State
Archives (Osterreichisches Staatsarchiv,) Arcanum in Budapest.

There were two types of maps >from that time period: the military
surveys (typically scaled 1 to 28.800) and the more detailed cadastral
maps (scaled 1 to 2.880,) with both of them covering the entire
territory. The original manuscript map sheets of the military surveys
can be found in the Austrian National Archives, but cadastral
(extremely details property maps on the town level) are found in
various archives of the successor states. For example, cadastral maps
for the province of Galicia are held the following regional or
historical archives: Krakow, Przemsyl, Rzeszow in Poland and Lviv and
Ternopil in Ukraine. (Examples of Galician cadastral maps can be
found in Gesher Galicia's map room: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

To use the site, scroll down. When you see the passing selection of
maps, click "complete view" on one that interests you. You can also
scroll further and choose "Complete View" to see the entire Empire in
context, or choose to focus on the following territories:

Bohemia
Bukovina
Coastal Zone
Croatia
Dalmatia
Galicia
Illyria
Lichtenstein
Lombardy
Modena
Moravia
Parma
Silesia
Slavonia
Styria
Salzberg
Tyrol
Venice
Vorarlberg

Click on the area and then start zooming in. You can adjust the
"opacity" using the slider bar at the top of the page to switch views
between the historical map layered with the current GIS map. This
feature is very useful for those researching historical place names
that may not show up on current maps.

The Second (also known as Franciscan) Military Survey (1806-1809) has
outstanding quality and while not a cadastral survey, when you zoom in
at the closest range you will be able to view plots of land and
buildings, especially ones detailed along the banks of rivers that ran
through these communities.

Arcanum, based in Budapest, specializes in digitization projects, and
has already covered the entire collection of maps of the City Archives
of Budapest, the hand-written map collection of the Hungarian National
Library, and the cadastral maps of Hungarian Archives and Croatia.

A more thorough explanation of these maps can be found in the
"Digitized Maps of the Habsburg Empire" paper here:

http://mapire.staatsarchiv.at/static/pdf/mkf_booklet.pdf

Or the "Digitizing and Geo-Referencing of the Historical Cadastral
Maps (1856-60) of Hungary" here:

http://www.academia.edu/3614065/Digitizing_and_georeferencing_of_the_historical_cadastral_maps_1856-60_of_Hungary

The MAPIRE site is also available in German and Hungarian.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...


Old name for location in Ukraine, end #general

JONES Etienne H.L.F.
 

Hi !

I think the solution is found : Konstantinograd (today Krasnograd) , abt
100 km ssw >from Kharkov.
Thanks to everyone who helped, especially Phyllis K., Edwin R. and
the moderator, also nices tools indeed available on Jewishgen / Com-
munities Database http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp
and the Gazetteer http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp).

Now it should be a nice final confirmation if we could get a birth act in
this town of at least one of the two married people, we're thinking about.

Etienne JONES
et.jones@...
Antwerp, Belgium
Searching
EMBDEN, HAMBRO, JONES, PHILLIPS, JOHNSON, SIMPSON,
ADAMS, BARLIN, ROBINSON, DANIELS, VERNIMMEN, JACOBS,
MORRIS, SWABEY, etc.
(Denmark, England, Germany, The Netherlands, U.S. of America)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Old name for location in Ukraine, end #general

JONES Etienne H.L.F.
 

Hi !

I think the solution is found : Konstantinograd (today Krasnograd) , abt
100 km ssw >from Kharkov.
Thanks to everyone who helped, especially Phyllis K., Edwin R. and
the moderator, also nices tools indeed available on Jewishgen / Com-
munities Database http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp
and the Gazetteer http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp).

Now it should be a nice final confirmation if we could get a birth act in
this town of at least one of the two married people, we're thinking about.

Etienne JONES
et.jones@...
Antwerp, Belgium
Searching
EMBDEN, HAMBRO, JONES, PHILLIPS, JOHNSON, SIMPSON,
ADAMS, BARLIN, ROBINSON, DANIELS, VERNIMMEN, JACOBS,
MORRIS, SWABEY, etc.
(Denmark, England, Germany, The Netherlands, U.S. of America)


ViewMate translation request - Hebrew #general

Stan Romanoff <smromy@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Hebrew:.
These two images were scanned >from a copy of the Bible, which belonged to
my grandfather, Arthur P Feinberg (Aaron). His father's name was Herman
William Feinberg (Yaruchium Gabriel) and his father's name was Charles
(Gabriel) Feinberg. I obtained it after Arthur's death in 1977.
The images come >from the first and last pages of the book. I do not read or
understand Hebrew, however, it appears that they are the same, except
for the end, which appears to be a signature.

I am looking for a complete translation and confirmation that the
two are identical, except for the signature.
It is on ViewMate at the following address...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32392

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Stan Romanoff
romy@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Hebrew #general

Stan Romanoff <smromy@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Hebrew:.
These two images were scanned >from a copy of the Bible, which belonged to
my grandfather, Arthur P Feinberg (Aaron). His father's name was Herman
William Feinberg (Yaruchium Gabriel) and his father's name was Charles
(Gabriel) Feinberg. I obtained it after Arthur's death in 1977.
The images come >from the first and last pages of the book. I do not read or
understand Hebrew, however, it appears that they are the same, except
for the end, which appears to be a signature.

I am looking for a complete translation and confirmation that the
two are identical, except for the signature.
It is on ViewMate at the following address...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32392

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Stan Romanoff
romy@...

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