Date   

New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austrro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to voluteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemy=C5=9Bl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanis=C5=82aw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lw=C3=B3w before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Moderator: Please contact Pamela off-list if you need more info.


Hungary SIG #Hungary New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #hungary

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austrro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to voluteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemy=C5=9Bl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanis=C5=82aw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lw=C3=B3w before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Moderator: Please contact Pamela off-list if you need more info.


JGSLA - Monday, April 28th - Searching the Censuses of the City of New York with Joel Weintraub #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Curious about finding relatives in census records?

Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles at our next event:
"Searching the Censuses of The City of New York" with Joel Weintraub

Monday, April 28 at 7:30PM
Toyota Automobile Museum
19600 Van Ness Ave. Torrance, CA 90501

Many immigrants to the U.S. came through the Port of New York, and
many stayed in the City. In the early 20th century about half of the
U.S. Jewish population resided in the City of New York and most
researchers had relatives who lived - or passed through - New York at
some time. Knowledge of the different City censuses is important for
Jewish genealogists. Joel will discuss the history and geography of
the counties and boroughs of the City along with the City's Jury
censuses (Manhattan) and the 1890 Police census (Manhattan and West
Bronx.) The State military census of 1917, federal censuses,
including the second 1870 NYC enumeration, and and the State censuses
(stopped after 1925 because of a scandal) will be presented. The 1925
Census can help find the court of naturalization of the respondent.
Name search hints and locational search tools for these censuses will
conclude the talk.

Our speaker, Joel Weintraub, is Professor Emeritus in Biology at
California State University in Fullerton in Biology. As a genealogist
he volunteered for nine years at the National Archives and in 2002
teamed up with Stephen Morse to produce census tools and database
management for census conversions, tables and searches on
http://www.stevemorse.org. Joel's contribution to street finder aids
for locating people on the census schedules have benefited all
genealogists and these census records can often provide clues that
enable researchers to break through brick walls.

Free to JGSLA members. Guests $5.00. Refreshments will be served.
(The JGSLA traveling library will be available starting at 7:00PM.
Come early and browse our books!)

More info at: www.JGSLA.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA - Monday, April 28th - Searching the Censuses of the City of New York with Joel Weintraub #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Curious about finding relatives in census records?

Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles at our next event:
"Searching the Censuses of The City of New York" with Joel Weintraub

Monday, April 28 at 7:30PM
Toyota Automobile Museum
19600 Van Ness Ave. Torrance, CA 90501

Many immigrants to the U.S. came through the Port of New York, and
many stayed in the City. In the early 20th century about half of the
U.S. Jewish population resided in the City of New York and most
researchers had relatives who lived - or passed through - New York at
some time. Knowledge of the different City censuses is important for
Jewish genealogists. Joel will discuss the history and geography of
the counties and boroughs of the City along with the City's Jury
censuses (Manhattan) and the 1890 Police census (Manhattan and West
Bronx.) The State military census of 1917, federal censuses,
including the second 1870 NYC enumeration, and and the State censuses
(stopped after 1925 because of a scandal) will be presented. The 1925
Census can help find the court of naturalization of the respondent.
Name search hints and locational search tools for these censuses will
conclude the talk.

Our speaker, Joel Weintraub, is Professor Emeritus in Biology at
California State University in Fullerton in Biology. As a genealogist
he volunteered for nine years at the National Archives and in 2002
teamed up with Stephen Morse to produce census tools and database
management for census conversions, tables and searches on
http://www.stevemorse.org. Joel's contribution to street finder aids
for locating people on the census schedules have benefited all
genealogists and these census records can often provide clues that
enable researchers to break through brick walls.

Free to JGSLA members. Guests $5.00. Refreshments will be served.
(The JGSLA traveling library will be available starting at 7:00PM.
Come early and browse our books!)

More info at: www.JGSLA.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Re: The role of Social Networks in Genealogy Research #general

sharon yampell
 

No matter how distant of a cousin is that I find on Facebook, I still contact
them and explain to them how we are related...I then ask them if they have
any pictures they may want to contribute to my tree or if I may copy and paste
pictures they have....

There was one time when more than 75% of my friends on Facebook were cousins
ranging >from first all the way to fifth that I had found through years of
research....

I believe you should reach out to these relatives! It is fascinating to learn
of similarities even in the most distant of cousin!

Sharon F. Yampell
Voorhees, NJ (Suburb of Philly)

From: Risa.Becker@gfk.com

I've found Social Networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn to be very
valuable in finding living relatives. I've located 4th/5th cousins, etc. I
don't always reach out to these folks, but I do add their names, DOB, etc. to
my "family tree" if appropriate.

I'm curious about the ethical considerations, however, in using these sites
and specifically, in copying pictures to use in a family tree. All users to
a social networking sites have privacy control settings and may choose to
limit who can see their friends lists, pictures, etc. If a social network
user has not put in place these limits and his/her page is publicly available,
is it appropriate for me to copy a "head-shot" to use in my tree without the
owners' explicit permission?

My tree (on ancestry) is public too, but information on "living" people is
blocked unless you've been specifically invited to view it, so in that way,
I'm not "publicizing" information about anyone that's not already public.

In any case, I wanted to open up the topic for discussion and see if there is
a general consensus on this topic.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: The role of Social Networks in Genealogy Research #general

sharon yampell
 

No matter how distant of a cousin is that I find on Facebook, I still contact
them and explain to them how we are related...I then ask them if they have
any pictures they may want to contribute to my tree or if I may copy and paste
pictures they have....

There was one time when more than 75% of my friends on Facebook were cousins
ranging >from first all the way to fifth that I had found through years of
research....

I believe you should reach out to these relatives! It is fascinating to learn
of similarities even in the most distant of cousin!

Sharon F. Yampell
Voorhees, NJ (Suburb of Philly)

From: Risa.Becker@gfk.com

I've found Social Networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn to be very
valuable in finding living relatives. I've located 4th/5th cousins, etc. I
don't always reach out to these folks, but I do add their names, DOB, etc. to
my "family tree" if appropriate.

I'm curious about the ethical considerations, however, in using these sites
and specifically, in copying pictures to use in a family tree. All users to
a social networking sites have privacy control settings and may choose to
limit who can see their friends lists, pictures, etc. If a social network
user has not put in place these limits and his/her page is publicly available,
is it appropriate for me to copy a "head-shot" to use in my tree without the
owners' explicit permission?

My tree (on ancestry) is public too, but information on "living" people is
blocked unless you've been specifically invited to view it, so in that way,
I'm not "publicizing" information about anyone that's not already public.

In any case, I wanted to open up the topic for discussion and see if there is
a general consensus on this topic.


Dutch student's battle for Holocaust justice - Apil 19, 2014 - Associated Press #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Amsterdam, April 19, 2014 (AP) By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
Posted at ABC News website - http://tinyurl.com/m8coqsa
(original URL:
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/student-fought-bureaucrats-holocaust-justice-23390629?singlePage=true

"Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working
part-time in Amsterdam's city archives when she and other interns came
across a shocking find: letters >from Jewish Holocaust survivors
complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late
payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi
death camps. .....

"Following her discovery in 2011, Van den Berg waged a lonely fight
against Amsterdam's modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly
recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are
considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and
possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to
pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the
rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the
camps.".............> http://tinyurl.com/m8coqsa

GerSIG Moderator - with thanks to Chuck Weinstein and Rand H. Fishbein (IAJGS)


German SIG #Germany Dutch student's battle for Holocaust justice - Apil 19, 2014 - Associated Press #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

Amsterdam, April 19, 2014 (AP) By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
Posted at ABC News website - http://tinyurl.com/m8coqsa
(original URL:
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/student-fought-bureaucrats-holocaust-justice-23390629?singlePage=true

"Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working
part-time in Amsterdam's city archives when she and other interns came
across a shocking find: letters >from Jewish Holocaust survivors
complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late
payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi
death camps. .....

"Following her discovery in 2011, Van den Berg waged a lonely fight
against Amsterdam's modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly
recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are
considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and
possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to
pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the
rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the
camps.".............> http://tinyurl.com/m8coqsa

GerSIG Moderator - with thanks to Chuck Weinstein and Rand H. Fishbein (IAJGS)


WEINER-SWOFF - Bialystok #poland

Lisa Cohn
 

Hi, Just joined this list...here's my puzzle:=0AI've been researching
my mother's side and hopefully finding a way through a brick wall to
Poland.

The family: Abraham Swoff (b 7/1859), son of Yehuda Leib Swoff,
married Celia Weiner (b.1873). Abraham Swoff immigrated to New York
about 1887, with Celia and their son Beryl/Barnett following in 1889.
As far as we knew, Abraham and Celia Swoff were >from Zagare, Lithuania
and immigrated via Belgium.

I recently noticed that in one of the census records, Celia's brother,
Morris Weiner, was staying with them and his birthplace was given as
Bialystok, Poland. Browsing through the database on Poland in Jewishgen,
I noticed quite a few names that sounded similar to Swoff/Zwoffe in
Poland. So, I'm wondering if I'll finally be able to find out a little
more about the Weiner-Swoff family before they lived in Zagare.

Any advice on how to continue would be appreciated as I'm new to
Polish genealogy.

Thanks,
Lisa Cohn, USA, NJ
WEINER-SWOFF - Poland, Zagare (Lithuania) LITMAN-COHN - Romania
(Novoselitsa, Botosani)


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland WEINER-SWOFF - Bialystok #poland

Lisa Cohn
 

Hi, Just joined this list...here's my puzzle:=0AI've been researching
my mother's side and hopefully finding a way through a brick wall to
Poland.

The family: Abraham Swoff (b 7/1859), son of Yehuda Leib Swoff,
married Celia Weiner (b.1873). Abraham Swoff immigrated to New York
about 1887, with Celia and their son Beryl/Barnett following in 1889.
As far as we knew, Abraham and Celia Swoff were >from Zagare, Lithuania
and immigrated via Belgium.

I recently noticed that in one of the census records, Celia's brother,
Morris Weiner, was staying with them and his birthplace was given as
Bialystok, Poland. Browsing through the database on Poland in Jewishgen,
I noticed quite a few names that sounded similar to Swoff/Zwoffe in
Poland. So, I'm wondering if I'll finally be able to find out a little
more about the Weiner-Swoff family before they lived in Zagare.

Any advice on how to continue would be appreciated as I'm new to
Polish genealogy.

Thanks,
Lisa Cohn, USA, NJ
WEINER-SWOFF - Poland, Zagare (Lithuania) LITMAN-COHN - Romania
(Novoselitsa, Botosani)


New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to volunteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemysl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanislaw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lwow before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to volunteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemysl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanislaw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lwow before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


Russian translation of records from Poland #poland

arie dzick
 

Dear all,
I've posted vital record of my Szames familly >from Kozienice. I have
already received a kind translation but it is too short (with
only principal names and date). I need more details for it to be
useful so i would be grateful if I could get a more detailed
translation >from Russian. It is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33309
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33308
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33307
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33306
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33305

Thank you very much for your time

Arie Dzick

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


JRI Poland #Poland Russian translation of records from Poland #poland

arie dzick
 

Dear all,
I've posted vital record of my Szames familly >from Kozienice. I have
already received a kind translation but it is too short (with
only principal names and date). I need more details for it to be
useful so i would be grateful if I could get a more detailed
translation >from Russian. It is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33309
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33308
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33307
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33306
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33305

Thank you very much for your time

Arie Dzick

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


Ancestor Search - SMOLINSKY from Lipno #poland

Jerry Small
 

My grandfather John Small came to America in 1891 >from Poland. Before
he changed his surname in 1902, it was Smolinsky. His brother Isadore,
came to America in 1881 with the same surname. On Isadore's
naturalization paper of 1886, the town Lipno Plock Poland is noted as
the place >from which he came. I assume John also came >from there.

I notice in the JRI-Poland database Rypin PSA Births, Marriages 1866-1903
that a Jonas Smolinski appears with birth year 1868, the same year on
John Small's grave stone. I'm thinking this may be my grandfather.
What is the next step in the search?

Respectfully,

Jerry Small
jerry.small1947@sbcglobal.net


JRI Poland #Poland Ancestor Search - SMOLINSKY from Lipno #poland

Jerry Small
 

My grandfather John Small came to America in 1891 >from Poland. Before
he changed his surname in 1902, it was Smolinsky. His brother Isadore,
came to America in 1881 with the same surname. On Isadore's
naturalization paper of 1886, the town Lipno Plock Poland is noted as
the place >from which he came. I assume John also came >from there.

I notice in the JRI-Poland database Rypin PSA Births, Marriages 1866-1903
that a Jonas Smolinski appears with birth year 1868, the same year on
John Small's grave stone. I'm thinking this may be my grandfather.
What is the next step in the search?

Respectfully,

Jerry Small
jerry.small1947@sbcglobal.net


Re: German first name question [Rose, Manele, Zilli] #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

Rose: for centuries, the name of this flower was very popular among
Jewish women, especially the diminutive or pet form Roeschen (Northern
Germany) or Roesle (Southern Germany; also -la, -li, -el,-l). Due to
different dialects the sound -oe- became the German sound -e- or -ee-.
So we find Roesle and Reesle, and also short Rees. In the 19th century,
the Jewish women replaced their traditional names by modern ones or by
those used by the majority. In this case, Rees (le / chen) became
Therese. In the Hebrew headstone text, a form starting with R is more
likely.

Manele: This was also a popular name with a great variety of forms, due
to dialects and misspellings. The origin is the German word "Mann",
[English = man]. In the same way as Rose it was changed by adding
various suffixes. We can find the name written with single or double n.

The ending also can be -ge or -gen. The etymology shows that this
was a secular name. I have just finished a pedigree in which the
religious equivalent on several Hebrew headstones was Menachem.
Yet in one case the given name was Emanuel in Latin script.
The Hebrew signature was Manche.

Cilli or Zilli: This Latin name stands between the long form Caecilie,
which you will find in official documents since the later 19th century,
and a traditional Hebrew given name. It is a rule that traditional and
modern names must rhyme on the first sound or letter. In this case it is
"ts". It is most likely that you find the Hebrew name Zippora on the
headstone and also in some places of your pedigree. Since female names
were handed down >from one generation to the other, they are a good help
to reconstruct relationships, before family names were introduced.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@t-online.de


German SIG #Germany Re: German first name question [Rose, Manele, Zilli] #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

Rose: for centuries, the name of this flower was very popular among
Jewish women, especially the diminutive or pet form Roeschen (Northern
Germany) or Roesle (Southern Germany; also -la, -li, -el,-l). Due to
different dialects the sound -oe- became the German sound -e- or -ee-.
So we find Roesle and Reesle, and also short Rees. In the 19th century,
the Jewish women replaced their traditional names by modern ones or by
those used by the majority. In this case, Rees (le / chen) became
Therese. In the Hebrew headstone text, a form starting with R is more
likely.

Manele: This was also a popular name with a great variety of forms, due
to dialects and misspellings. The origin is the German word "Mann",
[English = man]. In the same way as Rose it was changed by adding
various suffixes. We can find the name written with single or double n.

The ending also can be -ge or -gen. The etymology shows that this
was a secular name. I have just finished a pedigree in which the
religious equivalent on several Hebrew headstones was Menachem.
Yet in one case the given name was Emanuel in Latin script.
The Hebrew signature was Manche.

Cilli or Zilli: This Latin name stands between the long form Caecilie,
which you will find in official documents since the later 19th century,
and a traditional Hebrew given name. It is a rule that traditional and
modern names must rhyme on the first sound or letter. In this case it is
"ts". It is most likely that you find the Hebrew name Zippora on the
headstone and also in some places of your pedigree. Since female names
were handed down >from one generation to the other, they are a good help
to reconstruct relationships, before family names were introduced.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@t-online.de


New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And... four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the regional
maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and medium
towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina showing
mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by Freytag &
Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape folds are
depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized rivers are named,
cities and towns are indicated by initial letters only, apparently to avoid
obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austro-Hungarian empire; this is our first
which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in color, helpful for
understanding the administrative borders. A transport route map
showing highways, railways, and waterways of Galicia and Bukovina
created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by Freytag & Berndt of
Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of connections between
major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding regions), the colorful
map also shows district boundaries, distances between major cities, and
city populations. Types and capacity of the transport routes are indicated
by 11 different map symbols. The 1890 map was published with an 1898
transport statistics booklet, describing and quantifying the regional
transport network, and comparing it to those of adjacent regions. (The
terms are in Polish. If anyone wants to voluteer to translate these, please
contact me privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on eBay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia with
portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing Russian
and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemysl). The map is well-detailed, including all major and
many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military positions
in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanislaw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lwow before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers at
the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in plotting travel
routes across Galicia that might have been taken by your ancestors and
can enhance your knowledge about the physical attributes of the land
that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our map
room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to see
everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


ViewMate translation request - headstones #galicia

Michael Stock
 

I have posted two images of headstones. I am requesting translation of
the Hebrew inscriptions on both, most important would be the Hebrew
name of the deceased and the name of any parent inscribed with it.

Thank you.

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=33324
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=33325

Michael Stock

123581 - 123600 of 668757