Date   

Help with given name "Szime" #general

redangel54@...
 

Dear Genners

I would appreciate some insight into what the Hebrew name "Szime" might
translate to. Three births certificates list my Hungarian great grandfather,
Ignatz (Nathan) FRIEDMAN's first wife as Szime. However I am searching
for a manifest to New York for Szime FRIEDMAN around 1892 and have not been
able to find anything. Ultimately I am trying to find her death certificate
sometime between 1893 and 1895 in New York City.

Most of the first names of the children have been changed once they were
listed in the census, so no doubt she used another first name!

Any insight would be appreciated.

Lauren Johnson-Semmel
Delray Beach, FL
Researching: FRIEDMAN (Zemplen, Hungary)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with given name "Szime" #general

redangel54@...
 

Dear Genners

I would appreciate some insight into what the Hebrew name "Szime" might
translate to. Three births certificates list my Hungarian great grandfather,
Ignatz (Nathan) FRIEDMAN's first wife as Szime. However I am searching
for a manifest to New York for Szime FRIEDMAN around 1892 and have not been
able to find anything. Ultimately I am trying to find her death certificate
sometime between 1893 and 1895 in New York City.

Most of the first names of the children have been changed once they were
listed in the census, so no doubt she used another first name!

Any insight would be appreciated.

Lauren Johnson-Semmel
Delray Beach, FL
Researching: FRIEDMAN (Zemplen, Hungary)


New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austrro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to voluteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemy=C5=9Bl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanis=C5=82aw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lw=C3=B3w before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


JewishGen Success! Stories #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@lyris.jewishgen.org >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Eva Burgova, Kindertransport (?) #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Does anyone know if there is a database of Kindertransport children, perhaps on-line?

I am looking for Eva Sonja Burgova, born 16 May 1930, daughter of Frantisek and Jarmila Burg of Prague.

Her police registration paper suggests that she was sent to England on 24 June 1939.


None of her other family members appear to have traveled with her, which suggests it might have been
one of Mr. Winton's Kindertransports.

Thank you for any tips and shalom >from Prague.

Rick Pinard


Question on Familianten record - ViewMate file # 33387 #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

I have a question on a Familianten record >from Praskolesy. The text
under the "Gattin" column appears to be "Sara Klopstok auf die Ludmilla
Loewytus umgeschrieben", which sounds like two names for the same woman.
However, the next column seems to show two distinct marriage dates
associated with the two names. Does this describe two wives, or one
wife with two names?

The record can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33387

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. More
extensive discussions of Familianten records belong here on the list.

Thank you,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado USA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech New Maps Added to Gesher Galicia Map Room: WWI-Era maps, 1890 transport map, 1885 rivers and mountains map, 1941 Lwow Street Index #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Here are some new additions to the Gesher Galicia map room:

Street index to the 1941 Lemberg map created by the Luftwaffe in
advance of the German invasion:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/general/lviv-lwow-lemberg-1941-index/

An alphabetical street index to the German Luftwaffe general plan of
Lemberg (Lwow, Lvov, Lviv) >from March 1941.

And....four Galicia region maps, listed chronologically in the
regional maps section:

1. Map >from 1885 of mountains and rivers of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-mountains-rivers-1885/

An odd map, quite colorful, and gives good at-a-glance understanding
of the terrain of Galicia overall and in the vicinity of large and
medium towns. A hypsometric tinted relief map of Galicia and Bukovina
showing mountain ranges with elevations and waterways, produced by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna after 1885. Curiously, while the landscape
folds are depicted in colorful detail, and large and medium-sized
rivers are named, cities and towns are indicated by initial letters
only, apparently to avoid obstructing the illustrated topography.

2. 1890 Kornman transport map of Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-rail-1890/

We have two rail maps of the Austrro-Hungarian empire; this is our
first which details Galicia. It also highlights the districts in
color, helpful for understanding the administrative borders. A
transport route map showing highways, railways, and waterways of
Galicia and Bukovina created by Samuel Kornman of Lwow and printed by
Freytag & Berndt of Vienna in 1890. Very useful for its depiction of
connections between major and minor towns of Galicia (and surrounding
regions), the colorful map also shows district boundaries, distances
between major cities, and city populations. Types and capacity of the
transport routes are indicated by 11 different map symbols. The 1890
map was published with an 1898 transport statistics booklet,
describing and quantifying the regional transport network, and
comparing it to those of adjacent regions, (The terms are in Polish.
If anyone wants to voluteer to translate these, please contact me
privately.)

3. A 1914 WWI map showing battle lines in Galicia:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-ww1-battle-lines-1914/

This map was bought on e-bay so we are unsure of its provenance, but
the map is quite useful for anyone who has looked at photos of their
Galician towns destroyed by WWI battles. An historic map of Galicia
with portions of the Russian Empire and partitioned Poland, showing
Russian and Austro-Hungarian army positions and battles in August and
September 1914. The action shows events leading to the early Battle of
Galicia on the Eastern Front, including two battles in Lemberg and the
withdrawal of Austro-Hungarian forces across the San River (leading to
the Siege of Przemy=C5=9Bl). The map is well-detailed, including all major
and many minor towns, key roads, rivers and lakes, and the military
positions in color.

4. Majerski map of Galicia before 1918:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-majerski-1918/

An historic map of Galicia, showing towns, elevations, and major
geographic landmarks, created by Stanis=C5=82aw Majerski and printed by
Piller in Lw=C3=B3w before 1918. Color shadings represent land elevation,
with regional peaks highlighted by map symbols. Major rail lines and
rivers are indicated in red and black, respectively. This map is a
simplified version of the 1910 map by Majerski.

While not the town cadastral maps that interest Galician researchers
at the local levels, these province maps can still be useful in
plotting travel routes across Galicia that might have been taken by
your ancestors and can enhance your knowledge about the physical
attributes of the land that people (or troops) had to traverse.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
getting these new maps online and to Logan Kleinwaks for providing the
1941 Luftwaffe map street index.

(We've provided the direct links here, but if you haven't visited our
map room recently, best to start with our home page and scroll down to
see everything: http://maps.geshergalicia.org)

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JewishGen Success! Stories #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@lyris.jewishgen.org >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Eva Burgova, Kindertransport (?) #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Does anyone know if there is a database of Kindertransport children, perhaps on-line?

I am looking for Eva Sonja Burgova, born 16 May 1930, daughter of Frantisek and Jarmila Burg of Prague.

Her police registration paper suggests that she was sent to England on 24 June 1939.


None of her other family members appear to have traveled with her, which suggests it might have been
one of Mr. Winton's Kindertransports.

Thank you for any tips and shalom >from Prague.

Rick Pinard


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Question on Familianten record - ViewMate file # 33387 #austria-czech

Bob Lenk
 

I have a question on a Familianten record >from Praskolesy. The text
under the "Gattin" column appears to be "Sara Klopstok auf die Ludmilla
Loewytus umgeschrieben", which sounds like two names for the same woman.
However, the next column seems to show two distinct marriage dates
associated with the two names. Does this describe two wives, or one
wife with two names?

The record can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33387

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. More
extensive discussions of Familianten records belong here on the list.

Thank you,
Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado USA


INTRO - researching STATTIN family from Nieder Glasersdorf (Luben, Silesia) #germany

Liat Cohen <LiatCo@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for about a
year now, but I don't have much experience in doing German Jewish Genealogy
research. I live in Jerusalem, Israel. My native language is Hebrew, but my
American co-worker is helping me write this email, and I understand English
reasonably well. I consider myself good at using a computer. My experience
in using the Internet is extensive.

I am searching for information regarding Frieda STATTIN who lived in
Nieder Glasersdorf (a umlaut), Germany. >from my best efforts searching
for information about this location, I think this is/was a village
located in Luben (u umlaut) county, in the Silesia region, though I'm
not sure as all the information I could find was in German.

Does anyone know of some resources that could help me in my search?

Liat Cohen, Jerusalem, Israel LiatCo@justice.gov.il


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching STATTIN family from Nieder Glasersdorf (Luben, Silesia) #germany

Liat Cohen <LiatCo@...>
 

Hello GerSig,
I just joined the group. I have been doing genealogy research for about a
year now, but I don't have much experience in doing German Jewish Genealogy
research. I live in Jerusalem, Israel. My native language is Hebrew, but my
American co-worker is helping me write this email, and I understand English
reasonably well. I consider myself good at using a computer. My experience
in using the Internet is extensive.

I am searching for information regarding Frieda STATTIN who lived in
Nieder Glasersdorf (a umlaut), Germany. >from my best efforts searching
for information about this location, I think this is/was a village
located in Luben (u umlaut) county, in the Silesia region, though I'm
not sure as all the information I could find was in German.

Does anyone know of some resources that could help me in my search?

Liat Cohen, Jerusalem, Israel LiatCo@justice.gov.il


Re: The role of Social Networks in Genealogy Research #general

andrew@...
 

Bess Rose writes:

Now that Facebook puts messages >from people you're
not "friends" with into an "Other" folder, people I reach
out to usually don't see my message
If you click on the "learn more" link, there's an option to pay $1 so
that Facebook will deliver those messages to the recipient's inbox
instead of their "other" folder.

I have found this a worthwhile investment, with about 2/3 of the
recipients responding eagerly, and it has been a great way to connect
with long-lost cousins (some of whom are now good friends).

Best,

Andrew Greene


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The role of Social Networks in Genealogy Research #general

andrew@...
 

Bess Rose writes:

Now that Facebook puts messages >from people you're
not "friends" with into an "Other" folder, people I reach
out to usually don't see my message
If you click on the "learn more" link, there's an option to pay $1 so
that Facebook will deliver those messages to the recipient's inbox
instead of their "other" folder.

I have found this a worthwhile investment, with about 2/3 of the
recipients responding eagerly, and it has been a great way to connect
with long-lost cousins (some of whom are now good friends).

Best,

Andrew Greene


Re: Woman's name Paja #general

Tom Klein <bossman@...>
 

You didn't mention which "old country" it was, or the time frame.

Looking up "Paye" (a guess as to the most likely transliteration based on
the sound) in the JewishGen given names database under Polish names (I picked
Poland because there isn't an option to search all of them) yielded 2
possibilities: Pua, the name of one of the midwives listed in the biblical
story of Moses, or Tziporah, Moses' wife. Of the two, Tziporah is by far
the more common name.

Tom Klein, Toronto

Jake Jacobs <jake6621@hotmail.com> wrote:
My g'g'grandmother's first name was listed on a marriage record as "Pye."
Several people on this list suggested the name might have been "Paya" or
"Piya" or "Paja"in the old country.

Does anybody have any resources that might cast some light on this name,
where it might have been used, what it means?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Woman's name Paja #general

Tom Klein <bossman@...>
 

You didn't mention which "old country" it was, or the time frame.

Looking up "Paye" (a guess as to the most likely transliteration based on
the sound) in the JewishGen given names database under Polish names (I picked
Poland because there isn't an option to search all of them) yielded 2
possibilities: Pua, the name of one of the midwives listed in the biblical
story of Moses, or Tziporah, Moses' wife. Of the two, Tziporah is by far
the more common name.

Tom Klein, Toronto

Jake Jacobs <jake6621@hotmail.com> wrote:
My g'g'grandmother's first name was listed on a marriage record as "Pye."
Several people on this list suggested the name might have been "Paya" or
"Piya" or "Paja"in the old country.

Does anybody have any resources that might cast some light on this name,
where it might have been used, what it means?


Translation help needed #ukraine

hmb@...
 

I've posted a copy of part of a Russian passport for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address :


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM33342


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. Any help
would be appreciated.


Howard M. Brown
Brookline, MA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Translation help needed #ukraine

hmb@...
 

I've posted a copy of part of a Russian passport for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address :


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM33342


Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. Any help
would be appreciated.


Howard M. Brown
Brookline, MA


Seeking sperm donor #general

Jon Smith
 

Hello. More than a few people have suggested sharing this with the
Jewish genealogy community and I know most, if not all of you can
empathize with the importance of knowing your roots, so I'm giving
this a go. Please share this with *everyone* you know, repost, attach to
mailing lists etc. The more people who see this, the more likely it is
that I'll find the person I'm searching for. Thanks for reading!

Attention Jewish Men: Did you donate sperm during the '80s?

Seeking light-featured Jewish men who acted as anonymous sperm donors
in the Los Angeles/UCLA area, between (but not limited to) 1981-1985

Your offspring are seeking medical information.

Please contact 1980donor@gmail.com (for anonymous communication,
create a new Gmail account)

D. Shear


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking sperm donor #general

Jon Smith
 

Hello. More than a few people have suggested sharing this with the
Jewish genealogy community and I know most, if not all of you can
empathize with the importance of knowing your roots, so I'm giving
this a go. Please share this with *everyone* you know, repost, attach to
mailing lists etc. The more people who see this, the more likely it is
that I'll find the person I'm searching for. Thanks for reading!

Attention Jewish Men: Did you donate sperm during the '80s?

Seeking light-featured Jewish men who acted as anonymous sperm donors
in the Los Angeles/UCLA area, between (but not limited to) 1981-1985

Your offspring are seeking medical information.

Please contact 1980donor@gmail.com (for anonymous communication,
create a new Gmail account)

D. Shear

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