Date   

Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #france

bounce-2804910-772957@...
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


French SIG #France Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #france

bounce-2804910-772957@...
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #subcarpathia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


WWI casualty lists searchable, high-quality images at Upper Austrian Regional Library #subcarpathia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Very clear images of World War I casualty lists for Austria-Hungary
are viewable and full-text searchable on the website of the Upper
Austrian Regional Library. To search the casualty lists, enter your
search term (e.g., surname, surname and given name, surname and town)
at http://digi.landesbibliothek.at/viewer/browse/periodika.verlustliste*/-/1/CURRENTNOSORT/-/.
In the list of search results, click on a thumbnail image to show a
medium-size image with the matching text highlighted. Even larger
images can then be viewed by 1) clicking the full-screen button above
the medium-size image and then using the zoom slider at the top, or 2)
moving the grey slider above the medium-size image to the right to
zoom in. When zoomed in, an image can be clicked-and-dragged to
change the section that is visible.

The search results for these images (generated via OCR) seem to be
(much?) more accurate than those for the same lists at other sites
(e.g., Austrian National Library at
http://anno.onb.ac.at/anno-suche/#searchMode=complex&title=Verlustliste+&resultMode=list&from=1&sort=date+asc
or Kramerius Digital Library at
http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/handle/ABA001/24665809). This might
be because of the superior quality of their images.

The Upper Austrian Regional Library has not yet posted all its lists
online. They have so far posted about 40% of known lists, and are
digitizing more each day, essentially in chronological order from
earliest to latest. It remains to be seen how much their online
collection will ultimately overlap with the others in scope.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #subcarpathia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia WWI casualty lists searchable, high-quality images at Upper Austrian Regional Library #subcarpathia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Very clear images of World War I casualty lists for Austria-Hungary
are viewable and full-text searchable on the website of the Upper
Austrian Regional Library. To search the casualty lists, enter your
search term (e.g., surname, surname and given name, surname and town)
at http://digi.landesbibliothek.at/viewer/browse/periodika.verlustliste*/-/1/CURRENTNOSORT/-/.
In the list of search results, click on a thumbnail image to show a
medium-size image with the matching text highlighted. Even larger
images can then be viewed by 1) clicking the full-screen button above
the medium-size image and then using the zoom slider at the top, or 2)
moving the grey slider above the medium-size image to the right to
zoom in. When zoomed in, an image can be clicked-and-dragged to
change the section that is visible.

The search results for these images (generated via OCR) seem to be
(much?) more accurate than those for the same lists at other sites
(e.g., Austrian National Library at
http://anno.onb.ac.at/anno-suche/#searchMode=complex&title=Verlustliste+&resultMode=list&from=1&sort=date+asc
or Kramerius Digital Library at
http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/handle/ABA001/24665809). This might
be because of the superior quality of their images.

The Upper Austrian Regional Library has not yet posted all its lists
online. They have so far posted about 40% of known lists, and are
digitizing more each day, essentially in chronological order from
earliest to latest. It remains to be seen how much their online
collection will ultimately overlap with the others in scope.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Finding people to help search in Bucharest #romania

David Schreiber
 

A newly met cousin whose family comes >from Romania tried unsuccessfully to get
information >from Romanian archives. He found the officials to be largely
uncooperative even though he speaks fluent Romanian. He was told later that,
as we've frequently heard on JewishGen, that this resistance mostly comes from
suspicion that the people who are searching might use the results to attempt to
stake a claim to someone's present day property. Is there anyone on JewishGen who
might know of a reliable native researcher in Bucharest who could facilitate such
research? I've heard that there are some suggestions in the Infofiles but I
couldn't find where they are cited. Feel free to reply privately if preferable.
Thanks in advance.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Any references, good or bad, must be sent directly to the
poster in a private reply.

David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


Romania SIG #Romania Finding people to help search in Bucharest #romania

David Schreiber
 

A newly met cousin whose family comes >from Romania tried unsuccessfully to get
information >from Romanian archives. He found the officials to be largely
uncooperative even though he speaks fluent Romanian. He was told later that,
as we've frequently heard on JewishGen, that this resistance mostly comes from
suspicion that the people who are searching might use the results to attempt to
stake a claim to someone's present day property. Is there anyone on JewishGen who
might know of a reliable native researcher in Bucharest who could facilitate such
research? I've heard that there are some suggestions in the Infofiles but I
couldn't find where they are cited. Feel free to reply privately if preferable.
Thanks in advance.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Any references, good or bad, must be sent directly to the
poster in a private reply.

David Schreiber
Melbourne, FL


NY Times, June 10, 2014 - GerSIG's Renee Steinig links NYC Cardial O'Connor to his Jewish roots #germany

jplowens@...
 

While Cardinal John Joseph O'Connor of New York City was well-known as
a defender and friend of the Jewish people, he was apparently unaware
that his mother was born Jewish, the daughter of a rabbi.

The saga, reflecting the kinds of rifts, new starts and reinventions
that mark many American families, emerged in recent weeks, first in
the April 30 issue of Catholic New York in a first-person essay by
Mrs. Ward-Donegan, who had been searching for information about her
forebears. The revelation set off a storm of genealogical research by
the religious press, including Jewish Week, which called upon
*** Renee Stern Steinig *** , an expert in Jewish genealogy, to
connect some dots.

http://tinyurl.com/qfht7mu original URL

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/11/nyregion/cardinal-john-joseph-oconnor-jewish-mother-genealogy.html

Thanks to Chuck Weinstein - Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island via
JGSLI Facebook page

Charter GerSIG member Renee Steinig is a past president of the JGSLI and
helped organize NYC IAJGS Conferences in 2006, 1999 and earlier.
She does in-depth genealogy research professionally and as a volunteer.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC


German SIG #Germany NY Times, June 10, 2014 - GerSIG's Renee Steinig links NYC Cardial O'Connor to his Jewish roots #germany

jplowens@...
 

While Cardinal John Joseph O'Connor of New York City was well-known as
a defender and friend of the Jewish people, he was apparently unaware
that his mother was born Jewish, the daughter of a rabbi.

The saga, reflecting the kinds of rifts, new starts and reinventions
that mark many American families, emerged in recent weeks, first in
the April 30 issue of Catholic New York in a first-person essay by
Mrs. Ward-Donegan, who had been searching for information about her
forebears. The revelation set off a storm of genealogical research by
the religious press, including Jewish Week, which called upon
*** Renee Stern Steinig *** , an expert in Jewish genealogy, to
connect some dots.

http://tinyurl.com/qfht7mu original URL

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/11/nyregion/cardinal-john-joseph-oconnor-jewish-mother-genealogy.html

Thanks to Chuck Weinstein - Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island via
JGSLI Facebook page

Charter GerSIG member Renee Steinig is a past president of the JGSLI and
helped organize NYC IAJGS Conferences in 2006, 1999 and earlier.
She does in-depth genealogy research professionally and as a volunteer.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC


translation from Polish #poland #warsaw

mara.friedman@...
 

I am interested in getting the following Polish marriage document between
Ayzyk Festman and Margula Szczesny in 1854 translated. I am especially
interested in the names of the bride's and groom's parents.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34149

Thanks so much!
Mara Friedman
mara.friedman@...


Russian translation #warsaw #poland

mara.friedman@...
 

I would like to get as much translated as possible >from the following
marriage document between Szaja Frydman and Chana Ruchla Festman in 1891.
It took place in Poland but the document is in Russian. I am particularly
interested in the names of the parents of the bride and groom, with special
attention to groom's mother's last name (if provided).

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33290

Thanks so much!

Mara Friedman
mara.friedman@...


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland translation from Polish #warsaw #poland

mara.friedman@...
 

I am interested in getting the following Polish marriage document between
Ayzyk Festman and Margula Szczesny in 1854 translated. I am especially
interested in the names of the bride's and groom's parents.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM34149

Thanks so much!
Mara Friedman
mara.friedman@...


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Russian translation #warsaw #poland

mara.friedman@...
 

I would like to get as much translated as possible >from the following
marriage document between Szaja Frydman and Chana Ruchla Festman in 1891.
It took place in Poland but the document is in Russian. I am particularly
interested in the names of the parents of the bride and groom, with special
attention to groom's mother's last name (if provided).

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33290

Thanks so much!

Mara Friedman
mara.friedman@...


Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


KehilaLinks Project Report for May 2014 #warsaw #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Bil'shivtsi (Bolshevitz, Bolshovtsy) (G), Ukraine
Created by Kenneth Entin
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Bilshivtsi/
~~~

Dubasari (Dubossary, Dubasar), Moldova
Created by Yefim A. Kogan
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dubasari/
~~~

Shklov (Shklow) (including Zarecha and Rizhkevich), Belarus
Created by Daria Fane
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/shklov/
~~~

Skuodas (Shkod Shkudy), Lithuania
Created by Rachel Mines
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer <samglaser@...>
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/skuodas/Skuodas.html
~~~

Velikiye Komyaty (Magyarkomjat) (S-C), Ukraine
Created by Roberta Solit
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/velikiye_komyaty/index.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Belozerka (Bielozorka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/
~~~

Buchach (Buczacz) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_buczacz.htm
~~~

Grodzisko Dolne (G), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/grodziskodolne/sl_grodziskodolne.htm
~~~

Kherson (Cherson), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kherson/
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Novopoltavka (Koloniya Poltavka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Novopoltavka/
~~~

Perechyn (Perecseny, Perecin) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Perechyn/
~~~

Pereyaslav-Khmel'nyts'kyy (Periyoslov), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pereyaslav_Khmelnytskyy/
~~~

Raducaneni, Moldova
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Solotvyno (Aknaszlatina, Slatinske Doly) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Solotvyno/
~~~

Zolotonosha, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zolotonosha/

ORPHANED WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by
people who are no longer able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish
them luck on their future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@...>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland KehilaLinks Project Report for May 2014 #warsaw #poland

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Bil'shivtsi (Bolshevitz, Bolshovtsy) (G), Ukraine
Created by Kenneth Entin
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Bilshivtsi/
~~~

Dubasari (Dubossary, Dubasar), Moldova
Created by Yefim A. Kogan
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dubasari/
~~~

Shklov (Shklow) (including Zarecha and Rizhkevich), Belarus
Created by Daria Fane
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/shklov/
~~~

Skuodas (Shkod Shkudy), Lithuania
Created by Rachel Mines
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer <samglaser@...>
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/skuodas/Skuodas.html
~~~

Velikiye Komyaty (Magyarkomjat) (S-C), Ukraine
Created by Roberta Solit
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/velikiye_komyaty/index.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Belozerka (Bielozorka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/
~~~

Buchach (Buczacz) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_buczacz.htm
~~~

Grodzisko Dolne (G), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/grodziskodolne/sl_grodziskodolne.htm
~~~

Kherson (Cherson), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kherson/
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Novopoltavka (Koloniya Poltavka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Novopoltavka/
~~~

Perechyn (Perecseny, Perecin) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Perechyn/
~~~

Pereyaslav-Khmel'nyts'kyy (Periyoslov), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pereyaslav_Khmelnytskyy/
~~~

Raducaneni, Moldova
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Solotvyno (Aknaszlatina, Slatinske Doly) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Solotvyno/
~~~

Zolotonosha, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zolotonosha/

ORPHANED WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by
people who are no longer able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish
them luck on their future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@...>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


[UK] Civilian War Dead Honor Roll 1939-1945 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Imperial War Graves Commission (UK) was empowered to collect and record
the names of civilians who died >from enemy action during World War II. They
used information supplied by the Registrar-General and local authorities an
initial list of 43,000 names was compiled covering just the period of the
Battle of Britain in 1940 and the big air raids of 1940-41. It was agreed
that the final roll would be placed in Westminster Abbey once all the
hostilities were over. The seven-bound volumes contain printed details of
66,375 fatalities. Entries are not arranged chronologically but by county,
and within county by local government areas (many of which have changed
since 1945). The lists are then alphabetical by surname and give details of
the residential address, place of death and family relationship. One volume
covers deaths on board ship and deaths abroad (including civilian deaths in
prison camps).

The books are kept just outside the entrance to St George's Chapel at the
west end of Westminster Abbey. The books cannot be photocopied, but copies
of entries can be obtained >from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission at 2
Marlow Road, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 7DX (a charge is made). The
Commission's 'Debt of Honour Register', which includes all the names on the
Civilian War Dead Roll of Honor, can be searched via the internet at
www.cwgc.org

Another copy of the Roll is held by the Imperial War Museum and can be
consulted by appointment in the Museum's library.

The Roll of Honor for United States servicemen who died in air raids in the
United Kingdom is in St Paul's Cathedral, in the American Memorial Chapel
there.

To read more about this go to: http://tinyurl.com/mjgzste
Original url:
http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/people/civilian-war-dead-roll-of-honour-1939---1945

Thank you to Saul Issroff, President of the JGS of Great Britain for
alerting us to this interesting list of civilian names of WWII dead.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen [UK] Civilian War Dead Honor Roll 1939-1945 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Imperial War Graves Commission (UK) was empowered to collect and record
the names of civilians who died >from enemy action during World War II. They
used information supplied by the Registrar-General and local authorities an
initial list of 43,000 names was compiled covering just the period of the
Battle of Britain in 1940 and the big air raids of 1940-41. It was agreed
that the final roll would be placed in Westminster Abbey once all the
hostilities were over. The seven-bound volumes contain printed details of
66,375 fatalities. Entries are not arranged chronologically but by county,
and within county by local government areas (many of which have changed
since 1945). The lists are then alphabetical by surname and give details of
the residential address, place of death and family relationship. One volume
covers deaths on board ship and deaths abroad (including civilian deaths in
prison camps).

The books are kept just outside the entrance to St George's Chapel at the
west end of Westminster Abbey. The books cannot be photocopied, but copies
of entries can be obtained >from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission at 2
Marlow Road, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 7DX (a charge is made). The
Commission's 'Debt of Honour Register', which includes all the names on the
Civilian War Dead Roll of Honor, can be searched via the internet at
www.cwgc.org

Another copy of the Roll is held by the Imperial War Museum and can be
consulted by appointment in the Museum's library.

The Roll of Honor for United States servicemen who died in air raids in the
United Kingdom is in St Paul's Cathedral, in the American Memorial Chapel
there.

To read more about this go to: http://tinyurl.com/mjgzste
Original url:
http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/people/civilian-war-dead-roll-of-honour-1939---1945

Thank you to Saul Issroff, President of the JGS of Great Britain for
alerting us to this interesting list of civilian names of WWII dead.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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