Date   

Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #austria-czech

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #austria-czech

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


KehilaLinks Project Report for May 2014 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Bil'shivtsi (Bolshevitz, Bolshovtsy) (G), Ukraine
Created by Kenneth Entin
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Bilshivtsi/
~~~

Dubasari (Dubossary, Dubasar), Moldova
Created by Yefim A. Kogan
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dubasari/
~~~

Shklov (Shklow) (including Zarecha and Rizhkevich), Belarus
Created by Daria Fane
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/shklov/
~~~

Skuodas (Shkod Shkudy), Lithuania
Created by Rachel Mines
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer <samglaser@...>
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/skuodas/Skuodas.html
~~~

Velikiye Komyaty (Magyarkomjat) (S-C), Ukraine
Created by Roberta Solit
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/velikiye_komyaty/index.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Belozerka (Bielozorka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/
~~~

Buchach (Buczacz) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_buczacz.htm
~~~

Grodzisko Dolne (G), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/grodziskodolne/sl_grodziskodolne.htm
~~~

Kherson (Cherson), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kherson/
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Novopoltavka (Koloniya Poltavka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Novopoltavka/
~~~

Perechyn (Perecseny, Perecin) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Perechyn/
~~~

Pereyaslav-Khmel'nyts'kyy (Periyoslov), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pereyaslav_Khmelnytskyy/
~~~

Raducaneni, Moldova
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Solotvyno (Aknaszlatina, Slatinske Doly) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Solotvyno/
~~~

Zolotonosha, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zolotonosha/

ORPHANED WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by
people who are no longer able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish
them luck on their future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@...>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech KehilaLinks Project Report for May 2014 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Bil'shivtsi (Bolshevitz, Bolshovtsy) (G), Ukraine
Created by Kenneth Entin
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Bilshivtsi/
~~~

Dubasari (Dubossary, Dubasar), Moldova
Created by Yefim A. Kogan
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Dubasari/
~~~

Shklov (Shklow) (including Zarecha and Rizhkevich), Belarus
Created by Daria Fane
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/shklov/
~~~

Skuodas (Shkod Shkudy), Lithuania
Created by Rachel Mines
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer <samglaser@...>
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/skuodas/Skuodas.html
~~~

Velikiye Komyaty (Magyarkomjat) (S-C), Ukraine
Created by Roberta Solit
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/velikiye_komyaty/index.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Belozerka (Bielozorka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/
~~~

Buchach (Buczacz) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_buczacz.htm
~~~

Grodzisko Dolne (G), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolbuszowa/grodziskodolne/sl_grodziskodolne.htm
~~~

Kherson (Cherson), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kherson/
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Novopoltavka (Koloniya Poltavka), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Novopoltavka/
~~~

Perechyn (Perecseny, Perecin) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Perechyn/
~~~

Pereyaslav-Khmel'nyts'kyy (Periyoslov), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pereyaslav_Khmelnytskyy/
~~~

Raducaneni, Moldova
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Solotvyno (Aknaszlatina, Slatinske Doly) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Solotvyno/
~~~

Zolotonosha, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zolotonosha/

ORPHANED WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by
people who are no longer able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish
them luck on their future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@...>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #rabbinic

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #rabbinic

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Re: Jewish relative in 1892 NY Census #general

Mark Jacobson
 

The 1892 New York State Census does not survive for the borough of
Manhattan, so you can't find someone living on the Lower East Side
or anywhere else in Manhattan (or the Bronx or Staten Island where
records also do not survive) in that particular Census. It does
survive for what was then the City of Brooklyn. All surviving 1892
census records are indexed with images at Familysearch.org:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1529100

Mark Jacobson
Past President, JGSPBCI
Boca Raton, FL

DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine; COHEN/KANA/KAHAN -
Tripolye, Ukraine; JACOBSON - Polotsk/Lepel, Belarus; KOBLENTZ -
Polotsk, Belarus; KAMERMAN/KAMMERMANN, WEGNER - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia


"WalterRosettwrosett@..." wrote:

I am trying to locate information >from the 1892 NY State Census.  My
grandfather, Joshua ROSETT arrived in 1891 and supposedly was staying
with family. ... Stories suggest that he stayed with "family" but
there were many "Rosett" families in NYC.  It seems likely that he
was in a Jewish-Russian or Jewish-Polish neighborhood. I hope that
someone could give me an idea what area this would have been at that
time ...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish relative in 1892 NY Census #general

Mark Jacobson
 

The 1892 New York State Census does not survive for the borough of
Manhattan, so you can't find someone living on the Lower East Side
or anywhere else in Manhattan (or the Bronx or Staten Island where
records also do not survive) in that particular Census. It does
survive for what was then the City of Brooklyn. All surviving 1892
census records are indexed with images at Familysearch.org:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1529100

Mark Jacobson
Past President, JGSPBCI
Boca Raton, FL

DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine; COHEN/KANA/KAHAN -
Tripolye, Ukraine; JACOBSON - Polotsk/Lepel, Belarus; KOBLENTZ -
Polotsk, Belarus; KAMERMAN/KAMMERMANN, WEGNER - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia


"WalterRosettwrosett@..." wrote:

I am trying to locate information >from the 1892 NY State Census.  My
grandfather, Joshua ROSETT arrived in 1891 and supposedly was staying
with family. ... Stories suggest that he stayed with "family" but
there were many "Rosett" families in NYC.  It seems likely that he
was in a Jewish-Russian or Jewish-Polish neighborhood. I hope that
someone could give me an idea what area this would have been at that
time ...


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #southafrica

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #southafrica

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #latvia #courland

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #courland #latvia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #ukraine

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #ukraine

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@...


Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #subcarpathia

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Check out the 60+ conference programs to be available over the Internet as LIVE! #subcarpathia

Hal Bookbinder
 

If you have been waiting to see what Conference programming will be
available over the Internet through LIVE!, your wait is over. Check it
out at the Conference website and subscribe to LIVE! now!

Once you go to the conference website, www.iajgs2014.org, click on
"Program and Schedule" (under the "PROGRAM" tab) and then enter
"LIVE!" in the "Session Code" field and click "Search". Check out the
more than 60 programs that will be available live and for three months
after the Conference on the Internet.

To register for the Conference or LIVE! go to registration.iajgs2014.org.

See you at the Conference. But, if you cannot join us in Salt Lake
City this summer, we certainly hope you take advantage of this very
affordable way to enjoy much of what the Conference has to offer.

Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein, Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Hilton Salt Lake City Center
July 27 - August 1, 2014
bookbndr@...


Ginsberg/Gunzberg family trees #rabbinic

c-fox4@sky.com <c-fox4@...>
 

Can anyone lead me to Gunzberg/Ginsberg family trees - possibly
starting with Simeon Ullma-Gunzburg ? If possible in english script.
Bella Fox
c-fox4@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Ginsberg/Gunzberg family trees #rabbinic

c-fox4@sky.com <c-fox4@...>
 

Can anyone lead me to Gunzberg/Ginsberg family trees - possibly
starting with Simeon Ullma-Gunzburg ? If possible in english script.
Bella Fox
c-fox4@...


Rabbi Baruch Twersky #rabbinic

Bernard Weill
 

Dear colleagues,

Does anyone have contact information on Rabbi Baruch Twersky,
author of the serial "Collectibles" column that ran for several
years in the Mishpacha magazine?

Thank you,
Bezalel Weill

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Lipschitz in Jerusalem #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking for descendants (with contact information) of two brothers -

R. Jacob Zalman Libschitz, died 1915.((( His descendants reside in
Jerusalem (surnamed Ben Yaakov).

and R. Meir Ezekiel Libschitz (Lipschitz), died in Jerusalem on
November 12, 1909 and was buried on the Mt. of Olives. He married
Rebecca Goodglick (divorced and she remarried Asher Velvel Slutzki).
Meir was gabbai of the Etz Chaim yeshiva and Talmud Torah in
Jerusalem.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.

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