Date   

The ReMA's daughters #rabbinic

Cyril Fox <c-fox4@...>
 

I would like to know whether the sister of Dreizel ISSERLES, namely Malka
Isserles, was without issue?
Did she die childless?
Her marriage was to Eliezer GUNZBURG.
Does anyone know?

Bella Fox


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic The ReMA's daughters #rabbinic

Cyril Fox <c-fox4@...>
 

I would like to know whether the sister of Dreizel ISSERLES, namely Malka
Isserles, was without issue?
Did she die childless?
Her marriage was to Eliezer GUNZBURG.
Does anyone know?

Bella Fox


FRIEDENSOHN in Paris #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact or get information on

Asher FRIEDENSOHN, who married his first cousin, Ela Ernestina and
settled in Paris.
Their three children -
1. Olga, born 1902, lived in Paris.
2. Ruth, born 1911 in Rumania, lived in Paris.
3. Alexander Friedensohn, born 1907, married Dora, lived in Paris.
(parents of Patrick Friedensohn, born 1944 in Paris and George
Friedensohn, born 1945 in Paris.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic FRIEDENSOHN in Paris #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact or get information on

Asher FRIEDENSOHN, who married his first cousin, Ela Ernestina and
settled in Paris.
Their three children -
1. Olga, born 1902, lived in Paris.
2. Ruth, born 1911 in Rumania, lived in Paris.
3. Alexander Friedensohn, born 1907, married Dora, lived in Paris.
(parents of Patrick Friedensohn, born 1944 in Paris and George
Friedensohn, born 1945 in Paris.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rav GORDON of Yeshivat Lomza in Petach Tikva. #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact anyone who knows of this rabbi and his family.
A son-in-law was Yehoshua Eizik KOSTIKOWSKY.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rav GORDON of Yeshivat Lomza in Petach Tikva. #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact anyone who knows of this rabbi and his family.
A son-in-law was Yehoshua Eizik KOSTIKOWSKY.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


One name: one person or two? #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a puzzler for you. Would it be reasonable for there to be
two Jewish women of the same name in a certain shtetl in the late
nineteenth century?

The shtetl in question is Frampol, which had a Jewish population in
1900 of somewhere around 1,000, according to Jewishgen.

So here are my two records:

1) I have a translated birth record for a Sluwa Krikszer born in
Frampol in 1878. In this record, the father's name is Majer.

2) I also have a 1910 passenger manifest for a Sluwa Brenner (nee
Krikszer) >from Frampol that lists her father's name as Moshe.

I have many more records for her and I'm sure her maiden name was
Krikszer.

Both women would have been about the same age, which makes me wonder
whether I truly have two different people. Clearly, one of the records
could be in error about the father's name, most likely the passenger
manifest.

What I'm wondering is, how likely would it be for there to be two
roughly-the-same-age Jewish women of the same name in this shtetl?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Dave Strausfeld

P.S. Complicating things a bit, I also have an 1889 Frampol birth
record for a Krikszer son that says the father's name was Moshe.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen One name: one person or two? #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a puzzler for you. Would it be reasonable for there to be
two Jewish women of the same name in a certain shtetl in the late
nineteenth century?

The shtetl in question is Frampol, which had a Jewish population in
1900 of somewhere around 1,000, according to Jewishgen.

So here are my two records:

1) I have a translated birth record for a Sluwa Krikszer born in
Frampol in 1878. In this record, the father's name is Majer.

2) I also have a 1910 passenger manifest for a Sluwa Brenner (nee
Krikszer) >from Frampol that lists her father's name as Moshe.

I have many more records for her and I'm sure her maiden name was
Krikszer.

Both women would have been about the same age, which makes me wonder
whether I truly have two different people. Clearly, one of the records
could be in error about the father's name, most likely the passenger
manifest.

What I'm wondering is, how likely would it be for there to be two
roughly-the-same-age Jewish women of the same name in this shtetl?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Dave Strausfeld

P.S. Complicating things a bit, I also have an 1889 Frampol birth
record for a Krikszer son that says the father's name was Moshe.


Re : SCHWARTZ Suwalki #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybr26@...>
 

" SCHWARTZ is not a Polish name, most probably the translation of the original
name which is CZARNY in polish. And that name was present in Suwalki records."

Schwartz is indeed not Polish (and Czarny is), but it is German and (I am guessing)
Yiddish. My gg grandmother, >from Augustow, now Poland, then Suwalki gubernia (on
the Prussian border), was SN Schwartz in some of the few records that exist in the
area, and a distant cousin I found knows the name >from her family's stories.

Any 'German' name that you think doesn't belong in a Russian area is probably
Yiddish.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re : SCHWARTZ Suwalki #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybr26@...>
 

" SCHWARTZ is not a Polish name, most probably the translation of the original
name which is CZARNY in polish. And that name was present in Suwalki records."

Schwartz is indeed not Polish (and Czarny is), but it is German and (I am guessing)
Yiddish. My gg grandmother, >from Augustow, now Poland, then Suwalki gubernia (on
the Prussian border), was SN Schwartz in some of the few records that exist in the
area, and a distant cousin I found knows the name >from her family's stories.

Any 'German' name that you think doesn't belong in a Russian area is probably
Yiddish.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


ViewMate - Translation requested of one word (German or Polish) #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a partial translation of the record below

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=33744

(#24 relating to Berl Holon) but I was wondering if anyone might be
able to translate one word whose meaning I do not yet know.

The word appears to be "Curulik" and, >from where it is on the record,
it's probably an occupation. The rest of the record is in German.
Google Translate tells me that "Cyrulik" means "The Barber" in Polish
-- but the rest of this record is in German.

Thanks very much.

Dave Strausfeld

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate - Translation requested of one word (German or Polish) #general

Dave Strausfeld <davestra@...>
 

Hi all,

I have a partial translation of the record below

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=33744

(#24 relating to Berl Holon) but I was wondering if anyone might be
able to translate one word whose meaning I do not yet know.

The word appears to be "Curulik" and, >from where it is on the record,
it's probably an occupation. The rest of the record is in German.
Google Translate tells me that "Cyrulik" means "The Barber" in Polish
-- but the rest of this record is in German.

Thanks very much.

Dave Strausfeld

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately or on the ViewMate response form.


Issue 118 of Genealo-J, journal of the French JGS #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 118, Summer 2014 has just been published.

This issue is entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace.

Bernard Wils studies the community of Wittenheim, a small village of Haut-Rhin,
from which come several of his ancestors. The community grew >from 7 families and
22 people in 1751 to a maximum of 22 families and 78 people in 1808. Then it
declined slowly for economical reasons but the deathblow was given by the German
annexation of Alsace. A large proportion of the Jews chose the French citizenship
and left the village. Only 5 Jews were left in 1900. The author follows in detail
the fate of members of the community: a large number of them were called
Grumbach but also Schwob or Lehmann.

Pierre-Andre Meyer published a few years ago in our journal two long and very well
documented articles about the Aron family of Phalsbourg. Some genealogical
information by Aaron Worms (1754-1836), chief rabbi of Metz, about his ancestors
Aron Isaac and Elle Cahen, and the discovery of the tombstone of Ella Cahen in the
cemetery of Saverne let Pascal Faustini expose new elements about this couple who
had thousands of descendants.

The rabbi Abraham Bloch (1859-1914) is well known because he was the first rabbi
killed during the first World War while bringing a crucifix to an expiring
christian soldier. His grandparents are well known but his published genealogy
beyond that point is wrong, as shown by Pierre-Andre Meyer. The confusion is due to
the fact that three David Bloch were living in Uttenheim in 1784. Meyer finds which
one is the actual g-g-g-father of Abraham Bloch and is therefore able to draw the
genealogical tree until the beginning of the 18th century.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was puzzled by the numerous unions between her Blum ancestors
from Niederroedern (Bas-Rhin) and another Blum family >from Vorderweidenthal, in
Germany, not far >from the French border. She was able to build the family tree
which explains the connexions between these two families.

The family name Wertenschlag has a mysterious origin. Bernard Lyon-Caen quotes many
explanations and many spellings. Although most people bearing this name are
Alsatian, Lyon-Caen adds a post-scriptum : “In Wien around 1880 lived a Miss
Werthenschlag who had a wart on the chin and thick black eyebrows. She was the
headmistress of a small Jewish school which had among its pupils Martha, the future
Mrs Freud”.

Eliane Roos Schuhl had in hands a curious list. It is a list written in Hebrew
which gives the names of thirty one Jewish communities of Bas-Rhin and the amount
of money they have to pay for a common charity fund. It is not always easy to
recognize the actual name of the village since the Hebrew spelling is purely
phonetic. If Ditlenhem is clearly Duttlenheim, would you guess that Tibkhe is
Duppigheim ?The list has been written around 1800 by Rabbi Jacob aka Jeqel Meyer.
whose family history is also analyzed by the author.

At last, we find in this issue a short (only 5 pages) paper by Pierre-Andre Meyer
on "Judeo-Alsatian genealogy: the bases for a good start". These pages are an
extract of a 28-pages brochure which has just been published by the same author on
the Jewish genealogy in Alsace and in Lorraine. It gives an amazing list of
sources, both printed and numerical, to help the searcher in his quest. This
brochure is available for a modest price >from our office.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 118 of Genealo-J, journal of the French JGS #general

Georges Graner <georges.graner@...>
 

Genealo-J/, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 118, Summer 2014 has just been published.

This issue is entirely devoted to the Jews of Alsace.

Bernard Wils studies the community of Wittenheim, a small village of Haut-Rhin,
from which come several of his ancestors. The community grew >from 7 families and
22 people in 1751 to a maximum of 22 families and 78 people in 1808. Then it
declined slowly for economical reasons but the deathblow was given by the German
annexation of Alsace. A large proportion of the Jews chose the French citizenship
and left the village. Only 5 Jews were left in 1900. The author follows in detail
the fate of members of the community: a large number of them were called
Grumbach but also Schwob or Lehmann.

Pierre-Andre Meyer published a few years ago in our journal two long and very well
documented articles about the Aron family of Phalsbourg. Some genealogical
information by Aaron Worms (1754-1836), chief rabbi of Metz, about his ancestors
Aron Isaac and Elle Cahen, and the discovery of the tombstone of Ella Cahen in the
cemetery of Saverne let Pascal Faustini expose new elements about this couple who
had thousands of descendants.

The rabbi Abraham Bloch (1859-1914) is well known because he was the first rabbi
killed during the first World War while bringing a crucifix to an expiring
christian soldier. His grandparents are well known but his published genealogy
beyond that point is wrong, as shown by Pierre-Andre Meyer. The confusion is due to
the fact that three David Bloch were living in Uttenheim in 1784. Meyer finds which
one is the actual g-g-g-father of Abraham Bloch and is therefore able to draw the
genealogical tree until the beginning of the 18th century.

Anne-Marie Fribourg was puzzled by the numerous unions between her Blum ancestors
from Niederroedern (Bas-Rhin) and another Blum family >from Vorderweidenthal, in
Germany, not far >from the French border. She was able to build the family tree
which explains the connexions between these two families.

The family name Wertenschlag has a mysterious origin. Bernard Lyon-Caen quotes many
explanations and many spellings. Although most people bearing this name are
Alsatian, Lyon-Caen adds a post-scriptum : “In Wien around 1880 lived a Miss
Werthenschlag who had a wart on the chin and thick black eyebrows. She was the
headmistress of a small Jewish school which had among its pupils Martha, the future
Mrs Freud”.

Eliane Roos Schuhl had in hands a curious list. It is a list written in Hebrew
which gives the names of thirty one Jewish communities of Bas-Rhin and the amount
of money they have to pay for a common charity fund. It is not always easy to
recognize the actual name of the village since the Hebrew spelling is purely
phonetic. If Ditlenhem is clearly Duttlenheim, would you guess that Tibkhe is
Duppigheim ?The list has been written around 1800 by Rabbi Jacob aka Jeqel Meyer.
whose family history is also analyzed by the author.

At last, we find in this issue a short (only 5 pages) paper by Pierre-Andre Meyer
on "Judeo-Alsatian genealogy: the bases for a good start". These pages are an
extract of a 28-pages brochure which has just been published by the same author on
the Jewish genealogy in Alsace and in Lorraine. It gives an amazing list of
sources, both printed and numerical, to help the searcher in his quest. This
brochure is available for a modest price >from our office.

Georges Graner (Paris-France)


Findmypast Buys Mocavo; Origins.net #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The consolidation of genealogy website companies continues. Findmypast announced
they have purchased Mocavo. Findmypast is part of the DC Thomson Family History
company also known as Brightsolid Online Publishing in the US.

To read more about this new Findmypast acquisition go to:
http://blog.findmypast.com/2014/findmypast-buys-mocavo/
Earlier this month Findmypast also a purchased the UK and Irish genealogy website
Origins.net. Origins will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Findmypast and the
extensive record sets >from Origins will be brought into Findmypast over the next
few months. The Origins website will continue to run as usual.

To read more about this acquisition go to:
http://blog.findmypast.co.uk/2014/findmypast-buys-origins-net/

I have no relationship with Findmypast, Mocavo or Origins.net and post this solely
for the readers' information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Findmypast Buys Mocavo; Origins.net #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The consolidation of genealogy website companies continues. Findmypast announced
they have purchased Mocavo. Findmypast is part of the DC Thomson Family History
company also known as Brightsolid Online Publishing in the US.

To read more about this new Findmypast acquisition go to:
http://blog.findmypast.com/2014/findmypast-buys-mocavo/
Earlier this month Findmypast also a purchased the UK and Irish genealogy website
Origins.net. Origins will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Findmypast and the
extensive record sets >from Origins will be brought into Findmypast over the next
few months. The Origins website will continue to run as usual.

To read more about this acquisition go to:
http://blog.findmypast.co.uk/2014/findmypast-buys-origins-net/

I have no relationship with Findmypast, Mocavo or Origins.net and post this solely
for the readers' information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Schwartz/Czarny #general

Roberta Sheps
 

And in case there may be any of our members who don't know, they both mean Black in
English.

Roberta Sheps


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Schwartz/Czarny #general

Roberta Sheps
 

And in case there may be any of our members who don't know, they both mean Black in
English.

Roberta Sheps


last letter from Warsaw #general

George J. Fogelson
 

I am interviewing a Holocaust survivor Gerry Friedenfeld, son of Rudolf and
Henriette Friedenfeld nee Weinwurm and he said that the last letter >from his
parents was a card >from his mother with the return address "Warsaw, T-3." Does T-3
mean anything to anybody?

Also Terezin lists his mother's name as Jindka. Is this a form of Henrietta in
Czech?
Thanks,

George Fogelson
Lod Angeles
gjfogelson@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen last letter from Warsaw #general

George J. Fogelson
 

I am interviewing a Holocaust survivor Gerry Friedenfeld, son of Rudolf and
Henriette Friedenfeld nee Weinwurm and he said that the last letter >from his
parents was a card >from his mother with the return address "Warsaw, T-3." Does T-3
mean anything to anybody?

Also Terezin lists his mother's name as Jindka. Is this a form of Henrietta in
Czech?
Thanks,

George Fogelson
Lod Angeles
gjfogelson@aol.com

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