Date   

Frankfurter Allgemeine #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Can anyone advise me how to look at online copies of the _Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung_ for the second half of 1887, to find an obituary of my
ggggrandfather, Anselm UNGER / UNGAR, who died in August of that year?
Many thanks

Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@...


German SIG #Germany Frankfurter Allgemeine #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Can anyone advise me how to look at online copies of the _Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung_ for the second half of 1887, to find an obituary of my
ggggrandfather, Anselm UNGER / UNGAR, who died in August of that year?
Many thanks

Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@...


Draft Avoidance #lithuania

Wendy Freebourne <art@...>
 

Hello Researchers

I've just been looking at lists of draft avoiders in Lithuania in 1915.
I see that a great uncle (aged 60) and his 4 sons (aged 20s and 30s)
managed to avoid the draft.

Can anyone tell me how Jewish men managed to do this?

Many thanks

Wendy Freebourne
art@...
Researching: BRENER, INDIKH, RUBINSHTEIN, KAPLAN, Pakruojis


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Draft Avoidance #lithuania

Wendy Freebourne <art@...>
 

Hello Researchers

I've just been looking at lists of draft avoiders in Lithuania in 1915.
I see that a great uncle (aged 60) and his 4 sons (aged 20s and 30s)
managed to avoid the draft.

Can anyone tell me how Jewish men managed to do this?

Many thanks

Wendy Freebourne
art@...
Researching: BRENER, INDIKH, RUBINSHTEIN, KAPLAN, Pakruojis


Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dave:

Tell your friend that all of these names were originally in Germanic
languages - generally German or Yiddish. Funny things happen to
pronunciations when spelling (or, in the case of Yiddish,
transliteration for reading as German) is retained even in the
environment of a different language.

In modern German the 'ei' combination has the vowel sound you get in
"fine." The 'ie' combination has the sound you get in "seen."

Of course, both vowels and consonants change >from dialect to dialect and
also shift over time. Yiddish having evolved >from an earlier form of
German, the vowels don't exactly correspond even if the Yiddish word is
recognizably the same as the one in modern German. In some regions, the
sound in Yiddish that corresponds to the 'ei' of 'stein' sounds closer
to the one in 'brain'.

German has its dialects too. Up north (Low German) the 'st' at the
beginning of a syllable is pronounced as we have it in English: the
initial sound in 'stop.' Elsewhere (and in standard school German) it's
pronounced 'sht.'

The 'sht' pronunciation is evident in the transliteration of Jewish
names into languages other than German. In Polish, what we'd write as
STEIN is SZTAJN. Pronounce that Polish-style and it sounds like
"shtine." And >from Russian - well, think of the author Gary SHTEYNGART.

Accordingly, the "original" pronunciation of 'stein' is always (more or
less) 'shtine.'

The 'steen' version comes >from English-speaking people reading the
letters as though they'd always been in English. Which is why many
immigrants changed the spelling of their name when they got to a country
with a different language - to keep the sound, which mattered more to them.

But others were more interested in keeping the spelling...

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 8/23/2014 12:10 PM, David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@... wrote:
A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dave:

Tell your friend that all of these names were originally in Germanic
languages - generally German or Yiddish. Funny things happen to
pronunciations when spelling (or, in the case of Yiddish,
transliteration for reading as German) is retained even in the
environment of a different language.

In modern German the 'ei' combination has the vowel sound you get in
"fine." The 'ie' combination has the sound you get in "seen."

Of course, both vowels and consonants change >from dialect to dialect and
also shift over time. Yiddish having evolved >from an earlier form of
German, the vowels don't exactly correspond even if the Yiddish word is
recognizably the same as the one in modern German. In some regions, the
sound in Yiddish that corresponds to the 'ei' of 'stein' sounds closer
to the one in 'brain'.

German has its dialects too. Up north (Low German) the 'st' at the
beginning of a syllable is pronounced as we have it in English: the
initial sound in 'stop.' Elsewhere (and in standard school German) it's
pronounced 'sht.'

The 'sht' pronunciation is evident in the transliteration of Jewish
names into languages other than German. In Polish, what we'd write as
STEIN is SZTAJN. Pronounce that Polish-style and it sounds like
"shtine." And >from Russian - well, think of the author Gary SHTEYNGART.

Accordingly, the "original" pronunciation of 'stein' is always (more or
less) 'shtine.'

The 'steen' version comes >from English-speaking people reading the
letters as though they'd always been in English. Which is why many
immigrants changed the spelling of their name when they got to a country
with a different language - to keep the sound, which mattered more to them.

But others were more interested in keeping the spelling...

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 8/23/2014 12:10 PM, David Mayer Rafky dave15851585@... wrote:
A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


Re: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Sue Martin
 

The correct German pronunciation is 'shtine'.

Obviously, the American pronunciation is 's' rather than 'sh'.
'Stine' is definitely correct. I've also heard people say 'steen,'
but to my mind that's incorrect, or at least a mutation of the
correct/original pronunciation.

Sue Martin

- Original Message -
From: David Rafky
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 12:10pm
Subject: Pronounciation: "stein"

A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Pronounciation: "stein" #general

Sue Martin
 

The correct German pronunciation is 'shtine'.

Obviously, the American pronunciation is 's' rather than 'sh'.
'Stine' is definitely correct. I've also heard people say 'steen,'
but to my mind that's incorrect, or at least a mutation of the
correct/original pronunciation.

Sue Martin

- Original Message -
From: David Rafky
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 12:10pm
Subject: Pronounciation: "stein"

A gentile friend pointed out that some names ending in "stein" are
pronounced "stine" while others are pronounced "steen." What can
I tell him?


Researching PARADIES family in Prussia/Germany #germany

Jack L. Paradise <jlparadise@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group. My wife is an experienced genealogist. I
lean on her expertise. She has done extensive research over the years
trying to trace the PARADIES family line.

This is our initial connection with JewishGen.org. I live in Utah in
the United States. My native language is English. I also know Portuguese.
Although I do not speak German, I have a son who does.

I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in
using the Internet is intermediate. I have identified the names and
birth and death dates of my grandparents and my great grandparents.

My primary research goal now is to trace the PARADIES family line
beyond my great grandfather, John PARADIES (changed to Paradise), who
emigrated to the United States >from Prussia within a year or two of
1865. Perhaps he was Itzig PARADIES of Belgard, Preussen, who came
from Hamburg on the Teutonia, arriving in New York on June 2, 1865.
We do not know for sure. We have not found a John or Johan PARADIES
on a passenger list around 1865.

John PARADIES was born in Prussia on December 18, 1847. In all of the
documents we have found, he has not identified a place of birth (other
than Prussia or Germany). We do not know the names of his parents.
We believe his father may have been an officer in the Prussian army.
Although John is the name recorded on all US records we have, his
likely given name at birth would have been Johan -- or perhaps a
totally different name.

I have recently done DNA testing which indicates I have a high
likelihood of Ashkenazi Levite genes through the PARADIES lineage.

My JGFF Researcher ID number is 646900.

Jack Paradise, Cottonwood Heights, Utah JLParadise@...

Moderator Note - WELCOME to GerSIG and thanks for your good INTRO
message. We sent YOU an INTRO letter too. It urged you to search
the GerSIG archives for the family names and towns of special interest
to you. GerSIG has a long time member with your rather unusual family
name. Check her GerSIG messages and think about writing to her.
Good luck - GerSIG Moderator


German SIG #Germany Researching PARADIES family in Prussia/Germany #germany

Jack L. Paradise <jlparadise@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group. My wife is an experienced genealogist. I
lean on her expertise. She has done extensive research over the years
trying to trace the PARADIES family line.

This is our initial connection with JewishGen.org. I live in Utah in
the United States. My native language is English. I also know Portuguese.
Although I do not speak German, I have a son who does.

I consider myself intermediate in using a computer. My experience in
using the Internet is intermediate. I have identified the names and
birth and death dates of my grandparents and my great grandparents.

My primary research goal now is to trace the PARADIES family line
beyond my great grandfather, John PARADIES (changed to Paradise), who
emigrated to the United States >from Prussia within a year or two of
1865. Perhaps he was Itzig PARADIES of Belgard, Preussen, who came
from Hamburg on the Teutonia, arriving in New York on June 2, 1865.
We do not know for sure. We have not found a John or Johan PARADIES
on a passenger list around 1865.

John PARADIES was born in Prussia on December 18, 1847. In all of the
documents we have found, he has not identified a place of birth (other
than Prussia or Germany). We do not know the names of his parents.
We believe his father may have been an officer in the Prussian army.
Although John is the name recorded on all US records we have, his
likely given name at birth would have been Johan -- or perhaps a
totally different name.

I have recently done DNA testing which indicates I have a high
likelihood of Ashkenazi Levite genes through the PARADIES lineage.

My JGFF Researcher ID number is 646900.

Jack Paradise, Cottonwood Heights, Utah JLParadise@...

Moderator Note - WELCOME to GerSIG and thanks for your good INTRO
message. We sent YOU an INTRO letter too. It urged you to search
the GerSIG archives for the family names and towns of special interest
to you. GerSIG has a long time member with your rather unusual family
name. Check her GerSIG messages and think about writing to her.
Good luck - GerSIG Moderator


A new and fantastic resource for researchers #hungary

tom.venetia@...
 

Friends,
Recently I stumbled into a fantastic site: cintoriny.sk
http://www.cintoriny.sk/src/index.php?lan=en
You will find there a search engine for hundreds of cemeteries in Slovakia
(not only Jewish), returning a wealth of data about interred people,
including photos of graves.
In most cases one will also find a detailed map of the graves' layout,
numbering and alleys.
Furthermore, the search allows truncated words/names, such as "vene" for
Venetianer which of course returns all Venetianers but also other surnames
starting with "vene."
The site can be accessed in five languages: Slovak, Czech, Hungarian,
English and German.
The search mechanism ignores accented characters but finds and lists them.
So, for instance, "Muller" returns all Mu:llers. Janos will return Ja'nos,
etc.
This place is still in development and growing every day.
Sadly, Kosice is missing, but the explanation may be that this city has two
huge cemeteries so it is taking some time to have all graves
survayes/photographed/recorded.
Definitively worth of a visit :-)
Regards
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary A new and fantastic resource for researchers #hungary

tom.venetia@...
 

Friends,
Recently I stumbled into a fantastic site: cintoriny.sk
http://www.cintoriny.sk/src/index.php?lan=en
You will find there a search engine for hundreds of cemeteries in Slovakia
(not only Jewish), returning a wealth of data about interred people,
including photos of graves.
In most cases one will also find a detailed map of the graves' layout,
numbering and alleys.
Furthermore, the search allows truncated words/names, such as "vene" for
Venetianer which of course returns all Venetianers but also other surnames
starting with "vene."
The site can be accessed in five languages: Slovak, Czech, Hungarian,
English and German.
The search mechanism ignores accented characters but finds and lists them.
So, for instance, "Muller" returns all Mu:llers. Janos will return Ja'nos,
etc.
This place is still in development and growing every day.
Sadly, Kosice is missing, but the explanation may be that this city has two
huge cemeteries so it is taking some time to have all graves
survayes/photographed/recorded.
Definitively worth of a visit :-)
Regards
Tom


Accented Characters - one more suggestion #hungary

Margarita Lacko
 

There is one problem with the system Tom proposes.

If someone does a search for the place Abaujszanto in the H-SIG mailing
list, he/she will miss the messages that contain abau'jsza'nto'.

We all agree that diacritics are important in the Hungarian language.
Although I have no problem with accented characters, maybe we should write
the word twice - one without accents and another one in parenthesis with
diacritics or adding them after the vowels, like Tom proposes (so that
people know that the word does have accents and will be able to do a correct
Internet search).

Just an idea,
Margarita Lacko'

(Tom, the word is "rega'le'-be'rlo:")

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@...]
Sent: Thursday, 21 August, 2014 11:00 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Re: translation to English

pending "future announcements", it's better to understand that no matter
what it looks like on your screen, accents will not display properly on
everybody else's screens.

despite the fact that accents are a critical part of the hungarian language,
changing not only the pronunciation but also the meaning of words, it's
still preferable to remove the accents when posting to jewishgen's list
server, because the list server changes most of them to weird characters
which are not related to the original. it's better to at least know the
letter and guess the accent, than have to guess the whole letter, especially
in proper nouns, and with words out of context. (a recent posting referred
to "reg*lE-bErl^" - although i found the message interesting, i still
haven't figured out what the word was supposed to be.)

the simplest approach is to leave them off, but if that's a problem, then it
is possible to represent the accents with standard, non-accented characters.
(and i have posted this suggestion a couple of times before.) putting the
accents after the letter, as in a' or u", is slightly more difficult to
read, and is a bit tedious to enter, but you get used to it, and it works.
especially if you want to distinguish between bor kereskedo" and bo"r
kereskedo", etc.


....... tom klein, toronto

vkahn@... wrote:

The problem with accented fonts is that our current server sometimes
has problems reading them. When that happens, results are illegible to
to readers. We are looking forward to improvements in the near
future. Watch for announcements.

Vivian Kahn


Hungary SIG #Hungary Accented Characters - one more suggestion #hungary

Margarita Lacko
 

There is one problem with the system Tom proposes.

If someone does a search for the place Abaujszanto in the H-SIG mailing
list, he/she will miss the messages that contain abau'jsza'nto'.

We all agree that diacritics are important in the Hungarian language.
Although I have no problem with accented characters, maybe we should write
the word twice - one without accents and another one in parenthesis with
diacritics or adding them after the vowels, like Tom proposes (so that
people know that the word does have accents and will be able to do a correct
Internet search).

Just an idea,
Margarita Lacko'

(Tom, the word is "rega'le'-be'rlo:")

-----Original Message-----
From: H-SIG [mailto:h-sig@...]
Sent: Thursday, 21 August, 2014 11:00 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Re: translation to English

pending "future announcements", it's better to understand that no matter
what it looks like on your screen, accents will not display properly on
everybody else's screens.

despite the fact that accents are a critical part of the hungarian language,
changing not only the pronunciation but also the meaning of words, it's
still preferable to remove the accents when posting to jewishgen's list
server, because the list server changes most of them to weird characters
which are not related to the original. it's better to at least know the
letter and guess the accent, than have to guess the whole letter, especially
in proper nouns, and with words out of context. (a recent posting referred
to "reg*lE-bErl^" - although i found the message interesting, i still
haven't figured out what the word was supposed to be.)

the simplest approach is to leave them off, but if that's a problem, then it
is possible to represent the accents with standard, non-accented characters.
(and i have posted this suggestion a couple of times before.) putting the
accents after the letter, as in a' or u", is slightly more difficult to
read, and is a bit tedious to enter, but you get used to it, and it works.
especially if you want to distinguish between bor kereskedo" and bo"r
kereskedo", etc.


....... tom klein, toronto

vkahn@... wrote:

The problem with accented fonts is that our current server sometimes
has problems reading them. When that happens, results are illegible to
to readers. We are looking forward to improvements in the near
future. Watch for announcements.

Vivian Kahn


Are you planing a cemetery trip? #general

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...>
 

If you are planning to visit a cemetery soon and you have a smart phone
(iPhone or Android) I will suggest you to use the BillionGraves app to
take as many pictures as you can.

But first you need to:
1.- Register using this special URL http://billiongraves.com/myheritage
2.- Place the word JOWBR in your user name (i.e. DanHo_JOWBR)
3.- Download the application into your phone and start taking pictures.

This will assure all the images and the transcription will be donated
to JewishGen JOWBR project.

If you need help or more information do not hesitate to contact me privately.

Daniel Horowitz
Daniel@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Are you planing a cemetery trip? #general

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...>
 

If you are planning to visit a cemetery soon and you have a smart phone
(iPhone or Android) I will suggest you to use the BillionGraves app to
take as many pictures as you can.

But first you need to:
1.- Register using this special URL http://billiongraves.com/myheritage
2.- Place the word JOWBR in your user name (i.e. DanHo_JOWBR)
3.- Download the application into your phone and start taking pictures.

This will assure all the images and the transcription will be donated
to JewishGen JOWBR project.

If you need help or more information do not hesitate to contact me privately.

Daniel Horowitz
Daniel@...


Cemetery visit: Newark , NJ - Union Field #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

Hi,

My ggg-grandfather's sister-in-law (or aunt) and her son,
daughter-in-law and two grandsons (SZUSZHOLCS/SIESHOLTZ, ROEDER and
RUBOVITZ - born in what is now eastern Slovakia) are buried at Union
Field in Newark. In addition, some family members of a current neighbour
(RIEGELHAUPT) of my mother are buried a short distance away in the same
cemetery. All these graves date >from about 1920 to 1940.

Union Field is located at 532 South Orange Avenue in Newark between 19th
St and Grove St., east of the Garden State Parkway and south of 280
(exit 13).

The cemetery seems to be in okay condition, though dormant, with an open
gate.

Please write me privately if you can visit and take photos of these
seven graves.

Thanks!

Todd Edelman
near Los Angeles
edelman@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery visit: Newark , NJ - Union Field #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

Hi,

My ggg-grandfather's sister-in-law (or aunt) and her son,
daughter-in-law and two grandsons (SZUSZHOLCS/SIESHOLTZ, ROEDER and
RUBOVITZ - born in what is now eastern Slovakia) are buried at Union
Field in Newark. In addition, some family members of a current neighbour
(RIEGELHAUPT) of my mother are buried a short distance away in the same
cemetery. All these graves date >from about 1920 to 1940.

Union Field is located at 532 South Orange Avenue in Newark between 19th
St and Grove St., east of the Garden State Parkway and south of 280
(exit 13).

The cemetery seems to be in okay condition, though dormant, with an open
gate.

Please write me privately if you can visit and take photos of these
seven graves.

Thanks!

Todd Edelman
near Los Angeles
edelman@...


Re: Cemetary Visit, West Roxbury, MA - Jewish Cemetery Lookup for Massachusetts #general

Bill Rubin <brubin@...>
 

I could probably head over to the cemetery, but there may be an easier
way for you to find out for yourself. The Jewish Cemetery Association of
Massachusetts (JCAM ~ jcam.org) offers a Genealogical Service.

So go to: http://www.jcam.org/Pages/Services/Search/search.php and type
in the name of the person you are looking for. Congregation Beth Israel
is one of the many cemeteries under JCAM's care.

Please make sure you donate to support this service JCAM provides.

Thanks,

Bill Rubin
Arlington, MA

RUBINCHIK, NISHNEVITZ, KOOSHUK, POLISHUK - Seliba, Igumen, Puchowitzi,
Belarus, Eishishok - SCHRIBER, FINESCHRIBER, SKOLNICK Lida -
[K]CHIGOROVICH, FURMAN, HOROWITZ, SCHRIBER, SKOLNICK, WOLCHUCK
Vasilishki, Zeludock - KOSHINEVSKY/KOSCHETZINEVSKY, CHIGOROVICH
MYERS – London, Liverpool; LESSOR - New York City, St.Louis, southern states
ROSEBERG - New York; St. Louis; Louisville; LITMAN - Kiev, Ukraine

---

Subject: Cemetary Visit, West Roxbury, MA
From: Rachel S Goodman <rgoodman108@...>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:10:53 -0500

... Does anyone live near enough to the Congregation Beth Israel Cemetery
on Center Street in West Roxbury to go by and let me know the father's
name on a grave stone? ...
Rachel Goodman
Iowa, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cemetary Visit, West Roxbury, MA - Jewish Cemetery Lookup for Massachusetts #general

Bill Rubin <brubin@...>
 

I could probably head over to the cemetery, but there may be an easier
way for you to find out for yourself. The Jewish Cemetery Association of
Massachusetts (JCAM ~ jcam.org) offers a Genealogical Service.

So go to: http://www.jcam.org/Pages/Services/Search/search.php and type
in the name of the person you are looking for. Congregation Beth Israel
is one of the many cemeteries under JCAM's care.

Please make sure you donate to support this service JCAM provides.

Thanks,

Bill Rubin
Arlington, MA

RUBINCHIK, NISHNEVITZ, KOOSHUK, POLISHUK - Seliba, Igumen, Puchowitzi,
Belarus, Eishishok - SCHRIBER, FINESCHRIBER, SKOLNICK Lida -
[K]CHIGOROVICH, FURMAN, HOROWITZ, SCHRIBER, SKOLNICK, WOLCHUCK
Vasilishki, Zeludock - KOSHINEVSKY/KOSCHETZINEVSKY, CHIGOROVICH
MYERS – London, Liverpool; LESSOR - New York City, St.Louis, southern states
ROSEBERG - New York; St. Louis; Louisville; LITMAN - Kiev, Ukraine

---

Subject: Cemetary Visit, West Roxbury, MA
From: Rachel S Goodman <rgoodman108@...>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 15:10:53 -0500

... Does anyone live near enough to the Congregation Beth Israel Cemetery
on Center Street in West Roxbury to go by and let me know the father's
name on a grave stone? ...
Rachel Goodman
Iowa, USA

117861 - 117880 of 670656