Date   

Bacau: GALITZAN(U)variants, AARONSOHN, BLIEMAN variants #romania

B McNamara <tngenewhiz@...>
 

Greetings >from East Tennessee, USA

I spent most of this past Chanukkah with friends who shared what
little they knew of their family history with me. Being a long-time
and rabid genealogist, I decided to try to locate more information.

I have a little experience with Romanian research -- my husband's
family is ethnically Hungarian, placed in Romania by the Treaty of
Trianon. But, Eastern Romania is new to me.

My experience with Jewish research is also limited. Nonetheless, I
have persevered.

My friends' grandfather arrived at Ellis Island in 1905. The family's
surname on the manifest is GALASIAN. When they settled in Detroit,
they became GARRISON

I have learned their grandfather was related -- possibly a nephew --
to Malka Galatzanu AARONSOHN, wife of Efraim, who were among the
pioneers >from Bacau who settled at Zichron Ya'acov (now Israel) in
1882. The AARONSOHN family is well-documented after their arrival in
Palestine. My interest is in Malka.

A typescript history of the AARONSOHN family in Palestine says Malka
was the daughter of Esther Gittel EFRATI and Rabbi Shmuel GALATZANU,
who was a native of Berdichev, Russia (now Ukraine).

Rose (Raisa?) GALASIAN, my friends' great-grandmother, was a widow
when she and her children arrived at Ellis Island. Family legend says
she was the second wife. Her husband was listed as Hyman. They
surname was spelled GALITZEN, GALITZEAN, GALATZENU, etc., on various
family documents.

Rose's death certificate gives her maiden name as BLIEMAN. That is
all we have about her.

And that is all I have determined thus far.

I'm sharing the details here in case someone might be familiar with
these surnames now or discover this post in future in the list
archives.

Also, I'd be extremely grateful for suggestions on how to probe
further into Jewish records >from Bacau that might contain information
about the GALASIAN/GALITZEN family.

(Ms.) Billie McNamara
Knoxville, TN, USA


Romania SIG #Romania Bacau: GALITZAN(U)variants, AARONSOHN, BLIEMAN variants #romania

B McNamara <tngenewhiz@...>
 

Greetings >from East Tennessee, USA

I spent most of this past Chanukkah with friends who shared what
little they knew of their family history with me. Being a long-time
and rabid genealogist, I decided to try to locate more information.

I have a little experience with Romanian research -- my husband's
family is ethnically Hungarian, placed in Romania by the Treaty of
Trianon. But, Eastern Romania is new to me.

My experience with Jewish research is also limited. Nonetheless, I
have persevered.

My friends' grandfather arrived at Ellis Island in 1905. The family's
surname on the manifest is GALASIAN. When they settled in Detroit,
they became GARRISON

I have learned their grandfather was related -- possibly a nephew --
to Malka Galatzanu AARONSOHN, wife of Efraim, who were among the
pioneers >from Bacau who settled at Zichron Ya'acov (now Israel) in
1882. The AARONSOHN family is well-documented after their arrival in
Palestine. My interest is in Malka.

A typescript history of the AARONSOHN family in Palestine says Malka
was the daughter of Esther Gittel EFRATI and Rabbi Shmuel GALATZANU,
who was a native of Berdichev, Russia (now Ukraine).

Rose (Raisa?) GALASIAN, my friends' great-grandmother, was a widow
when she and her children arrived at Ellis Island. Family legend says
she was the second wife. Her husband was listed as Hyman. They
surname was spelled GALITZEN, GALITZEAN, GALATZENU, etc., on various
family documents.

Rose's death certificate gives her maiden name as BLIEMAN. That is
all we have about her.

And that is all I have determined thus far.

I'm sharing the details here in case someone might be familiar with
these surnames now or discover this post in future in the list
archives.

Also, I'd be extremely grateful for suggestions on how to probe
further into Jewish records >from Bacau that might contain information
about the GALASIAN/GALITZEN family.

(Ms.) Billie McNamara
Knoxville, TN, USA


Viewmate translation request - German #general

Linda Berkowitz <lindaberkowitz@...>
 

I've posted vital records in German for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37484

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37494

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37496

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37500

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37501

The first request is >from a page of the Familianten Book of Dub,
Bohemia for the FANTEL family.

The next four requests all all relate to the MANNHEIM family
registration of Abraham MAIER and family.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Linda Berkowitz
Deerfield, IL

MODERATOR: Other family names mentioned in Linda's documents
include RHEINHEIMER, SCHLAGENHAUF, and HOCHGESCHWENDER.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation request - German #general

Linda Berkowitz <lindaberkowitz@...>
 

I've posted vital records in German for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37484

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37494

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37496

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37500

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37501

The first request is >from a page of the Familianten Book of Dub,
Bohemia for the FANTEL family.

The next four requests all all relate to the MANNHEIM family
registration of Abraham MAIER and family.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Linda Berkowitz
Deerfield, IL

MODERATOR: Other family names mentioned in Linda's documents
include RHEINHEIMER, SCHLAGENHAUF, and HOCHGESCHWENDER.


LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you H-sig and JewishGen #hungary

cia@...
 

What an incredible story, Tom. Thank you for sharing it. It gives hope =
to those struggling with abandoned cemetery issues elsewhere in Europe.
It also leaves me with a question of how to give recognition to people =
like Miki described in the post and others, one of whom I described in =
an earlier post who is located in Backa Topola, Serbia.

Catherine Adam
Toronto, Canada
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you, H-SIG and JewishGen, for a =
breakthrough year!
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 23:59:56 -0800
Subject: LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you, H-SIG and JewishGen, for a breakthrough year!
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 23:59:56 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I owe a big debt of gratitude to JewishGen and H-SIG for a major
breakthrough I had this past year. For the longest time, I never knew where
my great-grandparents came from. They met and married in New York in 1892,
both having immigrated a few years earlier >from different unknown places.
Their documents in America told vague and conflicting stories.
For my great-grandmother, Betty LITTMAN, some records said Hungary, some Austria,
some Bohemia. Nobody in the surviving family really knew. I searched all I
could, but everything was a dead end trying to pin down where they were from
exactly. Then early last year, mindful that new records are always being
added, I tried the JewishGen databases once again. Suddenly, I got a hit on
the 1869 Hungary census. I found a family record that was a certain match.
My great-grandmother's age was off by several years, but the parents names
(which I had >from her New York marriage certificate) along with some
siblings that I knew of all lined up perfectly so there was no doubt. Then,
as happens with breakthroughs, one thing leads to another, and all of the
JewishGen resources worked together to make this breakthrough even more
amazing.
Focusing on the Hungary databases, and learning more about the
family, I was able to find some vital records. Most importantly, the census
record gave me a town: Spisske Podhradie, in the Spis region of what is now
northeastern Slovakia, but what was then Hungary. Turning to the
Kehilalinks, I found great information about the Spis region. I learned that
though in Hungary, it was primarily settled by Germans, and German was the
prevalent language. This jibed, as my family was very certain that my
great-grandparents had spoked German and not Yiddish. The KehilaLinks,
particularly the one for Huncovce, where my great-grandmother and her
sister's births were recorded, lead me to contact its author, Madeleine
Isenberg. What a jackpot that was!
I learned that Madeleine, an Orthodox Jew living in the Los Angeles area, together
with Mikulas "Miki" Liptak, an
Evangelical Christian living in Kezmarok, had taken on an ambitious project
of systematically documenting all of the Jewish cemeteries in the Spis
region. Miki would locate the cemeteries, mostly in neglected, overgrown,
and sometimes even vandalized state, survey and map them, and carefully
catalog and photograph all of the gravestones. He sent the information to
Madeleine who would decipher and transcribe the faded Hebrew inscriptions.
Thanks to their Herculean efforts, when I contacted Madeleine, she was able
to tell me where Betty LITTMAN's parents were buried, and send me
photographs of the stones! The stones were beautiful, and very lucky for me,
both still intact and reasonably legible. The stone of Betty's father, David
LITTMAN, was particularly elaborate, including a poetic description of his
characteristics. While trying to decipher the poem, I had a sudden
realization that it was an acrostic, with the first letter of each line when
read down spelling out his Hebrew name, Isser David!

Serendipity had a few more cards to play for me last year. As it turned out,
I made this discovery in February, and we had just decided the previous
month that we would take a vacation in the fall to explore Budapest and
Prague. I had booked flights, but no other plans were made. A visit to the
Spis region was workable into our itinerary, and turned out to be a
highlight of the trip. Aside >from my ancestral connection, it turns out to
be quite a beautiful and interesting region to visit, including not only a
large 12th century castle, some well-preserved medieval walled towns, and,
in my ancestral town, one of the few still extant synagogue buildings in
Slovakia! We made arrangements to meet with Miki, the local researcher, who
spent a whole day taking us all around.
We started with the synagogue in
Spisske Podhradie, abandoned for decades but being restored in recent years.
There is still work to be done, but it is looking good. Miki knew who to
contact to let us in. The synagogue was originally built in 1875, and though
rebuilt after a fire in 1905, this is essentially the synagogue that my
great-great-grandparents would have attended. It was an awesome feeling to
walk in the very place where they once walked. In conversation with the
local guy who let us in to the synagogue, we had yet another breakthrough.
On the census record, my ancestors were registered in the town of Spisska
Kapitula (an ecclesiastical town immediately adjacent to Spisske Podhradie),
but refered to a place called Ribnicsek. That same place was referenced on
some of the birth records I found as well, including Betty's. But I could
not find it on any map or database, and Miki did not know it. But it turns
out that the local guy did! It was the name of a farmstead just outside the
town limit. With this information, we were able to drive to the very place
they lived, along the road where they would have made the 15-minute walk
into town to the synagogue. Finally, after Miki picked up a different key
from someone else, we went to visit the cemetery, a few miles outside of
town, down a bumpy dirt road. It is protected by a sturdy wall, with a gate
passing through a small chevra kadisha room to enter the cemetery. Today, a
volunteer >from the town keeps the weeds moderately in check, but it is a
small forest and there are probably trees grown now that weren't originally
there. The stones are in widely varying condition, some still intact and
legible, some chipped, crack, and worn, and some broken or toppled. >from the
photographs and Miki's map, we knew what we were looking for, and found my
ancestors' stones without much trouble. We weren't entirely sure what we'd
find, as the photos that Madeleine had were taken many years ago and things
can deteriorate quickly. Fortunately, my LITTMAN stones remain in good
condition. We admired the inscriptions on each, and I said a Kaddish. As I
looked around the cemetery, I realized how daunting it would have been to
hunt for these stones if I didn't know what they looked like or wasn't even
sure they were there, and my already-great gratitude for the work that Miki
and Madeleine had done grew even more. Later in the day, we went up to the
castle ruins on the hill above the town, where we had a sweeping view of the
town. In one panorama I took in where my ancestors lived, where they prayed,
and where they were buried. It was an awesome thing to see all this, and to
ponder what life was like for this Jewish community of 200, in this town of
3000, in the mid-1800s. What a fantastic experience to make this connection,
and to stand in that place where my ancestors lived.

So, to all the people of JewishGen and H-SIG who helped make this possible:
thank you, thank you, thank you!

If anyone is interested to see photos >from our trip, you're welcome to view
them at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tomchatt/sets/72157649367270635/

Best regards,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA

Moderator: A donation to the Hungarian SIG General Fund is always a good way to show
your appreciation and might also provide future benefits if it helps us to acquire
yet more records to help further your research.


Hungary SIG #Hungary LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you H-sig and JewishGen #hungary

cia@...
 

What an incredible story, Tom. Thank you for sharing it. It gives hope =
to those struggling with abandoned cemetery issues elsewhere in Europe.
It also leaves me with a question of how to give recognition to people =
like Miki described in the post and others, one of whom I described in =
an earlier post who is located in Backa Topola, Serbia.

Catherine Adam
Toronto, Canada
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you, H-SIG and JewishGen, for a =
breakthrough year!
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 23:59:56 -0800
Subject: LITTMAN in the Spis: Thank you, H-SIG and JewishGen, for a breakthrough year!
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 8 Jan 2015 23:59:56 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I owe a big debt of gratitude to JewishGen and H-SIG for a major
breakthrough I had this past year. For the longest time, I never knew where
my great-grandparents came from. They met and married in New York in 1892,
both having immigrated a few years earlier >from different unknown places.
Their documents in America told vague and conflicting stories.
For my great-grandmother, Betty LITTMAN, some records said Hungary, some Austria,
some Bohemia. Nobody in the surviving family really knew. I searched all I
could, but everything was a dead end trying to pin down where they were from
exactly. Then early last year, mindful that new records are always being
added, I tried the JewishGen databases once again. Suddenly, I got a hit on
the 1869 Hungary census. I found a family record that was a certain match.
My great-grandmother's age was off by several years, but the parents names
(which I had >from her New York marriage certificate) along with some
siblings that I knew of all lined up perfectly so there was no doubt. Then,
as happens with breakthroughs, one thing leads to another, and all of the
JewishGen resources worked together to make this breakthrough even more
amazing.
Focusing on the Hungary databases, and learning more about the
family, I was able to find some vital records. Most importantly, the census
record gave me a town: Spisske Podhradie, in the Spis region of what is now
northeastern Slovakia, but what was then Hungary. Turning to the
Kehilalinks, I found great information about the Spis region. I learned that
though in Hungary, it was primarily settled by Germans, and German was the
prevalent language. This jibed, as my family was very certain that my
great-grandparents had spoked German and not Yiddish. The KehilaLinks,
particularly the one for Huncovce, where my great-grandmother and her
sister's births were recorded, lead me to contact its author, Madeleine
Isenberg. What a jackpot that was!
I learned that Madeleine, an Orthodox Jew living in the Los Angeles area, together
with Mikulas "Miki" Liptak, an
Evangelical Christian living in Kezmarok, had taken on an ambitious project
of systematically documenting all of the Jewish cemeteries in the Spis
region. Miki would locate the cemeteries, mostly in neglected, overgrown,
and sometimes even vandalized state, survey and map them, and carefully
catalog and photograph all of the gravestones. He sent the information to
Madeleine who would decipher and transcribe the faded Hebrew inscriptions.
Thanks to their Herculean efforts, when I contacted Madeleine, she was able
to tell me where Betty LITTMAN's parents were buried, and send me
photographs of the stones! The stones were beautiful, and very lucky for me,
both still intact and reasonably legible. The stone of Betty's father, David
LITTMAN, was particularly elaborate, including a poetic description of his
characteristics. While trying to decipher the poem, I had a sudden
realization that it was an acrostic, with the first letter of each line when
read down spelling out his Hebrew name, Isser David!

Serendipity had a few more cards to play for me last year. As it turned out,
I made this discovery in February, and we had just decided the previous
month that we would take a vacation in the fall to explore Budapest and
Prague. I had booked flights, but no other plans were made. A visit to the
Spis region was workable into our itinerary, and turned out to be a
highlight of the trip. Aside >from my ancestral connection, it turns out to
be quite a beautiful and interesting region to visit, including not only a
large 12th century castle, some well-preserved medieval walled towns, and,
in my ancestral town, one of the few still extant synagogue buildings in
Slovakia! We made arrangements to meet with Miki, the local researcher, who
spent a whole day taking us all around.
We started with the synagogue in
Spisske Podhradie, abandoned for decades but being restored in recent years.
There is still work to be done, but it is looking good. Miki knew who to
contact to let us in. The synagogue was originally built in 1875, and though
rebuilt after a fire in 1905, this is essentially the synagogue that my
great-great-grandparents would have attended. It was an awesome feeling to
walk in the very place where they once walked. In conversation with the
local guy who let us in to the synagogue, we had yet another breakthrough.
On the census record, my ancestors were registered in the town of Spisska
Kapitula (an ecclesiastical town immediately adjacent to Spisske Podhradie),
but refered to a place called Ribnicsek. That same place was referenced on
some of the birth records I found as well, including Betty's. But I could
not find it on any map or database, and Miki did not know it. But it turns
out that the local guy did! It was the name of a farmstead just outside the
town limit. With this information, we were able to drive to the very place
they lived, along the road where they would have made the 15-minute walk
into town to the synagogue. Finally, after Miki picked up a different key
from someone else, we went to visit the cemetery, a few miles outside of
town, down a bumpy dirt road. It is protected by a sturdy wall, with a gate
passing through a small chevra kadisha room to enter the cemetery. Today, a
volunteer >from the town keeps the weeds moderately in check, but it is a
small forest and there are probably trees grown now that weren't originally
there. The stones are in widely varying condition, some still intact and
legible, some chipped, crack, and worn, and some broken or toppled. >from the
photographs and Miki's map, we knew what we were looking for, and found my
ancestors' stones without much trouble. We weren't entirely sure what we'd
find, as the photos that Madeleine had were taken many years ago and things
can deteriorate quickly. Fortunately, my LITTMAN stones remain in good
condition. We admired the inscriptions on each, and I said a Kaddish. As I
looked around the cemetery, I realized how daunting it would have been to
hunt for these stones if I didn't know what they looked like or wasn't even
sure they were there, and my already-great gratitude for the work that Miki
and Madeleine had done grew even more. Later in the day, we went up to the
castle ruins on the hill above the town, where we had a sweeping view of the
town. In one panorama I took in where my ancestors lived, where they prayed,
and where they were buried. It was an awesome thing to see all this, and to
ponder what life was like for this Jewish community of 200, in this town of
3000, in the mid-1800s. What a fantastic experience to make this connection,
and to stand in that place where my ancestors lived.

So, to all the people of JewishGen and H-SIG who helped make this possible:
thank you, thank you, thank you!

If anyone is interested to see photos >from our trip, you're welcome to view
them at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tomchatt/sets/72157649367270635/

Best regards,
Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA

Moderator: A donation to the Hungarian SIG General Fund is always a good way to show
your appreciation and might also provide future benefits if it helps us to acquire
yet more records to help further your research.


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish (First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association) #general

Emily Garber
 

I've posted Yiddish text >from the 25th anniversary publication of the
First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association - a landsmanshaft
organization in New York City - for which I need a translation. I
believe this may be a congratulatory message >from the women's
auxiliary. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37440

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Yiddish (First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association) #general

Emily Garber
 

I've posted Yiddish text >from the 25th anniversary publication of the
First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association - a landsmanshaft
organization in New York City - for which I need a translation. I
believe this may be a congratulatory message >from the women's
auxiliary. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37440

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/yurovshchina/index.html


Viewmate translation request - Polish #poland

RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
 

I've posted a page >from a Polish book of residents for which I need
a translation nto English. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37492

Specifically, I'm interested in the first two comments in the far
right-hand column under the heading "Uwaga." (I don't need the other
two comments translated.)

What has me completely nonplussed is the the first comment, the first
word of which begins with "wykres" (or maybe "wykras"). The remarks
seem to pertain to a report or judgment by the municipal offices
in another city.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Any help will be appreciated.

Thank you very much.

Naidia Woolf
ruthnw@comcast.net
San Francisco, CA USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

RESEARCHING: (partial list)
DROZDIASZ (or variants): Otwock, Karczew, Poland
KUJAWSKI: Kalisz/Lodz, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants): Otwock/Karczew, Poland
GRINBERG/GRUNBERG: Poland (town unknown)
ISAACS, Solomon and Sarah: Mlawa, Poland/Birmingham, England.
Original Polish surname unknown.
SUMMERS/WINTER: Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Kalisz, Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate translation request - Polish #poland

RuthNW <ruthnw@...>
 

I've posted a page >from a Polish book of residents for which I need
a translation nto English. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37492

Specifically, I'm interested in the first two comments in the far
right-hand column under the heading "Uwaga." (I don't need the other
two comments translated.)

What has me completely nonplussed is the the first comment, the first
word of which begins with "wykres" (or maybe "wykras"). The remarks
seem to pertain to a report or judgment by the municipal offices
in another city.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Any help will be appreciated.

Thank you very much.

Naidia Woolf
ruthnw@comcast.net
San Francisco, CA USA
Formerly of Birmingham, England

RESEARCHING: (partial list)
DROZDIASZ (or variants): Otwock, Karczew, Poland
KUJAWSKI: Kalisz/Lodz, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants): Otwock/Karczew, Poland
GRINBERG/GRUNBERG: Poland (town unknown)
ISAACS, Solomon and Sarah: Mlawa, Poland/Birmingham, England.
Original Polish surname unknown.
SUMMERS/WINTER: Paterson, New Jersey, USA; Kalisz, Poland


Re: Translation Request Polish Marriage Warsaw #poland

Sarah L Meyer
 

I have posted a marriage record on Viewmate for a marriage between Lewek
ANKIER and Lea STOKFISZ. I would appreciate as complete a translation as
possible, with special attention to all names and relationships. It is on
Viewmate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37493 .

Please reply using the Viewmate form.

Thank you all.
Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown TX 78633


Translations Russian Warsaw Marriages #poland

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Genners,
I have posted three marriage records in Russian for which I would
appreciate a translation. All three are >from Warsaw Poland. They are
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37497
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37499

Please respond using the Viewmate form. Thank you very much.

Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown, TX


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Translation Request Polish Marriage Warsaw #poland

Sarah L Meyer
 

I have posted a marriage record on Viewmate for a marriage between Lewek
ANKIER and Lea STOKFISZ. I would appreciate as complete a translation as
possible, with special attention to all names and relationships. It is on
Viewmate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37493 .

Please reply using the Viewmate form.

Thank you all.
Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown TX 78633


JRI Poland #Poland Translations Russian Warsaw Marriages #poland

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Genners,
I have posted three marriage records in Russian for which I would
appreciate a translation. All three are >from Warsaw Poland. They are
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37497
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37499

Please respond using the Viewmate form. Thank you very much.

Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen
Georgetown, TX


explanation of Polish death record, Parczew, 1836 #poland

Tim Homewood
 

Dear all, thank you to those who helped me with my previous question
about the place of birth for my ancestor, Lewis Jacobs. Please feel free
to add any more suggestions.

One place suggested was Parczew and in searching the JRI-Poland archives
I was presented with one entry. In the record I found a name similar to
my great great great grandfather however it's mentioned in every entry,
which leads me to believe he is recorded in an official capacity. Could
some one explain the structure of the death record to me and what role
was played by the two gentlemen who have signed the end of each entry?

I've uploaded the record here:
http://timhomewood.com/lewis/ParczewDeath1836.jpg

My great great great grandfather was Henry/Henri Jacobs and his Hebrew
name was Yehuda Leib according to the London Great Synagogue marriage
record of his son Lewis. The first of the two "official" names appears
to be Jude Leib Jekowicz, followed by a title. If anyone can let me know
what his role would have been and also his Hebrew name I would be very
grateful.

Thank you in advance,
Tim Homewood
London, UK
tim@timhomewood.com

Researching:
CASPER Angel Levy - born around 1756, London, England
SOLOMONS/HENRY - Germany (before 1820), London
WOOLFSON - Germany (before 1820), London, Plymouth, Jersey
JACOBS - Poland (before 1850) and London
ROSENBERG/VLOSKY - Pultusk, Poland (before 1870) and London

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


JRI Poland #Poland explanation of Polish death record, Parczew, 1836 #poland

Tim Homewood
 

Dear all, thank you to those who helped me with my previous question
about the place of birth for my ancestor, Lewis Jacobs. Please feel free
to add any more suggestions.

One place suggested was Parczew and in searching the JRI-Poland archives
I was presented with one entry. In the record I found a name similar to
my great great great grandfather however it's mentioned in every entry,
which leads me to believe he is recorded in an official capacity. Could
some one explain the structure of the death record to me and what role
was played by the two gentlemen who have signed the end of each entry?

I've uploaded the record here:
http://timhomewood.com/lewis/ParczewDeath1836.jpg

My great great great grandfather was Henry/Henri Jacobs and his Hebrew
name was Yehuda Leib according to the London Great Synagogue marriage
record of his son Lewis. The first of the two "official" names appears
to be Jude Leib Jekowicz, followed by a title. If anyone can let me know
what his role would have been and also his Hebrew name I would be very
grateful.

Thank you in advance,
Tim Homewood
London, UK
tim@timhomewood.com

Researching:
CASPER Angel Levy - born around 1756, London, England
SOLOMONS/HENRY - Germany (before 1820), London
WOOLFSON - Germany (before 1820), London, Plymouth, Jersey
JACOBS - Poland (before 1850) and London
ROSENBERG/VLOSKY - Pultusk, Poland (before 1870) and London

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately


Polin: 1000 Years of Jewish Life in Poland #poland

Tony Hausner
 

I just received a copy that I ordered of: "Polin: 1000 Years of
Jewish Life in Poland" Published by Polin the Museum of the
History of Polish Jews. It is a beautiful book with an incredible
amount of information about Polish Jewish History, over 1000 years,
with photos >from the Museum and its collection and many other
photographs of Polish Jewish History.

Here is a link to purchase a copy.

http://store.jewishmuseum.org.pl/en_US/p/1000-Years-of-Jewish-Life-in-Poland/1895

Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
(primary email address: thausner@gmail.com)


JRI Poland #Poland Polin: 1000 Years of Jewish Life in Poland #poland

Tony Hausner
 

I just received a copy that I ordered of: "Polin: 1000 Years of
Jewish Life in Poland" Published by Polin the Museum of the
History of Polish Jews. It is a beautiful book with an incredible
amount of information about Polish Jewish History, over 1000 years,
with photos >from the Museum and its collection and many other
photographs of Polish Jewish History.

Here is a link to purchase a copy.

http://store.jewishmuseum.org.pl/en_US/p/1000-Years-of-Jewish-Life-in-Poland/1895

Tony Hausner
Silver Spring, MD 20901
(primary email address: thausner@gmail.com)


RUBINSHETYN from Zinkov or Sharovka, Ukraine #ukraine

Linda Shefler
 

I recently learned that the mother of my gg grandfather was Esther Faige
RUBINSTEIN; she was probably born about 1830 and was supposedly from
Zinkov. I found a family in the 1875 Zinkov Conscription Revision List
that has the following people:
Mortko RUBINSHETYN - born about 1819, son of Gershko
Ikhel RUBINSHETYN - born about 1849, son of Mortko
The men were registered in Sharovka, Proskurov uyezd, which I assume is
probably where they were from. What immediately caught my attention is
the fact that my gg grandfather was Mordechai and he had a son Ikhel.
Is anyone familiar with this family? I would love to discuss them further
with someone who is familiar with them!


Wishing everyone a great week.
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RUBINSHETYN from Zinkov or Sharovka, Ukraine #ukraine

Linda Shefler
 

I recently learned that the mother of my gg grandfather was Esther Faige
RUBINSTEIN; she was probably born about 1830 and was supposedly from
Zinkov. I found a family in the 1875 Zinkov Conscription Revision List
that has the following people:
Mortko RUBINSHETYN - born about 1819, son of Gershko
Ikhel RUBINSHETYN - born about 1849, son of Mortko
The men were registered in Sharovka, Proskurov uyezd, which I assume is
probably where they were from. What immediately caught my attention is
the fact that my gg grandfather was Mordechai and he had a son Ikhel.
Is anyone familiar with this family? I would love to discuss them further
with someone who is familiar with them!


Wishing everyone a great week.
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@gmail.com

101321 - 101340 of 661904