Date   

Finding Aid to Online Danzig Civil Records, 1874-1899 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Thanks to Rodney Eisfelder, there is now a very useful finding aid to
GenPol.com/GenBaza's massive collection of online scans of Danzig
civil records (both Jewish and non-Jewish), 1874-1899, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidcivil.php . This finding
aid should be your starting point for exploring the collection.

Because only a small part of the scanned records have been indexed,
you cannot simply search the records by name. The collection is not
even searchable by date or type of record. It is just a very large
collection of images to manually browse through, divided into 600
volumes. Rodney's finding aid will significantly reduce your browsing
time, as it lists for each of the volumes of images the corresponding
type of record (birth, marriage, death) and date range. The more
accurately you know the date of the record you are looking for, the
less time you will likely have to spend browsing. However, even if
you know the exact date, the process still might be quite
time-consuming.

The finding aid also lists the range of record numbers for each volume
of images. The record numbers can sometimes be found in the partial
indices on FamilySearch.org as "Reference IDs." There is no perfect
way to restrict searches at FamilySearch.org to only these indices,
but the following seems to work well: at
https://familysearch.org/search, enter a person's name in the search
form and, under, "Search with a life event," select "Any" and type
"Danzig, Prussia" in the "Any Place" field. If you are fortunate and
find a record and record number in the partial indices, using the
record number with the finding aid will likely be the quickest way to
find the record scan. Please note that these indices cover only a
small part of the records and, even for records they include,
typically do not list all of the genealogical information in the
record scans.

If you find record scans of interest, but have difficulty reading
them, the recommended way to seek volunteer translation is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/. Please read the instructions at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp . In particular, note
step 6, where you announce that your images are on the ViewMate site.
I suggest sending any announcements to this list and GerSIG, where you
are most likely to find people who can read this style of German
writing. Please note that some records might extend over two
consecutive images, especially marriage records.

If anyone would like to prepare a guide to interpreting these records,
please contact me privately.

Although using this collection of images can be laborious, the high
quality of the scans and genealogical information they contain makes
them tremendously valuable. To minimize your effort, remember to try
any other means to narrow the dates you are looking for and search the
partial indices.

Please share your successes and any tips for using the collection.
Thanks again to Rodney for his work preparing the finding aid, which
will benefit us all.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Finding Aid to Online Danzig Civil Records, 1874-1899 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Thanks to Rodney Eisfelder, there is now a very useful finding aid to
GenPol.com/GenBaza's massive collection of online scans of Danzig
civil records (both Jewish and non-Jewish), 1874-1899, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidcivil.php . This finding
aid should be your starting point for exploring the collection.

Because only a small part of the scanned records have been indexed,
you cannot simply search the records by name. The collection is not
even searchable by date or type of record. It is just a very large
collection of images to manually browse through, divided into 600
volumes. Rodney's finding aid will significantly reduce your browsing
time, as it lists for each of the volumes of images the corresponding
type of record (birth, marriage, death) and date range. The more
accurately you know the date of the record you are looking for, the
less time you will likely have to spend browsing. However, even if
you know the exact date, the process still might be quite
time-consuming.

The finding aid also lists the range of record numbers for each volume
of images. The record numbers can sometimes be found in the partial
indices on FamilySearch.org as "Reference IDs." There is no perfect
way to restrict searches at FamilySearch.org to only these indices,
but the following seems to work well: at
https://familysearch.org/search, enter a person's name in the search
form and, under, "Search with a life event," select "Any" and type
"Danzig, Prussia" in the "Any Place" field. If you are fortunate and
find a record and record number in the partial indices, using the
record number with the finding aid will likely be the quickest way to
find the record scan. Please note that these indices cover only a
small part of the records and, even for records they include,
typically do not list all of the genealogical information in the
record scans.

If you find record scans of interest, but have difficulty reading
them, the recommended way to seek volunteer translation is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/. Please read the instructions at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp . In particular, note
step 6, where you announce that your images are on the ViewMate site.
I suggest sending any announcements to this list and GerSIG, where you
are most likely to find people who can read this style of German
writing. Please note that some records might extend over two
consecutive images, especially marriage records.

If anyone would like to prepare a guide to interpreting these records,
please contact me privately.

Although using this collection of images can be laborious, the high
quality of the scans and genealogical information they contain makes
them tremendously valuable. To minimize your effort, remember to try
any other means to narrow the dates you are looking for and search the
partial indices.

Please share your successes and any tips for using the collection.
Thanks again to Rodney for his work preparing the finding aid, which
will benefit us all.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


A Study Utilizing Small Segment Matching #dna

Israel P
 

Where I demonstrate conclusively that Roberta Estes is correct, at
least in certain cases, regarding Small Segments (and Endogamy).

http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


DNA Research #DNA A Study Utilizing Small Segment Matching #dna

Israel P
 

Where I demonstrate conclusively that Roberta Estes is correct, at
least in certain cases, regarding Small Segments (and Endogamy).

http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Re: NYC newspapers #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"

While it's unlikely they had an obituary if they were not prominent or
wealthy, there were many paid death notices in the Times and you can
get quite lucky by searching the digitized New York Times archives.
If you are a home -delivery subscriber to the Times anywhere in the
country, you can get a log on and password to search the archives for
free.

NYC libraries (and many others) will have the ProQuest databases
including the NY Times and many other papers. ProQuest is a paid
subscription service only available at universities and libraries and
individuals cannot pay for a subscription.

Note, however that anything considered "news" was covered so murders,
suicides, strange deaths (window cleaners falling, ptomaine poisoning,
domestic violence) were covered by reporters. So were the untimely
deaths of children on the lower east side at the turn of the century
in items like "Deaths of the Week" where the name, age and address was
provided by the paper. These were not notices paid for by the family,
just a regularly run column listing unfortunate deaths, so until you
go looking you can't be sure what you might find. The best rule is to
not assume just because someone wasn't famous you won't find a mention
of their death in a newspaper.

The Fulton Postcard site with other New York papers is also an
excellent resource, as is the Brooklyn Eagle.

ProQuest also offers a collection of historical American Jewish
newspapers. These often carried obituaries of more prominent Jews
throughout the U.S. including New York:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922) - a weekly Jewish
newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the
Jewish Messenger.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990) - a primary source of news and
information as well as a forum for discussion and debate.

The American Israelite (1854-2000) - the longest-running
English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United
States. The newspaper's two goals were to spread the principles of
Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs
and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990) - which carried news of developments in
Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over >from repressive regimes,
and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life.

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC newspapers #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"

While it's unlikely they had an obituary if they were not prominent or
wealthy, there were many paid death notices in the Times and you can
get quite lucky by searching the digitized New York Times archives.
If you are a home -delivery subscriber to the Times anywhere in the
country, you can get a log on and password to search the archives for
free.

NYC libraries (and many others) will have the ProQuest databases
including the NY Times and many other papers. ProQuest is a paid
subscription service only available at universities and libraries and
individuals cannot pay for a subscription.

Note, however that anything considered "news" was covered so murders,
suicides, strange deaths (window cleaners falling, ptomaine poisoning,
domestic violence) were covered by reporters. So were the untimely
deaths of children on the lower east side at the turn of the century
in items like "Deaths of the Week" where the name, age and address was
provided by the paper. These were not notices paid for by the family,
just a regularly run column listing unfortunate deaths, so until you
go looking you can't be sure what you might find. The best rule is to
not assume just because someone wasn't famous you won't find a mention
of their death in a newspaper.

The Fulton Postcard site with other New York papers is also an
excellent resource, as is the Brooklyn Eagle.

ProQuest also offers a collection of historical American Jewish
newspapers. These often carried obituaries of more prominent Jews
throughout the U.S. including New York:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922) - a weekly Jewish
newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the
Jewish Messenger.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990) - a primary source of news and
information as well as a forum for discussion and debate.

The American Israelite (1854-2000) - the longest-running
English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United
States. The newspaper's two goals were to spread the principles of
Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs
and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990) - which carried news of developments in
Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over >from repressive regimes,
and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life.

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Re: Town ID Assistance #ukraine

Phyllis Kramer
 

H. Chimoff asled:
Can anyone please help me, based on the three, separate pieces of
information I have:
1 Podulsk, Ukraine
2 Communitz Padolsk Gubernia Raachne Schtetel (I know what shtetl is
but am just including the entire description passed on by a family
member)
3 Rachny (Ellis Island arrival record - no further detail on the
manifest either)

Since it was ellis island...i'm assuminig the immigration was between
1892 and 1924....At that time it was Podolia Gubernia. The town
(shtetl) WAS Raachne or Rachny...

first i went to the community pages (6500 towns in eastern europe) and
did not find it....so i'm assuming it was a town with a small Jewish
population...then i queried podolia and looked at the towns within
it....major town was kaminetz podolsk.

second i went to the list of towns on the Ukraine SIG...didnt find it.

third i went to the JewishGen gazetteer and looked for towns
beginning with Rach...didnt find it.

Fourth I went to the radius search and asked for towns beginning with
R within 30 miles of Kaminetz in current day Ukraine...i found one
possibility:

Rakhnovka populated place 3.8 miles SSW of kaminetz podolsk

so now what i'd sugest you do is search jewishgen's JGFF, the Ukraine
country database and the Ukraine SIG pages for your surnames >from the
area around Kaminetz Podolsk, today called Kamyanets Podilskyy

Here's aninteresting aside: thanks to Googles Wiki....i found that
poldolia wasnt always in Russia/Ukraine... the western part of Podalia
was In Poland >from 1921 to 1939, part of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.
Eastern Podolia remained to the Ukrainian SSR and between 1922 and
1940, in the southwestern part, the Moldavian Autonomous Soviet
Socialist Republic was created.

Hope this helps!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens
Researching KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm

Moderator;s note: Also remember the "Jewish Geography
with Varying Accents" syndrome. You have to learan how to
spell townnames without using vowels. They are all interchangeable!


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Town ID Assistance #ukraine

Phyllis Kramer
 

H. Chimoff asled:
Can anyone please help me, based on the three, separate pieces of
information I have:
1 Podulsk, Ukraine
2 Communitz Padolsk Gubernia Raachne Schtetel (I know what shtetl is
but am just including the entire description passed on by a family
member)
3 Rachny (Ellis Island arrival record - no further detail on the
manifest either)

Since it was ellis island...i'm assuminig the immigration was between
1892 and 1924....At that time it was Podolia Gubernia. The town
(shtetl) WAS Raachne or Rachny...

first i went to the community pages (6500 towns in eastern europe) and
did not find it....so i'm assuming it was a town with a small Jewish
population...then i queried podolia and looked at the towns within
it....major town was kaminetz podolsk.

second i went to the list of towns on the Ukraine SIG...didnt find it.

third i went to the JewishGen gazetteer and looked for towns
beginning with Rach...didnt find it.

Fourth I went to the radius search and asked for towns beginning with
R within 30 miles of Kaminetz in current day Ukraine...i found one
possibility:

Rakhnovka populated place 3.8 miles SSW of kaminetz podolsk

so now what i'd sugest you do is search jewishgen's JGFF, the Ukraine
country database and the Ukraine SIG pages for your surnames >from the
area around Kaminetz Podolsk, today called Kamyanets Podilskyy

Here's aninteresting aside: thanks to Googles Wiki....i found that
poldolia wasnt always in Russia/Ukraine... the western part of Podalia
was In Poland >from 1921 to 1939, part of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.
Eastern Podolia remained to the Ukrainian SSR and between 1922 and
1940, in the southwestern part, the Moldavian Autonomous Soviet
Socialist Republic was created.

Hope this helps!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens
Researching KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm

Moderator;s note: Also remember the "Jewish Geography
with Varying Accents" syndrome. You have to learan how to
spell townnames without using vowels. They are all interchangeable!


Exhibition, "No One Remembers Alone," extended through February 23, 2015 #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

My traveling exhibition, "No One Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of
an American Family," which tells the story of a young man >from Orgeyev, Bessarabia, and his
sweetheart >from Odessa, as they flee Czarist Russia for America at the turn of the 20th century,
has been extended at Yale University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life. Originally scheduled to
close on February 1, it has now been extended through February 23rd.

You are all welcome to visit the Center, which has free parking behind it after 3 pm on
weekdays and all day Saturday and Sunday. The Center has very long hours, so visitors are
welcome late into the evening. There is a fine cafe next door, and Slifka also has a kosher
kitchen with a lively dining hall.

For information and directions, go here: http://slifkacenter.org/node/590sphie

And for a wonderful, detailed review of the exhibition, go here:
http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/slifka_travels_back_in_time/

I could not have created this exhibition without the generous help of two hundred JewishGen
members who contributed translations and interpretive notes over many years. My goals are to
wake memory in visitors to the show, and to teach people how much can still be learned about
family who seemed lost forever.


Thank you!

Patricia

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti,
Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev,
Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Exhibition, "No One Remembers Alone," extended through February 23, 2015 #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear SIG Members,

My traveling exhibition, "No One Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of
an American Family," which tells the story of a young man >from Orgeyev, Bessarabia, and his
sweetheart >from Odessa, as they flee Czarist Russia for America at the turn of the 20th century,
has been extended at Yale University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life. Originally scheduled to
close on February 1, it has now been extended through February 23rd.

You are all welcome to visit the Center, which has free parking behind it after 3 pm on
weekdays and all day Saturday and Sunday. The Center has very long hours, so visitors are
welcome late into the evening. There is a fine cafe next door, and Slifka also has a kosher
kitchen with a lively dining hall.

For information and directions, go here: http://slifkacenter.org/node/590sphie

And for a wonderful, detailed review of the exhibition, go here:
http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/slifka_travels_back_in_time/

I could not have created this exhibition without the generous help of two hundred JewishGen
members who contributed translations and interpretive notes over many years. My goals are to
wake memory in visitors to the show, and to teach people how much can still be learned about
family who seemed lost forever.


Thank you!

Patricia

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti,
Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev,
Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Re: Rheinland-Pfalz Gatermann Films? [always ask for the "Belegakten"] #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

one additional remark to the civil registers >from Rheinland-Pfalz:

still there. The marginally less heartwarming part--especially for us
across the sea--is that most of those registers are still in their
original towns or very close by.
According to the new civil record law (>from 2007), the civil records
from Rheinland-Pfalz are being transferred to the state archiv at
Koblenz ("Landeshauptarchiv Koblenz").

Because all registers are written and kept twice, one set of registers
will be kept in Koblenz, the other set usually in the county
administrations (or the city archives; it depends).

family pets, it seems. Marriage records can have the dates of the
bride's or groom's parents' deaths, for instance.
In some cases, they contain the names of the grandparents, too. - You
should always ask for the "Belegakten", i.e. additional papers to the
registers, containing the papers which had the groom and the bride to
bring to the office (copies of birth certificates etc.).

Sometimes the local administrations do not know that they have
Belegakten somewhere in the attic ... Regards

Tobias Kemper in Germany kemper@lenz-kemper.de


German SIG #Germany Re: Rheinland-Pfalz Gatermann Films? [always ask for the "Belegakten"] #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

one additional remark to the civil registers >from Rheinland-Pfalz:

still there. The marginally less heartwarming part--especially for us
across the sea--is that most of those registers are still in their
original towns or very close by.
According to the new civil record law (>from 2007), the civil records
from Rheinland-Pfalz are being transferred to the state archiv at
Koblenz ("Landeshauptarchiv Koblenz").

Because all registers are written and kept twice, one set of registers
will be kept in Koblenz, the other set usually in the county
administrations (or the city archives; it depends).

family pets, it seems. Marriage records can have the dates of the
bride's or groom's parents' deaths, for instance.
In some cases, they contain the names of the grandparents, too. - You
should always ask for the "Belegakten", i.e. additional papers to the
registers, containing the papers which had the groom and the bride to
bring to the office (copies of birth certificates etc.).

Sometimes the local administrations do not know that they have
Belegakten somewhere in the attic ... Regards

Tobias Kemper in Germany kemper@lenz-kemper.de


Jewish Genealogy Society Cleveland; Feb 1 #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Sunday, February 1 starting at 1:30 P.M. in the Lelyveld Library at Anshe
Chesed Fairmount Temple, 23737 Fairmount Blvd., Beachwood.

The program will feature a video presentation >from the Spielberg Holocaust
Project titled "Sima Grozalsky Tells Her Story." Board members will be
available starting at 1:00 P.M. to respond to questions. The program is free
and open to the public. Call 440-473-5364 for further information.

Stewart Hoicowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy Society Cleveland; Feb 1 #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Sunday, February 1 starting at 1:30 P.M. in the Lelyveld Library at Anshe
Chesed Fairmount Temple, 23737 Fairmount Blvd., Beachwood.

The program will feature a video presentation >from the Spielberg Holocaust
Project titled "Sima Grozalsky Tells Her Story." Board members will be
available starting at 1:00 P.M. to respond to questions. The program is free
and open to the public. Call 440-473-5364 for further information.

Stewart Hoicowitz


The JGS of Montreal's Annual Schmoozarama Event - Feb. 16, 2015 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Once again, we are holding our popular and informal **members-only** evening
again this year - the JGS of Montreal's "Schmoozarama" event.

On Monday evening, February 16th (>from 7:30 - 9:30 pm)
Annie and Hymie London will graciously host a coffee and dessert get-together.
All refreshments will be strictly kosher and will be served appropriately.

Here's the schedule:
7:30 to 8:00 pm - schmoozing time and the opportunity to treat
yourself to desserts and coffee, tea or soft drinks.
8:00 pm - members will be invited to give a brief (3-5 minutes maximum)
synopsis or update of his or her research
(no one will be obliged to speak to the group).
Spouses/partners are welcome!

There will be a $5.00 admission charge per person.
*Please RSVP by Thursday February 5th *
Send your confirmation by email to Merle Kastner:
merlek@bell.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The JGS of Montreal's Annual Schmoozarama Event - Feb. 16, 2015 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Once again, we are holding our popular and informal **members-only** evening
again this year - the JGS of Montreal's "Schmoozarama" event.

On Monday evening, February 16th (>from 7:30 - 9:30 pm)
Annie and Hymie London will graciously host a coffee and dessert get-together.
All refreshments will be strictly kosher and will be served appropriately.

Here's the schedule:
7:30 to 8:00 pm - schmoozing time and the opportunity to treat
yourself to desserts and coffee, tea or soft drinks.
8:00 pm - members will be invited to give a brief (3-5 minutes maximum)
synopsis or update of his or her research
(no one will be obliged to speak to the group).
Spouses/partners are welcome!

There will be a $5.00 admission charge per person.
*Please RSVP by Thursday February 5th *
Send your confirmation by email to Merle Kastner:
merlek@bell.net


Yiddish translation requested #general

Diane Sophrin
 

Hello all,
I've just posted a two-page Yiddish letter on ViewMate, for which I'd
very much appreciate as direct a translation as possible.

This letter was written (so I've been told) by my great-grandfather Max
Mendel SCHOPHRIN to his son Harry Louis Herschl who was at home in
Brooklyn, while Max and his wife Sarah were visiting Sarah's brother
David SCHLIMOWITZ in Waterbury, Connecticut. There are some family
"rumors" as to the letter's content, so I am very curious to learn what
it actually contains. Any insights or comments are welcome as well.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37845

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37846

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. I find
it helpful to have initial responses saved and visible on ViewMate.

I thank you all in advance for any and all help offered.

Sincerely,
Diane Sophrin
Vermont, USA

Researching:
BIERZWINSKI, FUCHS/FUKS/FOX, GRÃœNBAUM/GRINBAUM/GREENBAUM, PULVERMACHER,
SELIGMAN/ZELIGMAN, SZALADAJEWSKI, SZCZECINSKI (Lodz, Poland & environs;
USA)
MEHR, TRUBIK (Zagare & Vegeriai, Lithuania; USA)
SCHOPHRIN/SCHOPHRIM, SCHLIMOWITZ (Vilna, Lithuania; Poltova &
Donetsk,Ukraine; USA)
SOPHRIN, VAN FELIX (USA)
ET AL.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish translation requested #general

Diane Sophrin
 

Hello all,
I've just posted a two-page Yiddish letter on ViewMate, for which I'd
very much appreciate as direct a translation as possible.

This letter was written (so I've been told) by my great-grandfather Max
Mendel SCHOPHRIN to his son Harry Louis Herschl who was at home in
Brooklyn, while Max and his wife Sarah were visiting Sarah's brother
David SCHLIMOWITZ in Waterbury, Connecticut. There are some family
"rumors" as to the letter's content, so I am very curious to learn what
it actually contains. Any insights or comments are welcome as well.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37845

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37846

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application. I find
it helpful to have initial responses saved and visible on ViewMate.

I thank you all in advance for any and all help offered.

Sincerely,
Diane Sophrin
Vermont, USA

Researching:
BIERZWINSKI, FUCHS/FUKS/FOX, GRÃœNBAUM/GRINBAUM/GREENBAUM, PULVERMACHER,
SELIGMAN/ZELIGMAN, SZALADAJEWSKI, SZCZECINSKI (Lodz, Poland & environs;
USA)
MEHR, TRUBIK (Zagare & Vegeriai, Lithuania; USA)
SCHOPHRIN/SCHOPHRIM, SCHLIMOWITZ (Vilna, Lithuania; Poltova &
Donetsk,Ukraine; USA)
SOPHRIN, VAN FELIX (USA)
ET AL.


Translation Request - Russian #general

WALTER ELIAS
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
Surname is HOFFER. I am interested in names, dates, parents' names,
occupation and names of witnesses. It is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37875

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Walter S. Elias
St. Louis Park, Minnesota, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation Request - Russian #general

WALTER ELIAS
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
Surname is HOFFER. I am interested in names, dates, parents' names,
occupation and names of witnesses. It is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37875

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
Walter S. Elias
St. Louis Park, Minnesota, USA

103681 - 103700 of 665456