Date   

Translation help:Polish - Viewmate 37558 #general

Reuben Gross <rgtect@...>
 

Please help me with translation of birth record in polish.
It's listed under viewmate image 37558.

( MOD: Direct link is;
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37558 )

Thanks in advance

Reuben Gross
Teaneck, NJ 07666
Email rgtect@optonline.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation help:Polish - Viewmate 37558 #general

Reuben Gross <rgtect@...>
 

Please help me with translation of birth record in polish.
It's listed under viewmate image 37558.

( MOD: Direct link is;
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37558 )

Thanks in advance

Reuben Gross
Teaneck, NJ 07666
Email rgtect@optonline.net


Providing Some Help with Searching 1880 Krakow Census #galicia

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Hi All,

With the addition of the the 1880 Krakow Census links within Logan
Kleinwaks's Genealogy Indexer, once again, as I did for the 1890 census,
I have gone through the images to help people find their family names a
little more easily than paging through almost 1000 images. For the two
websites, there were respectively 503 and 447 images. I have indicated
the image number where the alphabetical listing appears.

Just a little of a caveat: While I haven't looked at these images in great
detail, some of the first images -- i.e., the "A" pages are torn and names
are not entirely there. In the second link, I did notice some pages appear
twice, possibly one scan being brighter/easier to read than the other.

In the first link,
http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/26/str/1/1/100#tabSkany,
there are 503 images. So the numbers below indicate the first image
among the 503, where you should look for your name of interest:

A 4
B 13
C 48
D 68
E 85
F 91
G 108
H 138
(I)J 155
K 175
L 231
M 258
N 294
O 309
P 321
Q --
R 353
S 374
T 430
U 445
V 452
W 454
X 485
Y --
Z 486

In the second link,
http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/27/str/1/1/100#tabSkany
(447 images):

A 5
B 18
C 49
D 63
E 80
F 86
G 104
H 130
(I)J 147
K 164
L 205
M 230
N 255
O 267
P 277
Q 304
R 305
S 325
T 371
U 385
V 395
W 403
X --
Y --
Z 429

With this as a starting point, you can now proceed as Logan indicated,
to find the appropriate pages.

Good luck!

--
Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN in various
parts of Galicia, Poland: Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno,
Lapuszna, Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby towns in
northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had
businesses in Moravska Ostrava). GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena),
Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva, Hungary; very briefly in Timisoara,
Romania


Transfer money to Polish banks - any news? #poland

Yohanan
 

Is there anything new about the well discussed issue of transferring money
to Polish banks as a payment for purchasing records >from a Polish archive?
The Radom archive request a humble payment of 19 Zloty for sending the
record, but the minimum payment via bank transfer is 300 Zloty.
To summarise >from past messages, what I understand is that you can't pay
cash, you can't pay via Western Union and you could join others to form a
group payment for records >from the same archive. Any updates/ suggestions?

Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne Australia


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Providing Some Help with Searching 1880 Krakow Census #galicia

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Hi All,

With the addition of the the 1880 Krakow Census links within Logan
Kleinwaks's Genealogy Indexer, once again, as I did for the 1890 census,
I have gone through the images to help people find their family names a
little more easily than paging through almost 1000 images. For the two
websites, there were respectively 503 and 447 images. I have indicated
the image number where the alphabetical listing appears.

Just a little of a caveat: While I haven't looked at these images in great
detail, some of the first images -- i.e., the "A" pages are torn and names
are not entirely there. In the second link, I did notice some pages appear
twice, possibly one scan being brighter/easier to read than the other.

In the first link,
http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/26/str/1/1/100#tabSkany,
there are 503 images. So the numbers below indicate the first image
among the 503, where you should look for your name of interest:

A 4
B 13
C 48
D 68
E 85
F 91
G 108
H 138
(I)J 155
K 175
L 231
M 258
N 294
O 309
P 321
Q --
R 353
S 374
T 430
U 445
V 452
W 454
X 485
Y --
Z 486

In the second link,
http://szukajwarchiwach.pl/29/87/0/2/27/str/1/1/100#tabSkany
(447 images):

A 5
B 18
C 49
D 63
E 80
F 86
G 104
H 130
(I)J 147
K 164
L 205
M 230
N 255
O 267
P 277
Q 304
R 305
S 325
T 371
U 385
V 395
W 403
X --
Y --
Z 429

With this as a starting point, you can now proceed as Logan indicated,
to find the appropriate pages.

Good luck!

--
Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN in various
parts of Galicia, Poland: Nowy Targ, Nowy Sanz, Wachsmund, Dembno,
Lapuszna, Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby towns in
northern Slovakia and Czech Republic (i.e., those who lived/had
businesses in Moravska Ostrava). GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena),
Szkaros and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva, Hungary; very briefly in Timisoara,
Romania


JRI Poland #Poland Transfer money to Polish banks - any news? #poland

Yohanan
 

Is there anything new about the well discussed issue of transferring money
to Polish banks as a payment for purchasing records >from a Polish archive?
The Radom archive request a humble payment of 19 Zloty for sending the
record, but the minimum payment via bank transfer is 300 Zloty.
To summarise >from past messages, what I understand is that you can't pay
cash, you can't pay via Western Union and you could join others to form a
group payment for records >from the same archive. Any updates/ suggestions?

Yohanan Loeffler
Melbourne Australia


The Brest Records #belarus

Jenni Buch
 

Apologize that the links to the lists of Brest and district names that have
not yet been uploaded were not live in my post to the Belarus SIG !
trying again:

1901-1914 birth record surnames

1895-1906 death record surnames

Jenni Buch =


Belarus SIG #Belarus The Brest Records #belarus

Jenni Buch
 

Apologize that the links to the lists of Brest and district names that have
not yet been uploaded were not live in my post to the Belarus SIG !
trying again:

1901-1914 birth record surnames

1895-1906 death record surnames

Jenni Buch =


Koniecpol #rabbinic

Ofer Manela
 

Hi all,

According to some sources (e.g.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00233.html) the
town Koniecpol (not far >from Czestochowa) was called by Jews "Sadeh
Chadash", i.e. New Field.
In some other sources a town in the same area is mentioned called
"Nawipale - Sade Chadash".

My question is: Does Nawipale is another name for Koniecpol?

Thanks,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Koniecpol #rabbinic

Ofer Manela
 

Hi all,

According to some sources (e.g.
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00233.html) the
town Koniecpol (not far >from Czestochowa) was called by Jews "Sadeh
Chadash", i.e. New Field.
In some other sources a town in the same area is mentioned called
"Nawipale - Sade Chadash".

My question is: Does Nawipale is another name for Koniecpol?

Thanks,
Ofer Manela
Petach-Tikva


Records of descendants/ancestors of Rabbi Yitzchok Jakubowicz Yekeles of Krakow #rabbinic

J.C.Keiner <j.c.keiner@...>
 

A "yiches" document produced by a distant cousin of my father records that
he was told by his father that my maternal grandmother's family are
descendants of Rabbi Yekeles, the founder of one of the most famous shuls
of Krakow, the "Ayzik" shul, founded by and named after him, which is
still standing. He is buried in the cemetery by the Remuh Shul.

http://www.worldholocaustforum.org/eng/history/4/

The document refers to my maternal great great great grandfather Shimon
Spitz as a "neched" of Rabbi Yekeles. I don't think he could have been a
grandchild of Rabbi Yekeles, who died in 1653. I don't know when my ggggf
was born. One of his daughters, Pessel Rechel, of Rzepiennik, Galicia,
lived to be 104 -- she must have been born in 1830. Even if her father was a
very old man when she was born -- say 60, he would have been born circa 1770,
almost 120 years after Rabbi Yekeles' death. I don't know whether it is
customary to use the word "neched" as a generic word for descendant, or
whether it is only used in Yiches documentation to specify grandchildren.

In any case, I would be very interested to know of any records of the
descendants and ancestors of Rabbi Yekeles.

His story has an extra resonance for British Jews like me. I was
astonished to discover that Rabbi Yekeles was mentioned as an example of a
Jew bringing prosperity to the country in which he lived, in a pamphlet
written by Manasseh ben Yisrael of Amsterdam circa 1656, for Oliver
Cromwell, the then ruler of England, to support his petition for Jews to
be readmitted, whence they had been expelled and banned since 1290.

http://elderofziyon.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/menasseh-ben-israels-letter-to-oliver.html#.VMTi9MbA6Hs
[or http://tinyurl.com/qcgudfm --Mod.]

Judy Keiner
London, England


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Records of descendants/ancestors of Rabbi Yitzchok Jakubowicz Yekeles of Krakow #rabbinic

J.C.Keiner <j.c.keiner@...>
 

A "yiches" document produced by a distant cousin of my father records that
he was told by his father that my maternal grandmother's family are
descendants of Rabbi Yekeles, the founder of one of the most famous shuls
of Krakow, the "Ayzik" shul, founded by and named after him, which is
still standing. He is buried in the cemetery by the Remuh Shul.

http://www.worldholocaustforum.org/eng/history/4/

The document refers to my maternal great great great grandfather Shimon
Spitz as a "neched" of Rabbi Yekeles. I don't think he could have been a
grandchild of Rabbi Yekeles, who died in 1653. I don't know when my ggggf
was born. One of his daughters, Pessel Rechel, of Rzepiennik, Galicia,
lived to be 104 -- she must have been born in 1830. Even if her father was a
very old man when she was born -- say 60, he would have been born circa 1770,
almost 120 years after Rabbi Yekeles' death. I don't know whether it is
customary to use the word "neched" as a generic word for descendant, or
whether it is only used in Yiches documentation to specify grandchildren.

In any case, I would be very interested to know of any records of the
descendants and ancestors of Rabbi Yekeles.

His story has an extra resonance for British Jews like me. I was
astonished to discover that Rabbi Yekeles was mentioned as an example of a
Jew bringing prosperity to the country in which he lived, in a pamphlet
written by Manasseh ben Yisrael of Amsterdam circa 1656, for Oliver
Cromwell, the then ruler of England, to support his petition for Jews to
be readmitted, whence they had been expelled and banned since 1290.

http://elderofziyon.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/menasseh-ben-israels-letter-to-oliver.html#.VMTi9MbA6Hs
[or http://tinyurl.com/qcgudfm --Mod.]

Judy Keiner
London, England


Re: Transcriptions of birth records for Liepaja "Father's place of registration" #latvia

Arlene Beare
 

The father kept his registration in the place >from where he had come for
example Kretingen or Sialuliai. They often chose to pay their taxes in
their place of origin. The father was living in Libau (Liepaja) but had
come >from wherever it says he was registered.
If the birth records are Libau(Liepaja) then the child was born in Liepaja

Arlene Beare
Researching Dorfman (Birzai Lithuania and then Riga) Scher /Blum(Pandelys
Lithuania and then Riga)
Berman (Lygumai Lithuania and then Jekabpils Latvia)
Samuels Poland possibly Krakow and Zychlin

-----Original Message-----
Sent: 26 January 2015 03:10

Dear LatviaSIG folk,

Some of you will be familiar with the late and wonderful Christine Usdin's
transcriptions of certain BMD records >from the Latvian archive.

On the birth records (for example for Libau) is a column entitled "Father's
Place of Registration". This doesn't say Libau/Libava in many instances,
but gives other town names. Does anyone know the relevance of this column?
Given that these records are the Libau records, what does "father's place of
registration" mean if it says Kretingen or Shavel ((Siauliai)) or Shkud or
whatever?

In particular, what if anything can we deduce about the the child's place of
birth?

Joyaa ANTARES


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Transcriptions of birth records for Liepaja "Father's place of registration" #latvia

Arlene Beare
 

The father kept his registration in the place >from where he had come for
example Kretingen or Sialuliai. They often chose to pay their taxes in
their place of origin. The father was living in Libau (Liepaja) but had
come >from wherever it says he was registered.
If the birth records are Libau(Liepaja) then the child was born in Liepaja

Arlene Beare
Researching Dorfman (Birzai Lithuania and then Riga) Scher /Blum(Pandelys
Lithuania and then Riga)
Berman (Lygumai Lithuania and then Jekabpils Latvia)
Samuels Poland possibly Krakow and Zychlin

-----Original Message-----
Sent: 26 January 2015 03:10

Dear LatviaSIG folk,

Some of you will be familiar with the late and wonderful Christine Usdin's
transcriptions of certain BMD records >from the Latvian archive.

On the birth records (for example for Libau) is a column entitled "Father's
Place of Registration". This doesn't say Libau/Libava in many instances,
but gives other town names. Does anyone know the relevance of this column?
Given that these records are the Libau records, what does "father's place of
registration" mean if it says Kretingen or Shavel ((Siauliai)) or Shkud or
whatever?

In particular, what if anything can we deduce about the the child's place of
birth?

Joyaa ANTARES


Finding Aid to Online Danzig Civil Records, 1874-1899 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Thanks to Rodney Eisfelder, there is now a very useful finding aid to
GenPol.com/GenBaza's massive collection of online scans of Danzig
civil records (both Jewish and non-Jewish), 1874-1899, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidcivil.php . This finding
aid should be your starting point for exploring the collection.

Because only a small part of the scanned records have been indexed,
you cannot simply search the records by name. The collection is not
even searchable by date or type of record. It is just a very large
collection of images to manually browse through, divided into 600
volumes. Rodney's finding aid will significantly reduce your browsing
time, as it lists for each of the volumes of images the corresponding
type of record (birth, marriage, death) and date range. The more
accurately you know the date of the record you are looking for, the
less time you will likely have to spend browsing. However, even if
you know the exact date, the process still might be quite
time-consuming.

The finding aid also lists the range of record numbers for each volume
of images. The record numbers can sometimes be found in the partial
indices on FamilySearch.org as "Reference IDs." There is no perfect
way to restrict searches at FamilySearch.org to only these indices,
but the following seems to work well: at
https://familysearch.org/search, enter a person's name in the search
form and, under, "Search with a life event," select "Any" and type
"Danzig, Prussia" in the "Any Place" field. If you are fortunate and
find a record and record number in the partial indices, using the
record number with the finding aid will likely be the quickest way to
find the record scan. Please note that these indices cover only a
small part of the records and, even for records they include,
typically do not list all of the genealogical information in the
record scans.

If you find record scans of interest, but have difficulty reading
them, the recommended way to seek volunteer translation is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/. Please read the instructions at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp . In particular, note
step 6, where you announce that your images are on the ViewMate site.
I suggest sending any announcements to this list and GerSIG, where you
are most likely to find people who can read this style of German
writing. Please note that some records might extend over two
consecutive images, especially marriage records.

If anyone would like to prepare a guide to interpreting these records,
please contact me privately.

Although using this collection of images can be laborious, the high
quality of the scans and genealogical information they contain makes
them tremendously valuable. To minimize your effort, remember to try
any other means to narrow the dates you are looking for and search the
partial indices.

Please share your successes and any tips for using the collection.
Thanks again to Rodney for his work preparing the finding aid, which
will benefit us all.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Finding Aid to Online Danzig Civil Records, 1874-1899 #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Thanks to Rodney Eisfelder, there is now a very useful finding aid to
GenPol.com/GenBaza's massive collection of online scans of Danzig
civil records (both Jewish and non-Jewish), 1874-1899, at
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/findingaidcivil.php . This finding
aid should be your starting point for exploring the collection.

Because only a small part of the scanned records have been indexed,
you cannot simply search the records by name. The collection is not
even searchable by date or type of record. It is just a very large
collection of images to manually browse through, divided into 600
volumes. Rodney's finding aid will significantly reduce your browsing
time, as it lists for each of the volumes of images the corresponding
type of record (birth, marriage, death) and date range. The more
accurately you know the date of the record you are looking for, the
less time you will likely have to spend browsing. However, even if
you know the exact date, the process still might be quite
time-consuming.

The finding aid also lists the range of record numbers for each volume
of images. The record numbers can sometimes be found in the partial
indices on FamilySearch.org as "Reference IDs." There is no perfect
way to restrict searches at FamilySearch.org to only these indices,
but the following seems to work well: at
https://familysearch.org/search, enter a person's name in the search
form and, under, "Search with a life event," select "Any" and type
"Danzig, Prussia" in the "Any Place" field. If you are fortunate and
find a record and record number in the partial indices, using the
record number with the finding aid will likely be the quickest way to
find the record scan. Please note that these indices cover only a
small part of the records and, even for records they include,
typically do not list all of the genealogical information in the
record scans.

If you find record scans of interest, but have difficulty reading
them, the recommended way to seek volunteer translation is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/. Please read the instructions at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/topost.asp . In particular, note
step 6, where you announce that your images are on the ViewMate site.
I suggest sending any announcements to this list and GerSIG, where you
are most likely to find people who can read this style of German
writing. Please note that some records might extend over two
consecutive images, especially marriage records.

If anyone would like to prepare a guide to interpreting these records,
please contact me privately.

Although using this collection of images can be laborious, the high
quality of the scans and genealogical information they contain makes
them tremendously valuable. To minimize your effort, remember to try
any other means to narrow the dates you are looking for and search the
partial indices.

Please share your successes and any tips for using the collection.
Thanks again to Rodney for his work preparing the finding aid, which
will benefit us all.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


A Study Utilizing Small Segment Matching #dna

Israel P
 

Where I demonstrate conclusively that Roberta Estes is correct, at
least in certain cases, regarding Small Segments (and Endogamy).

http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


DNA Research #DNA A Study Utilizing Small Segment Matching #dna

Israel P
 

Where I demonstrate conclusively that Roberta Estes is correct, at
least in certain cases, regarding Small Segments (and Endogamy).

http://allmyforeparents.blogspot.com

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Re: NYC newspapers #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"

While it's unlikely they had an obituary if they were not prominent or
wealthy, there were many paid death notices in the Times and you can
get quite lucky by searching the digitized New York Times archives.
If you are a home -delivery subscriber to the Times anywhere in the
country, you can get a log on and password to search the archives for
free.

NYC libraries (and many others) will have the ProQuest databases
including the NY Times and many other papers. ProQuest is a paid
subscription service only available at universities and libraries and
individuals cannot pay for a subscription.

Note, however that anything considered "news" was covered so murders,
suicides, strange deaths (window cleaners falling, ptomaine poisoning,
domestic violence) were covered by reporters. So were the untimely
deaths of children on the lower east side at the turn of the century
in items like "Deaths of the Week" where the name, age and address was
provided by the paper. These were not notices paid for by the family,
just a regularly run column listing unfortunate deaths, so until you
go looking you can't be sure what you might find. The best rule is to
not assume just because someone wasn't famous you won't find a mention
of their death in a newspaper.

The Fulton Postcard site with other New York papers is also an
excellent resource, as is the Brooklyn Eagle.

ProQuest also offers a collection of historical American Jewish
newspapers. These often carried obituaries of more prominent Jews
throughout the U.S. including New York:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922) - a weekly Jewish
newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the
Jewish Messenger.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990) - a primary source of news and
information as well as a forum for discussion and debate.

The American Israelite (1854-2000) - the longest-running
English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United
States. The newspaper's two goals were to spread the principles of
Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs
and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990) - which carried news of developments in
Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over >from repressive regimes,
and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life.

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC newspapers #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Mark Fearer asks:

"My question is, when our non-famous immigrant ancestors who lived in
Manhattan died, were they likely to have an obituary in any local
publications, between 1890-1940? The Forward? It seems unlikely they
would appear in the NY Times. Where - if anywhere - might there be an
obituary?"

While it's unlikely they had an obituary if they were not prominent or
wealthy, there were many paid death notices in the Times and you can
get quite lucky by searching the digitized New York Times archives.
If you are a home -delivery subscriber to the Times anywhere in the
country, you can get a log on and password to search the archives for
free.

NYC libraries (and many others) will have the ProQuest databases
including the NY Times and many other papers. ProQuest is a paid
subscription service only available at universities and libraries and
individuals cannot pay for a subscription.

Note, however that anything considered "news" was covered so murders,
suicides, strange deaths (window cleaners falling, ptomaine poisoning,
domestic violence) were covered by reporters. So were the untimely
deaths of children on the lower east side at the turn of the century
in items like "Deaths of the Week" where the name, age and address was
provided by the paper. These were not notices paid for by the family,
just a regularly run column listing unfortunate deaths, so until you
go looking you can't be sure what you might find. The best rule is to
not assume just because someone wasn't famous you won't find a mention
of their death in a newspaper.

The Fulton Postcard site with other New York papers is also an
excellent resource, as is the Brooklyn Eagle.

ProQuest also offers a collection of historical American Jewish
newspapers. These often carried obituaries of more prominent Jews
throughout the U.S. including New York:

The American Hebrew & Jewish Messenger (1857-1922) - a weekly Jewish
newspaper published in New York City. In 1903 it merged with the
Jewish Messenger.

The Jewish Advocate (1905-1990) - a primary source of news and
information as well as a forum for discussion and debate.

The American Israelite (1854-2000) - the longest-running
English-language Jewish newspaper still published in the United
States. The newspaper's two goals were to spread the principles of
Reform Judaism, and to keep American Jews in touch with Jewish affairs
and their religious identity.

Jewish Exponent (1887-1990) - which carried news of developments in
Israel, efforts to rescue Jews the world over >from repressive regimes,
and the ever-expanding role of Jews in American public life.

If you live in New York you can research this collection at the Center
for Jewish History, 3rd floor Ackmann & Ziff Genealogical Institute.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com

102001 - 102020 of 663791