Date   

Incident near Przygodzice, Ostrow Wielkopolski, Poland in 1886-1887? #germany

Bill Spriggs <billsprigg@...>
 

I am doing research on a cousin's maternal grandmother. Her grandmother
was Anna ZINN.

Anna ZINN immigrated to the United States in March 1887 on board
the SS Hermann, a vesssel that sailed >from Bremen, Germany.
The German to Americans passenger list data base shows that her
last permanent residence was listed as "Drygds." I looked up the
data base using the National Archives search engine for it, and
found that the only vessel and only voyage that listed anyone
claiming "Drygds" as their last permanent residence was the March 1887
voyage of the SS Hermann.

The vessel carried a little over 1,000 passengers on that voyage.
Close to 670 of them were Germans who claimed "Drygds" as their last
permanent residence and there were another several dozen that were
Russians and also claimed "Drygds" as their last permanent residence.

I looked at a bulletin board discussion on Ancestry and also consulted
the Meyers Gazetteer of the German Empire and found "Drygase" a small
hamlet outside the village of Przygodzice in Ostrow Wielkopsolki, Poland.

Since Drygase appears to be so small, an exodus of about 700 people
would be a very significant event. And, given that no other immigrants
arriving into the US ever claimed Drygase as their home, it is also
significant, as it means it was not a typical trickle of immigrants
following each other over time.

I have looked to see if there was some significant event in Ostrow
Wielkopolski that could have prompted such a large emigration at one time.
I have not been able to find it.

I am hoping that someone else whose ancestors may be >from that region
would have some information or family recollection of something that
might have happened in Ostrow Wielkopolski around the time of 1886-1887.
I found that a synagogue built in 1860 in the area had an accident in
1872 that lead to 19 people dying on Yom Kippur. But, that appears
too distant >from a mass event in 1886.

Bill Spriggs. Great Falls, VA billsprigg@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Incident near Przygodzice, Ostrow Wielkopolski, Poland in 1886-1887? #germany

Bill Spriggs <billsprigg@...>
 

I am doing research on a cousin's maternal grandmother. Her grandmother
was Anna ZINN.

Anna ZINN immigrated to the United States in March 1887 on board
the SS Hermann, a vesssel that sailed >from Bremen, Germany.
The German to Americans passenger list data base shows that her
last permanent residence was listed as "Drygds." I looked up the
data base using the National Archives search engine for it, and
found that the only vessel and only voyage that listed anyone
claiming "Drygds" as their last permanent residence was the March 1887
voyage of the SS Hermann.

The vessel carried a little over 1,000 passengers on that voyage.
Close to 670 of them were Germans who claimed "Drygds" as their last
permanent residence and there were another several dozen that were
Russians and also claimed "Drygds" as their last permanent residence.

I looked at a bulletin board discussion on Ancestry and also consulted
the Meyers Gazetteer of the German Empire and found "Drygase" a small
hamlet outside the village of Przygodzice in Ostrow Wielkopsolki, Poland.

Since Drygase appears to be so small, an exodus of about 700 people
would be a very significant event. And, given that no other immigrants
arriving into the US ever claimed Drygase as their home, it is also
significant, as it means it was not a typical trickle of immigrants
following each other over time.

I have looked to see if there was some significant event in Ostrow
Wielkopolski that could have prompted such a large emigration at one time.
I have not been able to find it.

I am hoping that someone else whose ancestors may be >from that region
would have some information or family recollection of something that
might have happened in Ostrow Wielkopolski around the time of 1886-1887.
I found that a synagogue built in 1860 in the area had an accident in
1872 that lead to 19 people dying on Yom Kippur. But, that appears
too distant >from a mass event in 1886.

Bill Spriggs. Great Falls, VA billsprigg@aol.com


SITE CITE- Reinstatement of German citizenship to children and grandchildren #germany

Steve Ebstein <ebstein@...>
 

I don't think these links have been sent with any of the messages
regarding reclaiming citizenship. Information >from the German Missions
in the US is here: http://tinyurl.com/6l8keu6
http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/05__Legal/02__Directory__Services/02__Citizenship/__Restored.html

An application form that is not required but is useful is here:
http://tinyurl.com/l9t8pm4
http://www.germany.info/contentblob/2095222/Daten/278878/Article116_2_PDF.pdf

As I understand it, you have to provide some documentary proof that
you or your ancestors are entitled to reinstatement. You shouldn't
need outside help unless you cannot put your hands on such documents.
The German authorities will review them and presumably check records
in Germany, as well, before issuing a naturalization certificate.

In my case, my father had some documents including a birth certificate
and school registration, along with something >from his voyage by ship
establishing when he left Germany. I had my birth certificate. We made
an appointment at the consulate and presented the documents. The
consular official said I would also need my parents' marriage
certificate, which I was able to order online >from the secretary of
state. My naturalization certificate came 7 months later and my
passport came a month or two after I applied.

Steve Ebstein Newton, MA ebstein@lexitek.com


German SIG #Germany SITE CITE- Reinstatement of German citizenship to children and grandchildren #germany

Steve Ebstein <ebstein@...>
 

I don't think these links have been sent with any of the messages
regarding reclaiming citizenship. Information >from the German Missions
in the US is here: http://tinyurl.com/6l8keu6
http://www.germany.info/Vertretung/usa/en/05__Legal/02__Directory__Services/02__Citizenship/__Restored.html

An application form that is not required but is useful is here:
http://tinyurl.com/l9t8pm4
http://www.germany.info/contentblob/2095222/Daten/278878/Article116_2_PDF.pdf

As I understand it, you have to provide some documentary proof that
you or your ancestors are entitled to reinstatement. You shouldn't
need outside help unless you cannot put your hands on such documents.
The German authorities will review them and presumably check records
in Germany, as well, before issuing a naturalization certificate.

In my case, my father had some documents including a birth certificate
and school registration, along with something >from his voyage by ship
establishing when he left Germany. I had my birth certificate. We made
an appointment at the consulate and presented the documents. The
consular official said I would also need my parents' marriage
certificate, which I was able to order online >from the secretary of
state. My naturalization certificate came 7 months later and my
passport came a month or two after I applied.

Steve Ebstein Newton, MA ebstein@lexitek.com


JGS NY Meeting Sunday, February 22 #ukraine

Harriet Mayer
 

Join us for the JGS NY Meeting on Sunday, February 22
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York
at 2 PM

Speaker: Dr. Janette Silverman
Program: "Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: Genealogical
Resources at The Jewish Theological Seminary"

The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York is off the radar screen for
many genealogists. Yet its library is a treasure, home to almost half a million
volumes including manuscripts, rare books and archives. The archives are a rich
repository of records of Jewish communities, institutions and prominent individuals
in the US and Europe.

With Dr. Silverman, we will take a digital trip and explore some of the unique resources
of the JTS archives. We will also explore a variety of ketubot and mohel books and
discuss the ways that all of these materials can advance our research.

Dr.Silverman is Outreach Director for the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish
Education at JTS. She is also a professional genealogist and owner of the genealogy
consulting firm RelativaTree. Active as a volunteer in genealogical activities, she
is the JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator; a Moderator of the JewishGen Discussion
Group; a volunteer at the NY Family History Center; and former President of the Phoenix
Jewish Genealogy Society. She holds a doctoral degree in Jewish Studies.

Come join us at the Lunch & Learn session at 12:30 PM prior to the meeting. Bring your
lunch and questions for a special session with Janette Silverman on Ukraine Research and
the resources of Ukraine SIG.

Free for JGS members, guests $5 at the door.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open at 11 AM with access
to research materials.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine JGS NY Meeting Sunday, February 22 #ukraine

Harriet Mayer
 

Join us for the JGS NY Meeting on Sunday, February 22
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York
at 2 PM

Speaker: Dr. Janette Silverman
Program: "Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: Genealogical
Resources at The Jewish Theological Seminary"

The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York is off the radar screen for
many genealogists. Yet its library is a treasure, home to almost half a million
volumes including manuscripts, rare books and archives. The archives are a rich
repository of records of Jewish communities, institutions and prominent individuals
in the US and Europe.

With Dr. Silverman, we will take a digital trip and explore some of the unique resources
of the JTS archives. We will also explore a variety of ketubot and mohel books and
discuss the ways that all of these materials can advance our research.

Dr.Silverman is Outreach Director for the William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish
Education at JTS. She is also a professional genealogist and owner of the genealogy
consulting firm RelativaTree. Active as a volunteer in genealogical activities, she
is the JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator; a Moderator of the JewishGen Discussion
Group; a volunteer at the NY Family History Center; and former President of the Phoenix
Jewish Genealogy Society. She holds a doctoral degree in Jewish Studies.

Come join us at the Lunch & Learn session at 12:30 PM prior to the meeting. Bring your
lunch and questions for a special session with Janette Silverman on Ukraine Research and
the resources of Ukraine SIG.

Free for JGS members, guests $5 at the door.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open at 11 AM with access
to research materials.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York, NY


Research in Kirovograd #ukraine

Cheryl Lieberman <crl4242@...>
 

I have identified a research to look up family information for me and
he suggested that I see if anyone else would like research done in
Kirovograd, formally known a Elizavetgrad. Having multiple customers
will reduce the cost for each of us.

--
Cheryl R. Lieberman CISSP, CISM
crl4242@gmail.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Research in Kirovograd #ukraine

Cheryl Lieberman <crl4242@...>
 

I have identified a research to look up family information for me and
he suggested that I see if anyone else would like research done in
Kirovograd, formally known a Elizavetgrad. Having multiple customers
will reduce the cost for each of us.

--
Cheryl R. Lieberman CISSP, CISM
crl4242@gmail.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: "Czargorod" and German farming colonies #ukraine

davidnsandler@...
 

Check out Shargorod, now spelled Sharhorod in Ukrainian. Near
Vinnitsya. Lots of info on web.

David Sandler

-----Original Message-----
From: Adam D Turner adam.d.turner@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: Ukraine SIG <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Fri, Feb 13, 2015 5:10 pm
Subject: [ukraine] "Czargorod" and German farming colonies

Hello! I just came across the manifest of the SS Potsdam, arriving in
NY on 8 June 1907, which I believe lists my gg-grandfather Yossel
SEIDENBERG (changed to Joseph Siden in the US).

There's a bit of a puzzle here as the manifest lists his town as
"Czargorod", a name which, as best I can tell, is an archaic name for
a part of Moscow. But all the information I have so far accrued on
this family is that they came >from Kherson Gubernia in Ukraine and
lived either in Berezivka, or in small Black Sea German farming
colonies in the vicinity, chiefly Rohrbach (now Novosvitlivka) or
possibly Worms (now Vynohradne). My family lore is that Joseph was a
merchant who drove produce >from German farmers into Odessa for sale.

There appears to be no such town in this area as "Czargorod" in any of
the gazetteers I checked. The closest matches seem to be:

-Tsaregol, a tiny place in present-day Odessa Oblast:
http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/17/Tsaregol.html . Closest towns
seem to be Ivanivka and Petrivka, about 19km south of Novosvitlivka.
-Tsaregol, better known as Lyublino, in present-day Mykolayvis'ka
Oblast: http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/16/Lyublino.html . This
town is only about 8 km to the south of the other Tsaregol.
-Tsaredarivka in present-day Mykolayvis'ka Oblast,
http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/16/Tsaredarovka.html. This town is
about 60 km north-northwest of Novosvitlivka and Berezivka.

I'm curious if any experts in this area can weigh in on which (if any)
of these sound like the best match. Wasn't sure how the Russian
Revolution affected place names in Ukraine that began with "Czar", or
how the Russian suffix "gorod" was rendered in other languages.

Also, if you've researched ancestors in or around these Black Sea
German colonies, I'd love any pointers! I've turned up little so far
on Jews in Rohrbach and Worms.

Thanks,
Adam Turner
adam.d.turner@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: "Czargorod" and German farming colonies #ukraine

davidnsandler@...
 

Check out Shargorod, now spelled Sharhorod in Ukrainian. Near
Vinnitsya. Lots of info on web.

David Sandler

-----Original Message-----
From: Adam D Turner adam.d.turner@gmail.com
<ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: Ukraine SIG <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Fri, Feb 13, 2015 5:10 pm
Subject: [ukraine] "Czargorod" and German farming colonies

Hello! I just came across the manifest of the SS Potsdam, arriving in
NY on 8 June 1907, which I believe lists my gg-grandfather Yossel
SEIDENBERG (changed to Joseph Siden in the US).

There's a bit of a puzzle here as the manifest lists his town as
"Czargorod", a name which, as best I can tell, is an archaic name for
a part of Moscow. But all the information I have so far accrued on
this family is that they came >from Kherson Gubernia in Ukraine and
lived either in Berezivka, or in small Black Sea German farming
colonies in the vicinity, chiefly Rohrbach (now Novosvitlivka) or
possibly Worms (now Vynohradne). My family lore is that Joseph was a
merchant who drove produce >from German farmers into Odessa for sale.

There appears to be no such town in this area as "Czargorod" in any of
the gazetteers I checked. The closest matches seem to be:

-Tsaregol, a tiny place in present-day Odessa Oblast:
http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/17/Tsaregol.html . Closest towns
seem to be Ivanivka and Petrivka, about 19km south of Novosvitlivka.
-Tsaregol, better known as Lyublino, in present-day Mykolayvis'ka
Oblast: http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/16/Lyublino.html . This
town is only about 8 km to the south of the other Tsaregol.
-Tsaredarivka in present-day Mykolayvis'ka Oblast,
http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/16/Tsaredarovka.html. This town is
about 60 km north-northwest of Novosvitlivka and Berezivka.

I'm curious if any experts in this area can weigh in on which (if any)
of these sound like the best match. Wasn't sure how the Russian
Revolution affected place names in Ukraine that began with "Czar", or
how the Russian suffix "gorod" was rendered in other languages.

Also, if you've researched ancestors in or around these Black Sea
German colonies, I'd love any pointers! I've turned up little so far
on Jews in Rohrbach and Worms.

Thanks,
Adam Turner
adam.d.turner@gmail.com


Re: Czargorod" and German farming colonies #ukraine

Sheldon Kugelmass <smkugelmass@...>
 

Adam,
I think you are looking for Shargorod in Ukraine. If you search in Google Maps, it'll show up as Sharhorod, Vinnyts'ka oblast ; location at (48.74, 28.08). Although there appear to be a few places called Berezivka, there is one that is about 10 miles south of Shargorod. Given the proximity, I think these may be the places you are looking for.


Hope this helps.

Sheldon Kugelmass
Montclair, NJ

Researching
KUGELMASS >from Horodenka and vicinity
GROSSINGER >from Baligrod
OWSIANKA, NOVOMINSKI >from Pultusk


Subject: "Czargorod" and German farming coloniesFrom: Adam Turner <adam.d.turner@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 13:52:18 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello! I just came across the manifest of the SS Potsdam, arriving in
NY on 8 June 1907, which I believe lists my gg-grandfather Yossel
SEIDENBERG (changed to Joseph Siden in the US).

There's a bit of a puzzle here as the manifest lists his town as
"Czargorod", a name which, as best I can tell, is an archaic name for
a part of Moscow. But all the information I have so far accrued on
this family is that they came >from Kherson Gubernia in Ukraine and
lived either in Berezivka, or in small Black Sea German farming
colonies in the vicinity, chiefly Rohrbach (now Novosvitlivka) or
possibly Worms (now Vynohradne). My family lore is that Joseph was a
merchant who drove produce >from German farmers into Odessa for sale.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Czargorod" and German farming colonies #ukraine

Sheldon Kugelmass <smkugelmass@...>
 

Adam,
I think you are looking for Shargorod in Ukraine. If you search in Google Maps, it'll show up as Sharhorod, Vinnyts'ka oblast ; location at (48.74, 28.08). Although there appear to be a few places called Berezivka, there is one that is about 10 miles south of Shargorod. Given the proximity, I think these may be the places you are looking for.


Hope this helps.

Sheldon Kugelmass
Montclair, NJ

Researching
KUGELMASS >from Horodenka and vicinity
GROSSINGER >from Baligrod
OWSIANKA, NOVOMINSKI >from Pultusk


Subject: "Czargorod" and German farming coloniesFrom: Adam Turner <adam.d.turner@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 13:52:18 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello! I just came across the manifest of the SS Potsdam, arriving in
NY on 8 June 1907, which I believe lists my gg-grandfather Yossel
SEIDENBERG (changed to Joseph Siden in the US).

There's a bit of a puzzle here as the manifest lists his town as
"Czargorod", a name which, as best I can tell, is an archaic name for
a part of Moscow. But all the information I have so far accrued on
this family is that they came >from Kherson Gubernia in Ukraine and
lived either in Berezivka, or in small Black Sea German farming
colonies in the vicinity, chiefly Rohrbach (now Novosvitlivka) or
possibly Worms (now Vynohradne). My family lore is that Joseph was a
merchant who drove produce >from German farmers into Odessa for sale.


JGS of Maryland February 22 program #general

Susan Steeble
 

"The Jews of Eastern Europe in the Age of Mass Migration, 1881-1914"

Please join us on Sunday, February 22, 2015, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Pikesville Library's meeting room for our next program: "The Jews of
Eastern Europe in the Age of Mass Migration, 1881-1914." Our guest
speaker, Dr. Kenneth Moss, Director of the Jewish Studies Program at
Johns Hopkins University, will offer a portrait of East European
Jewish society and culture in a moment of rapid transition and
transformation, with particular attention to the everyday lives and
life courses of Jews against the backdrop of dramatic political and
economic changes; the Jewish cultural geography of Eastern Europe;
Jews in the small towns and the big cities; Judaism and Jewish
culture: continuities, contestations, fragmentation, reinvention; and
Jews and political upheaval: imperial retrenchment, popular
nationalism, and the question of Jewish fate, 1881-1914.

Kenneth B. Moss is Director of the Stulman Program in Jewish Studies,
Department of History, and Felix Posen Associate Professor of Modern
Jewish History at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He is also
Co-editor of Jewish Social Studies. Dr. Mossâ??s research interests
include: modern Jewish history; the history of Israel, Russia, Poland,
and Eastern Europe; Jewish political thought; Hebrew and Yiddish
literature and culture; history and sociology of nationalism; theory
and practice of cultural history; and history of the cultural sphere.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
JGSMD Public Relations


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Maryland February 22 program #general

Susan Steeble
 

"The Jews of Eastern Europe in the Age of Mass Migration, 1881-1914"

Please join us on Sunday, February 22, 2015, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Pikesville Library's meeting room for our next program: "The Jews of
Eastern Europe in the Age of Mass Migration, 1881-1914." Our guest
speaker, Dr. Kenneth Moss, Director of the Jewish Studies Program at
Johns Hopkins University, will offer a portrait of East European
Jewish society and culture in a moment of rapid transition and
transformation, with particular attention to the everyday lives and
life courses of Jews against the backdrop of dramatic political and
economic changes; the Jewish cultural geography of Eastern Europe;
Jews in the small towns and the big cities; Judaism and Jewish
culture: continuities, contestations, fragmentation, reinvention; and
Jews and political upheaval: imperial retrenchment, popular
nationalism, and the question of Jewish fate, 1881-1914.

Kenneth B. Moss is Director of the Stulman Program in Jewish Studies,
Department of History, and Felix Posen Associate Professor of Modern
Jewish History at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. He is also
Co-editor of Jewish Social Studies. Dr. Mossâ??s research interests
include: modern Jewish history; the history of Israel, Russia, Poland,
and Eastern Europe; Jewish political thought; Hebrew and Yiddish
literature and culture; history and sociology of nationalism; theory
and practice of cultural history; and history of the cultural sphere.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
JGSMD Public Relations


BABAD in Strassbourg #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact family of Alexander BABAD who lived in Strassbourg

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BABAD in Strassbourg #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to contact family of Alexander BABAD who lived in Strassbourg

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


Descendants of R'Arieh Leib ben (son of) R' Shmuel of Kremnitz-18th cent #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My lineage goes back to the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb.
Naftali KATZ, the author of the "Smichas Chachomim".

Several biographical sources show KATZ's descendants down to the above
father and sons who were Rabbis of Kremenetz during the latter part of
the 17th and early years of the 18th centuries. The only published
line that I've come across after the above Arieh Leib ben Shmuel is a
son Shmuel of Rava Ruska.

According to private, unpublished trees we are probaly descendants of
a daughter who married a Rabbi Yoseph who may have been a Rabbi in the
town/city called Breznitz (probably not the one in Czheck). This
Joseph had a son who married the daughter of Aharon and Pearl ,the
admo"r of Lechowitz and another son, R'Yisrael of Ostrow, who seems to
be my ancestor. There are two Yisrael of Ostrows mentioned in the book
, "Mazkeret Legdolei Ostrov" but we are not sure to which we may be
related and in both the lineage to Kremenetz, KATZ or the MAHARA"L are
not mentioned.

I would be happy to hear >from anyone who knows of other children of
the above R' Arieh Leib of Kremenetz to see how we may connect.

TIA and Shavua tov.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Origin of FREEDMAN name #general

Elizabeth Scofield
 

My ggrandfather Lipman NEINKEN emigrated >from Latvia in 1892 to the
US. His Brooklyn, NY, death certificate lists his mother's (maiden)
name as Rebecca Freedman, born in Russia. FREEDMAN does not appear to
be Latvian in origin. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Thank you.

Liz Scofield
Bethlehem, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Descendants of R'Arieh Leib ben (son of) R' Shmuel of Kremnitz-18th cent #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My lineage goes back to the Mahara"l and the Maharsha"l through Reb.
Naftali KATZ, the author of the "Smichas Chachomim".

Several biographical sources show KATZ's descendants down to the above
father and sons who were Rabbis of Kremenetz during the latter part of
the 17th and early years of the 18th centuries. The only published
line that I've come across after the above Arieh Leib ben Shmuel is a
son Shmuel of Rava Ruska.

According to private, unpublished trees we are probaly descendants of
a daughter who married a Rabbi Yoseph who may have been a Rabbi in the
town/city called Breznitz (probably not the one in Czheck). This
Joseph had a son who married the daughter of Aharon and Pearl ,the
admo"r of Lechowitz and another son, R'Yisrael of Ostrow, who seems to
be my ancestor. There are two Yisrael of Ostrows mentioned in the book
, "Mazkeret Legdolei Ostrov" but we are not sure to which we may be
related and in both the lineage to Kremenetz, KATZ or the MAHARA"L are
not mentioned.

I would be happy to hear >from anyone who knows of other children of
the above R' Arieh Leib of Kremenetz to see how we may connect.

TIA and Shavua tov.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Origin of FREEDMAN name #general

Elizabeth Scofield
 

My ggrandfather Lipman NEINKEN emigrated >from Latvia in 1892 to the
US. His Brooklyn, NY, death certificate lists his mother's (maiden)
name as Rebecca Freedman, born in Russia. FREEDMAN does not appear to
be Latvian in origin. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

Thank you.

Liz Scofield
Bethlehem, PA

99241 - 99260 of 662114