Date   

Translation Request - Russian, FINKLESTEYN, FINKIELSTAJN #poland

Genealogy BLW
 

Marilyn Robinson found this Russian website and posted it to her blog.
http://kfinkelshteyn.narod.ru/Genealogy/gen_main1.htm It's a
long shot, but I wonder if this FINKLESTEYN family could be related to
my FINKIELSTAJN ancestors in Kielce District of Poland, the most recent
of whom is my great grandmother, Rywka Maria FINKIELSTAJN, abt. 1868 to
1928. Her parents were Abraham FINKIELSTAJN and Chaya Melnick.

The family tree is in Russian as are the supporting pages for each
member of the tree. I've used Google Translate, but it is
imperfect.

I would appreciate any genealogical information that might link the two
families.

Thank you,
Barbara Weintraub
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Researching SZNAJDER, KAC, FINKIESZTAJN, WAKSMAN, GORECKI, LINDZON,
CELNICK, ERDSZNEKE, KREL in Ostrowiec, Opole Lubelskie, Markuszow and
other nearby towns in Congress Poland, and after emigration in USA,
Canada, Paraguay, Cuba, Brazil
Also, WEINTRAUB, BROD/BRAUDE/BRODY, HAMMER/KAMER, FINK, SPINDEL >from
Ivano-Frankivska, Ukraine (formerly Stanislawow, Galicia).
Also, BROD/BRAUDE/BRODY/BRODIE in New York and wherever they went >from
there.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.


JRI Poland #Poland Translation Request - Russian, FINKLESTEYN, FINKIELSTAJN #poland

Genealogy BLW
 

Marilyn Robinson found this Russian website and posted it to her blog.
http://kfinkelshteyn.narod.ru/Genealogy/gen_main1.htm It's a
long shot, but I wonder if this FINKLESTEYN family could be related to
my FINKIELSTAJN ancestors in Kielce District of Poland, the most recent
of whom is my great grandmother, Rywka Maria FINKIELSTAJN, abt. 1868 to
1928. Her parents were Abraham FINKIELSTAJN and Chaya Melnick.

The family tree is in Russian as are the supporting pages for each
member of the tree. I've used Google Translate, but it is
imperfect.

I would appreciate any genealogical information that might link the two
families.

Thank you,
Barbara Weintraub
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Researching SZNAJDER, KAC, FINKIESZTAJN, WAKSMAN, GORECKI, LINDZON,
CELNICK, ERDSZNEKE, KREL in Ostrowiec, Opole Lubelskie, Markuszow and
other nearby towns in Congress Poland, and after emigration in USA,
Canada, Paraguay, Cuba, Brazil
Also, WEINTRAUB, BROD/BRAUDE/BRODY, HAMMER/KAMER, FINK, SPINDEL >from
Ivano-Frankivska, Ukraine (formerly Stanislawow, Galicia).
Also, BROD/BRAUDE/BRODY/BRODIE in New York and wherever they went >from
there.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.


Seeking birth records in Bacau. #romania

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am seeking to find birth records 1894-1914 in Bacau - anyone had success in this
field?, if so please forward any relevant information to me privately., unless of
course this would be of interest to the group.

Thank you.

Purim Sameach.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Romania SIG #Romania Seeking birth records in Bacau. #romania

nigel wilson <wilsonettess@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am seeking to find birth records 1894-1914 in Bacau - anyone had success in this
field?, if so please forward any relevant information to me privately., unless of
course this would be of interest to the group.

Thank you.

Purim Sameach.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Adoption records New York City #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Is there any new information available that can help someone research their
adoption records?

This person was born in New York City in 1950. She located her birth mother
who gave no information regarding the father. This individual would like to
locate her father's family.

Or is this still something that cannot be accomplished?

Thank you in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider
Baltimore, Maryland USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Adoption records New York City #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Is there any new information available that can help someone research their
adoption records?

This person was born in New York City in 1950. She located her birth mother
who gave no information regarding the father. This individual would like to
locate her father's family.

Or is this still something that cannot be accomplished?

Thank you in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider
Baltimore, Maryland USA


Jewish Transmigration Bureau - refunded money year before deportation #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Could someone possibly answer this for me. It is the first time I have come
across it in my genealogical searches.

Hani Johanna Schmetterling
from Yad Vashem: Details of transport: Transport 34 >from Wien,Vienna,Austria
to Theresienstadt,Ghetto,Czechoslovakia on 28/07/1942 Prisoner Nr. 693

But I have found 2 cards >from the Jewish Transmigration Bureau that indicate
her son (Joachim Schmetterling, NYC) sent money to her Vienna address on
March 17, 1941, October 29, 1941 but receives a refund check November 21, 1941
yet she was not deported until July, 1942,

So my questions: Were borders were already closed by November, 1941 so she
could not emmigrate or was the JTB not able to send money to Vienna after 1941.
Either way, where would she have been >from November, 1941 to her deportation
in July, 1942?

Thank you.

Debbie Painter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Transmigration Bureau - refunded money year before deportation #general

Debby Gincig Painter
 

Could someone possibly answer this for me. It is the first time I have come
across it in my genealogical searches.

Hani Johanna Schmetterling
from Yad Vashem: Details of transport: Transport 34 >from Wien,Vienna,Austria
to Theresienstadt,Ghetto,Czechoslovakia on 28/07/1942 Prisoner Nr. 693

But I have found 2 cards >from the Jewish Transmigration Bureau that indicate
her son (Joachim Schmetterling, NYC) sent money to her Vienna address on
March 17, 1941, October 29, 1941 but receives a refund check November 21, 1941
yet she was not deported until July, 1942,

So my questions: Were borders were already closed by November, 1941 so she
could not emmigrate or was the JTB not able to send money to Vienna after 1941.
Either way, where would she have been >from November, 1941 to her deportation
in July, 1942?

Thank you.

Debbie Painter


(US) National Archives March Genealogy Programs; Family Search Free March and April Webinars #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The National Archives (US) genealogy programs for the month of March have
been announced. All programs at the National Archives are free and open to
the public. The programs will be held at the National Archives in Washington
DC at will be held in the National Archives Building Research Center (Room
G-25), in Washington, DC. The programs are free and open to the public.

Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives
Wednesday, March 4, at 11 a.m., Room G-25, Research Center

"Help! I'm Stuck" Genealogy Consultation
Saturday, March 21, noon-4 p.m., Room G-25, Research Center

Last October 28-30 the National Archives hosted a live 3-day virtual
genealogy fair via webcast on YouTube and they may be accessed at:
http://www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair/
To read more go to:
http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2015/nr15-50.html

FamilySearch provides free webinars every month and have posted the upcoming
ones for March and April at:
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Family_History_Library#March_2015
Note the times are all (US) Mountain time and to convert to your time zone
use\ http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

When you click on any of the webinar links please note effective February 25
they changed to WebEx as their webinar provider. I would strongly encourage
you to read the pdf with instructions **before** you attend the webinar so you
are all set to go at the correct time.
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/images/a/a6/AttendMeetingInstructions.pdf

There are directions on the page (remember to click on one of the webinar
dates to access this information) to join the webinar and set up WEB-EX.

To see the webinars go to the first url under FamilySearch above-not
everyone will find each webinar of interest so pick and choose to your own
preferences.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) National Archives March Genealogy Programs; Family Search Free March and April Webinars #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The National Archives (US) genealogy programs for the month of March have
been announced. All programs at the National Archives are free and open to
the public. The programs will be held at the National Archives in Washington
DC at will be held in the National Archives Building Research Center (Room
G-25), in Washington, DC. The programs are free and open to the public.

Introduction to Genealogy at the National Archives
Wednesday, March 4, at 11 a.m., Room G-25, Research Center

"Help! I'm Stuck" Genealogy Consultation
Saturday, March 21, noon-4 p.m., Room G-25, Research Center

Last October 28-30 the National Archives hosted a live 3-day virtual
genealogy fair via webcast on YouTube and they may be accessed at:
http://www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair/
To read more go to:
http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2015/nr15-50.html

FamilySearch provides free webinars every month and have posted the upcoming
ones for March and April at:
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Family_History_Library#March_2015
Note the times are all (US) Mountain time and to convert to your time zone
use\ http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

When you click on any of the webinar links please note effective February 25
they changed to WebEx as their webinar provider. I would strongly encourage
you to read the pdf with instructions **before** you attend the webinar so you
are all set to go at the correct time.
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/images/a/a6/AttendMeetingInstructions.pdf

There are directions on the page (remember to click on one of the webinar
dates to access this information) to join the webinar and set up WEB-EX.

To see the webinars go to the first url under FamilySearch above-not
everyone will find each webinar of interest so pick and choose to your own
preferences.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Switched At Birth in 1913-2014 DNA Tests Proves the Mix-up #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

This is an interesting genealogical story-evidently in 1913 two male
children were switched at the Bronx NY Fordham Hospital and this was only
found over 100 years later in 2014 >from DNA tests of their children who were
surprised being raised Irish that they were Ashkenazi Jewish and the one
raised Jewish DNA showed Irish ancestry - no Ashkenazi heritage.

To read both stories go to:

Alice's Story:
http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.com/2015/02/switched-at-birth-unravelling-century_27.html
[Mod. Note: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/oDCb8d ]

Jess's Story:
https://strangepilgrimage.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/and-who-wouldve-thought-it-figures/
[Mod. Note: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/JhQM7L ]

I have no affiliation with 23andMe which was the DNA company involved and
they are not the ones who published the stories.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Switched At Birth in 1913-2014 DNA Tests Proves the Mix-up #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

This is an interesting genealogical story-evidently in 1913 two male
children were switched at the Bronx NY Fordham Hospital and this was only
found over 100 years later in 2014 >from DNA tests of their children who were
surprised being raised Irish that they were Ashkenazi Jewish and the one
raised Jewish DNA showed Irish ancestry - no Ashkenazi heritage.

To read both stories go to:

Alice's Story:
http://www.yourgeneticgenealogist.com/2015/02/switched-at-birth-unravelling-century_27.html
[Mod. Note: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/oDCb8d ]

Jess's Story:
https://strangepilgrimage.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/and-who-wouldve-thought-it-figures/
[Mod. Note: shortened URL - http://goo.gl/JhQM7L ]

I have no affiliation with 23andMe which was the DNA company involved and
they are not the ones who published the stories.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Tombstone translated. #general

Anne Wise
 

Thanks to all who took a look at the matzeva of my great grand uncle.
I have a reasonable translation.

Anne Wise
Researching:
ROTHMAN, BRICKMAN and BARSKY Beresovka Ukraine and Philadelphia; LIEBERMAN LEVIN
in Yaltushkov, Ukraine and Philadelphia; ROTHSCHILD Virbellen/Virbalis Lithuania
and Chicago; GOODMAN Mariampole Lithuania and Chicago; PALNITSKI Kalvarija
Lithuania and Chicago; KOENIG/COHN Debica Galicia Poland; GAMZU Kursanai
Lithuania and Cincinnati OH; WISHNATSKI/WISE Kermenchug Ukraine and Jerusalem;
RIVLIN Shklov Ukraine and Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tombstone translated. #general

Anne Wise
 

Thanks to all who took a look at the matzeva of my great grand uncle.
I have a reasonable translation.

Anne Wise
Researching:
ROTHMAN, BRICKMAN and BARSKY Beresovka Ukraine and Philadelphia; LIEBERMAN LEVIN
in Yaltushkov, Ukraine and Philadelphia; ROTHSCHILD Virbellen/Virbalis Lithuania
and Chicago; GOODMAN Mariampole Lithuania and Chicago; PALNITSKI Kalvarija
Lithuania and Chicago; KOENIG/COHN Debica Galicia Poland; GAMZU Kursanai
Lithuania and Cincinnati OH; WISHNATSKI/WISE Kermenchug Ukraine and Jerusalem;
RIVLIN Shklov Ukraine and Jerusalem


Re: Escaping conscription in czarist Russia #general

Judith Singer
 

For those who do not want to read an entire book on the subject but
would like to gain more accurate information about conscription of
Jews into the Tsarist army, I recommend the article "Military Service
in Russia" in The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe. It can
be found at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Military_Service_in_Russia

This will help dispel some of the notions Emily Garber appropriately
describes as "overblown". It was not the case that all Jewish males
were required to serve. According to the YIVO article, when conscription
was instituted in 1827, the usual annual quota was about four conscripts
for every 1,000 thousand Jews.

Judith Singer

From: Emily Garber <emilyhgarber@gmail.com>
Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@shaw.ca> wrote:
Between 1827 and 1856 all Jewish boys except the first born were
conscripted into the army for 31 years.
I am researching a tale of a man who gave each of his 5 sons a different
name and, presumably, bribed the local conscription officer to brief
officials about these "only sons". The names I know are Gurstein,
Poshtar, Dudick and Boslik - the 5th remains a mystery..
If anyone has information about this practice or about these names,
please let me know. The Gurstein line is the one I am researching but
the others are also of interest. This family probably lived in Volhynia
Province, perhaps in Bilohirya or Belozerka.
I have been researching a similar story in my family: the four
brother's names were Utchenik, Garber, Reznik and (I was told) Lehman
(but it was likely Lederman). I began my research with something
completely different in mind - finding the relationship between my
family and a woman named on a manifest.

My research (which may be followed through 12 posts, thus far, in a
series on my blog) led me back to this seeming family bubba meintza. I
am still not ready to say it's true, but via DNA testing and
exhaustive traditional genealogical research I have successfully
linked my Garber males to Lederman males who share the exact same
Y-DNA at the 37 marker level of testing.

Where I may diverge >from the family story is causation. While I can
prove that my great grandfather Avraham Abba Garber was the brother of
Levi Yitzchak Lederman, I am not prepared to say this was due to
avoidance of conscription. In the nineteenth century Russian Empire
there were places where Jews likely did not adopt surnames until well
into mid-century. It may have had little to do with avoidance of
conscription.

Certainly, popular information among Jewish genealogists regarding the
length of Russian military service and the Jewish experience in the
service is overblown. It does not take into consideration the fact
that rules of conscription were not monolithic. The role of the kahal
and the character and length of service changed through time in the
Russian Empire. I suggest you read Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern's book
"Jews in the Russian Army, 1827-1917." He has completed extensive
research in formerly closed archival records and has been able to
refute some notions about Jews in the military.

I am actually quite satisfied that I did not pursue this line of
research at the outset in order to prove the tale. That type of
research would likely not be based on solid genealogical methods. I
firmly believe that these stories should only be pursued when they are
ripe. By that I mean, when research into other questions lead you
inexorably back to the story.

For those interested in my series on this research, the first post was:
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2012/07/avrums-women-part-2-feiga-grinfeld.html
The most recent post is:
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2015/02/avrums-women-part-13-bond-of-brothers.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Escaping conscription in czarist Russia #general

Judith Singer
 

For those who do not want to read an entire book on the subject but
would like to gain more accurate information about conscription of
Jews into the Tsarist army, I recommend the article "Military Service
in Russia" in The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe. It can
be found at
http://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Military_Service_in_Russia

This will help dispel some of the notions Emily Garber appropriately
describes as "overblown". It was not the case that all Jewish males
were required to serve. According to the YIVO article, when conscription
was instituted in 1827, the usual annual quota was about four conscripts
for every 1,000 thousand Jews.

Judith Singer

From: Emily Garber <emilyhgarber@gmail.com>
Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@shaw.ca> wrote:
Between 1827 and 1856 all Jewish boys except the first born were
conscripted into the army for 31 years.
I am researching a tale of a man who gave each of his 5 sons a different
name and, presumably, bribed the local conscription officer to brief
officials about these "only sons". The names I know are Gurstein,
Poshtar, Dudick and Boslik - the 5th remains a mystery..
If anyone has information about this practice or about these names,
please let me know. The Gurstein line is the one I am researching but
the others are also of interest. This family probably lived in Volhynia
Province, perhaps in Bilohirya or Belozerka.
I have been researching a similar story in my family: the four
brother's names were Utchenik, Garber, Reznik and (I was told) Lehman
(but it was likely Lederman). I began my research with something
completely different in mind - finding the relationship between my
family and a woman named on a manifest.

My research (which may be followed through 12 posts, thus far, in a
series on my blog) led me back to this seeming family bubba meintza. I
am still not ready to say it's true, but via DNA testing and
exhaustive traditional genealogical research I have successfully
linked my Garber males to Lederman males who share the exact same
Y-DNA at the 37 marker level of testing.

Where I may diverge >from the family story is causation. While I can
prove that my great grandfather Avraham Abba Garber was the brother of
Levi Yitzchak Lederman, I am not prepared to say this was due to
avoidance of conscription. In the nineteenth century Russian Empire
there were places where Jews likely did not adopt surnames until well
into mid-century. It may have had little to do with avoidance of
conscription.

Certainly, popular information among Jewish genealogists regarding the
length of Russian military service and the Jewish experience in the
service is overblown. It does not take into consideration the fact
that rules of conscription were not monolithic. The role of the kahal
and the character and length of service changed through time in the
Russian Empire. I suggest you read Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern's book
"Jews in the Russian Army, 1827-1917." He has completed extensive
research in formerly closed archival records and has been able to
refute some notions about Jews in the military.

I am actually quite satisfied that I did not pursue this line of
research at the outset in order to prove the tale. That type of
research would likely not be based on solid genealogical methods. I
firmly believe that these stories should only be pursued when they are
ripe. By that I mean, when research into other questions lead you
inexorably back to the story.

For those interested in my series on this research, the first post was:
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2012/07/avrums-women-part-2-feiga-grinfeld.html
The most recent post is:
http://extrayad.blogspot.com/2015/02/avrums-women-part-13-bond-of-brothers.html


Re: Anyone visiting Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, NY ? Or have ideas? #general

Diane Jacobs
 

Just to add to Allen Jordan's suggestions.

l. Mt. Carmel Cemetery Database is online and you can search yourself
by various names and also enter society names, if there is one, tp see
who else is buried there.

2. If you call the cemetery and they tell you their is a next of kin,
listed, most likely they will not give you any information, but you can
ask if they will forward a letter to this person >from you. I have
done this successfully in a NYC area cemetery.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

From: Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com [mailto:jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org]

From: Ellen B Barbieri elsal@cox.net
The only Murray SIMON in Mount Carmel Cemetery is in 5 -C- 359- #2.
Lists date of death unknown & no society.
...call the cemetery office and ask for more details.
They may have either the date of death or the date of burial in their
paper records. I recently called one of the cemeteries and questioned
them about a similar situation. They not only called me back in an hour
with the date of death but said they were going to correct the online
database.

The office should also be able to tell you if that is a family plot or a
society or ......

If the person you speak to is sympathetic (tell them you are calling
from California so you can not visit, etc.) they might help you with some
more information. They might have a record of who said for the plot
or the burial. They might tell you if there is any indication of next of
kin.

If they say oh we can not tell you that you can say well I think it
should be his father ..... and sometimes they will confirm. If they
still refuse say well he was single so if it is a wife or child I do
not think it would be right person and they might give you some details.

The cemetery would have required a burial permit if it was in fact an
out of state death but the problem is they don't keep them. You could
ask if they have any record of either the stone company or the funeral
home for the burial.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Anyone visiting Mt. Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, NY ? Or have ideas? #general

Diane Jacobs
 

Just to add to Allen Jordan's suggestions.

l. Mt. Carmel Cemetery Database is online and you can search yourself
by various names and also enter society names, if there is one, tp see
who else is buried there.

2. If you call the cemetery and they tell you their is a next of kin,
listed, most likely they will not give you any information, but you can
ask if they will forward a letter to this person >from you. I have
done this successfully in a NYC area cemetery.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset, NJ

From: Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com [mailto:jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org]

From: Ellen B Barbieri elsal@cox.net
The only Murray SIMON in Mount Carmel Cemetery is in 5 -C- 359- #2.
Lists date of death unknown & no society.
...call the cemetery office and ask for more details.
They may have either the date of death or the date of burial in their
paper records. I recently called one of the cemeteries and questioned
them about a similar situation. They not only called me back in an hour
with the date of death but said they were going to correct the online
database.

The office should also be able to tell you if that is a family plot or a
society or ......

If the person you speak to is sympathetic (tell them you are calling
from California so you can not visit, etc.) they might help you with some
more information. They might have a record of who said for the plot
or the burial. They might tell you if there is any indication of next of
kin.

If they say oh we can not tell you that you can say well I think it
should be his father ..... and sometimes they will confirm. If they
still refuse say well he was single so if it is a wife or child I do
not think it would be right person and they might give you some details.

The cemetery would have required a burial permit if it was in fact an
out of state death but the problem is they don't keep them. You could
ask if they have any record of either the stone company or the funeral
home for the burial.


Re: Naming after living relatives #general

Eva Lawrence
 

In my own research in 19th-century Germany, I've found children named only
for deceased relatives, even in non-observant families; Mark Jacobson has
found the same in his Galician research, an area with which I'm not
particularly familiar.

Naming children after a living relative is, I know, an Anglo-Saxon tradition,
once common in England as well as in USA, and the said daughter-in-law was
second-generation British. Perhaps Sally, too wasn't thinking of her
ancestors domiciled in Europe, but of immigrants to America.

And, as Barbara wrote, some people stick to one tradition others adopt a new one.

From: Barbara Mannlein
Date: 02 March 2015 02:08

Both Sally and and Eva are right and both are wrong…..

It is traditional, even today, for most Jews of Ashkenazic descent not to
name after living relatives. That said — it is tradition, not law — and it
varies >from family to family and with the level of religious observance…
While the vast majority of Eastern European Jews named children for the
deceased, others, especially in Germany and those of ‘liberal,” “modern”
Reform bent, aped the Christian practice of naming a child for a living
relative and created the custom of II and III, etc.

Now, Sephardic practice is to name a child after a living relative, altho
usually not after its parent…..

That said…. one must not use absolutes -i.e. never, always,

Eva Karoline Lawrence wrote:
I believe that Sally Bruckheimer has inadvertently got Eastern and Western
Jewish European practices the wrong way round. My mother >from Germany, (ie
Western Europe) was annoyed when her daughter-in-law with Galician roots
gave her name to one of her grandchildren -


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming after living relatives #general

Eva Lawrence
 

In my own research in 19th-century Germany, I've found children named only
for deceased relatives, even in non-observant families; Mark Jacobson has
found the same in his Galician research, an area with which I'm not
particularly familiar.

Naming children after a living relative is, I know, an Anglo-Saxon tradition,
once common in England as well as in USA, and the said daughter-in-law was
second-generation British. Perhaps Sally, too wasn't thinking of her
ancestors domiciled in Europe, but of immigrants to America.

And, as Barbara wrote, some people stick to one tradition others adopt a new one.

From: Barbara Mannlein
Date: 02 March 2015 02:08

Both Sally and and Eva are right and both are wrong…..

It is traditional, even today, for most Jews of Ashkenazic descent not to
name after living relatives. That said — it is tradition, not law — and it
varies >from family to family and with the level of religious observance…
While the vast majority of Eastern European Jews named children for the
deceased, others, especially in Germany and those of ‘liberal,” “modern”
Reform bent, aped the Christian practice of naming a child for a living
relative and created the custom of II and III, etc.

Now, Sephardic practice is to name a child after a living relative, altho
usually not after its parent…..

That said…. one must not use absolutes -i.e. never, always,

Eva Karoline Lawrence wrote:
I believe that Sally Bruckheimer has inadvertently got Eastern and Western
Jewish European practices the wrong way round. My mother >from Germany, (ie
Western Europe) was annoyed when her daughter-in-law with Galician roots
gave her name to one of her grandchildren -

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