Date   

Records from Bacau - thank you. #romania

wilsonettess@...
 

Thank you everyone regarding records >from Bacau - the information has been
extremely valuable.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Romania SIG #Romania Records from Bacau - thank you. #romania

wilsonettess@...
 

Thank you everyone regarding records >from Bacau - the information has been
extremely valuable.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Searching for descendants of Avram ELKIN and Eva SELESTEAN of Capresti #romania

epk13@...
 

I know that this married couple, who met in Capresti, Bessarabia, Russia
(later Romania), survived the Holocaust, having found Eva SELESTEAN
ELKIN's testimonies for her father and brother in Yad Vashem. I have
photographs, postcards, and messages each wrote to members of the SPIWAK
extended family visiting Romania in 1929. I would now like to find
anyone who can tell me more about how they survived and where they lived
after the war and who among their descendants is still alive.

I have wonderful images of them in their youth (1920s) to share if
relatives come forward.

Any leads would be appreciated.

Thank you,

Patricia

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their
related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US.
SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev &
Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti.
TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in
the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romania SIG #Romania Searching for descendants of Avram ELKIN and Eva SELESTEAN of Capresti #romania

epk13@...
 

I know that this married couple, who met in Capresti, Bessarabia, Russia
(later Romania), survived the Holocaust, having found Eva SELESTEAN
ELKIN's testimonies for her father and brother in Yad Vashem. I have
photographs, postcards, and messages each wrote to members of the SPIWAK
extended family visiting Romania in 1929. I would now like to find
anyone who can tell me more about how they survived and where they lived
after the war and who among their descendants is still alive.

I have wonderful images of them in their youth (1920s) to share if
relatives come forward.

Any leads would be appreciated.

Thank you,

Patricia

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their
related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US.
SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev &
Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti.
TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in
the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


IAJGS 2015 Conference Update #yizkorbooks

IAJGS2015 Publicity
 

PRE-REGISTER NOW at www.iajgs2015.org <http://www.iajgs2015.org/> for the
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem from
July 6-10, 2015, a conference where exceptional genealogical opportunities
abound.

Register now at the early registration rate and to be eligible for our
March 15 drawing.

Congratulations to the winners of the February 15th drawing: Keith Zerdin
won 2 nights' accommodation at the Ramada Hotel during the conference;
Miriam Pollak won an SIG Luncheon, and Julie Scott a free ticket to the
closing banquet.

Register by March 15, and be eligible for our next drawing. Prizes include
hotel accommodations, free registration to "Exploration Sunday,"
MyHeritage.com subscriptions, Ancestry.com subscriptions, touring, expert
assistance to locate your Israeli family, and more. Drawings are open only
to those registered for the Conference. The earlier you register, the
greater your chances to win! Prizes will be added on an ongoing basis.

Enhanced cancellation/refund - Ortra, our conference organizer is offering
"no questions asked" cancellation/refund covering both hotel and total
registration refunds, valid up to almost the eve of the conference (see
details at www.iajgs2015.org under the registration tab - FAQ).

ENJOY AN UNFORGETTABLE "EXPLORATION SUNDAY" preceding the official
Conference opening on Monday. The program includes:

*Hands-on visits to the rare, treasure-trove archives of Yad VaShem, The
Central Archives of the History of the Jewish People and the National
Library of Israel, the Central Zionist Archives and the Old Yishuv Court
Museum in Jerusalem's Old City.

*Specially arranged one-day tours to include such highlights as The
Ghetto Fighter's House Museum and the Illegal Immigrants Detention Camp in
Atlit, Caesaria, Zichron Ya'akov and Ein Hod, Palmach Museum and Tel Aviv
walking tour, Weizmann Institute, Rishon Le-Zion Aliyah Museum, Museum of
Babylonian Jewry, Eretz Israel Museum and Jaffa, the Old City of
Jerusalem, the New City of Jerusalem, and Latrun and Mini-Israel.

*Enjoy great adventures in Dig for a Day, an Archaeological Seminars dig
at Tel Maresha, the ancestral home of King Herod.

*And for more relaxation combine history and recreation at Massada and
the Dead Sea.

FULL DETAILS ON THE EXCITING OPTIONS FOR "EXPLORATION SUNDAY" WILL BE
POSTED SOON AT www.iajgs2015.org under the Program tab.

Sign up for our ongoing Conference discussion group, where announcements
and special offers are being posted. Also, follow us on Facebook and
Twitter. Just click on the links at www.iajgs2015.org under the FAQ tab to
sign up and stay informed.

See you in Jerusalem in July for the momentous and exciting 35th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy!

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
chairman@iajgs2015.org
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Jewish Gen Education offers 2015 Free Value-Added Class March 20-April 3 #yizkorbooks

Nancy Holden
 

Free Value-Added Course open for enrollment Basic 2 "JewishGen - The
Essential Jewish Resource" March 20 - April 3. Value Added courses
are free to those who contributed $100 within the year to the General
Fund. There is a charge of $18 for this 2 week class to those not
eligible for Value Added.

This Basic 2 course is a series of exercises that will take you on a
guided tour of the paths and byways that make up JewishGen's massive
website. You will visit the links that connect the composite databases,
projects, SIGs and open up the wonders of JewishGen.

The course does not require you to have started your genealogy projects.
It is for those who wish to grasp the intricacies of the JewishGen
website. You do not need the original surname or the name of your
immigrant town.

All JG classes are open 24/7 to accommodate members who live around the
world. Enrollment is now open. Registration is limited and will close
once the class is fully enrolled.

http://www.jewishgen.org/education
"Click here" in the "enroll" column.

Please address questions to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Nancy Holden


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks IAJGS 2015 Conference Update #yizkorbooks

IAJGS2015 Publicity
 

PRE-REGISTER NOW at www.iajgs2015.org <http://www.iajgs2015.org/> for the
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem from
July 6-10, 2015, a conference where exceptional genealogical opportunities
abound.

Register now at the early registration rate and to be eligible for our
March 15 drawing.

Congratulations to the winners of the February 15th drawing: Keith Zerdin
won 2 nights' accommodation at the Ramada Hotel during the conference;
Miriam Pollak won an SIG Luncheon, and Julie Scott a free ticket to the
closing banquet.

Register by March 15, and be eligible for our next drawing. Prizes include
hotel accommodations, free registration to "Exploration Sunday,"
MyHeritage.com subscriptions, Ancestry.com subscriptions, touring, expert
assistance to locate your Israeli family, and more. Drawings are open only
to those registered for the Conference. The earlier you register, the
greater your chances to win! Prizes will be added on an ongoing basis.

Enhanced cancellation/refund - Ortra, our conference organizer is offering
"no questions asked" cancellation/refund covering both hotel and total
registration refunds, valid up to almost the eve of the conference (see
details at www.iajgs2015.org under the registration tab - FAQ).

ENJOY AN UNFORGETTABLE "EXPLORATION SUNDAY" preceding the official
Conference opening on Monday. The program includes:

*Hands-on visits to the rare, treasure-trove archives of Yad VaShem, The
Central Archives of the History of the Jewish People and the National
Library of Israel, the Central Zionist Archives and the Old Yishuv Court
Museum in Jerusalem's Old City.

*Specially arranged one-day tours to include such highlights as The
Ghetto Fighter's House Museum and the Illegal Immigrants Detention Camp in
Atlit, Caesaria, Zichron Ya'akov and Ein Hod, Palmach Museum and Tel Aviv
walking tour, Weizmann Institute, Rishon Le-Zion Aliyah Museum, Museum of
Babylonian Jewry, Eretz Israel Museum and Jaffa, the Old City of
Jerusalem, the New City of Jerusalem, and Latrun and Mini-Israel.

*Enjoy great adventures in Dig for a Day, an Archaeological Seminars dig
at Tel Maresha, the ancestral home of King Herod.

*And for more relaxation combine history and recreation at Massada and
the Dead Sea.

FULL DETAILS ON THE EXCITING OPTIONS FOR "EXPLORATION SUNDAY" WILL BE
POSTED SOON AT www.iajgs2015.org under the Program tab.

Sign up for our ongoing Conference discussion group, where announcements
and special offers are being posted. Also, follow us on Facebook and
Twitter. Just click on the links at www.iajgs2015.org under the FAQ tab to
sign up and stay informed.

See you in Jerusalem in July for the momentous and exciting 35th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy!

Michael Goldstein, Chairman
chairman@iajgs2015.org
35th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Jewish Gen Education offers 2015 Free Value-Added Class March 20-April 3 #yizkorbooks

Nancy Holden
 

Free Value-Added Course open for enrollment Basic 2 "JewishGen - The
Essential Jewish Resource" March 20 - April 3. Value Added courses
are free to those who contributed $100 within the year to the General
Fund. There is a charge of $18 for this 2 week class to those not
eligible for Value Added.

This Basic 2 course is a series of exercises that will take you on a
guided tour of the paths and byways that make up JewishGen's massive
website. You will visit the links that connect the composite databases,
projects, SIGs and open up the wonders of JewishGen.

The course does not require you to have started your genealogy projects.
It is for those who wish to grasp the intricacies of the JewishGen
website. You do not need the original surname or the name of your
immigrant town.

All JG classes are open 24/7 to accommodate members who live around the
world. Enrollment is now open. Registration is limited and will close
once the class is fully enrolled.

http://www.jewishgen.org/education
"Click here" in the "enroll" column.

Please address questions to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Nancy Holden


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program March 29, 2015 - The Photo Genealogist, Ava Cohn will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details" #general

events@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society Of Illinois
Program: Sunday, March 29, 2015
Program starts 2:00 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook.

Ava Cohen will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details"

Ava Cohn, an internationally known genealogist and expert on Jewish family
photographs, will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details" at the
Sunday, March 29, 2015, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois
at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook.

Cohn, AKA Sherlock Cohn, The Photo Genealogist, will explain how to
differentiate between a clue that is useful and furthers our study of genealogy
and one that gives little or no usable information.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials, get
help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical questions before the main
program begins at 2 p.m.

For more information, visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

Among the questions that Ava Cohn considers are the following: "How often have
you looked at a family photograph and wondered how much more you could learn
about your family >from this photo? Beyond who is in the photo and when it was
taken, are there more subtle clues that give us a deeper appreciation of the
people who came before us. What are the relationships of the people in the
photos? What were their personal and religious choices? Why was this photo
taken? What messages were they trying to convey when they sat before the
photographer?"

According to Cohn, there is a wealth of information to be gleaned >from the
visual records of our mishpocha. Coupled with handed-down family oral
traditions and found documentation, these photo discoveries can become the
basis for our family stories. But, she asks, is the detail found in the photo
what she calls a bisl (something to ignore) or the gantze megilla (something
that tells us a story)?

Ava Cohn brings a lifelong experience with heirloom photos and a
multidisciplinary approach to photo dating and interpretation. A native
of upstate New York, currently residing in the Chicago area, she has a
degree >from Brandeis University with coursework in decorative arts, art
history, and costume history at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
Recognizing the need for accurate dating of Jewish family photographs,
combined with specialized knowledge of immigrant and Eastern European
culture and traditions, she devotes her work, almost exclusively, to
Jewish family photographs. Cohn is a speaker and writer whose articles
have appeared in many Jewish genealogy publications.

Submitted by Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Publicity VP


JGSGW March 2015 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

**JGSGW March 8, 2015 Meeting Announcement**

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its March 2015
meeting on Sunday, March 8, 2015 at 1:00 pm at B'nai Israel, Fanaroff Hall
6301 Montrose Road, Rockville, MD 20852 Directions available on the JGSGW
website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/directions.html#Bnai

Program: >from the Spanish Inquisition to the Present: A Search for Jewish Roots
Presenter: Genie Milgrom

Genie Milgrom will share the details of her journey back in time as she
searched for her Crypto-Jewish ancestors. She was able to trace an unbroken
lineage of 15 grandmothers going back to the early 1500s in Fermoselle, in
the province of Zamora in Spain. She was also able to prove that her family
were Converso Jews >from before the Spanish Inquisition.

Genie Milgrom was born in Havana, Cuba into a Roman Catholic family of
Spanish ancestry. She was always interested in her family genealogy but when
she learned of the possibility of having Converso Jewish Roots, her search
for the truth about her family?s past took on a deeper significance. In an
unparalleled work of genealogy, she was able to fully document her unbroken
maternal lineage going back as far as 1480 to pre-inquisition Spain and
Portugal. She has travelled extensively into Fermoselle, the village of her
ancestors in the Zamora region of Spain while doing field research on the
past Jews of Fermoselle. She is currently the President of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Miami, President of Tarbut Sefarad-Fermoselle
in Spain, and President of the Society of Crypto Judaic Studies at Colorado
State University in Colorado Springs. She is the author of the book My 15
Grandmothers as well as How I found My 15 Grandmothers, A Step By Step Guide.
She also writes for several on line sites including www.esefarad.com as well
as the Journal of Spanish, Portuguese and Italian Crypto Jewry.

Her work has been showcased in the Jerusalem Post, The Miami Herald and
publications around the world. She was awarded the State of Florida Genealogy
award for her outstanding achievements and advances in the pioneering work she
has done in Genealogy.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Program March 29, 2015 - The Photo Genealogist, Ava Cohn will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details" #general

events@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society Of Illinois
Program: Sunday, March 29, 2015
Program starts 2:00 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook.

Ava Cohen will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details"

Ava Cohn, an internationally known genealogist and expert on Jewish family
photographs, will speak on "Clued-In: The Stories are in the Details" at the
Sunday, March 29, 2015, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois
at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook.

Cohn, AKA Sherlock Cohn, The Photo Genealogist, will explain how to
differentiate between a clue that is useful and furthers our study of genealogy
and one that gives little or no usable information.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials, get
help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical questions before the main
program begins at 2 p.m.

For more information, visit http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

Among the questions that Ava Cohn considers are the following: "How often have
you looked at a family photograph and wondered how much more you could learn
about your family >from this photo? Beyond who is in the photo and when it was
taken, are there more subtle clues that give us a deeper appreciation of the
people who came before us. What are the relationships of the people in the
photos? What were their personal and religious choices? Why was this photo
taken? What messages were they trying to convey when they sat before the
photographer?"

According to Cohn, there is a wealth of information to be gleaned >from the
visual records of our mishpocha. Coupled with handed-down family oral
traditions and found documentation, these photo discoveries can become the
basis for our family stories. But, she asks, is the detail found in the photo
what she calls a bisl (something to ignore) or the gantze megilla (something
that tells us a story)?

Ava Cohn brings a lifelong experience with heirloom photos and a
multidisciplinary approach to photo dating and interpretation. A native
of upstate New York, currently residing in the Chicago area, she has a
degree >from Brandeis University with coursework in decorative arts, art
history, and costume history at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
Recognizing the need for accurate dating of Jewish family photographs,
combined with specialized knowledge of immigrant and Eastern European
culture and traditions, she devotes her work, almost exclusively, to
Jewish family photographs. Cohn is a speaker and writer whose articles
have appeared in many Jewish genealogy publications.

Submitted by Sandra Schon Kiferbaum
JGSI Publicity VP


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW March 2015 Meeting Announcement #general

Robin Meltzer
 

**JGSGW March 8, 2015 Meeting Announcement**

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington will host its March 2015
meeting on Sunday, March 8, 2015 at 1:00 pm at B'nai Israel, Fanaroff Hall
6301 Montrose Road, Rockville, MD 20852 Directions available on the JGSGW
website:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw/directions.html#Bnai

Program: >from the Spanish Inquisition to the Present: A Search for Jewish Roots
Presenter: Genie Milgrom

Genie Milgrom will share the details of her journey back in time as she
searched for her Crypto-Jewish ancestors. She was able to trace an unbroken
lineage of 15 grandmothers going back to the early 1500s in Fermoselle, in
the province of Zamora in Spain. She was also able to prove that her family
were Converso Jews >from before the Spanish Inquisition.

Genie Milgrom was born in Havana, Cuba into a Roman Catholic family of
Spanish ancestry. She was always interested in her family genealogy but when
she learned of the possibility of having Converso Jewish Roots, her search
for the truth about her family?s past took on a deeper significance. In an
unparalleled work of genealogy, she was able to fully document her unbroken
maternal lineage going back as far as 1480 to pre-inquisition Spain and
Portugal. She has travelled extensively into Fermoselle, the village of her
ancestors in the Zamora region of Spain while doing field research on the
past Jews of Fermoselle. She is currently the President of the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Greater Miami, President of Tarbut Sefarad-Fermoselle
in Spain, and President of the Society of Crypto Judaic Studies at Colorado
State University in Colorado Springs. She is the author of the book My 15
Grandmothers as well as How I found My 15 Grandmothers, A Step By Step Guide.
She also writes for several on line sites including www.esefarad.com as well
as the Journal of Spanish, Portuguese and Italian Crypto Jewry.

Her work has been showcased in the Jerusalem Post, The Miami Herald and
publications around the world. She was awarded the State of Florida Genealogy
award for her outstanding achievements and advances in the pioneering work she
has done in Genealogy.

JGSGW Guest Attendance Policy: As of January 1, 2014, a non-member may
attend the monthly JGSGW meeting as a Guest for a $5.00 fee payable at the
sign-in table. The $5.00 Guest fee may be applied toward payment of annual
JGSGW membership dues if dues are paid at the same meeting at which the
guest fee was paid. JGSGW members requiring personal assistance at a
meeting due to a health condition or disability may bring someone to assist
them free of charge.

Robin Meltzer
VP Communications, JGSGW
www.jgsgw.org
https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgw


Re: Smarkov Gmina Durachev #general

Alan Shuchat
 

You can find Smarkow and Duraczow in the JewishGen Gazeteer. Duraczow is 6.9
miles south of Smarkow. Konsk (Konskie) is 6.6 miles west of Smarkow. The
gmina (commune or municipality) of Duraczow is a former administrative
division of Poland that contained Smarkow. The webpage

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmina_Duracz%C3%B3w

gives this information in Polish, and Google Translate is useful but tries to
translate some of the place names (Smarkow is translated as snot!).

Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

From: Isabelcym@aol.com
......
In some vital records Sent >from a mobile device. Please excuse any typos.
Smarkov Gmina Durachev (or Duragev). Google gave no info. Can anyone
tell me what is was and where it was?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Smarkov Gmina Durachev #general

Alan Shuchat
 

You can find Smarkow and Duraczow in the JewishGen Gazeteer. Duraczow is 6.9
miles south of Smarkow. Konsk (Konskie) is 6.6 miles west of Smarkow. The
gmina (commune or municipality) of Duraczow is a former administrative
division of Poland that contained Smarkow. The webpage

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmina_Duracz%C3%B3w

gives this information in Polish, and Google Translate is useful but tries to
translate some of the place names (Smarkow is translated as snot!).

Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)

From: Isabelcym@aol.com
......
In some vital records Sent >from a mobile device. Please excuse any typos.
Smarkov Gmina Durachev (or Duragev). Google gave no info. Can anyone
tell me what is was and where it was?


Travel into and out of Germany for undocumented "Ostjuden" #general

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

My late father, Max KNISBACHER, fled the Nazis in the spring of 1933,
after having successfully completed one year at the prestigious Kaiser
Wilhelm University medical school. The career he had worked so hard for
was gone forever, but at least he saved his life. In researching his
life story I have run up against two questions that this group might
have answers to.

1. His parents had come to Berlin >from Galicia (Lysiec for his father,
Tarnow for his mother) some time in the early 1900s when those towns
were part of Austria-Hungary. They never became German citizens and, in
fact, were married, in 1911, not in Germany but in London--possibly, I
hypothesize, to be able to keep the KNISBACHER surname for their
children. Question: How did they get into Germany? Presumably they had
no papers, or was the border between Austria-Hungary and Germany open to
anyone?

2. When my father fled the Nazis, in May or June of 1933, he went to
Alsace in France, and spent most of his year there in the Strasbourg
suburb of Bischheim working for a Jewish carpentry firm. His medical
school records, which he kept, list him as a citizen of Poland, a
country he never was in, nor did he ever know Polish. Presumably that
idea came >from the fact that the towns his parents had come >from had
become Polish at the end of WWI when the Austro-Hungarian empire
collapsed. When his mother managed to cross the Swiss border in 1943
after years of evading the Nazi and Vichy police in France, she was also
listed as a Polish citizen. So the question here is how did my father
get into France? Was the border between Germany and France open to
anyone >from Germany in 1933, or did he somehow manage to slip across
illegally?

Jeff Knisbacher

ps And one more question: Are children and further direct descendants of
"Ostjuden" (who, in this case, was born in Berlin, in 1913) eligible
today for German citizenship?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Travel into and out of Germany for undocumented "Ostjuden" #general

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

My late father, Max KNISBACHER, fled the Nazis in the spring of 1933,
after having successfully completed one year at the prestigious Kaiser
Wilhelm University medical school. The career he had worked so hard for
was gone forever, but at least he saved his life. In researching his
life story I have run up against two questions that this group might
have answers to.

1. His parents had come to Berlin >from Galicia (Lysiec for his father,
Tarnow for his mother) some time in the early 1900s when those towns
were part of Austria-Hungary. They never became German citizens and, in
fact, were married, in 1911, not in Germany but in London--possibly, I
hypothesize, to be able to keep the KNISBACHER surname for their
children. Question: How did they get into Germany? Presumably they had
no papers, or was the border between Austria-Hungary and Germany open to
anyone?

2. When my father fled the Nazis, in May or June of 1933, he went to
Alsace in France, and spent most of his year there in the Strasbourg
suburb of Bischheim working for a Jewish carpentry firm. His medical
school records, which he kept, list him as a citizen of Poland, a
country he never was in, nor did he ever know Polish. Presumably that
idea came >from the fact that the towns his parents had come >from had
become Polish at the end of WWI when the Austro-Hungarian empire
collapsed. When his mother managed to cross the Swiss border in 1943
after years of evading the Nazi and Vichy police in France, she was also
listed as a Polish citizen. So the question here is how did my father
get into France? Was the border between Germany and France open to
anyone >from Germany in 1933, or did he somehow manage to slip across
illegally?

Jeff Knisbacher

ps And one more question: Are children and further direct descendants of
"Ostjuden" (who, in this case, was born in Berlin, in 1913) eligible
today for German citizenship?


Viewmate translation request - German [BEINER] #general

Judith Feldman <judithfeldman1@...>
 

I would appreciate a translation of some pages >from German to English
of my grandfather's passport, dated 1872. They can be found at the
following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38456
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38457
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38458

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Judith Feldman
St. Paul, MN
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation request - German [BEINER] #general

Judith Feldman <judithfeldman1@...>
 

I would appreciate a translation of some pages >from German to English
of my grandfather's passport, dated 1872. They can be found at the
following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38456
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38457
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM38458

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Judith Feldman
St. Paul, MN
USA


Jewish Gen Education offers 2015 Free Value-Added Class March 20-April 3 #france

Nancy Holden
 

Free Value-Added Course open for enrollment Basic 2 "JewishGen - The
Essential Jewish Resource" March 20 - April 3. Value Added courses
are free to those who contributed $100 within the year to the General
Fund. There is a charge of $18 for this 2 week class to those not
eligible for Value Added.

This Basic 2 course is a series of exercises that will take you on a
guided tour of the paths and byways that make up JewishGen's massive
website. You will visit the links that connect the composite databases,
projects, SIGs and open up the wonders of JewishGen.

The course does not require you to have started your genealogy projects.
It is for those who wish to grasp the intricacies of the JewishGen
website. You do not need the original surname or the name of your
immigrant town.

All JG classes are open 24/7 to accommodate members who live around the
world. Enrollment is now open. Registration is limited and will close
once the class is fully enrolled.

http://www.jewishgen.org/education
"Click here" in the "enroll" column.

Please address questions to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Nancy Holden


French SIG #France Jewish Gen Education offers 2015 Free Value-Added Class March 20-April 3 #france

Nancy Holden
 

Free Value-Added Course open for enrollment Basic 2 "JewishGen - The
Essential Jewish Resource" March 20 - April 3. Value Added courses
are free to those who contributed $100 within the year to the General
Fund. There is a charge of $18 for this 2 week class to those not
eligible for Value Added.

This Basic 2 course is a series of exercises that will take you on a
guided tour of the paths and byways that make up JewishGen's massive
website. You will visit the links that connect the composite databases,
projects, SIGs and open up the wonders of JewishGen.

The course does not require you to have started your genealogy projects.
It is for those who wish to grasp the intricacies of the JewishGen
website. You do not need the original surname or the name of your
immigrant town.

All JG classes are open 24/7 to accommodate members who live around the
world. Enrollment is now open. Registration is limited and will close
once the class is fully enrolled.

http://www.jewishgen.org/education
"Click here" in the "enroll" column.

Please address questions to
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Nancy Holden

98041 - 98060 of 662134