Date   

Sanzer Rebbe's Torah #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Back in 2011 the Sefer Torah belonging to the Sanzer Rebbe, Haim
Halberstam, which survived to Holocaust, was apparently bought from
two brother descendants (either of the Rubin or Jeruchem families - as
quoted in the former case by the Jewish Press and in the latter case
by Hamodia).
Can anyone clarify these brothers for me and their ancestry?
The inheritance would have passed >from Rav Haim to his son Yechezkel,
the Sinover Rebbe to one of two possible sons - Moshe or Dovid.

--
Neil Rosenstein


Children of the Biala-Lugano Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

R. Bezalel Simcha Menachem BenZion Rabinowitz, Admur
Biala-Jerusalem-Lugano and ABD Lugano had eight children but I only
know the name of one -
Abraham Moses Rabinowitz, married in June 1993 to Perl Malka, daughter
of R. Shmuel Shmelke Halpert.
Can anyone help fill in the others, who they married and children?
--
Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Sanzer Rebbe's Torah #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Back in 2011 the Sefer Torah belonging to the Sanzer Rebbe, Haim
Halberstam, which survived to Holocaust, was apparently bought from
two brother descendants (either of the Rubin or Jeruchem families - as
quoted in the former case by the Jewish Press and in the latter case
by Hamodia).
Can anyone clarify these brothers for me and their ancestry?
The inheritance would have passed >from Rav Haim to his son Yechezkel,
the Sinover Rebbe to one of two possible sons - Moshe or Dovid.

--
Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Children of the Biala-Lugano Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

R. Bezalel Simcha Menachem BenZion Rabinowitz, Admur
Biala-Jerusalem-Lugano and ABD Lugano had eight children but I only
know the name of one -
Abraham Moses Rabinowitz, married in June 1993 to Perl Malka, daughter
of R. Shmuel Shmelke Halpert.
Can anyone help fill in the others, who they married and children?
--
Neil Rosenstein


Koidanovo Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Rav Jacob Zvi Meir Ehrlich, eleventh Admur Koidanovo - trying to find
biographical information on him, who is parents, wife and chidlren
are.

--
Neil Rosenstein


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Koidanovo Rebbe #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Rav Jacob Zvi Meir Ehrlich, eleventh Admur Koidanovo - trying to find
biographical information on him, who is parents, wife and chidlren
are.

--
Neil Rosenstein


HOLLAENDER or ISZAK Family (from Tarnow) #galicia

Marilyn Robinson
 

Is anyone related to the Hollaender family? Does anyone have any
information about them?

My aunt was related to the following (I believe through her father):

Oskar (Kuba) HOLLAENDER: attorney, approx. 57 years old (1940s),
lived in Tarnow (born somewhere in Poland)

Pola HOLLAENDER (nee ISZAK), born (1890) & lived in Tarnow, wife
of Oskar

Halinka HOLLAENDER: daughter of Pola & Oskar. Born in Tarnow 1927

All died in the Holocaust.

My aunt reported them to Yad Vashem

Marilyn Robinson


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia HOLLAENDER or ISZAK Family (from Tarnow) #galicia

Marilyn Robinson
 

Is anyone related to the Hollaender family? Does anyone have any
information about them?

My aunt was related to the following (I believe through her father):

Oskar (Kuba) HOLLAENDER: attorney, approx. 57 years old (1940s),
lived in Tarnow (born somewhere in Poland)

Pola HOLLAENDER (nee ISZAK), born (1890) & lived in Tarnow, wife
of Oskar

Halinka HOLLAENDER: daughter of Pola & Oskar. Born in Tarnow 1927

All died in the Holocaust.

My aunt reported them to Yad Vashem

Marilyn Robinson


Tips for researching your Berlin relatives #germany

Judith Elam
 

In recent months, with some creative searching, I have found about 100 more
relatives, using the Berlin civil records now available on Ancestry.com, the
Berlin newspapers available on the European Library website at
http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/newspapers, and some other sites. I
thought I would share my method with you!

1. On Ancestry.com enter "Berlin" under Keyword. This will limit the
results to Berlin records and records that contain the word "Berlin".
2. If your surname is common, such as LEVY, or not especially Jewish (I have
several, such as BRAUN, NATHAN, WEISS, SCHWARZ, MICHAELIS, etc.) you may be
able to skip through hundreds of hits for marriage records by skipping over
those entries with several first names. Jews generally had one or maybe two
first names only.
3. Marriages required two witnesses, who were usually relatives. Even if
the witness is not known, research them. Their age and address will be
given on the marriage certificate. They may turn out to be the husband of
another relative you have yet to find! Always keep note of these witnesses
for possible later identification, if you cannot immediately identify them.
4. The marriage and death records will give the parents' names too, as well
as where they lived - and died, if applicable. They will give divorce
details, if any, and sometimes death details, and if they had to assume the
name "Israel" or "Sara. If you are entering your records on a public site
such as Ancestry or Geni, then enter your relative's spouse's relatives
(parents, witness) too, to facilitate other researchers linking their tree
to yours. They may have additional information on your relatives too that
you didn't know about, or their own trees which will then appear as a
"hint".
5. Use wildcard searches (*) as much as possible, especially for surnames
that can easily be misspelled. If the first name ends in "a" or "e" always
use the * to search (for example Johann*), as transcribers will use both
randomly, even though the name probably ends with an "e".
6. Let's say you have found a marriage record for your relative and now you
want to know if the marriage produced children. Let's assume they were
married in 1890. Then do a search using just the surname and enter the
search year as 1896 with a 5 year +/-. This will pull up all Berlin BMD
records for anyone born 1891 - 1901, which should cover all children, unless
it was a large family! You can also use the 2 or 10 year +/- option.
7. If you cannot find the death record for your female relative, also search
using her maiden name. She may have remarried.
8. Once you have exhausted Ancestry.com, then use
http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/newspapers. Of particular interest
are the death notices, usually published in the Berliner Tageblatt. In
addition to the description of "long and painful suffering" which seems to
appear on all these notices, you may find "new" family members. The best
way to search is to use "+", for example "Ottilie+SCHWARZ" (my
gg-grandmother) This will yield 55 hits. Then click on the 4
Staatsbibliothek (for the Berlin newspapers) hits. The last 2 refer to my
Ottilie. The last is her death notice. Click on it and you will see the
relevant part in blue on the left side. Click on it to bring that section
of the newspaper up. Even if you have found the death certificate on
Ancestry, still search for the death notice on this site, in the hopes of
finding more relatives. Then you can contact Weissensee cemetery for the
burial records. juedfriedweissensee@jg-berlin.org. These can also yield
more relatives!
9. If you can't find your married female relative on this site, then try
just using "geb+maiden name", which, for some reason, will bring up
different results.
10. If you search just using the surname you may get thousands of hits, if
it is a common surname. You can then narrow down your search by using
"Decades of Publication" on the right side. Click on the desired decade.
Then click on the Year, if applicable. You can then sort in ascending or
descending time. This will considerably narrow down the hits.
11. This newspaper site also has newspapers >from Hamburg and other
countries too, such as Austria. It is also useful for finding engagement
notices, marriage notices and birth notices, as well as business details and
addresses. A birth notice will typically say a son or daughter was born,
often citing the birth date (but no first name), and then you can continue
your search back on Ancestry using the surname and the birth year. If your
relative lived during the Holocaust years, then also search on
http://tracingthepast.org/minority-census/census-database. To find all those
living at the same address, just put in the surname and street name. This
database is for all of Germany. You can also use
http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en?result#frmResults,
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/search.html?language=en and
http://digital.zlb.de/viewer/sites/collection-berlin-adresses/.

Judith E. Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@hawaii.rr.comm


German SIG #Germany Tips for researching your Berlin relatives #germany

Judith Elam
 

In recent months, with some creative searching, I have found about 100 more
relatives, using the Berlin civil records now available on Ancestry.com, the
Berlin newspapers available on the European Library website at
http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/newspapers, and some other sites. I
thought I would share my method with you!

1. On Ancestry.com enter "Berlin" under Keyword. This will limit the
results to Berlin records and records that contain the word "Berlin".
2. If your surname is common, such as LEVY, or not especially Jewish (I have
several, such as BRAUN, NATHAN, WEISS, SCHWARZ, MICHAELIS, etc.) you may be
able to skip through hundreds of hits for marriage records by skipping over
those entries with several first names. Jews generally had one or maybe two
first names only.
3. Marriages required two witnesses, who were usually relatives. Even if
the witness is not known, research them. Their age and address will be
given on the marriage certificate. They may turn out to be the husband of
another relative you have yet to find! Always keep note of these witnesses
for possible later identification, if you cannot immediately identify them.
4. The marriage and death records will give the parents' names too, as well
as where they lived - and died, if applicable. They will give divorce
details, if any, and sometimes death details, and if they had to assume the
name "Israel" or "Sara. If you are entering your records on a public site
such as Ancestry or Geni, then enter your relative's spouse's relatives
(parents, witness) too, to facilitate other researchers linking their tree
to yours. They may have additional information on your relatives too that
you didn't know about, or their own trees which will then appear as a
"hint".
5. Use wildcard searches (*) as much as possible, especially for surnames
that can easily be misspelled. If the first name ends in "a" or "e" always
use the * to search (for example Johann*), as transcribers will use both
randomly, even though the name probably ends with an "e".
6. Let's say you have found a marriage record for your relative and now you
want to know if the marriage produced children. Let's assume they were
married in 1890. Then do a search using just the surname and enter the
search year as 1896 with a 5 year +/-. This will pull up all Berlin BMD
records for anyone born 1891 - 1901, which should cover all children, unless
it was a large family! You can also use the 2 or 10 year +/- option.
7. If you cannot find the death record for your female relative, also search
using her maiden name. She may have remarried.
8. Once you have exhausted Ancestry.com, then use
http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/tel4/newspapers. Of particular interest
are the death notices, usually published in the Berliner Tageblatt. In
addition to the description of "long and painful suffering" which seems to
appear on all these notices, you may find "new" family members. The best
way to search is to use "+", for example "Ottilie+SCHWARZ" (my
gg-grandmother) This will yield 55 hits. Then click on the 4
Staatsbibliothek (for the Berlin newspapers) hits. The last 2 refer to my
Ottilie. The last is her death notice. Click on it and you will see the
relevant part in blue on the left side. Click on it to bring that section
of the newspaper up. Even if you have found the death certificate on
Ancestry, still search for the death notice on this site, in the hopes of
finding more relatives. Then you can contact Weissensee cemetery for the
burial records. juedfriedweissensee@jg-berlin.org. These can also yield
more relatives!
9. If you can't find your married female relative on this site, then try
just using "geb+maiden name", which, for some reason, will bring up
different results.
10. If you search just using the surname you may get thousands of hits, if
it is a common surname. You can then narrow down your search by using
"Decades of Publication" on the right side. Click on the desired decade.
Then click on the Year, if applicable. You can then sort in ascending or
descending time. This will considerably narrow down the hits.
11. This newspaper site also has newspapers >from Hamburg and other
countries too, such as Austria. It is also useful for finding engagement
notices, marriage notices and birth notices, as well as business details and
addresses. A birth notice will typically say a son or daughter was born,
often citing the birth date (but no first name), and then you can continue
your search back on Ancestry using the surname and the birth year. If your
relative lived during the Holocaust years, then also search on
http://tracingthepast.org/minority-census/census-database. To find all those
living at the same address, just put in the surname and street name. This
database is for all of Germany. You can also use
http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en?result#frmResults,
http://db.yadvashem.org/names/search.html?language=en and
http://digital.zlb.de/viewer/sites/collection-berlin-adresses/.

Judith E. Elam, Kihei, HI elamj@hawaii.rr.comm


Sanzer Rebbe's Torah #general

Neil@...
 

Back in 2011 the Sefer Torah belonging to the Sanzer Rebbe, Haim HALBERSTAM,
which survived to Holocaust, was apparently bought >from two brother
descendants (either of the Rubin or Jeruchem families - as quoted in the
former case by the Jewish Press and in the latter case by Hamodia).

Can anyone clarify these brothers for me and their ancestry?
The inheritance would have passed >from Rav Haim to his son Yechezkel,
the Sinover Rebbe to one of two possible sons - Moshe or Dovid.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sanzer Rebbe's Torah #general

Neil@...
 

Back in 2011 the Sefer Torah belonging to the Sanzer Rebbe, Haim HALBERSTAM,
which survived to Holocaust, was apparently bought >from two brother
descendants (either of the Rubin or Jeruchem families - as quoted in the
former case by the Jewish Press and in the latter case by Hamodia).

Can anyone clarify these brothers for me and their ancestry?
The inheritance would have passed >from Rav Haim to his son Yechezkel,
the Sinover Rebbe to one of two possible sons - Moshe or Dovid.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.


Re: Dorosic Forced Laborers #general

tom
 

As an aside, having read the moderator's note at the end of Paul Nussbaum's
posting, I followed the link to the description of the Dorosic massacre, and
read the description of the data set. But I haven't been able to figure out
how to look at a list of the victims' names. Using the All Hungary Database,
a search for "Dorosic" either in any field, or in town, returns zero records.
How can I browse the records, without having to know their names in advance?

tom klein, Toronto

paulnuss@aol.com wrote:

[snip!]

I have tried to see the list of the Dorosic Laborers and have not been
successful. I just want to see the list

[snip!]

MODERATOR NOTE: Information may be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/0230_Dorosic_forced_laborers.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Dorosic Forced Laborers #general

tom
 

As an aside, having read the moderator's note at the end of Paul Nussbaum's
posting, I followed the link to the description of the Dorosic massacre, and
read the description of the data set. But I haven't been able to figure out
how to look at a list of the victims' names. Using the All Hungary Database,
a search for "Dorosic" either in any field, or in town, returns zero records.
How can I browse the records, without having to know their names in advance?

tom klein, Toronto

paulnuss@aol.com wrote:

[snip!]

I have tried to see the list of the Dorosic Laborers and have not been
successful. I just want to see the list

[snip!]

MODERATOR NOTE: Information may be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/0230_Dorosic_forced_laborers.html


Re: Dorosic Forced Laborers #general

tom
 

For what it's worth, my father was also a forced labourer at the same
time and place, and barely escaped being killed there. His unit was
there, and they were told that they were setting up a field hospital,
in a barn, for those who were too sick to continue marching. My father
was sick, but he said that there were others who were in worse condition,
and he could still go on. The massacre was carried out that night.

Do you know much about your father's experiences during the war?

tom klein, Toronto

paulnuss@aol.com wrote:
My name is Paul Scott Nussbaum
My Jewish Gen ID# is 479670
My Father, Nuszbaum, Imre was a survivor of the massacre in the barn at
Dorosic. He had typhus and crawled out in delirium some time after
the shooting was over and woke up some time later

I have tried to see the list of the Dorosic Laborers and have not been
successful. I just want to see the list


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Dorosic Forced Laborers #general

tom
 

For what it's worth, my father was also a forced labourer at the same
time and place, and barely escaped being killed there. His unit was
there, and they were told that they were setting up a field hospital,
in a barn, for those who were too sick to continue marching. My father
was sick, but he said that there were others who were in worse condition,
and he could still go on. The massacre was carried out that night.

Do you know much about your father's experiences during the war?

tom klein, Toronto

paulnuss@aol.com wrote:
My name is Paul Scott Nussbaum
My Jewish Gen ID# is 479670
My Father, Nuszbaum, Imre was a survivor of the massacre in the barn at
Dorosic. He had typhus and crawled out in delirium some time after
the shooting was over and woke up some time later

I have tried to see the list of the Dorosic Laborers and have not been
successful. I just want to see the list


Almost Magical Translations #general

Bob Fitterman
 

Today I had a bit of insight to combine two things together that had
never crossed my mind. It might be of use to some of you in your research.

In looking at the email >from Logan Kleinwaks to Carol Rombrol Rider's query
about directories, I decided to try genealogyindexer.org . In my case, I put
in my maternal grandmother's maiden name and up popped dozens of listings in
Cyrillic. I had cast a very wide net and there were too may listings to be
of use, plus while I can sound out Russian, I have no grounding in vocabulary
and grammar. To me it's just phonetic. Nonetheless, I clicked through a few
of them and found a listing I was curious about.

I tried to copy the text, in hopes of putting it into translate.google.com .
Like many sites with full-text searching, the thing on the screen is an
image, so it's either impossible to select the image or if you do select an
image, there's no way to put it into the web-based version of Google
Translate. What I did that was new was I picked up my phone, where I have
installed the Google Translate App, and pointed it at the screen. (My exact
steps were to choose >from Russian to English translation, then press the
camera icon at the lower-left corner.)

Having told the app it was searching for Russian, it started translating
words >from the computer screen onto my phone screen. It wasn't all entirely
readable, but it was enough to figure out section headings of the document.
(It felt like that magic moment in the movies of the 1930s when the Chinese
signs temporarily melt into English and back.)

The pages I found did not help, yet, in my particular case, but I think this
might help some of you navigate through documents in unfamiliar languages.
It's no substitute for a fluent translator. Note that some languages support
this instant translation while others only support a scan feature that
requires tapping the screen and then selecting an area to translate which is
much more cumbersome. Yiddish is unsupported and handwriting will not work
either. I'm sure that things like headstones will completely confuse the
program.

Maybe I'm sharing something very obvious, but I had never thought to put the
two things together.

Bob Fitterman
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Almost Magical Translations #general

Bob Fitterman
 

Today I had a bit of insight to combine two things together that had
never crossed my mind. It might be of use to some of you in your research.

In looking at the email >from Logan Kleinwaks to Carol Rombrol Rider's query
about directories, I decided to try genealogyindexer.org . In my case, I put
in my maternal grandmother's maiden name and up popped dozens of listings in
Cyrillic. I had cast a very wide net and there were too may listings to be
of use, plus while I can sound out Russian, I have no grounding in vocabulary
and grammar. To me it's just phonetic. Nonetheless, I clicked through a few
of them and found a listing I was curious about.

I tried to copy the text, in hopes of putting it into translate.google.com .
Like many sites with full-text searching, the thing on the screen is an
image, so it's either impossible to select the image or if you do select an
image, there's no way to put it into the web-based version of Google
Translate. What I did that was new was I picked up my phone, where I have
installed the Google Translate App, and pointed it at the screen. (My exact
steps were to choose >from Russian to English translation, then press the
camera icon at the lower-left corner.)

Having told the app it was searching for Russian, it started translating
words >from the computer screen onto my phone screen. It wasn't all entirely
readable, but it was enough to figure out section headings of the document.
(It felt like that magic moment in the movies of the 1930s when the Chinese
signs temporarily melt into English and back.)

The pages I found did not help, yet, in my particular case, but I think this
might help some of you navigate through documents in unfamiliar languages.
It's no substitute for a fluent translator. Note that some languages support
this instant translation while others only support a scan feature that
requires tapping the screen and then selecting an area to translate which is
much more cumbersome. Yiddish is unsupported and handwriting will not work
either. I'm sure that things like headstones will completely confuse the
program.

Maybe I'm sharing something very obvious, but I had never thought to put the
two things together.

Bob Fitterman
New York City


Re: Seeking Records from Palestine (Ukraine>Palestine>US) #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Shalom Eric,

There are two main repositories for immigration to Palestine. The Central
Zionist Archives [CZA]and the Israel State Archives. The Israel Genealogy
Research Association [IGRA] in working with the CZA on some of the immigration
lists to build databases which will be part of the IGRA collection. The State
Archives have scanned some of the lists through 1933, but they are not indexed
so you have to go thru page by page.

I suggest you follow the IGRA website or facebook for notices of new
databases being added.

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and
Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with
http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl

From: Eric Ellman <eellman@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2015 13:28:04 +0000 (UTC)

I am trying to locate information on several family members during their
time in Mandate Palestine. These family members left >from Minkovitz, Ukraine
around 1918-1920 to Jaffa, Palestine. In 1923 one family member left from
Jaffa to the U.S. and in 1925 three others followed suit.

Might there be any records of their immigration in to Palestine >from Minkovitz?
Might there be any records about their stay in Jaffa? Might there be passport
or visa information related to their departure >from Jaffa to the U.S.

I seek Fishel Dick, born in 1906, who left Jaffa on the S.S. Madonna on
Oct. 2, 1923 arriving Providence, RI and then to Brooklyn. I also seek Rachel
Dick, born c. 1877 who departed Jaffa on the S.S. Canada on Nov. 11, 1925
arriving Providence and then to Brooklyn. Rachel had two children with her,
Zusel (b. 1910) and Asron (b. 1912).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Records from Palestine (Ukraine>Palestine>US) #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Shalom Eric,

There are two main repositories for immigration to Palestine. The Central
Zionist Archives [CZA]and the Israel State Archives. The Israel Genealogy
Research Association [IGRA] in working with the CZA on some of the immigration
lists to build databases which will be part of the IGRA collection. The State
Archives have scanned some of the lists through 1933, but they are not indexed
so you have to go thru page by page.

I suggest you follow the IGRA website or facebook for notices of new
databases being added.

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and
Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with
http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl

From: Eric Ellman <eellman@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2015 13:28:04 +0000 (UTC)

I am trying to locate information on several family members during their
time in Mandate Palestine. These family members left >from Minkovitz, Ukraine
around 1918-1920 to Jaffa, Palestine. In 1923 one family member left from
Jaffa to the U.S. and in 1925 three others followed suit.

Might there be any records of their immigration in to Palestine >from Minkovitz?
Might there be any records about their stay in Jaffa? Might there be passport
or visa information related to their departure >from Jaffa to the U.S.

I seek Fishel Dick, born in 1906, who left Jaffa on the S.S. Madonna on
Oct. 2, 1923 arriving Providence, RI and then to Brooklyn. I also seek Rachel
Dick, born c. 1877 who departed Jaffa on the S.S. Canada on Nov. 11, 1925
arriving Providence and then to Brooklyn. Rachel had two children with her,
Zusel (b. 1910) and Asron (b. 1912).

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