Date   

A found manuscript: How to publish? #general

Moishe Miller
 

Felicia,

You are living our dream come-true. You won the genealogy lottery.

I commend you on wanting to publish your findings. I am of the opinion
that if you do not share it, you may as well put it back in the box for
another 70 years. I myself have written about my own publishing
experiences in the winter 2013/2014 edition of Dorot (distributed May
2014), the periodical of the JGS of NY.

I am sure many of us would appreciate following the manuscript's journey.
Please let us share in this wonderful experience.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A found manuscript: How to publish? #general

Moishe Miller
 

Felicia,

You are living our dream come-true. You won the genealogy lottery.

I commend you on wanting to publish your findings. I am of the opinion
that if you do not share it, you may as well put it back in the box for
another 70 years. I myself have written about my own publishing
experiences in the winter 2013/2014 edition of Dorot (distributed May
2014), the periodical of the JGS of NY.

I am sure many of us would appreciate following the manuscript's journey.
Please let us share in this wonderful experience.

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY


Re: A found manuscript: How to publish? #general

spdenker@...
 

Hello Felicia,
We have used two excellent publishers for our 6 books.

Both are listed online:

No Waste Publishing (hardcover) and DiggyPod (softcover).

They have 800 telephone numbers and will promptly pick up the
phone to answer *all* your questions.

We have also published a book about the entire *process* of
taking a manuscript, then designing and publishing it as a book.
See us on Amazon or at your library.

Sounds like a wonderful and exciting find.

Elayne and Steve Denker


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: A found manuscript: How to publish? #general

spdenker@...
 

Hello Felicia,
We have used two excellent publishers for our 6 books.

Both are listed online:

No Waste Publishing (hardcover) and DiggyPod (softcover).

They have 800 telephone numbers and will promptly pick up the
phone to answer *all* your questions.

We have also published a book about the entire *process* of
taking a manuscript, then designing and publishing it as a book.
See us on Amazon or at your library.

Sounds like a wonderful and exciting find.

Elayne and Steve Denker


Old Postcard Photos of Individuals #general

abediw@...
 

My father had photo postcards >from friends sent to him in Buzau (Buzeu)
Romania and here in the US.

I don't know who anyone is but somehow hesitate to throw them out...
These cards are between 95 and 100 years old.
Any suggests as to what to do with them?

Also some of the pictures (to the best of my ability to read the names) are
of:

Petri SCUMPUL, Lillian SCHILLINGER, Avrum CEISSLER, Ernestina WWENDER, Morris
ISACSON, Betti HERSCOVINCY, Maricu FELLER Marcu HUSSLER. There is one of
an American soldier, Mike CAIPP.

all of these people had to have been born in the 1890's or so.
Are any of these names familiar to anyone?

Diana GOODMAN WEINMAN
Monroe Twpl, NJ

(GOODMAN, GUTTMAN, LEIBOVICI, LEIBOWITZ, DAVIS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Old Postcard Photos of Individuals #general

abediw@...
 

My father had photo postcards >from friends sent to him in Buzau (Buzeu)
Romania and here in the US.

I don't know who anyone is but somehow hesitate to throw them out...
These cards are between 95 and 100 years old.
Any suggests as to what to do with them?

Also some of the pictures (to the best of my ability to read the names) are
of:

Petri SCUMPUL, Lillian SCHILLINGER, Avrum CEISSLER, Ernestina WWENDER, Morris
ISACSON, Betti HERSCOVINCY, Maricu FELLER Marcu HUSSLER. There is one of
an American soldier, Mike CAIPP.

all of these people had to have been born in the 1890's or so.
Are any of these names familiar to anyone?

Diana GOODMAN WEINMAN
Monroe Twpl, NJ

(GOODMAN, GUTTMAN, LEIBOVICI, LEIBOWITZ, DAVIS


When Keller is not Keller (was: Searching ROSEN from Radwanitz) #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I want to thank everyone that responded. Several experienced researchers
reminded me of two important points that I want to share:

a) The JewishGen Communities Database (available via the JewishGen
homepage) is not a complete list. If you need to find a town, click on
the "about" link on the advanced page and read the detail. Smaller places
appear only in the "JewishGen Gazetteer". That would be this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

Using the Soundex, I still only get Czech Republic for Radwanitz.
Using the Sounds Like dropdown, I get three towns in Belarus. My
challenge now is to find which one the Rosen's came >from and to see if
I can find ROSEN records there.

b) When looking for the arrival of Sarah KELLER nee Rosen, I did not
cast a wide enough net. It is important to try alternatives when looking
for names. She arrived in July of 1912 under the name of Sore KALER (and
this time, her hometown is listed as Radowalitz - and that spelling is
not even in the Gazetteer for Belarus).

Wishing everyone a very happy Passover,

Moishe Miller


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen When Keller is not Keller (was: Searching ROSEN from Radwanitz) #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I want to thank everyone that responded. Several experienced researchers
reminded me of two important points that I want to share:

a) The JewishGen Communities Database (available via the JewishGen
homepage) is not a complete list. If you need to find a town, click on
the "about" link on the advanced page and read the detail. Smaller places
appear only in the "JewishGen Gazetteer". That would be this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

Using the Soundex, I still only get Czech Republic for Radwanitz.
Using the Sounds Like dropdown, I get three towns in Belarus. My
challenge now is to find which one the Rosen's came >from and to see if
I can find ROSEN records there.

b) When looking for the arrival of Sarah KELLER nee Rosen, I did not
cast a wide enough net. It is important to try alternatives when looking
for names. She arrived in July of 1912 under the name of Sore KALER (and
this time, her hometown is listed as Radowalitz - and that spelling is
not even in the Gazetteer for Belarus).

Wishing everyone a very happy Passover,

Moishe Miller


FW: Gravestone images - Kiliya Cemetery #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I have responded to Jana, but I might not be clear in my messages. If you
can transcribe even one inscription, please send information directly to me.
It might be in a plain text (use the image number, plot number or file
name) or you can fill the table I put in the same directory at the dropbox.
The Excel table has some information derived >from the images...

Just for people interested in Kiliya... in addition to finishing soon this
cemetery, which as I mentioned before has the earliest tombstones, starting
from 1822, our Revision List team is completing translation of a Revision
set for Kiliya >from 1835!!

Happy Passover,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 7:59 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Gravestone images

Hi Yefim,
I'm a photoshop expert. I will mess around with the gravestone images.
Where should I send them when I'm done?

Cheers,
Jana Marcus

Ludvipol Yizkor Book Project Manager
Researching
EIZENMAN, SHEMESH, WEXLER, MALMAD in Ludvipol (now Sosnove), Ukraine MARKUS,
SAGANOVSKAYA in Kishnev and Rashkov KASHINSKY, KAWISTANKA, KOVISHANSKI,
ZAITCHIK in Dubassari BABCZUK, BABCHUCK in Berezna, Volynhia, Ukraine
-------


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia FW: Gravestone images - Kiliya Cemetery #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I have responded to Jana, but I might not be clear in my messages. If you
can transcribe even one inscription, please send information directly to me.
It might be in a plain text (use the image number, plot number or file
name) or you can fill the table I put in the same directory at the dropbox.
The Excel table has some information derived >from the images...

Just for people interested in Kiliya... in addition to finishing soon this
cemetery, which as I mentioned before has the earliest tombstones, starting
from 1822, our Revision List team is completing translation of a Revision
set for Kiliya >from 1835!!

Happy Passover,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org]
Sent: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 7:59 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Gravestone images

Hi Yefim,
I'm a photoshop expert. I will mess around with the gravestone images.
Where should I send them when I'm done?

Cheers,
Jana Marcus

Ludvipol Yizkor Book Project Manager
Researching
EIZENMAN, SHEMESH, WEXLER, MALMAD in Ludvipol (now Sosnove), Ukraine MARKUS,
SAGANOVSKAYA in Kishnev and Rashkov KASHINSKY, KAWISTANKA, KOVISHANSKI,
ZAITCHIK in Dubassari BABCZUK, BABCHUCK in Berezna, Volynhia, Ukraine
-------


INTRO- Seek Pauline TOBIAS, nee FREEMAN b Alsace 1848 #germany

Daria O'Connor <dariaoconnor@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I have just joined the group after researching my family tree for
about a year. Just before starting my research I had my DNA profiled.
When I saw my ashkenazi hertiage pop up it reminded me that one of my
GGrandmothers was a German jew. Her parents were both >from Germany
and immigrated to the Hartford, Connecticut area and married there
in 1867. I was lucky to have an aunt who was still alive and she told
me what she knew about this branch of our family including a story
about a mysterious disappearance of my 3x GGrandmother. The family
story was that she went back to Germany, leaving her children behind.
I want to know what happened to her and so far I have not found her in
the US after much looking. There is some history of mental illness in
our family and this 3x GGrandmother may have suffered a great deal
because of it. I would like to find out what happened to her. Here
is what I know:

Searching for deathplace of Pauline TOBIAS:

Pauline TOBIAS, nee FREEMAN, born on January 18, 1848 in Alsace (then
Germany), was married to Theodore TOBIAS in Hartford, CT on 7 July,
1867. On January 4, 1882 they were divorced and she was found guilty
to have an affair with her neighbor Robert MILLER for almost 7 years.
The last trace of her is a newspaper article >from Hartford saying that
she was arrested for drunkenness/unsound mind, two weeks after her ex
re-married in July 1882. She might have been depressive as well since
her sister committed suicide by poison in 1874 in Hartford and a
nephew, Edward FREEMAN, also committed suicide by pistol in 1920 in
Boston. He was declared to be temporarily insane as his wife had just
minutes before lost her battle with tuberculosis.

Pauline had a brother named Jacob FREEMAN living in Boston, MA and a
brother named Martin FREEMAN living in Chicago, IL. Maybe she moved
there or to New York or even back to her parents, Ignatz
FREEMAN/FREIMANN and Sophie BERLINER to Bad Buchau, Germany. We don't
know if she re-married or if she spent her last years in a mental
hospital. Obviously she didn't marry Robert Miller >from Hartford.

If you ever came across a person like Pauline TOBIAS, please send us a message.

Thank you, Daria Lyons O'Connor, Brookline, MA, USA, dariaoconnor@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO- Seek Pauline TOBIAS, nee FREEMAN b Alsace 1848 #germany

Daria O'Connor <dariaoconnor@...>
 

Hello GerSig,

I have just joined the group after researching my family tree for
about a year. Just before starting my research I had my DNA profiled.
When I saw my ashkenazi hertiage pop up it reminded me that one of my
GGrandmothers was a German jew. Her parents were both >from Germany
and immigrated to the Hartford, Connecticut area and married there
in 1867. I was lucky to have an aunt who was still alive and she told
me what she knew about this branch of our family including a story
about a mysterious disappearance of my 3x GGrandmother. The family
story was that she went back to Germany, leaving her children behind.
I want to know what happened to her and so far I have not found her in
the US after much looking. There is some history of mental illness in
our family and this 3x GGrandmother may have suffered a great deal
because of it. I would like to find out what happened to her. Here
is what I know:

Searching for deathplace of Pauline TOBIAS:

Pauline TOBIAS, nee FREEMAN, born on January 18, 1848 in Alsace (then
Germany), was married to Theodore TOBIAS in Hartford, CT on 7 July,
1867. On January 4, 1882 they were divorced and she was found guilty
to have an affair with her neighbor Robert MILLER for almost 7 years.
The last trace of her is a newspaper article >from Hartford saying that
she was arrested for drunkenness/unsound mind, two weeks after her ex
re-married in July 1882. She might have been depressive as well since
her sister committed suicide by poison in 1874 in Hartford and a
nephew, Edward FREEMAN, also committed suicide by pistol in 1920 in
Boston. He was declared to be temporarily insane as his wife had just
minutes before lost her battle with tuberculosis.

Pauline had a brother named Jacob FREEMAN living in Boston, MA and a
brother named Martin FREEMAN living in Chicago, IL. Maybe she moved
there or to New York or even back to her parents, Ignatz
FREEMAN/FREIMANN and Sophie BERLINER to Bad Buchau, Germany. We don't
know if she re-married or if she spent her last years in a mental
hospital. Obviously she didn't marry Robert Miller >from Hartford.

If you ever came across a person like Pauline TOBIAS, please send us a message.

Thank you, Daria Lyons O'Connor, Brookline, MA, USA, dariaoconnor@gmail.com


Autosomal DNA testing (German comment/ question) #germany

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer
 

Hi,

I have had mtDNA and Y-DNA tests done with Family Tree DNA for my
husband, my brother, and myself, because several experts have told me
that they are the best company for this (not to mention that Ancestry
DNA is no longer offering these two tests).

Recently, I had FTDNA do autosomal testing on my husband and my
brother. These tests are supposed to give you a breakdown of your
ancestral background >from various regions of the world. Since my
father's husband is completely German (making him 50% German), and my
brother and I are about 40% German, I was surprised that the breakdown
they sent us showed no German ancestry.

When I wrote to ask them why, they said they have no German population
reference group. I found this amazing, since German is one of the most
reported foreign ancestries in census data.

My husband's breakdown did show 12% ancestry >from Jewish diaspora
(mathematically, exactly what I expected), so I can figure that
accounts for about 12% of his German ancestry, but that still leaves
me with 38% to allocate >from the other groups that show in his
results.

I'm going to investigate whether Ancestry.com has a German reference
group or not, and then perhaps test with them. However, I thought I'd
ask if anyone on the list has experience with autosomal testing with a
company that has a German reference group. Thanks! Christine

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer Hyde Park, NY christine3cats@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Private replies only. I suggest posting also to the DNA
SIG.


German SIG #Germany Autosomal DNA testing (German comment/ question) #germany

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer
 

Hi,

I have had mtDNA and Y-DNA tests done with Family Tree DNA for my
husband, my brother, and myself, because several experts have told me
that they are the best company for this (not to mention that Ancestry
DNA is no longer offering these two tests).

Recently, I had FTDNA do autosomal testing on my husband and my
brother. These tests are supposed to give you a breakdown of your
ancestral background >from various regions of the world. Since my
father's husband is completely German (making him 50% German), and my
brother and I are about 40% German, I was surprised that the breakdown
they sent us showed no German ancestry.

When I wrote to ask them why, they said they have no German population
reference group. I found this amazing, since German is one of the most
reported foreign ancestries in census data.

My husband's breakdown did show 12% ancestry >from Jewish diaspora
(mathematically, exactly what I expected), so I can figure that
accounts for about 12% of his German ancestry, but that still leaves
me with 38% to allocate >from the other groups that show in his
results.

I'm going to investigate whether Ancestry.com has a German reference
group or not, and then perhaps test with them. However, I thought I'd
ask if anyone on the list has experience with autosomal testing with a
company that has a German reference group. Thanks! Christine

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer Hyde Park, NY christine3cats@gmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Private replies only. I suggest posting also to the DNA
SIG.


Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Conference Papers online for free viewing #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

In the fall of 2013 Jay Osborn and I participated in a conference in
Pisa, Italy called "Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Visions >from the
Past for a Vision of Our Future" sponsored by ICARUS: the
International Centre for Archival Research. The catalog of conference
proceedings are now online, edited by Benedetto Benedetti, Charles
Farrugia, Beatrice Romiti and Andras Sipos. The papers can be viewed
online an/or downloaded for free:

http://edizioni.sns.it/it/testi-online/pdf-scaricabile-282.html

Click on the author's name and program title to view them.

Besides our two presentations dealing with Galician cadastral maps
and their importance to genealogical research, there are others
dealing with regions of interest to Jewish genealogists including Italy,
Hungary, Estonia, Croatia and France. One very interesting paper by
Julian Holzapel, deals with 3,000 aerial reconnaissance photos taken
by a unit of German Bavarian aviators >from 1917-1918 in historical
Palestine while on military assignment when Imperial Germany was
assisting the Ottoman Empire during WWI. Because the photographers
realized they were flying over the Holy Land they took photographs
that went beyond the military mission, including religious sites and
Jewish settlements.

Most papers are in English, some in the native language of the
presenter, but still with a short introduction in English:

- Andras Sipos,
Cadastral Maps -- Ideal Field for International Archival Cooperation

- Nicolas Verdier, Estate Maps in 18th Century France: Between
Representation of Land Rights and the Production of Accurate Maps.

- Eniko Torok, Step by Step: Digitisation Projects of Cadastral
Documents in the Central Archive of National Archives of Hungary,
Budapest.

- Pamela A. Weisberger, Gesher Galicia's Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project: A Virtual Recreation of a Vanished Province.

- Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's Online Cadastral Map Room: Evolution
and Opportunities.

- Julian Holzapfl, Early Aerial Photographs >from the State Archives of
Bavaria. Exploring a New Synergy between Archival Holdings and
Geographic Imaging.

- Sassoli, The Historical Cadaster of Tuscany and the CASTORE Project.

- Liina Lohmus, Register of the Maps in National Archives of Estonia:
Visions, Plans, Practices.

- Mirjana Juric, Present and Future of the Digital Catastral Heritage
in Croatian State Archives

- Biserka Budicin, Maja Ceric, Cadastral Maps in the State Archives in
Pazin and Their Usage in Everyday Archival Practice.

- Enrico Romiti, Ancient Cartography and Historical Maps, Useful Tools
in the Hands of the Archaeologists.

- Tommaso Maria Rossi, Sources for Knowing the Territory: The
Terrilogi of the Historical Diocesan Archives of Lucca.

- Micaela Antola, Illustrated Cabrei, a Private Form of Cadastral
Maps: The Case of the Republic of Genoa.

- Vincenzo De Santi, Online Access to the Historical Cartography of
Trapani's Territory: Problems and Perspectives.

- Alexandre Nobajas, >from Hidden to Online, the Case of Horta's
Cadastral Map.

A printed version will be available shortly.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Conference Papers online for free viewing #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

In the fall of 2013 Jay Osborn and I participated in a conference in
Pisa, Italy called "Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Visions >from the
Past for a Vision of Our Future" sponsored by ICARUS: the
International Centre for Archival Research. The catalog of conference
proceedings are now online, edited by Benedetto Benedetti, Charles
Farrugia, Beatrice Romiti and Andras Sipos. The papers can be viewed
online an/or downloaded for free:

http://edizioni.sns.it/it/testi-online/pdf-scaricabile-282.html

Click on the author's name and program title to view them.

Besides our two presentations dealing with Galician cadastral maps
and their importance to genealogical research, there are others
dealing with regions of interest to Jewish genealogists including Italy,
Hungary, Estonia, Croatia and France. One very interesting paper by
Julian Holzapel, deals with 3,000 aerial reconnaissance photos taken
by a unit of German Bavarian aviators >from 1917-1918 in historical
Palestine while on military assignment when Imperial Germany was
assisting the Ottoman Empire during WWI. Because the photographers
realized they were flying over the Holy Land they took photographs
that went beyond the military mission, including religious sites and
Jewish settlements.

Most papers are in English, some in the native language of the
presenter, but still with a short introduction in English:

- Andras Sipos,
Cadastral Maps -- Ideal Field for International Archival Cooperation

- Nicolas Verdier, Estate Maps in 18th Century France: Between
Representation of Land Rights and the Production of Accurate Maps.

- Eniko Torok, Step by Step: Digitisation Projects of Cadastral
Documents in the Central Archive of National Archives of Hungary,
Budapest.

- Pamela A. Weisberger, Gesher Galicia's Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project: A Virtual Recreation of a Vanished Province.

- Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's Online Cadastral Map Room: Evolution
and Opportunities.

- Julian Holzapfl, Early Aerial Photographs >from the State Archives of
Bavaria. Exploring a New Synergy between Archival Holdings and
Geographic Imaging.

- Sassoli, The Historical Cadaster of Tuscany and the CASTORE Project.

- Liina Lohmus, Register of the Maps in National Archives of Estonia:
Visions, Plans, Practices.

- Mirjana Juric, Present and Future of the Digital Catastral Heritage
in Croatian State Archives

- Biserka Budicin, Maja Ceric, Cadastral Maps in the State Archives in
Pazin and Their Usage in Everyday Archival Practice.

- Enrico Romiti, Ancient Cartography and Historical Maps, Useful Tools
in the Hands of the Archaeologists.

- Tommaso Maria Rossi, Sources for Knowing the Territory: The
Terrilogi of the Historical Diocesan Archives of Lucca.

- Micaela Antola, Illustrated Cabrei, a Private Form of Cadastral
Maps: The Case of the Republic of Genoa.

- Vincenzo De Santi, Online Access to the Historical Cartography of
Trapani's Territory: Problems and Perspectives.

- Alexandre Nobajas, >from Hidden to Online, the Case of Horta's
Cadastral Map.

A printed version will be available shortly.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Aron & Simone BURSZTAJN #general

Stanley Grossman
 

Aron & Simone BURSZTAJN

According to Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, Aron Bursztajn, a second
cousin, b June 17, 1901 Brzeziny, Poland, lived in Paris France and was
married to Simone (not further described). According to the Shoah Memorial
Paris Aron lived at 2 Cite des Envierges, 20th District Paris. He was
deported on Convoy #5 28 June 1942 and died in Auschwitz Oct 6 1942. The
fate of Simone is unknown. Her name sounds French and she may, or may not,
have been Jewish thus avoiding deportation. Any ideas as to identifying
Simone, when/if a marriage took place in Paris etc. would be appreciated.

Stanley Grossman
Glasgow, Scotland

Researching BURSZTAJN, GROSMAN, BOCIAN, (Brzeziny & Lodz)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Aron & Simone BURSZTAJN #general

Stanley Grossman
 

Aron & Simone BURSZTAJN

According to Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, Aron Bursztajn, a second
cousin, b June 17, 1901 Brzeziny, Poland, lived in Paris France and was
married to Simone (not further described). According to the Shoah Memorial
Paris Aron lived at 2 Cite des Envierges, 20th District Paris. He was
deported on Convoy #5 28 June 1942 and died in Auschwitz Oct 6 1942. The
fate of Simone is unknown. Her name sounds French and she may, or may not,
have been Jewish thus avoiding deportation. Any ideas as to identifying
Simone, when/if a marriage took place in Paris etc. would be appreciated.

Stanley Grossman
Glasgow, Scotland

Researching BURSZTAJN, GROSMAN, BOCIAN, (Brzeziny & Lodz)


Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Conference Papers online for free viewing #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

In the fall of 2013 Jay Osborn and I participated in a conference in
Pisa, Italy called "Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Visions >from the
Past for a Vision of Our Future" sponsored by ICARUS: the
International Centre for Archival Research. The catalog of conference
proceedings are now online, edited by Benedetto Benedetti, Charles
Farrugia, Beatrice Romiti and Andras Sipos. The papers can be viewed
online and/or downloaded for free:

http://edizioni.sns.it/it/testi-online/pdf-scaricabile-282.html

Click on the author's name and program title to view them.

Besides our two presentations dealing with Galician cadastral maps and
their importance to genealogical research, there are others dealing
with regions of interest to Jewish genealogists including Italy,
Hungary, Estonia, Croatia and France. One very interesting paper by
Julian Holzapel, deals with 3,000 aerial reconnaissance photos taken
by a unit of German Bavarian aviators >from 1917-1918 in historical
Palestine while on military assignment when Imperial Germany was
assisting the Ottoman Empire during WWI. Because the photographers
realized they were flying over the Holy Land they took photographs
that went beyond the military mission, including religious sites and
Jewish settlements.

Most papers are in English, some in the native language of the
presenter, but still with a short introduction in English:

- Andras Sipos, Cadastral Maps -- Ideal Field for International
Archival Cooperation.

- Nicolas Verdier, Estate Maps in 18th Century France: Between
Representation of Land Rights and the Production of Accurate Maps.

- Eniko Torok, Step by Step: Digitisation Projects of Cadastral
Documents in the Central Archive of National Archives of Hungary,
Budapest.

- Pamela A. Weisberger, Gesher Galiciaâ??s Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project: A Virtual Recreation of a Vanished Province.

- Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's Online Cadastral Map Room: Evolution
and Opportunities.

- Julian Holzapfl, Early Aerial Photographs >from the State Archives of
Bavaria. Exploring a New Synergy between Archival Holdings and
Geographic Imaging.

- Sassoli, The Historical Cadaster of Tuscany and the CASTORE Project.

- Liina Lohmus, Register of the Maps in National Archives of Estonia:
Visions, Plans, Practices.

- Mirjana Juric, Present and Future of the Digital Catastral Heritage
in Croatian State Archives

- Biserka Budicin, Maja Ceric, Cadastral Maps in the State Archives in
Pazin and Their Usage in Everyday Archival Practice.

- Enrico Romiti, Ancient Cartography and Historical Maps, Useful Tools
in the Hands of the Archaeologists.

- Tommaso Maria Rossi, Sources for Knowing the Territory: The
Terrilogi of the Historical Diocesan Archives of Lucca.

- Micaela Antola, Illustrated Cabrei, a Private Form of Cadastral
Maps: The Case of the Republic of Genoa.

- Vincenzo De Santi, Online Access to the Historical Cartography of
Trapani's Territory: Problems and Perspectives.

- Alexandre Nobajas, >from Hidden to Online, the Case of Horta's Cadastral Map.

A printed version will be available shortly.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Conference Papers online for free viewing #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

In the fall of 2013 Jay Osborn and I participated in a conference in
Pisa, Italy called "Cartography and Cadastral Maps: Visions >from the
Past for a Vision of Our Future" sponsored by ICARUS: the
International Centre for Archival Research. The catalog of conference
proceedings are now online, edited by Benedetto Benedetti, Charles
Farrugia, Beatrice Romiti and Andras Sipos. The papers can be viewed
online and/or downloaded for free:

http://edizioni.sns.it/it/testi-online/pdf-scaricabile-282.html

Click on the author's name and program title to view them.

Besides our two presentations dealing with Galician cadastral maps and
their importance to genealogical research, there are others dealing
with regions of interest to Jewish genealogists including Italy,
Hungary, Estonia, Croatia and France. One very interesting paper by
Julian Holzapel, deals with 3,000 aerial reconnaissance photos taken
by a unit of German Bavarian aviators >from 1917-1918 in historical
Palestine while on military assignment when Imperial Germany was
assisting the Ottoman Empire during WWI. Because the photographers
realized they were flying over the Holy Land they took photographs
that went beyond the military mission, including religious sites and
Jewish settlements.

Most papers are in English, some in the native language of the
presenter, but still with a short introduction in English:

- Andras Sipos, Cadastral Maps -- Ideal Field for International
Archival Cooperation.

- Nicolas Verdier, Estate Maps in 18th Century France: Between
Representation of Land Rights and the Production of Accurate Maps.

- Eniko Torok, Step by Step: Digitisation Projects of Cadastral
Documents in the Central Archive of National Archives of Hungary,
Budapest.

- Pamela A. Weisberger, Gesher Galiciaâ??s Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project: A Virtual Recreation of a Vanished Province.

- Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's Online Cadastral Map Room: Evolution
and Opportunities.

- Julian Holzapfl, Early Aerial Photographs >from the State Archives of
Bavaria. Exploring a New Synergy between Archival Holdings and
Geographic Imaging.

- Sassoli, The Historical Cadaster of Tuscany and the CASTORE Project.

- Liina Lohmus, Register of the Maps in National Archives of Estonia:
Visions, Plans, Practices.

- Mirjana Juric, Present and Future of the Digital Catastral Heritage
in Croatian State Archives

- Biserka Budicin, Maja Ceric, Cadastral Maps in the State Archives in
Pazin and Their Usage in Everyday Archival Practice.

- Enrico Romiti, Ancient Cartography and Historical Maps, Useful Tools
in the Hands of the Archaeologists.

- Tommaso Maria Rossi, Sources for Knowing the Territory: The
Terrilogi of the Historical Diocesan Archives of Lucca.

- Micaela Antola, Illustrated Cabrei, a Private Form of Cadastral
Maps: The Case of the Republic of Genoa.

- Vincenzo De Santi, Online Access to the Historical Cartography of
Trapani's Territory: Problems and Perspectives.

- Alexandre Nobajas, >from Hidden to Online, the Case of Horta's Cadastral Map.

A printed version will be available shortly.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com

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