Date   

LEFCOVITCH - JACOBS #unitedkingdom

Liz James
 

Dear Genners,

I am looking for the parents of Bernard (Barnett, Berrish) ) LEFCOVITCH who
was born about 1899 in either Russia or Poland.
He married Annie JACOBS on the 26 November 1916 at the East London
Synagogue.

I would also like to know the name of the parents of Annie JACOBS. She lived
in the South End of London.
Hoping someone can help me.

Liz James
Belbourne, Australia


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom LEFCOVITCH - JACOBS #unitedkingdom

Liz James
 

Dear Genners,

I am looking for the parents of Bernard (Barnett, Berrish) ) LEFCOVITCH who
was born about 1899 in either Russia or Poland.
He married Annie JACOBS on the 26 November 1916 at the East London
Synagogue.

I would also like to know the name of the parents of Annie JACOBS. She lived
in the South End of London.
Hoping someone can help me.

Liz James
Belbourne, Australia


Re: Troedeljude - Sackjude #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

"[...] a translation >from German to English for words like Sackjude or
Troedeljude ?

A Troedeljude was a Jew who bought and sold "pre-owned" (used) items... a
second-hand goods dealer.

In a pre-mass consumption era, goods >from most product categories typically
were successively re-owned and reused, whether within the circle of family
and friends, or outright. Comparable markets today might include used cars,
thrift shops and national (even international) used goods franchises.

Alan Ehrlich. Geneva, Switzerland alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Troedeljude - Sackjude #germany

Alan Ehrlich
 

"[...] a translation >from German to English for words like Sackjude or
Troedeljude ?

A Troedeljude was a Jew who bought and sold "pre-owned" (used) items... a
second-hand goods dealer.

In a pre-mass consumption era, goods >from most product categories typically
were successively re-owned and reused, whether within the circle of family
and friends, or outright. Comparable markets today might include used cars,
thrift shops and national (even international) used goods franchises.

Alan Ehrlich. Geneva, Switzerland alan.ehrlich@ehrlich-online.com


(Spain) Spanish Lawmakers Approved Law Giving Descendants of Inquisition Rights of Dual Citizenship #sephardic

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On June 11, the Spanish Parliament passed legislation granting dual
citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who fled during the
Inquisition. Potentially, 3.5 million Sephardic Jews who settled in across
the world may apply for dual citizenship although it is estimated that only
90,000 people will apply. The law becomes effective in October 1, 2015. The
previous law >from 1924 permitted Sephardic Jews to become citizens but they
had to give up their previous citizenship. The new law permits dual
citizenship. Having a Spanish passport permits the holder the right to work
and live anywhere in the 28-Member European Union.

Applicants will have to have their Jewish heritage vetted by the Spanish
Federation of Jewish Communities or by rabbis where they live-they do not
have to be practicing Jews. In addition, applicants will have to pass tests
on Spanish or Ladino languages, Spanish culture and prove they have a
connection to modern day Spain (i.e. donating to a Spanish charity or buying
Spanish property). To apply, interested parties will have to go to Spain at
their own expense. The requirements for application are similar to those of
anyone applying for Spanish citizenship, unlike Portuguese law, which became
effective this Spring, which only requires vetting of applicants ancestry
by Jewish organizations

The law will expire after three years. The website of the Federation of
Jewish Communities in Spain has a detailed explanation on how to file the
application see: http://www.fcje.org/nacionalidad-3/ (scroll down the
page for the English translation). At this time there are no instructions on
how to file the application.

To read more see: http://tinyurl.com/oqj5mq4
Original url:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/11/spain-law-citizenship-jews

and http://tinyurl.com/ng7p9we
Original url:
http://www.myfoxaustin.com/story/29297384/spain-lawmakers-approve-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim (Spain) Spanish Lawmakers Approved Law Giving Descendants of Inquisition Rights of Dual Citizenship #sephardic

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On June 11, the Spanish Parliament passed legislation granting dual
citizenship to descendants of Sephardic Jews who fled during the
Inquisition. Potentially, 3.5 million Sephardic Jews who settled in across
the world may apply for dual citizenship although it is estimated that only
90,000 people will apply. The law becomes effective in October 1, 2015. The
previous law >from 1924 permitted Sephardic Jews to become citizens but they
had to give up their previous citizenship. The new law permits dual
citizenship. Having a Spanish passport permits the holder the right to work
and live anywhere in the 28-Member European Union.

Applicants will have to have their Jewish heritage vetted by the Spanish
Federation of Jewish Communities or by rabbis where they live-they do not
have to be practicing Jews. In addition, applicants will have to pass tests
on Spanish or Ladino languages, Spanish culture and prove they have a
connection to modern day Spain (i.e. donating to a Spanish charity or buying
Spanish property). To apply, interested parties will have to go to Spain at
their own expense. The requirements for application are similar to those of
anyone applying for Spanish citizenship, unlike Portuguese law, which became
effective this Spring, which only requires vetting of applicants ancestry
by Jewish organizations

The law will expire after three years. The website of the Federation of
Jewish Communities in Spain has a detailed explanation on how to file the
application see: http://www.fcje.org/nacionalidad-3/ (scroll down the
page for the English translation). At this time there are no instructions on
how to file the application.

To read more see: http://tinyurl.com/oqj5mq4
Original url:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/11/spain-law-citizenship-jews

and http://tinyurl.com/ng7p9we
Original url:
http://www.myfoxaustin.com/story/29297384/spain-lawmakers-approve-sephardic-jew-citizenship-plan

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Abraham ABRAMOWITZ-born Jerusalem 1894 #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

It has always intrigued me if there is/was a family connection between
Abraham ABRAMOWITZ who was born in Jerusalem in 1894 and my
grandfather Chaim Yitzchak ABRAMOWITZ who was also born in Jerusalem
in 1895.

Abraham, I believe married a CHARLAP and eventually moved to Chicago
where he served as a Conservative Rabbi during the 1930-1950s. My
grandfather also emmigrated to the states in the 1930s but returned
after a 5 year stay there.

Several years ago I was in contact with descendants of Abraham A. but
they could not confirm whether or not there was a connection between
our two families. I would be happy to reconnect with Rabbi Abraham
A.'s family to see if there is a connection.

Connected to the above is a rumor told to me by a distant
relative-also ABRAMOWITZ- that there is a building in the Geula
section (actually Achva) which seems to have been known as the
ABRAMOWITZ house which had been given to "Kolel North America" in
Jerusalem. The teller of this tale said that this ABRAMOWITZ was on
our family name.
Being the family geneaologist I am a bit surprised that I never heard
of this story and my guess is that it is not connected to our
ABRAMOWITZ family.

Shavua tov/ a gutte voch

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Abraham ABRAMOWITZ-born Jerusalem 1894 #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

It has always intrigued me if there is/was a family connection between
Abraham ABRAMOWITZ who was born in Jerusalem in 1894 and my
grandfather Chaim Yitzchak ABRAMOWITZ who was also born in Jerusalem
in 1895.

Abraham, I believe married a CHARLAP and eventually moved to Chicago
where he served as a Conservative Rabbi during the 1930-1950s. My
grandfather also emmigrated to the states in the 1930s but returned
after a 5 year stay there.

Several years ago I was in contact with descendants of Abraham A. but
they could not confirm whether or not there was a connection between
our two families. I would be happy to reconnect with Rabbi Abraham
A.'s family to see if there is a connection.

Connected to the above is a rumor told to me by a distant
relative-also ABRAMOWITZ- that there is a building in the Geula
section (actually Achva) which seems to have been known as the
ABRAMOWITZ house which had been given to "Kolel North America" in
Jerusalem. The teller of this tale said that this ABRAMOWITZ was on
our family name.
Being the family geneaologist I am a bit surprised that I never heard
of this story and my guess is that it is not connected to our
ABRAMOWITZ family.

Shavua tov/ a gutte voch

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Paltiel #rabbinic

Roberta Sheps
 

My maternal grand-father's family was not known (at least in my mother's
generation) for being particularly religious, despite being Kohanim.
Indeed, the only time I recollect seeing either of my maternal grandparents
in shul was for my wedding. However, I have just come across a small fact
that suggests that my maternal great-grandfather's family may have been more
devout that I thought. My grandfather had a brother named, in English,
Phillip. The family came >from Talno, which was the site of an important
Yeshiva. An account by a woman who I always thought was embroidering the
story, said that the family were among the "highest of rabbis". Some years
ago my mother told me that she thought Phillip had been named Paltiel, after
the ship on which they travelled to Canada. Those of you who are much more
learned that I am will, of course, recognise Paltiel as being a name that
occurs in Numbers, a fact which I have just learned. And someone who knows
a lot more about ships than I do, said that he couldn't think of any ship
called "The Paltiel".

My questions are, was Paltiel a name that was reserved to Kohanim, and if
not, how common a name was it?

Many thanks,

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Paltiel #rabbinic

Roberta Sheps
 

My maternal grand-father's family was not known (at least in my mother's
generation) for being particularly religious, despite being Kohanim.
Indeed, the only time I recollect seeing either of my maternal grandparents
in shul was for my wedding. However, I have just come across a small fact
that suggests that my maternal great-grandfather's family may have been more
devout that I thought. My grandfather had a brother named, in English,
Phillip. The family came >from Talno, which was the site of an important
Yeshiva. An account by a woman who I always thought was embroidering the
story, said that the family were among the "highest of rabbis". Some years
ago my mother told me that she thought Phillip had been named Paltiel, after
the ship on which they travelled to Canada. Those of you who are much more
learned that I am will, of course, recognise Paltiel as being a name that
occurs in Numbers, a fact which I have just learned. And someone who knows
a lot more about ships than I do, said that he couldn't think of any ship
called "The Paltiel".

My questions are, was Paltiel a name that was reserved to Kohanim, and if
not, how common a name was it?

Many thanks,

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England


(Russia) Prepares its Own Version of "Right to be Forgotten" #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Russian Duma (Parliament) is preparing its own version of the European
Union's "right to be forgotten." While the EU's "right to be forgotten
gives the search engines, i.e. Google, Bing and Yahoo, the authority to
decide who may have their stories "delinked," that is not how the Russian
legislation is being drafted.

The State Duma Committee on Information Policy, Information Technology and
Communications approved a bill requiring search engines to remove links
about its citizens, however, the public interest exception in the EU model
is not included. It is expected to become effective January 2016. In Russia
RTBF will be administered by state communications watchdog Roskomnadzor.
This is the state's agency which can censor information and order Internet
Service Providers to block sites it deems inappropriate or extremist.

Russia's leading search engine, Yandex, argues against the bill, saying the
"proposed mechanism in the draft law undermines the basic principles of
placement and retrieval of information on the Internet". Unlike the EU's
right to be forgotten where the individual must tell the search engine
which link they request to be removed, the Russian draft bill requires the
search engine providers to search for information about the citizen.

The continuing expansion of the right to be forgotten is a way to hide or
rewrite history and is of concern to genealogists who want to find out
information about their ancestors.

To read about the Russian draft legislation on the right to be forgotten see
http://qz.com/423455/russia-is-getting-its-own-right-to-be-forgotten/

Thank you to David Ockene, member, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring
Committee.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Russia) Prepares its Own Version of "Right to be Forgotten" #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Russian Duma (Parliament) is preparing its own version of the European
Union's "right to be forgotten." While the EU's "right to be forgotten
gives the search engines, i.e. Google, Bing and Yahoo, the authority to
decide who may have their stories "delinked," that is not how the Russian
legislation is being drafted.

The State Duma Committee on Information Policy, Information Technology and
Communications approved a bill requiring search engines to remove links
about its citizens, however, the public interest exception in the EU model
is not included. It is expected to become effective January 2016. In Russia
RTBF will be administered by state communications watchdog Roskomnadzor.
This is the state's agency which can censor information and order Internet
Service Providers to block sites it deems inappropriate or extremist.

Russia's leading search engine, Yandex, argues against the bill, saying the
"proposed mechanism in the draft law undermines the basic principles of
placement and retrieval of information on the Internet". Unlike the EU's
right to be forgotten where the individual must tell the search engine
which link they request to be removed, the Russian draft bill requires the
search engine providers to search for information about the citizen.

The continuing expansion of the right to be forgotten is a way to hide or
rewrite history and is of concern to genealogists who want to find out
information about their ancestors.

To read about the Russian draft legislation on the right to be forgotten see
http://qz.com/423455/russia-is-getting-its-own-right-to-be-forgotten/

Thank you to David Ockene, member, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring
Committee.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


ROZIN (Rosen) from Radwanitz & Siemiatycze, Belarus #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I am researching my son-in-law's family. His maternal great-grandmother
was Sarah ROZIN (Rosen in the USA) of either Radwanitz or Siemiatycze,
Belarus (May 06, 1888 - August 8, 1978). She married Phillip (Feivel)
KALER (Keller in the USA) >from Ros, Belarus. The marriage is recorded as
having taken place in Brest, Belarus in 1910. Sarah and Phillip settled
in Providence, RI around 1915, where their 4 children were born.

Sarah had 3 siblings:
Sophie, who married a SOBOL in Belarus
Edith married (1933) Max PANKEN in the Bronx
Henry married Frances BLOOM (1935) in the Bronx.

The ROSEN parents were Abraham Issac (c1858 - c1910 in Belarus) and
Zlate (c1860 - c1950 in NJ).
Does anyone know of these families or the extended Keller - Rosen clan?

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROZIN (Rosen) from Radwanitz & Siemiatycze, Belarus #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I am researching my son-in-law's family. His maternal great-grandmother
was Sarah ROZIN (Rosen in the USA) of either Radwanitz or Siemiatycze,
Belarus (May 06, 1888 - August 8, 1978). She married Phillip (Feivel)
KALER (Keller in the USA) >from Ros, Belarus. The marriage is recorded as
having taken place in Brest, Belarus in 1910. Sarah and Phillip settled
in Providence, RI around 1915, where their 4 children were born.

Sarah had 3 siblings:
Sophie, who married a SOBOL in Belarus
Edith married (1933) Max PANKEN in the Bronx
Henry married Frances BLOOM (1935) in the Bronx.

The ROSEN parents were Abraham Issac (c1858 - c1910 in Belarus) and
Zlate (c1860 - c1950 in NJ).
Does anyone know of these families or the extended Keller - Rosen clan?

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


Re: The name Paltiel #general

tom klein <bossman@...>
 

It's really hard to make any conclusions >from given names. Someone named David
isn't necessarily descended >from the biblical king of Israel, nor are there
any "reserved" given names as far as I know. (observant Jews may hesitate to
give their children certain biblical names, like Korach or Izabel, because of
the connotations those names carry, but for no other reason.) Some surnames
were derived >from "Kohen" or "Levi" (or "Katz" or "Segal", etc., which are
acronyms used for Kohanim and Leviim), but even so, there is no rule
guaranteeing that it's anything more than a name. I know of COHENs who are
Levites, and others who are neither, despite their surname. (EPSTEIN is a name
commonly associated with Levites, for example, but at least one EPSTEIN whom I
have met, says that his family adopted the name after immigrating, because they
felt it sounded "more American".)

Given names are more usually "in honour" of an ancestor, so a single,
distinguished "Schneur" or "Yerachmiel" could give rise to a whole bunch of
similarly-named young ones.

For an overview of historical Paltiels, you can look up
<http://jewishencyclopedia.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&keywords=paltiel>, which
has the text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia online.

As for being named after the ship, on the face of it, this seems unlikely. I
couldn't find references online to any ship named Paltiel. (not a definitive
result, but certainly a good indication, since so many other ships *are* to be
found online.) There are, however, plenty of ships' names containing "Philip"
or "Phillip", so I would guess that the story was originally that he was named
Phillip after the ship they arrived on (and Paltiel being a nice biblical
sound-alike for Phillip, showing a definite knowledge of the bible, which was
probably a result of the yeshiva connection), and it got a little mixed up in
the retelling. Or at least that's one possibility.

....... tom klein, Toronto

"Roberta Sheps" <rsheps@ntlworld.com> wrote:
My maternal grand-father's family was not known (at least in my mother's
generation) for being particularly religious, despite being Kohanim.
Indeed, the only time I recollect seeing either of my maternal grandparents
in shul was for my wedding. However, I have just come across a small fact
that suggests that my maternal great-grandfather's family may have been more
devout that I thought.

My grandfather had a brother named, in English, Phillip. The family came
from Talno, which was the site of an important Yeshiva. An account by a
woman who I always thought was embroidering the story, said that the family
were among the "highest of rabbis". Some years ago my mother told me that
she thought Phillip had been named Paltiel, after the ship on which the
family travelled to Canada. However, I have just learned that Paltiel is a
name that occurs in Numbers. And someone who knows a lot more about ships
than I do, said that he couldn't think of any ship called "The Paltiel".

My questions are, was Paltiel a name that was reserved to Kohanim, and if
not, how common a name was it?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The name Paltiel #general

tom klein <bossman@...>
 

It's really hard to make any conclusions >from given names. Someone named David
isn't necessarily descended >from the biblical king of Israel, nor are there
any "reserved" given names as far as I know. (observant Jews may hesitate to
give their children certain biblical names, like Korach or Izabel, because of
the connotations those names carry, but for no other reason.) Some surnames
were derived >from "Kohen" or "Levi" (or "Katz" or "Segal", etc., which are
acronyms used for Kohanim and Leviim), but even so, there is no rule
guaranteeing that it's anything more than a name. I know of COHENs who are
Levites, and others who are neither, despite their surname. (EPSTEIN is a name
commonly associated with Levites, for example, but at least one EPSTEIN whom I
have met, says that his family adopted the name after immigrating, because they
felt it sounded "more American".)

Given names are more usually "in honour" of an ancestor, so a single,
distinguished "Schneur" or "Yerachmiel" could give rise to a whole bunch of
similarly-named young ones.

For an overview of historical Paltiels, you can look up
<http://jewishencyclopedia.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&keywords=paltiel>, which
has the text of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia online.

As for being named after the ship, on the face of it, this seems unlikely. I
couldn't find references online to any ship named Paltiel. (not a definitive
result, but certainly a good indication, since so many other ships *are* to be
found online.) There are, however, plenty of ships' names containing "Philip"
or "Phillip", so I would guess that the story was originally that he was named
Phillip after the ship they arrived on (and Paltiel being a nice biblical
sound-alike for Phillip, showing a definite knowledge of the bible, which was
probably a result of the yeshiva connection), and it got a little mixed up in
the retelling. Or at least that's one possibility.

....... tom klein, Toronto

"Roberta Sheps" <rsheps@ntlworld.com> wrote:
My maternal grand-father's family was not known (at least in my mother's
generation) for being particularly religious, despite being Kohanim.
Indeed, the only time I recollect seeing either of my maternal grandparents
in shul was for my wedding. However, I have just come across a small fact
that suggests that my maternal great-grandfather's family may have been more
devout that I thought.

My grandfather had a brother named, in English, Phillip. The family came
from Talno, which was the site of an important Yeshiva. An account by a
woman who I always thought was embroidering the story, said that the family
were among the "highest of rabbis". Some years ago my mother told me that
she thought Phillip had been named Paltiel, after the ship on which the
family travelled to Canada. However, I have just learned that Paltiel is a
name that occurs in Numbers. And someone who knows a lot more about ships
than I do, said that he couldn't think of any ship called "The Paltiel".

My questions are, was Paltiel a name that was reserved to Kohanim, and if
not, how common a name was it?


Seeking translator for handwritten Yiddish records #general

Fern Blood <feblood@...>
 

I am seeking recommendations for a translator experienced with handwritten
Yiddish archival records. I have images of birth, marriage, divorce, and
death records beginning in 1854, for the town of Pyatigory, south of Kiev.
If you can recommend a translator for this work, please contact me privately.

Thank you,
Fern Greenberg Blood
Waterbury, VT

GREENBERG, ROSETSKY, POSTILNICK, SHPINDELYUK, GRIBELYUK, Pyatigory, Zashkov


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking translator for handwritten Yiddish records #general

Fern Blood <feblood@...>
 

I am seeking recommendations for a translator experienced with handwritten
Yiddish archival records. I have images of birth, marriage, divorce, and
death records beginning in 1854, for the town of Pyatigory, south of Kiev.
If you can recommend a translator for this work, please contact me privately.

Thank you,
Fern Greenberg Blood
Waterbury, VT

GREENBERG, ROSETSKY, POSTILNICK, SHPINDELYUK, GRIBELYUK, Pyatigory, Zashkov


Rotterdam passenger arrival #general

Sue Seales <sue.seales@...>
 

Would there have been any record kept, either by the shipping company or by
newspaper article, of a passenger arriving in Rotterdam >from New York, circa
1900?

I am looking for someone who was deported >from the U.S. after imprisonment in
Massachusetts for murder. She was a young woman, in the U.S. for approximately
two years. Since her original departure had been >from Rotterdam, she would
have been sent back to her port of departure.

I know that there were no U.S. records kept of passenger departures, although
I have found newspaper articles regarding the murder and court action. I also
know that the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, who might have been involved with
the person, did not begin keeping records until after 1900.

No online sources turn up anything relating to arrivals in Rotterdam.
Deportation >from the U.S. could be quite brutal, with people already in the
country being deported >from their point of entry, with no belongings or money.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Sue Seales, North Carolina

researching:
BOYARSKY; Mosty, Grodno and Massachusetts
FRIDMAN/FREEDMAN; Grinkishok and Siluva, Kovno
ROSENTAL; Odessa, Ukraine. Zaremby and Wengrow, Poland
BLUSZTEJN; Zaremby, Poland
ZELONY/ZELIONY/ZELENY; Bershad, Ukraine. Odessa and Chicago
TARTAK; Odessa, Argentina, Chicago


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rotterdam passenger arrival #general

Sue Seales <sue.seales@...>
 

Would there have been any record kept, either by the shipping company or by
newspaper article, of a passenger arriving in Rotterdam >from New York, circa
1900?

I am looking for someone who was deported >from the U.S. after imprisonment in
Massachusetts for murder. She was a young woman, in the U.S. for approximately
two years. Since her original departure had been >from Rotterdam, she would
have been sent back to her port of departure.

I know that there were no U.S. records kept of passenger departures, although
I have found newspaper articles regarding the murder and court action. I also
know that the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, who might have been involved with
the person, did not begin keeping records until after 1900.

No online sources turn up anything relating to arrivals in Rotterdam.
Deportation >from the U.S. could be quite brutal, with people already in the
country being deported >from their point of entry, with no belongings or money.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Sue Seales, North Carolina

researching:
BOYARSKY; Mosty, Grodno and Massachusetts
FRIDMAN/FREEDMAN; Grinkishok and Siluva, Kovno
ROSENTAL; Odessa, Ukraine. Zaremby and Wengrow, Poland
BLUSZTEJN; Zaremby, Poland
ZELONY/ZELIONY/ZELENY; Bershad, Ukraine. Odessa and Chicago
TARTAK; Odessa, Argentina, Chicago

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