Date   

Bacau Romania - Filderman Jewish School #romania

Marcel Glaskie <marcelg@...>
 

Filderman Jewish School - Bacau Romania

Does anyone have any information or a photograph of the Filderman Jewish
School that once existed in Bacau Romania ?
Reply to Marcel Glaskie - Ra'anana Israel
marcelg@...


Romania SIG #Romania Bacau Romania - Filderman Jewish School #romania

Marcel Glaskie <marcelg@...>
 

Filderman Jewish School - Bacau Romania

Does anyone have any information or a photograph of the Filderman Jewish
School that once existed in Bacau Romania ?
Reply to Marcel Glaskie - Ra'anana Israel
marcelg@...


Searching for a Yiddish Speaker in Philadelphia with access to the Parkway Central Library #general

Avi Lichtenstein
 

Dear Genners,

At the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia (1901 Vine Street),
there is a book which has some information which I believe is important
to my research. The book however, is a reference book that can only be
accessed at the Parkway Central Library. It is not located at the library;
it has to be ordered a few days ahead of time, but can only be accessed
at that branch. Additionally, the book is also in Yiddish (of which I
know only a little).

If someone is able to access this book, please contact me privately so as
to avoid duplicate requests. I will give you the information of what
to look for. I will reimburse any reasonable costs incurred.

Kindly,

Avi Lichtenstein
North Bethesda, Maryland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for a Yiddish Speaker in Philadelphia with access to the Parkway Central Library #general

Avi Lichtenstein
 

Dear Genners,

At the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia (1901 Vine Street),
there is a book which has some information which I believe is important
to my research. The book however, is a reference book that can only be
accessed at the Parkway Central Library. It is not located at the library;
it has to be ordered a few days ahead of time, but can only be accessed
at that branch. Additionally, the book is also in Yiddish (of which I
know only a little).

If someone is able to access this book, please contact me privately so as
to avoid duplicate requests. I will give you the information of what
to look for. I will reimburse any reasonable costs incurred.

Kindly,

Avi Lichtenstein
North Bethesda, Maryland


People saved by Count Folke Bernadotte to Sweden. #general

Shulamit
 

Is there a list of names of the people who were saved to Sweden,
via Denmark, at the end of WWII through the negotiations of
Count Folke Bernadotte?

Shulamit Spain, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen People saved by Count Folke Bernadotte to Sweden. #general

Shulamit
 

Is there a list of names of the people who were saved to Sweden,
via Denmark, at the end of WWII through the negotiations of
Count Folke Bernadotte?

Shulamit Spain, Scotland


Yiddish: Great-grandmother? #general

Liz Hanellin
 

Dear Genners,

Yesterday, I hit genealogical pay-dirt when I found a handwritten document
that my great-uncle Isidore SHUKET (born in Lipovets, Ukraine in 1906;
immigrated to the US in 1923) created in the 1970s, with a list of some
of his family members and friends and the years in which they passed away.
There are parallel English and Yiddish listings. It's clear that the first
approximately 10 people on the list are relatives and, excitingly,
although I recognize a couple of the relatives' names, there are eight or so
that are new to me!

The English and Yiddish listings sometimes provide different information,
so that, for example, the English listing "Uncle Yolek" coincides with the
Yiddish listing "Fetter Yolek Shuket" (my transliteration) -- so, I know
which side of the family Uncle Yolek was on! However, the very first person
on the list, who died in 1918, is listed in English simply as "The Old Freda"
and in Yiddish as "Di Alta Freda" (again, my transliteration).

I have heard the term "alta bubby" used to refer to a great-grandmother,
but I would like to hear what others think regarding usage of the term "alta"
preceding a first name. Is there an Eastern-European tradition of using this
word simply as a term of respect for an elder? A specific family relation? A
distinction >from another person with the same name? There is no Young Freda
on the list (although there is a Cousin Alta Wasserman) and I know that
neither of his grandmothers (or other relatives that I am aware of) was a Freda.
"Di Alta Freda" passed away when my great-uncle was only 12.

Thanks for your thoughts!

Liz Hanellin
New York City

Researching, on this side of the family: SHUKET, SPECTOR and their various
spellings.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yiddish: Great-grandmother? #general

Liz Hanellin
 

Dear Genners,

Yesterday, I hit genealogical pay-dirt when I found a handwritten document
that my great-uncle Isidore SHUKET (born in Lipovets, Ukraine in 1906;
immigrated to the US in 1923) created in the 1970s, with a list of some
of his family members and friends and the years in which they passed away.
There are parallel English and Yiddish listings. It's clear that the first
approximately 10 people on the list are relatives and, excitingly,
although I recognize a couple of the relatives' names, there are eight or so
that are new to me!

The English and Yiddish listings sometimes provide different information,
so that, for example, the English listing "Uncle Yolek" coincides with the
Yiddish listing "Fetter Yolek Shuket" (my transliteration) -- so, I know
which side of the family Uncle Yolek was on! However, the very first person
on the list, who died in 1918, is listed in English simply as "The Old Freda"
and in Yiddish as "Di Alta Freda" (again, my transliteration).

I have heard the term "alta bubby" used to refer to a great-grandmother,
but I would like to hear what others think regarding usage of the term "alta"
preceding a first name. Is there an Eastern-European tradition of using this
word simply as a term of respect for an elder? A specific family relation? A
distinction >from another person with the same name? There is no Young Freda
on the list (although there is a Cousin Alta Wasserman) and I know that
neither of his grandmothers (or other relatives that I am aware of) was a Freda.
"Di Alta Freda" passed away when my great-uncle was only 12.

Thanks for your thoughts!

Liz Hanellin
New York City

Researching, on this side of the family: SHUKET, SPECTOR and their various
spellings.


Cemeteries #ukraine

Miller, Martin G [SOC S] <mgmiller@...>
 

Dear Mr Kogan,

There is a cemetery on the outskirts of the village of Pulin (now Chervono Armysk) west of Zhitomyr that is a little overgrown but not vandalized and has quite a lot of graves. We visited there a few years ago as that is the village that my father-in-law grew up in and emigrated >from with his parents and other family members around 1907. Neither my husband, nor his sister, nor I read Hebrew so we couldn?t tell if any relatives were there, but the stones are very readable. We would love to see this cemetery indexed since it has not been destroyed. There is also a large monument erected in memory of "citizens" lost to the Nazis as one enters the cemetery. We were informed that there are no Jews now in Pulin.

Sincerely,

Martin and Marsha Miller
Ames, Iowa
Researching Melech, Kendal, Berezin, all of Ukraine.

On Sep 18, 2015, at 1:04 AM, Ukraine SIG digest <ukraine@...> wrote:
Subject: More about cemeteries
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@...>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2015 12:01:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Researchers,

I have updated you recently with Cemetery work. Since that our photographer
went to Bessarabeska, where he found two cemeteries, and photographed both
of them. I hope we will work on indexing of these two cemeteries soon.

Couple of days ago I got a very interesting idea. A person was working to
compile a list of people buried in Dumbroveni cemetery... and that cemetery
does not exist anymore. I have photos of few remaining tombstones at that
cemetery, and thought to send them to JOWBR, but now I think I will wait
until that list of people buried in that cemetery is completed, and will
send such a list... with these 3 photos.

Because of this, I was thinking that if you are certain that a person was
buried in a cemetery, but that information does not exist at JOWBR, you
can send me that information, and I will include it in the list.
Here is the template:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/cemetery/jowbrtemplateadd.xlsx
Probably many columns be empty, but put as much information as you know.
If you do not know exact date of birth or death, you can put just year...
There is one additional column S - that one will not be sent to JOWBR,
please put your name there, just for me to know who put this information!

So, if we finished a cemetery, you checked the JOWBR and cannot see your
ancestors who were buried there, please put information into the template
and send to us.

I recently got photos >from Skulyani, Bessarabia cemetery... the whole
cemetery was destroyed. There is only one monument standing, put recently
for the father of Skulyaner Rebe, with several parts and broken of
monuments put at the bottom. You can send me information about people
Buried in Skulyani, Moldova and I include the records to JOWBR.

I also planning to compile a list of Jews buried in Kaushany, Bendery
uezd... (cemetery was destroyed in the 1970s).

Let me know if you have any questions, issues.

L'Shana Tovah.
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please do not hit REPLY to respond to a message. This copies
the entire Digest and creates more work for your tireless moderator.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Cemeteries #ukraine

Miller, Martin G [SOC S] <mgmiller@...>
 

Dear Mr Kogan,

There is a cemetery on the outskirts of the village of Pulin (now Chervono Armysk) west of Zhitomyr that is a little overgrown but not vandalized and has quite a lot of graves. We visited there a few years ago as that is the village that my father-in-law grew up in and emigrated >from with his parents and other family members around 1907. Neither my husband, nor his sister, nor I read Hebrew so we couldn?t tell if any relatives were there, but the stones are very readable. We would love to see this cemetery indexed since it has not been destroyed. There is also a large monument erected in memory of "citizens" lost to the Nazis as one enters the cemetery. We were informed that there are no Jews now in Pulin.

Sincerely,

Martin and Marsha Miller
Ames, Iowa
Researching Melech, Kendal, Berezin, all of Ukraine.

On Sep 18, 2015, at 1:04 AM, Ukraine SIG digest <ukraine@...> wrote:
Subject: More about cemeteries
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@...>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2015 12:01:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Researchers,

I have updated you recently with Cemetery work. Since that our photographer
went to Bessarabeska, where he found two cemeteries, and photographed both
of them. I hope we will work on indexing of these two cemeteries soon.

Couple of days ago I got a very interesting idea. A person was working to
compile a list of people buried in Dumbroveni cemetery... and that cemetery
does not exist anymore. I have photos of few remaining tombstones at that
cemetery, and thought to send them to JOWBR, but now I think I will wait
until that list of people buried in that cemetery is completed, and will
send such a list... with these 3 photos.

Because of this, I was thinking that if you are certain that a person was
buried in a cemetery, but that information does not exist at JOWBR, you
can send me that information, and I will include it in the list.
Here is the template:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/cemetery/jowbrtemplateadd.xlsx
Probably many columns be empty, but put as much information as you know.
If you do not know exact date of birth or death, you can put just year...
There is one additional column S - that one will not be sent to JOWBR,
please put your name there, just for me to know who put this information!

So, if we finished a cemetery, you checked the JOWBR and cannot see your
ancestors who were buried there, please put information into the template
and send to us.

I recently got photos >from Skulyani, Bessarabia cemetery... the whole
cemetery was destroyed. There is only one monument standing, put recently
for the father of Skulyaner Rebe, with several parts and broken of
monuments put at the bottom. You can send me information about people
Buried in Skulyani, Moldova and I include the records to JOWBR.

I also planning to compile a list of Jews buried in Kaushany, Bendery
uezd... (cemetery was destroyed in the 1970s).

Let me know if you have any questions, issues.

L'Shana Tovah.
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please do not hit REPLY to respond to a message. This copies
the entire Digest and creates more work for your tireless moderator.


KAUFMAN Elsie #southafrica

Arlene <arlene@...>
 

I just came across the estate (3084/1956 - Pretoria) of the above deceased
who died at the Edenvale Hospital on 9 July 1955, aged 49 and originally
from Poland or Germany. She is recorded as having been a widow with no known
relatives. According to a letter >from the hospital to the Master of the
Supreme Court, she had been transferred >from the Johannesburg General
Hospital. She was visited by a Mrs. Payne & Mr. Abramowitz. She is not
listed as being buried in any of the Jewish Cemeteries. She may, of course,
not have been Jewish, but the fact that a Mr. Abramowitz used to visit her
seems to indicate that she was Jewish.

Any clues?

Louis ZETLER
Hoshaya, ISRAEL


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica KAUFMAN Elsie #southafrica

Arlene <arlene@...>
 

I just came across the estate (3084/1956 - Pretoria) of the above deceased
who died at the Edenvale Hospital on 9 July 1955, aged 49 and originally
from Poland or Germany. She is recorded as having been a widow with no known
relatives. According to a letter >from the hospital to the Master of the
Supreme Court, she had been transferred >from the Johannesburg General
Hospital. She was visited by a Mrs. Payne & Mr. Abramowitz. She is not
listed as being buried in any of the Jewish Cemeteries. She may, of course,
not have been Jewish, but the fact that a Mr. Abramowitz used to visit her
seems to indicate that she was Jewish.

Any clues?

Louis ZETLER
Hoshaya, ISRAEL


Re: Looking for Adam Rosthal, Daniela Atzmon and Dafne Sivan in Israel #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

Many thanks to all who have promptly and helpfully replied to my inquiry.

Based on the answer of one relative of Daniela Atzmon's and Daphne
Sivan's father Leo Rosthal however I conclude for now that I have been on
the wrong track.

He is saying that Leo Rosthal was an architect. So he cannot be just a
bearer of an alternative name of Edward Rosthal because I have a proof
that Edward graduated >from law (not architecture) in 1932. Leo cannot
be Edward's brother either, although Edward did have a brother of this
first name, but this Leo(pold) Rosthal was born on September 3, 1918,
studied medicine, and perished in the Holocaust on July 3, 1943 in the
Rakowice district of Krakow.

But it is not uncommon that first cousins have the same given name,
usually inherited >from recently perished common ancestor. So my guess
is that his relative Leo Rosthal was likely first cousin of my Leo and his
brother Edward Rosthal.

Years ago someone directed me to the Atzmon/Sivan names as likely
descendants of Edward but now I think that it was an incorrect
suggestion. It would be great if I could find out his Leo Rosthal's (the
architect, supposedly b. 1905 and married to Ilse Fischgrund) parents'
names. Edward's (the lawyer b. 1907) parents' names were Kalman Karol
Rosthal and Eugenia Gittel Statter.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
I am looking for descendants of Edward ROSTHAL b. May 19, 1907 in
Galicia (son of Karol Kalman Rosthal, b. 1872 - d. Auschwitz May 14,
1944 and Eugenia Gittel STATTER, b. Aug. 2, 1887 - d. Auschwitz,
Jan. 24, 1944), and Ella (aka Elza, Ilse, not sure of the last name, b. 1911).
Edward used to be a teacher in Poland; he immigrated to Palestine after
the war and lived in Tel-Aviv, Israel, where he was a Polish-language
newspaper editor.

The names of the sought descendants of Edward and Ella ROSTHAL are:

1. Adam ROSTHAL, who used to live in Beer Sheba, Israel some time ago.
2. Daniela ATZMON (nee Rosthal), who used to live in Tel-Aviv, Israel
some time ago. I don't have the first name of Mr. Atzmon.
3. Dafne SIVAN (nee Rosthal), who used to live in Rehovot, Israel some
time ago. I don't have the first name of Mr. Sivan.

I am guessing that all three could be somewhere between 60 and 70
years old. All three are my second cousins.

I will appreciate any help or suggestion. Please note that I cannot use
resources in Hebrew due to the language barrier.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Looking for Adam Rosthal, Daniela Atzmon and Dafne Sivan in Israel #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

Many thanks to all who have promptly and helpfully replied to my inquiry.

Based on the answer of one relative of Daniela Atzmon's and Daphne
Sivan's father Leo Rosthal however I conclude for now that I have been on
the wrong track.

He is saying that Leo Rosthal was an architect. So he cannot be just a
bearer of an alternative name of Edward Rosthal because I have a proof
that Edward graduated >from law (not architecture) in 1932. Leo cannot
be Edward's brother either, although Edward did have a brother of this
first name, but this Leo(pold) Rosthal was born on September 3, 1918,
studied medicine, and perished in the Holocaust on July 3, 1943 in the
Rakowice district of Krakow.

But it is not uncommon that first cousins have the same given name,
usually inherited >from recently perished common ancestor. So my guess
is that his relative Leo Rosthal was likely first cousin of my Leo and his
brother Edward Rosthal.

Years ago someone directed me to the Atzmon/Sivan names as likely
descendants of Edward but now I think that it was an incorrect
suggestion. It would be great if I could find out his Leo Rosthal's (the
architect, supposedly b. 1905 and married to Ilse Fischgrund) parents'
names. Edward's (the lawyer b. 1907) parents' names were Kalman Karol
Rosthal and Eugenia Gittel Statter.

Peter

-----Original Message-----
I am looking for descendants of Edward ROSTHAL b. May 19, 1907 in
Galicia (son of Karol Kalman Rosthal, b. 1872 - d. Auschwitz May 14,
1944 and Eugenia Gittel STATTER, b. Aug. 2, 1887 - d. Auschwitz,
Jan. 24, 1944), and Ella (aka Elza, Ilse, not sure of the last name, b. 1911).
Edward used to be a teacher in Poland; he immigrated to Palestine after
the war and lived in Tel-Aviv, Israel, where he was a Polish-language
newspaper editor.

The names of the sought descendants of Edward and Ella ROSTHAL are:

1. Adam ROSTHAL, who used to live in Beer Sheba, Israel some time ago.
2. Daniela ATZMON (nee Rosthal), who used to live in Tel-Aviv, Israel
some time ago. I don't have the first name of Mr. Atzmon.
3. Dafne SIVAN (nee Rosthal), who used to live in Rehovot, Israel some
time ago. I don't have the first name of Mr. Sivan.

I am guessing that all three could be somewhere between 60 and 70
years old. All three are my second cousins.

I will appreciate any help or suggestion. Please note that I cannot use
resources in Hebrew due to the language barrier.


Re: INTRO - researching DAHNHOF family from Pommern Province, Germany 1800s. #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Chris:
As far as Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern--the Polish part) is
concerned, none of the names you mention are associated with any Jewish
families there, certainly not around the time when Jews chose surnames,
i.e., 1812. See the NALDEX database, part of the Germany Database at
JewishGen. There were only about 800 Jewish heads of household listed
then, some of them siblings, i.e., perhaps 500 families. Jews in
Pomerania never made up even 1% of the population (neither did
Catholics, by the way); and most places are fairly well documented.

Intermarriage was illegal in Prussia until around 1870, so someone would
have had to convert in order for a marriage to take place. That means
looking through church registers, I'm afraid.

Before 1812 the records are much more difficult to work with--if there
are any Jewish records at all. Very few Jews used surnames before then.

Among the names you mention, only WITTKOP appears in the Germany
Database at all--for a Holocaust survivor >from Hamburg. Our database is
not terribly extensive, of course.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 9/16/2015, Christopher Lee Chasteen christopher.chasteen@... wrote:
My primary research goals now are to find out if there are Jewish ties
on maternal side at any point in the past. I have my maternal lineage
back to about 1830, but prior to that the lineage peters out. There
is family suspicion that there are Jewish ties on mother's mother's
side of the family, but there is no way I have to prove or disprove it.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is _???______.
The family names that I have traced back are : DAHNHOF and WITTKOP
from the Pommern Province of Germany. The DAHNHOF, I believe was
perviously married in an arranged marriage to a DUCHOW (for first
name), and prior to this I have nothing. The Maternal line is traced
back >from a GEILFUSS.


German SIG #Germany Re: INTRO - researching DAHNHOF family from Pommern Province, Germany 1800s. #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Chris:
As far as Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern--the Polish part) is
concerned, none of the names you mention are associated with any Jewish
families there, certainly not around the time when Jews chose surnames,
i.e., 1812. See the NALDEX database, part of the Germany Database at
JewishGen. There were only about 800 Jewish heads of household listed
then, some of them siblings, i.e., perhaps 500 families. Jews in
Pomerania never made up even 1% of the population (neither did
Catholics, by the way); and most places are fairly well documented.

Intermarriage was illegal in Prussia until around 1870, so someone would
have had to convert in order for a marriage to take place. That means
looking through church registers, I'm afraid.

Before 1812 the records are much more difficult to work with--if there
are any Jewish records at all. Very few Jews used surnames before then.

Among the names you mention, only WITTKOP appears in the Germany
Database at all--for a Holocaust survivor >from Hamburg. Our database is
not terribly extensive, of course.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 9/16/2015, Christopher Lee Chasteen christopher.chasteen@... wrote:
My primary research goals now are to find out if there are Jewish ties
on maternal side at any point in the past. I have my maternal lineage
back to about 1830, but prior to that the lineage peters out. There
is family suspicion that there are Jewish ties on mother's mother's
side of the family, but there is no way I have to prove or disprove it.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is _???______.
The family names that I have traced back are : DAHNHOF and WITTKOP
from the Pommern Province of Germany. The DAHNHOF, I believe was
perviously married in an arranged marriage to a DUCHOW (for first
name), and prior to this I have nothing. The Maternal line is traced
back >from a GEILFUSS.


Biecz 1850 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

A river ran through it... and the map tells the story.

Biecz Cadastral Map 1850 just added to the Gesher Galicia Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/biecz-1850/

A complete, full-color cadastral map of the entire town of Biecz (Beitch,
Beitsch, Baych, Baytsh, Beytch), surveyed and lithographed in 1850. This
archive copy includes extensive redline revisions drafted over the 1850
original, apparently for an 1876 edition, covering not only the usual
parcel and building changes but also a major re-routing of the Ropa
River through town to accommodate the arrival of an important rail line
in this province of the Austrian Empire; because this map includes both
the original and modified landscapes, it captures a significant historical
transformation of the town.

The map also shows a well-formed market square, three churches and
several Catholic cemeteries, a Jewish cemetery, a hospital, and
several named hamlets.

GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Thanks, as always, to Jay Osborn.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org
pweisberger@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Biecz 1850 Cadastral Map on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

A river ran through it... and the map tells the story.

Biecz Cadastral Map 1850 just added to the Gesher Galicia Map Room:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/biecz-1850/

A complete, full-color cadastral map of the entire town of Biecz (Beitch,
Beitsch, Baych, Baytsh, Beytch), surveyed and lithographed in 1850. This
archive copy includes extensive redline revisions drafted over the 1850
original, apparently for an 1876 edition, covering not only the usual
parcel and building changes but also a major re-routing of the Ropa
River through town to accommodate the arrival of an important rail line
in this province of the Austrian Empire; because this map includes both
the original and modified landscapes, it captures a significant historical
transformation of the town.

The map also shows a well-formed market square, three churches and
several Catholic cemeteries, a Jewish cemetery, a hospital, and
several named hamlets.

GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Thanks, as always, to Jay Osborn.

Pamela Weisberger
Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org
pweisberger@...


Re: Bistrita records help! #romania

LucR <luc.radu@...>
 

There is a 100 years rule. So a birth certificate >from 1923 is not public,
i.e. not available at a National Archive office. It is available at the
town Hall. In principle a close relative VISITING the place may be able
to find it. Officially only death certificates can be requested >from a
Romanian Consulate.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 9/16/15, 6:41 PM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Matthew Thomas Herzog
matthewherzog85@..." <rom-sig@...> wrote:

I am researching an individual known to me as Bela Herzcovici. (I'm
pretty sure that the last name could also be spelled in a variety of
ways in English. I've also noticed that Herzcovitz could be a
contender.) I know that he was born on August 9th in either 1923 or
1926. On his US social security application, he wrote that he was born
in Bistritsa, Romania (the alternate/corrected place on Ancestry has
it as Bistrta). His parents were noted as being Nathan Herzcovici and
Jeni Furst. According to one story, Bela, a Jew, had at least one
sibling. This sibling and his mother both perished in the Holocaust,
but the location and date are unknown. Bela was also in the camp, but
survived and was liberated. He was then transported to Argentina where
he married, had a small family, divorced, and then moved to New York.
I suppose I'd like to know where to start with my research. My goal at
the moment is to try and find a record to solidify when and where Bela
was born. Do I want to try and find Bela's birth record? Which would
be best, the civil or synagogal? Where do I look for that information?
Is there an easy way to access vital records in that particular region
of Romania?

My simple searches of a couple of Holocaust databases aren't proving
that Jeni was ever interred in a camp, but I'm sure they're incomplete
given the magnitude of the Holocaust.

Thank you in advance for your time!

Matthew Herzog
Orlando, Florida

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Bistrita records help! #romania

LucR <luc.radu@...>
 

There is a 100 years rule. So a birth certificate >from 1923 is not public,
i.e. not available at a National Archive office. It is available at the
town Hall. In principle a close relative VISITING the place may be able
to find it. Officially only death certificates can be requested >from a
Romanian Consulate.

Luc Radu
Great Neck, NY

On 9/16/15, 6:41 PM, "Romania SIG on behalf of Matthew Thomas Herzog
matthewherzog85@..." <rom-sig@...> wrote:

I am researching an individual known to me as Bela Herzcovici. (I'm
pretty sure that the last name could also be spelled in a variety of
ways in English. I've also noticed that Herzcovitz could be a
contender.) I know that he was born on August 9th in either 1923 or
1926. On his US social security application, he wrote that he was born
in Bistritsa, Romania (the alternate/corrected place on Ancestry has
it as Bistrta). His parents were noted as being Nathan Herzcovici and
Jeni Furst. According to one story, Bela, a Jew, had at least one
sibling. This sibling and his mother both perished in the Holocaust,
but the location and date are unknown. Bela was also in the camp, but
survived and was liberated. He was then transported to Argentina where
he married, had a small family, divorced, and then moved to New York.
I suppose I'd like to know where to start with my research. My goal at
the moment is to try and find a record to solidify when and where Bela
was born. Do I want to try and find Bela's birth record? Which would
be best, the civil or synagogal? Where do I look for that information?
Is there an easy way to access vital records in that particular region
of Romania?

My simple searches of a couple of Holocaust databases aren't proving
that Jeni was ever interred in a camp, but I'm sure they're incomplete
given the magnitude of the Holocaust.

Thank you in advance for your time!

Matthew Herzog
Orlando, Florida

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