Date   
TRAVEL IN LITHUANIA #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Having visited Lithuania this past July, I can offer some suggestions.

1. Hire an English speaking guide who can provide a car and driver. It
will make your visit that much more informative and comfortable. Visit the
travel section of the JGS of Rochester web site for more info on this
aspect:

http://www.rit.edu/~bekpph/jgsr/country/lithtrvl.html

2. You can make a day trip easily to Kaunas and stop over in Trakai which
is on the way there and which I recommend.

3. There are numerous towns by the name of Gudel or Gudeliai, so you have
to determine which is the one you are looking for. Seems strange to go all
the way to Lithuania and not see your ancestral shtetl. If you do decide to
visit your shtetl, I am sure your friend will enjoy it too as you will have
to travel through the rural countryside to get there which should give you
an idea of what Lithuania was and is like.

4. We stayed in Vilnius for three days and saw many sites, most, if not
all, were Jewish, for after all, Vilnius was a heavily Jewish town prior to
the Holocaust. You should decide with your friend how to spend your time.
Do you want to go sightseeing, shopping, etc. Vilnius was very easy to walk
around and you can see much by doing just that.

The airport has a counter to obtain maps and tour guides which it is good to
get first thing and look over. There is also a foreign exchange counter to
convert your money which is quite helpful. The tour guide for Vilnius can
also be gotten at your hotel front desk. It has lots of interesting places
and things to do.

5. You should decide if you want to visit the Holocaust sites in Lithuania
as they are everywhere. Of particular interest are those in Vilnius and
Kaunas. Both Jews and non-Jews visit these sites.

6. We did not need to know Lithuanian or Russian as the hotel staff spoke
English and so did the people in the restaurants and most of the stores.
Our guide was there to assist us on many occasions as well. Lithuania is
becoming more cosmopolitan in the large cities now that it has entered the
EU and there are hordes of foreign tourists. We saw many Japanese tourists,
for instance, who came to visit the Sugihara House.

Since you have so little time, it is important that you schedule your visit
beforehand in order to maximize what you can see.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania TRAVEL IN LITHUANIA #lithuania

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Having visited Lithuania this past July, I can offer some suggestions.

1. Hire an English speaking guide who can provide a car and driver. It
will make your visit that much more informative and comfortable. Visit the
travel section of the JGS of Rochester web site for more info on this
aspect:

http://www.rit.edu/~bekpph/jgsr/country/lithtrvl.html

2. You can make a day trip easily to Kaunas and stop over in Trakai which
is on the way there and which I recommend.

3. There are numerous towns by the name of Gudel or Gudeliai, so you have
to determine which is the one you are looking for. Seems strange to go all
the way to Lithuania and not see your ancestral shtetl. If you do decide to
visit your shtetl, I am sure your friend will enjoy it too as you will have
to travel through the rural countryside to get there which should give you
an idea of what Lithuania was and is like.

4. We stayed in Vilnius for three days and saw many sites, most, if not
all, were Jewish, for after all, Vilnius was a heavily Jewish town prior to
the Holocaust. You should decide with your friend how to spend your time.
Do you want to go sightseeing, shopping, etc. Vilnius was very easy to walk
around and you can see much by doing just that.

The airport has a counter to obtain maps and tour guides which it is good to
get first thing and look over. There is also a foreign exchange counter to
convert your money which is quite helpful. The tour guide for Vilnius can
also be gotten at your hotel front desk. It has lots of interesting places
and things to do.

5. You should decide if you want to visit the Holocaust sites in Lithuania
as they are everywhere. Of particular interest are those in Vilnius and
Kaunas. Both Jews and non-Jews visit these sites.

6. We did not need to know Lithuanian or Russian as the hotel staff spoke
English and so did the people in the restaurants and most of the stores.
Our guide was there to assist us on many occasions as well. Lithuania is
becoming more cosmopolitan in the large cities now that it has entered the
EU and there are hordes of foreign tourists. We saw many Japanese tourists,
for instance, who came to visit the Sugihara House.

Since you have so little time, it is important that you schedule your visit
beforehand in order to maximize what you can see.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...

Vilna Matching Funds Challenge #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

I am pleased to announce a matching funds challenge for the indexing of the
Vilna vital records.

Marvin and Arline Baron Joachim will match the first $1000 contributed by
Vilna researchers towards the indexing of the Vilna vital records project.
I urge all Vilna researchers to take advantage of this opportunity to
stretch your contribution and to take part in the indexing project will be
prove invaluable to us all.

I look forward, as do you all, to learning more about my Vilna family
through this initiative.

If you have questions regarding the project, please contact me or Joel
Ratner, the coordinator of the Lithuanian Vital Records Project.

Sincerely,
Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@...

Searching: BARON, KAPLAN, GOLDBERG, BERENSTEIN, HALPERN, PITUM

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilna Matching Funds Challenge #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks,

I am pleased to announce a matching funds challenge for the indexing of the
Vilna vital records.

Marvin and Arline Baron Joachim will match the first $1000 contributed by
Vilna researchers towards the indexing of the Vilna vital records project.
I urge all Vilna researchers to take advantage of this opportunity to
stretch your contribution and to take part in the indexing project will be
prove invaluable to us all.

I look forward, as do you all, to learning more about my Vilna family
through this initiative.

If you have questions regarding the project, please contact me or Joel
Ratner, the coordinator of the Lithuanian Vital Records Project.

Sincerely,
Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@...

Searching: BARON, KAPLAN, GOLDBERG, BERENSTEIN, HALPERN, PITUM

(jri-pol)surname Cymberkewitch #poland

Michelebigaret@...
 

Can anyone tell me about the surname Cymberkewitch? I know it is of
Russian Jewish origin. However this is myggfather 'name .
His name was Schmul-Iczek Cymberkewitch born in Oppatow(I don't
know which one) in 1893. He was the son of Ioska Cymberkewitch and
Idesse Markutzki.Thank you for help .

Michele Bigaret

JRI Poland #Poland (jri-pol)surname Cymberkewitch #poland

Michelebigaret@...
 

Can anyone tell me about the surname Cymberkewitch? I know it is of
Russian Jewish origin. However this is myggfather 'name .
His name was Schmul-Iczek Cymberkewitch born in Oppatow(I don't
know which one) in 1893. He was the son of Ioska Cymberkewitch and
Idesse Markutzki.Thank you for help .

Michele Bigaret

Photos - Warsaw, Chmielnick, Portraits, Monuments #poland

David Ferleger
 

Family name - Ferleger

http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html


My mother came >from Warsaw (later, was in Maidanek, Auschwitz and
others). My father >from shtetl Chmielnick.
A cousin >from USA took pictures (the only ones pre-War we have) on
mid-1930s visit to Poland. They're now
on this website.

Pictures of shtetl life, and also of busy Warsaw might be of interest
to others. Some of the portraits are very moving.
Some parks/landmarks may be identifiable by someone - let me know!

David Ferleger
http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html

JRI Poland #Poland Photos - Warsaw, Chmielnick, Portraits, Monuments #poland

David Ferleger
 

Family name - Ferleger

http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html


My mother came >from Warsaw (later, was in Maidanek, Auschwitz and
others). My father >from shtetl Chmielnick.
A cousin >from USA took pictures (the only ones pre-War we have) on
mid-1930s visit to Poland. They're now
on this website.

Pictures of shtetl life, and also of busy Warsaw might be of interest
to others. Some of the portraits are very moving.
Some parks/landmarks may be identifiable by someone - let me know!

David Ferleger
http://homepage.mac.com/davidferleger/polandpictures/PhotoAlbum7.html

SUSSMAN, ZYSMAN, EASTMAN families #poland

Beverly Sussman <aimprinter@...>
 

I am enquiring about Ike (Henry) ZYSMAN (SUSSMAN) who lived in Ostroleka
Poland/Russia. He was born in 1875, left Poland for England and arrived in
NYC in 1902. Name was changed to SUSSMAN. They lived in Brooklyn at 51
Chester St. St. Later moved to Hendrix St. My grandfather was a tailor
working in NYC. My grandmother Sarah ZYSMAN (EASTMAN) was also from
Poland/Russia, born in 1877, married in 1891 and arrived >from England with 2
children in 1902. One child, Louis was left behind due to chicken pox. He
arrived several years later. They brought over their cousins, David and
Samuel SUSSMAN (clothing manufacturers in NYC) and Joe COHEN (grocery
stores).

Martin Sussman

Buffalo Grove, IL

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland SUSSMAN, ZYSMAN, EASTMAN families #poland

Beverly Sussman <aimprinter@...>
 

I am enquiring about Ike (Henry) ZYSMAN (SUSSMAN) who lived in Ostroleka
Poland/Russia. He was born in 1875, left Poland for England and arrived in
NYC in 1902. Name was changed to SUSSMAN. They lived in Brooklyn at 51
Chester St. St. Later moved to Hendrix St. My grandfather was a tailor
working in NYC. My grandmother Sarah ZYSMAN (EASTMAN) was also from
Poland/Russia, born in 1877, married in 1891 and arrived >from England with 2
children in 1902. One child, Louis was left behind due to chicken pox. He
arrived several years later. They brought over their cousins, David and
Samuel SUSSMAN (clothing manufacturers in NYC) and Joe COHEN (grocery
stores).

Martin Sussman

Buffalo Grove, IL

Re: Jewish trades as listed in the 1793 Census #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Ruth Coman asked about the meaning of various
occupations listed in the 1793 census of Bohemia:

Schnittwarenhandel; Kurzenwarenhandel; Bandehandel
Fleklhandel and Buenkelgehen

Renate McWright has already explained Kurzwaren
as notions or haberdashery ie buttons, thread,
needles, scissors, zippers, eyes and hooks, elastic
bands, safety pins, thimbles, etc.

They had no elastic bands, safety pins and zippers in
the Hausierer's basket in 1793 as they were only
invented in 1845, 1849 and 1913 respectively!
The other items were definitely stocked and may also
have been included under the term "Galanteriewaren".

Schnittwaren - these are cut lengths of cloth sold by
Jewish traders because of restrictions placed on them
by the Christian guilds which forbade Jews to deal in
whole bales - hence the name Schnitt [>from cut].

Bandehandel are ribbons and bows. Ribbons would have
been decorative but must also have been used instead
of elastic! In bed linen, buttons were often sewn onto
lengths of ribbon instead of onto the the fabric
itself. They were also used for religious garments.

Flekl are smaller pieces of cloth and could be rags
ie Fetzen. >from this "Fleklhandel" some of the largest
paper companies in the Hapsburg Empire were founded
[ie BUNZL und BIACH - where Emanuel BIACH [born 1802]
was my gt-gt grandfather!

Buenkel or Binkel - this is a bundle see:
http://www.operone.de/spruch/red/reds01.htm

Hence in Binkel or Buenkelgehen; Binkel is a
"hold-all" or carrier, so a Buenkelgeher must be the
same a Hausierer. Perhaps he collected rags etc as
opposed to selling items; the seller might have been
higher up the employment ladder!

The word has a pejorative meaning; I have come across
it recently in the phrase Binkel-Jude re immigration
of unwanted Soviet Jews into Austria. I therefore
refrain >from giving you the url.

Celia Male [UK]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Jewish trades as listed in the 1793 Census #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Ruth Coman asked about the meaning of various
occupations listed in the 1793 census of Bohemia:

Schnittwarenhandel; Kurzenwarenhandel; Bandehandel
Fleklhandel and Buenkelgehen

Renate McWright has already explained Kurzwaren
as notions or haberdashery ie buttons, thread,
needles, scissors, zippers, eyes and hooks, elastic
bands, safety pins, thimbles, etc.

They had no elastic bands, safety pins and zippers in
the Hausierer's basket in 1793 as they were only
invented in 1845, 1849 and 1913 respectively!
The other items were definitely stocked and may also
have been included under the term "Galanteriewaren".

Schnittwaren - these are cut lengths of cloth sold by
Jewish traders because of restrictions placed on them
by the Christian guilds which forbade Jews to deal in
whole bales - hence the name Schnitt [>from cut].

Bandehandel are ribbons and bows. Ribbons would have
been decorative but must also have been used instead
of elastic! In bed linen, buttons were often sewn onto
lengths of ribbon instead of onto the the fabric
itself. They were also used for religious garments.

Flekl are smaller pieces of cloth and could be rags
ie Fetzen. >from this "Fleklhandel" some of the largest
paper companies in the Hapsburg Empire were founded
[ie BUNZL und BIACH - where Emanuel BIACH [born 1802]
was my gt-gt grandfather!

Buenkel or Binkel - this is a bundle see:
http://www.operone.de/spruch/red/reds01.htm

Hence in Binkel or Buenkelgehen; Binkel is a
"hold-all" or carrier, so a Buenkelgeher must be the
same a Hausierer. Perhaps he collected rags etc as
opposed to selling items; the seller might have been
higher up the employment ladder!

The word has a pejorative meaning; I have come across
it recently in the phrase Binkel-Jude re immigration
of unwanted Soviet Jews into Austria. I therefore
refrain >from giving you the url.

Celia Male [UK]

Re: Bohemian Jewish census of 1793 #austria-czech

Henry Sinai <hmsinai@...>
 

Thanks to Celia Male reply to Vera Finberg regarding the 1793 census of
Jews in Bohemia, I now have another lead to the SINAI family from
Trietsch (Moravia). - And this all started with a posting about
Hausieren!

Which only goes to show how important posting on peripheral subjects can
be, which naturally lead on to my questions:

How common was the practice to employ family tutors in the 1700s?

Is the name "LOW SINA" in combination or separately or its variations
(LOEW/LOWE with SINA or SINAI, for example) familiar to any other
Siggers?

Best Wishes,

Henry Sinai
RAANANA
Israel
hmsinai@...

Researching PERSONAL Name: SINAI (and variations)
Researching FAMILY:SINAI and variations (SZINAI, SINAJ, SYNAJ,
SINA, SINEI, etc)- Austria,Hungary, Turkey, Rest of World
TRITSCH/TRIETSCH (and variations) Central Europe
PARNES- Lemberg (Lvov), Brody, Berlin GOLDENBERG- Brody, Berlin
MOSZKOWSKI- Opole Lubelskie; Leszniow, Rzeszow, Poland
SOBEL- Opole Lubelskie; Poland WOLARSKY -Mlawa; Poland
JELLINEK - Bratislava (Pressburg), Vienna (von) KEMENY - Austria/Hungary


MODERATOR NOTE: Six lines is the maximum allowable size of places/names
being researched. Please consider creating several signature
blocks and alternating them.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: Bohemian Jewish census of 1793 #austria-czech

Henry Sinai <hmsinai@...>
 

Thanks to Celia Male reply to Vera Finberg regarding the 1793 census of
Jews in Bohemia, I now have another lead to the SINAI family from
Trietsch (Moravia). - And this all started with a posting about
Hausieren!

Which only goes to show how important posting on peripheral subjects can
be, which naturally lead on to my questions:

How common was the practice to employ family tutors in the 1700s?

Is the name "LOW SINA" in combination or separately or its variations
(LOEW/LOWE with SINA or SINAI, for example) familiar to any other
Siggers?

Best Wishes,

Henry Sinai
RAANANA
Israel
hmsinai@...

Researching PERSONAL Name: SINAI (and variations)
Researching FAMILY:SINAI and variations (SZINAI, SINAJ, SYNAJ,
SINA, SINEI, etc)- Austria,Hungary, Turkey, Rest of World
TRITSCH/TRIETSCH (and variations) Central Europe
PARNES- Lemberg (Lvov), Brody, Berlin GOLDENBERG- Brody, Berlin
MOSZKOWSKI- Opole Lubelskie; Leszniow, Rzeszow, Poland
SOBEL- Opole Lubelskie; Poland WOLARSKY -Mlawa; Poland
JELLINEK - Bratislava (Pressburg), Vienna (von) KEMENY - Austria/Hungary


MODERATOR NOTE: Six lines is the maximum allowable size of places/names
being researched. Please consider creating several signature
blocks and alternating them.

re; Holocaust victims born in New York #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Monica Leonards of Philadelphia asked recently how it
was that people born in the US, were deported from
Vienna and were holocaust victims - in essence, she
wondered why they did not return to the US in time?

I discussed this matter with Joe HERZ, an
old-established and knowledgeable SIG member from
Texas. He gives me full permission to post his views
as he has problems with plain text. This is what he
told me during our conversation:

"I would like to mention something concerning US
citizenship abroad. In the 1920s a new law came in
effect. Naturalized US citizens who returned to and
resided permanently in the country of their origin
lost their US citizenship after 3 years if they did
not return to the USA permanently.

Naturalized citizens residing in other foreign
countries lost their US citizenship after 5 years of
permanent residence abroad. There were exceptions to
this law and in the 1950s the Warren US Supreme Court
declared the law unconstitutional. Former US citizens
who had lost US citizenship under the law could
recover it. This may explain why some US citizens
living in Vienna could not return to the USA."

Celia Male [UK]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech re; Holocaust victims born in New York #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Monica Leonards of Philadelphia asked recently how it
was that people born in the US, were deported from
Vienna and were holocaust victims - in essence, she
wondered why they did not return to the US in time?

I discussed this matter with Joe HERZ, an
old-established and knowledgeable SIG member from
Texas. He gives me full permission to post his views
as he has problems with plain text. This is what he
told me during our conversation:

"I would like to mention something concerning US
citizenship abroad. In the 1920s a new law came in
effect. Naturalized US citizens who returned to and
resided permanently in the country of their origin
lost their US citizenship after 3 years if they did
not return to the USA permanently.

Naturalized citizens residing in other foreign
countries lost their US citizenship after 5 years of
permanent residence abroad. There were exceptions to
this law and in the 1950s the Warren US Supreme Court
declared the law unconstitutional. Former US citizens
who had lost US citizenship under the law could
recover it. This may explain why some US citizens
living in Vienna could not return to the USA."

Celia Male [UK]

Re: Emigration to UK in 1938 #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

You will find a wealth of related information about this at
Richard Gaskell's web site:

http://www.geocities.com/czechandslovakthings/WW2_aguide.htm

bonne chance,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

HELFGOTT - Radlow, Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
AUERBACH - Becov nad Teplou, Vienna
STEINER - Oschelin

--- peter bakos <pgbakos@...> wrote:

Prior to the start of WWII the UK (as well as the US) had a
policy of refusing DP's and refugees, particularly Jewish ones.

In the case of a cousin, the Vienna police records state that this
person "went to England" does not reflect whether or not they actually
gained entry. If that is the case, what happened to those persons?
-snip-

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Emigration to UK in 1938 #austria-czech

VMotor <vmotor@...>
 

You will find a wealth of related information about this at
Richard Gaskell's web site:

http://www.geocities.com/czechandslovakthings/WW2_aguide.htm

bonne chance,

Karel Vanek
Belleville
Canada

HELFGOTT - Radlow, Vienna, Becov nad Teplou
AUERBACH - Becov nad Teplou, Vienna
STEINER - Oschelin

--- peter bakos <pgbakos@...> wrote:

Prior to the start of WWII the UK (as well as the US) had a
policy of refusing DP's and refugees, particularly Jewish ones.

In the case of a cousin, the Vienna police records state that this
person "went to England" does not reflect whether or not they actually
gained entry. If that is the case, what happened to those persons?
-snip-

Re: Bohemian Jewish census of 1793 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Vera Finberg of Fairfax, Virginia asks about the 1793
Jewish census of Bohemia as mentioned in Ruth Coman's
posting yesterday on Kurzwaren, Schnittwaren which
followed on logically >from my Hausieren posting a few
days ago [nb genealogy of postings!].

re the 1793 census of Jews in Bohemia: I have
mentioned this many, many times in my postings on this
SIG. There was an earlier 1783 Jewish census of
Bohemia as well - and earlier ones too which are
mentioned on our A-C website.

Please search the Austria-Czech website using the
search facility. Enter the word "census" and many
references will appear out of the aether! I am often
surprised how few people use our website and also the
message archives [enter "census" as well!]. They could
answer many of your questions! Simple Internet
searches with keywords also answer many questions.
These can then be followed up by more intensive
research.

I have only been to Prague twice and on the second
trip I visited the State Archives, where I looked at
the original 1783 and 1793 Jewish censuses for Kolin.
This is of course a thrill, but very hard work if you
do not read Old German script and do not recognise the
many archaic words.

The 1793 census of Jews in Bohemia has been
transcribed into modern Roman letters ie German we can
all read easily, and will be issued as a complete opus
in the next year or so. Unfortunately, the text that
accompanies it is only in Czech.

It will eventually cover the complete census - ie all
the 16 Kreis of Bohemia as well as Prague. At present,
four volumes are available >from the State archives in
Prague, covering 13 Kreis.

We are still waiting impatiently for the Klattauer,
Rakonitzer and Tschaslauer Kreis as well as Prague
itself. I also pray that there will be a cumulative
index as it is a very time-consuming business trawling
through the names and villages/towns in the 13
individual indices so far. This opus would be a
perfect candidate for a DVD/CD.

The most powerful approach to Jewish genealogical
research in Bohemia is to compare the 1783 and 1793
Jewish censuses, the BMD record and the Familianten
records all housed in Prague. The 1783 census often
has the original names of the families - as do the
familiant records before the official name changes.
But who has the time and energy? We all started too
late. That is why many people employ a competent
genealogist. Using the 1793 census transcriptions you
can prepare some of the groundwork for this research
yourself.

BTW: the Adler Society in Vienna purchased the four
volumes which can be inspected every Wednesday night,
if you happen to be in Vienna! The Hungarian SIG also
has copious information on censuses which are being
transcribed and which point to the Moravian origin of
many Hungarian Jews.

Celia Male [UK]

PS: to give you an idea of the scope of these volumes,
I proudly present the 1793 census entry for two of my
gt-gt-gt grandfathers: Samuel KOHN of Grossbock [Velka
Bukovina] Koniggratzer Kreis and Juda POPPER of
Kolin [Kaurzimer Kreis]: Samuel KOHN [16] gehoren
in Schutz nach Gradlitz; Feder und Pottaschenhandel;
Weib: Marianna; Tochter: Maria. My gt-gt grandfather
Raphael KOHN had not yet been born. His son Albert
moved to Vienna.

The 16 refers to the fact that he is the 16th family
in the census of Grossbock.

For Juda POPPER the information re his sons says:
erstgeborener sohn Jacob, ledig [ie single];
zweitgeborener sohn: Wolf, ledig etc [my gt-gt
grandfather]; upto the fifth born son and one
daughter. It also includes the two Jewish maids in the
household >from Blinka and Low SINA - the instructor
from Trietsch in Moravia. The five boys and one girl
obviously had private lessons all day >from a strict
teacher, who is perhaps related to another member of
our SIG?

The census thus gives valuable information about
lifestyles and social status too.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Bohemian Jewish census of 1793 #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Vera Finberg of Fairfax, Virginia asks about the 1793
Jewish census of Bohemia as mentioned in Ruth Coman's
posting yesterday on Kurzwaren, Schnittwaren which
followed on logically >from my Hausieren posting a few
days ago [nb genealogy of postings!].

re the 1793 census of Jews in Bohemia: I have
mentioned this many, many times in my postings on this
SIG. There was an earlier 1783 Jewish census of
Bohemia as well - and earlier ones too which are
mentioned on our A-C website.

Please search the Austria-Czech website using the
search facility. Enter the word "census" and many
references will appear out of the aether! I am often
surprised how few people use our website and also the
message archives [enter "census" as well!]. They could
answer many of your questions! Simple Internet
searches with keywords also answer many questions.
These can then be followed up by more intensive
research.

I have only been to Prague twice and on the second
trip I visited the State Archives, where I looked at
the original 1783 and 1793 Jewish censuses for Kolin.
This is of course a thrill, but very hard work if you
do not read Old German script and do not recognise the
many archaic words.

The 1793 census of Jews in Bohemia has been
transcribed into modern Roman letters ie German we can
all read easily, and will be issued as a complete opus
in the next year or so. Unfortunately, the text that
accompanies it is only in Czech.

It will eventually cover the complete census - ie all
the 16 Kreis of Bohemia as well as Prague. At present,
four volumes are available >from the State archives in
Prague, covering 13 Kreis.

We are still waiting impatiently for the Klattauer,
Rakonitzer and Tschaslauer Kreis as well as Prague
itself. I also pray that there will be a cumulative
index as it is a very time-consuming business trawling
through the names and villages/towns in the 13
individual indices so far. This opus would be a
perfect candidate for a DVD/CD.

The most powerful approach to Jewish genealogical
research in Bohemia is to compare the 1783 and 1793
Jewish censuses, the BMD record and the Familianten
records all housed in Prague. The 1783 census often
has the original names of the families - as do the
familiant records before the official name changes.
But who has the time and energy? We all started too
late. That is why many people employ a competent
genealogist. Using the 1793 census transcriptions you
can prepare some of the groundwork for this research
yourself.

BTW: the Adler Society in Vienna purchased the four
volumes which can be inspected every Wednesday night,
if you happen to be in Vienna! The Hungarian SIG also
has copious information on censuses which are being
transcribed and which point to the Moravian origin of
many Hungarian Jews.

Celia Male [UK]

PS: to give you an idea of the scope of these volumes,
I proudly present the 1793 census entry for two of my
gt-gt-gt grandfathers: Samuel KOHN of Grossbock [Velka
Bukovina] Koniggratzer Kreis and Juda POPPER of
Kolin [Kaurzimer Kreis]: Samuel KOHN [16] gehoren
in Schutz nach Gradlitz; Feder und Pottaschenhandel;
Weib: Marianna; Tochter: Maria. My gt-gt grandfather
Raphael KOHN had not yet been born. His son Albert
moved to Vienna.

The 16 refers to the fact that he is the 16th family
in the census of Grossbock.

For Juda POPPER the information re his sons says:
erstgeborener sohn Jacob, ledig [ie single];
zweitgeborener sohn: Wolf, ledig etc [my gt-gt
grandfather]; upto the fifth born son and one
daughter. It also includes the two Jewish maids in the
household >from Blinka and Low SINA - the instructor
from Trietsch in Moravia. The five boys and one girl
obviously had private lessons all day >from a strict
teacher, who is perhaps related to another member of
our SIG?

The census thus gives valuable information about
lifestyles and social status too.