Date   

Re: Kamenets-Podolsky #general

firedavid@...
 

Hello
Thank your for this information it sounds great !
I'm looking for archives >from K-P concerning Israel Shloima Petchikowsky born 4th august 1884 in Kamenets Podolsky.
son of Moishe and Raizel
his half brother Hyman Pechkowsky born 24th may 1880 in K-P

kind regards
David Perchikowsky
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Any of these records are in the Archives in Khmelnitski. In order to
access them, you will need to contact a researcher in Ukraine. A list of researchers and
their references can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm. Ukraine SIG has no additional information
at this time.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Kamenets-Podolsky #ukraine

firedavid@...
 

Hello
Thank your for this information it sounds great !
I'm looking for archives >from K-P concerning Israel Shloima Petchikowsky born 4th august 1884 in Kamenets Podolsky.
son of Moishe and Raizel
his half brother Hyman Pechkowsky born 24th may 1880 in K-P

kind regards
David Perchikowsky
MODERATOR'S NOTE: Any of these records are in the Archives in Khmelnitski. In order to
access them, you will need to contact a researcher in Ukraine. A list of researchers and
their references can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm. Ukraine SIG has no additional information
at this time.


Kamenets Podolsky #ukraine

Martin Davis (com)
 

Chuck Weinstein wrote: All surviving Jewish vital records >from Kamenets
Podolsky can be found in the Khmelnitsky Archives in Ukraine...... many were
damaged in a fire in the Kamenets Podolsky Archives in 2003 and all were
transported to Khmelnitsky after the fire.

The Khmelnitsky branch of the Ukraine State Archives have a large amount of
material related to the Kamyanets Podilskyy (aka Kamanets Podolsk) area,
some of this was damaged in the fire of 2003, and that is partially restored
and partially catalogued. The general material available includes metrical
books of Kamyanets Jewish community (birth, marriages, divorces and death
records) plus general census records. The archives are, by continuing
accounts, only accessible to visiting professional researchers - see the
JewishGen list at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm .
Additionally, the Ukraine SIG currently hold a considerable amount of
untranslated Kamyanets Podilskyy material (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/RES_ProjectList.asp?ListType=S&reltype=4&re
lid=236&relsub=-1&staid=&kl=N&tl=N&keyw=&OrderBy=stat_new,%20LastChange_Date
%20DESC ) including the 1859 census of the area.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Kamenets Podolsky #ukraine

Martin Davis (com)
 

Chuck Weinstein wrote: All surviving Jewish vital records >from Kamenets
Podolsky can be found in the Khmelnitsky Archives in Ukraine...... many were
damaged in a fire in the Kamenets Podolsky Archives in 2003 and all were
transported to Khmelnitsky after the fire.

The Khmelnitsky branch of the Ukraine State Archives have a large amount of
material related to the Kamyanets Podilskyy (aka Kamanets Podolsk) area,
some of this was damaged in the fire of 2003, and that is partially restored
and partially catalogued. The general material available includes metrical
books of Kamyanets Jewish community (birth, marriages, divorces and death
records) plus general census records. The archives are, by continuing
accounts, only accessible to visiting professional researchers - see the
JewishGen list at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm .
Additionally, the Ukraine SIG currently hold a considerable amount of
untranslated Kamyanets Podilskyy material (see
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/RES_ProjectList.asp?ListType=S&reltype=4&re
lid=236&relsub=-1&staid=&kl=N&tl=N&keyw=&OrderBy=stat_new,%20LastChange_Date
%20DESC ) including the 1859 census of the area.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Lots of old census-like records, mostly from Galician towns, scanned and online at the Ossolineum library website #galicia

Brooke Schreier Ganz <asparagirl@...>
 

A big thank you to Logan Kleinwaks for alerting us all to the existence
of the Ossolineum library's website. It looks like they have scanned
the contents of their library shelves and have many files now available
on their website.

Only a few of these publications are probably useful for genealogical
purposes; a lot of them are old records relating to taxable goods
such as cattle or wine, for example. But there are quite a number of
census-like lists of (usually adult male) inhabitants >from many towns
from Galicia and nearby, many >from the late eighteenth century and
very early nineteenth century. Some interesting ones I've found so
far:

- Nadworna (now Nadvirna, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
A list of people (landowners? heads of households?) for 1787. Lots of
Jewish names, but practically every one of them is a patronymic (i.e.
Davidowitz, Ickowitz, Chaimowitz, etc.) rather than a typical surname.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002764

- Delyatin (now Delatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Another list of people for 1787. Only a few Jews here, helpfully
segregated to a section starting on page 54, and a few have
surnames, not just patronymics, but might be occupational or
toponymics, including DOBROTOWSKI, MIKULCZANSKI, SZAFARZ,
RZEZNIK, STARY, PANTELUK, LANCZINSKI, SZINCHARZ /
SZINOHARZ, and OZIMEK.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002765

- Brody (now in Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
A list of Jewish merchants in the town, sometimes grouped with their
family members (including wives and children) census-style, >from
1784. Some of them have patronymics but some of them have
recognizable surnames, including BYK, PERLER/BERLER, EBER,
BALABAN, ZELNITZ, ABELES, LIEBERMAN, MARGOSCHER, GEFSER /
GESSER, OLESKER, LOFER, FRENTZ, and others.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003948

- Lwow and Lwow area (now Lviv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
List of materials relating to anti-Jewish pogroms, 1918-1919
This document contains a mixture of typewritten reports (mostly in
Polish, but at least one in French), handwritten reports, newspaper
clippings, and lists of people who were hurt or killed in the pogroms
(surname, given name, age, address, location where attacked, etc.).
Some of the lists of people are comprised solely of Jews, most of
them middle-aged, but a few of the lists include a number of people
who are identified as Roman Catholics, i.e. likely ethnic Poles who
were also targeted by the attackers.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-008486

- Stanislau/Stanislawow (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Inventory of the city and all its ethnic groups, >from 1770. Basically a
census, listing heads of households and the number (though not
names) of other people in their families, i.e. 1 man, 1 woman, 2 girls,
3 boys. Many Jews listed, but almost all only have patronymics or
occupational words. Some non-patronymics seen include
PASTERNAK / PASZTERNAK, HOROCHOWSKI, WINNIK, RYBAK, etc.
But some of the "surnames" may actually just be occupational
names or toponyms indicating where the person was from, i.e.
HORODENSKI means >from Horodenka. Includes several pages
related to the Stanislawow synagogue(s).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000515

- Zloczow (now Zolochiv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Google Translate says it's a "circulars to dominion, municipalities
and kahals office". Written in book format, not tabular, so it's hard
to read, but I did notice a few Jews with patronymics and at least
one LANDAU.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003732

- Czortkow (now Chortkiv, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
list >from 1783 of all heads of household. It has a whole section on
people affiliated with the Czortkow synagogue, but all their surnames
seem to be patronymics, toponymics, or occupational (i.e. KRAWIEC
or SZNYDER, which are Polish and German/Yiddish words for a tailor).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003109

- Rawa (now Rava-Ruska, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Census-like list >from 1812 of the inhabitants (landowners? heads of
households?), with Jewish names starting on page 17. And at last,
it's a list with real surnames!
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003298

There are many, many other files on this website that look like they're
probably of interest to someone, but I didn't examine all of them. Just
a sampling of a few more:

- Oleska (now Olesko, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1823
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002956

- Bialego Kamienia (Bialy Kamien, now Belyy Kamen / Bily Kamien /
Bilyi Kamin, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1807
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003047

- Dzwinogrod (now Dzvenyhorod, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1808
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003113

- Snyatyn and its suburbs (now Sniatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Two documents seen, one for 1752, with inhabitants broken down by
religious/ethnic group (Ukrainians, Poles, Armenians, Jews) and then
broken into sub-groups by city or town. Almost all the Jewish
surnames are actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000513
And the other document, >from some time in the 19th century, in book
format and harder to read:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003879

- Uhnow (now Uhniv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1786/1835 (updated in 1835?). Jews clustered
together at end of the list, almost all the Jewish surnames are
actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003414

- Lysiec (now in Poland)
document >from 1843
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003206

- Kosow (now Kosiv, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1710 (!) Almost all the Jewish surnames are
patronymics, with a few occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003495

The main Ossolineum library search page is here:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/index2.php

Search tips:

- The library website is pretty slow, especially for downloading big
PDF's. Their search engine for their holdings is not the most
comprehensive or flexible, and there's basically no help text. Oh,
and it's all in Polish, but if you use Google Chrome for your web
browser, it will attempt to translate the text for you
automatically...but not very well.

- Make sure you use the exact Polish spelling of any towns, including
any Polish letters like the L with a slash, or the Z with a dot, or
any accented characters. Searching for the simplified transliteration
usually won't find what you want.

- Also, remember to search for other versions of town names, because
Polish words change their form when they're in different places in the
sentence. For example, searching for "Brodach" vs. "Brody" gives
different results. Use the Google Translate website and see how your
town's name would change in Polish if it were listed as ">from [Town]"
vs. "in [Town]" vs. "of [Town]" vs. "for [Town]", etc.

- And try to check for misspelled town names. I found a listing for a
"Szuszczyn" for 1836 -- perhaps it is really Szczuczyn, Grajewo
county, Podlaskie voivodeship, Poland?

- These records don't strictly cover just Galicia -- I did see a few
items listed for 16th-17th century Kamenets-Podolskyy, for example.
And some of the towns with inventory/census lists I saw in the search
results seem to be in modern-day Slovakia, near the Polish border,
which is why I am cross-posting this message to the H-SIG list too.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Lots of old census-like records, mostly from Galician towns, scanned and online at the Ossolineum library website #galicia

Brooke Schreier Ganz <asparagirl@...>
 

A big thank you to Logan Kleinwaks for alerting us all to the existence
of the Ossolineum library's website. It looks like they have scanned
the contents of their library shelves and have many files now available
on their website.

Only a few of these publications are probably useful for genealogical
purposes; a lot of them are old records relating to taxable goods
such as cattle or wine, for example. But there are quite a number of
census-like lists of (usually adult male) inhabitants >from many towns
from Galicia and nearby, many >from the late eighteenth century and
very early nineteenth century. Some interesting ones I've found so
far:

- Nadworna (now Nadvirna, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
A list of people (landowners? heads of households?) for 1787. Lots of
Jewish names, but practically every one of them is a patronymic (i.e.
Davidowitz, Ickowitz, Chaimowitz, etc.) rather than a typical surname.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002764

- Delyatin (now Delatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Another list of people for 1787. Only a few Jews here, helpfully
segregated to a section starting on page 54, and a few have
surnames, not just patronymics, but might be occupational or
toponymics, including DOBROTOWSKI, MIKULCZANSKI, SZAFARZ,
RZEZNIK, STARY, PANTELUK, LANCZINSKI, SZINCHARZ /
SZINOHARZ, and OZIMEK.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002765

- Brody (now in Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
A list of Jewish merchants in the town, sometimes grouped with their
family members (including wives and children) census-style, >from
1784. Some of them have patronymics but some of them have
recognizable surnames, including BYK, PERLER/BERLER, EBER,
BALABAN, ZELNITZ, ABELES, LIEBERMAN, MARGOSCHER, GEFSER /
GESSER, OLESKER, LOFER, FRENTZ, and others.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003948

- Lwow and Lwow area (now Lviv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
List of materials relating to anti-Jewish pogroms, 1918-1919
This document contains a mixture of typewritten reports (mostly in
Polish, but at least one in French), handwritten reports, newspaper
clippings, and lists of people who were hurt or killed in the pogroms
(surname, given name, age, address, location where attacked, etc.).
Some of the lists of people are comprised solely of Jews, most of
them middle-aged, but a few of the lists include a number of people
who are identified as Roman Catholics, i.e. likely ethnic Poles who
were also targeted by the attackers.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-008486

- Stanislau/Stanislawow (now Ivano-Frankivsk, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Inventory of the city and all its ethnic groups, >from 1770. Basically a
census, listing heads of households and the number (though not
names) of other people in their families, i.e. 1 man, 1 woman, 2 girls,
3 boys. Many Jews listed, but almost all only have patronymics or
occupational words. Some non-patronymics seen include
PASTERNAK / PASZTERNAK, HOROCHOWSKI, WINNIK, RYBAK, etc.
But some of the "surnames" may actually just be occupational
names or toponyms indicating where the person was from, i.e.
HORODENSKI means >from Horodenka. Includes several pages
related to the Stanislawow synagogue(s).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000515

- Zloczow (now Zolochiv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Google Translate says it's a "circulars to dominion, municipalities
and kahals office". Written in book format, not tabular, so it's hard
to read, but I did notice a few Jews with patronymics and at least
one LANDAU.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003732

- Czortkow (now Chortkiv, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
list >from 1783 of all heads of household. It has a whole section on
people affiliated with the Czortkow synagogue, but all their surnames
seem to be patronymics, toponymics, or occupational (i.e. KRAWIEC
or SZNYDER, which are Polish and German/Yiddish words for a tailor).
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003109

- Rawa (now Rava-Ruska, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
Census-like list >from 1812 of the inhabitants (landowners? heads of
households?), with Jewish names starting on page 17. And at last,
it's a list with real surnames!
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003298

There are many, many other files on this website that look like they're
probably of interest to someone, but I didn't examine all of them. Just
a sampling of a few more:

- Oleska (now Olesko, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1823
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-002956

- Bialego Kamienia (Bialy Kamien, now Belyy Kamen / Bily Kamien /
Bilyi Kamin, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1807
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003047

- Dzwinogrod (now Dzvenyhorod, Ternopil oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1808
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003113

- Snyatyn and its suburbs (now Sniatyn, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
Two documents seen, one for 1752, with inhabitants broken down by
religious/ethnic group (Ukrainians, Poles, Armenians, Jews) and then
broken into sub-groups by city or town. Almost all the Jewish
surnames are actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-000513
And the other document, >from some time in the 19th century, in book
format and harder to read:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003879

- Uhnow (now Uhniv, Lviv oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1786/1835 (updated in 1835?). Jews clustered
together at end of the list, almost all the Jewish surnames are
actually patronymics, toponyms, or occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003414

- Lysiec (now in Poland)
document >from 1843
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003206

- Kosow (now Kosiv, Ivano-Frankivsk oblast, Ukraine)
document >from 1710 (!) Almost all the Jewish surnames are
patronymics, with a few occupational names.
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/wyniki_pl.php?RL-003495

The main Ossolineum library search page is here:
http://bazy.oss.wroc.pl/kzc/index2.php

Search tips:

- The library website is pretty slow, especially for downloading big
PDF's. Their search engine for their holdings is not the most
comprehensive or flexible, and there's basically no help text. Oh,
and it's all in Polish, but if you use Google Chrome for your web
browser, it will attempt to translate the text for you
automatically...but not very well.

- Make sure you use the exact Polish spelling of any towns, including
any Polish letters like the L with a slash, or the Z with a dot, or
any accented characters. Searching for the simplified transliteration
usually won't find what you want.

- Also, remember to search for other versions of town names, because
Polish words change their form when they're in different places in the
sentence. For example, searching for "Brodach" vs. "Brody" gives
different results. Use the Google Translate website and see how your
town's name would change in Polish if it were listed as ">from [Town]"
vs. "in [Town]" vs. "of [Town]" vs. "for [Town]", etc.

- And try to check for misspelled town names. I found a listing for a
"Szuszczyn" for 1836 -- perhaps it is really Szczuczyn, Grajewo
county, Podlaskie voivodeship, Poland?

- These records don't strictly cover just Galicia -- I did see a few
items listed for 16th-17th century Kamenets-Podolskyy, for example.
And some of the towns with inventory/census lists I saw in the search
results seem to be in modern-day Slovakia, near the Polish border,
which is why I am cross-posting this message to the H-SIG list too.

Good luck!

- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California


How did you break through your thickest brick wall? #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,
As the publicity chair of the upcoming IAJGS conference in Seattle, I
am writing a short article on Jewish genealogy for a local magazine
called "Jewish in Seattle." I'd love to include some examples of how
family researchers broke through their most seemingly impenetrable
brick walls. For example, I discovered the name and occupation of my
great-great-grandfather on the gravestone of his son in a weedy
cemetery in Belarus. If you've got a success story you are
particularly proud of, I'd love to hear it.

Thank you and happy Pesach to all!

David Laskin
Seattle, WA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately to David


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How did you break through your thickest brick wall? #general

David Laskin
 

Dear Genners,
As the publicity chair of the upcoming IAJGS conference in Seattle, I
am writing a short article on Jewish genealogy for a local magazine
called "Jewish in Seattle." I'd love to include some examples of how
family researchers broke through their most seemingly impenetrable
brick walls. For example, I discovered the name and occupation of my
great-great-grandfather on the gravestone of his son in a weedy
cemetery in Belarus. If you've got a success story you are
particularly proud of, I'd love to hear it.

Thank you and happy Pesach to all!

David Laskin
Seattle, WA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately to David


A Stone with a Story #general

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Richard Shavei Tzion has written an excellent article about researching
and finding the tombstone of his great grandfather, Abba Saevitzon, at
the Braamfontein Cemetery in Johannesburg.

Read it here:

http://elirab.me/genealogy/a-stone-with-a-story-by-richard-shavei-tzion/

Best regards and Chag Pesach Sameach

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me/litvak-portal/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Stone with a Story #general

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Richard Shavei Tzion has written an excellent article about researching
and finding the tombstone of his great grandfather, Abba Saevitzon, at
the Braamfontein Cemetery in Johannesburg.

Read it here:

http://elirab.me/genealogy/a-stone-with-a-story-by-richard-shavei-tzion/

Best regards and Chag Pesach Sameach

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me/litvak-portal/


A Stone with a Story #southafrica

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Richard Shavei Tzion has written an excellent article about researching
and finding the tombstone of his great grandfather, Abba Saevitzon, at
the Braamfontein Cemetery in Johannesburg.

Read it here:

http://elirab.me/genealogy/a-stone-with-a-story-by-richard-shavei-tzion/

Best regards and Chag Pesach Sameach

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me/litvak-portal/


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica A Stone with a Story #southafrica

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Richard Shavei Tzion has written an excellent article about researching
and finding the tombstone of his great grandfather, Abba Saevitzon, at
the Braamfontein Cemetery in Johannesburg.

Read it here:

http://elirab.me/genealogy/a-stone-with-a-story-by-richard-shavei-tzion/

Best regards and Chag Pesach Sameach

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me/litvak-portal/


IAJGS Achievement Awards Committee 2016 and Call for Applications #general

Marlis Humphrey
 

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
Achievement Awards Committee for 2016 has been established. The purpose
of the committee is to review and select the 2016 IAJGS Achievement
Award recipients. The Committee members include:

Achievement Awards Committee 2016:
Eugene Alpert (Chair) (Washington DC, USA)
Debbie Wang (New York, USA)
Leigh Dworkin (Maidenhead, UK)
Shipley Munson (Utah, USA)
Garri Regev (Jerusalem, Israel)

The call for applications is now open. The IAJGS Achievement Awards are
given to individuals or organizations who have made or are making
outstanding contributions to Jewish genealogy. The awards are announced
at the annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.iajgs2016.org. The awards provide recognition in areas important to
the growth of organized Jewish genealogy. The 6 award categories are:

IAJGS Lifetime Achievement Award
Outstanding Project/Resource/Program
Outstanding Publication
IAJGS Member of the Year
Volunteer of the Year
Future Leader of the Year

Nominations are made through IAJGS member societies
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/membership/member-societies/.

Please refer to

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/ for a list of
all of the awards, the nomination rules, and award criteria.
At
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/achievement-awards/ there is a list of
past Achievement Award recipients. At
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/award-nomination-form/ is the Award
Nomination form.

The nomination deadline for submission of the Award Nomination Form and
supporting documentation is May 26, 2016 at 7pm EDT.

Marlis Humphrey, IAJGS President
on behalf of the IAJGS Board of Directors
president@iajgs.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IAJGS Achievement Awards Committee 2016 and Call for Applications #general

Marlis Humphrey
 

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
Achievement Awards Committee for 2016 has been established. The purpose
of the committee is to review and select the 2016 IAJGS Achievement
Award recipients. The Committee members include:

Achievement Awards Committee 2016:
Eugene Alpert (Chair) (Washington DC, USA)
Debbie Wang (New York, USA)
Leigh Dworkin (Maidenhead, UK)
Shipley Munson (Utah, USA)
Garri Regev (Jerusalem, Israel)

The call for applications is now open. The IAJGS Achievement Awards are
given to individuals or organizations who have made or are making
outstanding contributions to Jewish genealogy. The awards are announced
at the annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
www.iajgs2016.org. The awards provide recognition in areas important to
the growth of organized Jewish genealogy. The 6 award categories are:

IAJGS Lifetime Achievement Award
Outstanding Project/Resource/Program
Outstanding Publication
IAJGS Member of the Year
Volunteer of the Year
Future Leader of the Year

Nominations are made through IAJGS member societies
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/membership/member-societies/.

Please refer to

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/ for a list of
all of the awards, the nomination rules, and award criteria.
At
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/achievement-awards/ there is a list of
past Achievement Award recipients. At
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/award-nomination-form/ is the Award
Nomination form.

The nomination deadline for submission of the Award Nomination Form and
supporting documentation is May 26, 2016 at 7pm EDT.

Marlis Humphrey, IAJGS President
on behalf of the IAJGS Board of Directors
president@iajgs.org


IAJGS Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee 2016 and Call for Applications #general

Marlis Humphrey
 

The IAJGS Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee for 2016 has been
established. The purpose of the committee is to review the grant
applications and recommend the 2016 IAJGS Achievement Award recipients.
The Committee members include:

Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee 2016:
Mark Halpern (Chair) (Pennsylvania, USA)
Daniel Dratwa (Brussels, Belgium)
Emily Garber (Arizona, USA)

The call for applications is now open. The purpose of the Rabbi Malcolm
Stern Grant and John Stedman Memorial Fund Award is to encourage
non-profit institutions or organizations, Jewish or not, to pursue
projects, activities and acquisitions that provide new or enhanced
resources to benefit Jewish genealogists. The Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant
honors Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern, widely considered to be the dean of
American Jewish genealogy, and his efforts to increase the availability
of resources for Jewish genealogical research. The available grant is in
the amount of $3,000 USD, subject to board and membership approval.
Additionally, the IAJGS received a grant >from the estate of Jon Stedman
to honor his late father, John Stedman, an avid and accomplished
genealogist. A special $3,000 USD grant will also be available in the
memory of John Stedman under the Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant for 2016.

These grants are recommended by the Committee and must be approved by
the IAJGS board of directors and the IAJGS membership at the IAJGS
Annual Meeting held during the annual IAJGS conference. The grants are
announced at the annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy www.iajgs2016.org.

Nominations may be made by an individual or group, IAJGS member society
or non-member, or self nominated. The Committee can proactively pursue
additional nominees. Please refer to

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/
for the Nomination Rules and Grant Criteria. At

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/rabbi-malcolm-stern-grant/
there is a list of past Grant Award recipients. At

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/stern-nomination-form/
is the Grant Nomination Form.

The deadline for submission of the Grant Nomination Form and supporting
documentation is May 26, 2016 at 7pm EDT.

Marlis Humphrey, IAJGS President
on behalf of the IAJGS Board of Directors
president@iajgs.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IAJGS Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee 2016 and Call for Applications #general

Marlis Humphrey
 

The IAJGS Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee for 2016 has been
established. The purpose of the committee is to review the grant
applications and recommend the 2016 IAJGS Achievement Award recipients.
The Committee members include:

Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant Committee 2016:
Mark Halpern (Chair) (Pennsylvania, USA)
Daniel Dratwa (Brussels, Belgium)
Emily Garber (Arizona, USA)

The call for applications is now open. The purpose of the Rabbi Malcolm
Stern Grant and John Stedman Memorial Fund Award is to encourage
non-profit institutions or organizations, Jewish or not, to pursue
projects, activities and acquisitions that provide new or enhanced
resources to benefit Jewish genealogists. The Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant
honors Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern, widely considered to be the dean of
American Jewish genealogy, and his efforts to increase the availability
of resources for Jewish genealogical research. The available grant is in
the amount of $3,000 USD, subject to board and membership approval.
Additionally, the IAJGS received a grant >from the estate of Jon Stedman
to honor his late father, John Stedman, an avid and accomplished
genealogist. A special $3,000 USD grant will also be available in the
memory of John Stedman under the Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant for 2016.

These grants are recommended by the Committee and must be approved by
the IAJGS board of directors and the IAJGS membership at the IAJGS
Annual Meeting held during the annual IAJGS conference. The grants are
announced at the annual IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy www.iajgs2016.org.

Nominations may be made by an individual or group, IAJGS member society
or non-member, or self nominated. The Committee can proactively pursue
additional nominees. Please refer to

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/
for the Nomination Rules and Grant Criteria. At

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/rabbi-malcolm-stern-grant/
there is a list of past Grant Award recipients. At

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/stern-nomination-form/
is the Grant Nomination Form.

The deadline for submission of the Grant Nomination Form and supporting
documentation is May 26, 2016 at 7pm EDT.

Marlis Humphrey, IAJGS President
on behalf of the IAJGS Board of Directors
president@iajgs.org


Pronouncing Eastern European Town Names #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

So many times i have wanted to hear the pronunciation of my ancestral
towns. Recently I came across this website...

http://www.loecsen.com/travel/audioworldmap.html

first zoom into the map (use the + sign or use your mouse"slide"),
then click on the flag for your country of choice...
then select the city you wish to hear.
Cool!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gdns, Florida
www.jewishgen.org/education
Phyllis


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pronouncing Eastern European Town Names #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

So many times i have wanted to hear the pronunciation of my ancestral
towns. Recently I came across this website...

http://www.loecsen.com/travel/audioworldmap.html

first zoom into the map (use the + sign or use your mouse"slide"),
then click on the flag for your country of choice...
then select the city you wish to hear.
Cool!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gdns, Florida
www.jewishgen.org/education
Phyllis


Viewmate translatioon request Russian re Mosek BLUMBERG #general

Helen Gardner
 

Hi all.

I'm still on the track of Blumbergs.

I'm posting two different death notices >from Warsaw, both in Russian,
for which I need a translation.

One is for Abraham Mosek Blumberg, died 1869,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=46081

The other is for Mosek Blumberg, died 1893,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=46082

I'm really hopeful that one of them might be my ggrandfather Mosek Blumberg
who died in Warsaw but I have no idea when.

I would be very appreciative if someone would translate them for me.
A reply either to my personal email or to viewmate would be fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translatioon request Russian re Mosek BLUMBERG #general

Helen Gardner
 

Hi all.

I'm still on the track of Blumbergs.

I'm posting two different death notices >from Warsaw, both in Russian,
for which I need a translation.

One is for Abraham Mosek Blumberg, died 1869,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=46081

The other is for Mosek Blumberg, died 1893,

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/responselist.asp?key=46082

I'm really hopeful that one of them might be my ggrandfather Mosek Blumberg
who died in Warsaw but I have no idea when.

I would be very appreciative if someone would translate them for me.
A reply either to my personal email or to viewmate would be fine.

Regards
Helen Gardner

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