Date   

Issue 126 of Genealo-J #general

Georges Graner
 

Issue 126 of Genealo-J, the Journal of the French Jewish genealogical
Society (CGJ) has just been published.
The cover of this issue shows the portrait of Tobias Koen (1763-1849).
He was the podiatrist of Emperor Napoleon and of Empress Josephine and
after the fall of Napoleon, the podiatrist of King Charles X. Bernard
Lyon-Caen knew he had a vague relationship with this man but he was
surprised to discover he actually was his own ancestor. He found that
Koen's birthplace was one of the several cities called Muhlhausen in
Germany, specifically the one at 20 km >from Bamberg, in Bavaria.
Lyon-Caen visited Muhlhausen and found the tomb of Tobias Moses and
Ribika, Koen's parents. During his long life Koen lived through the
reigns of five kings, one emperor and two republics. It should be noted
that Koen was the only Jew among the 38 members of Napoleon's medical
staff. Tobias had six children and more than 600 descendents of which
Lyon-Caen gives an extensive list. Let's finish by a small amusing
detail. Tobias Koen had for a while his Parisian office at 27 rue de
l'Echiquier, within a few meters of the place where our society moved
two months ago, at number 16 of the same street.
Anne-Marie Fribourg was interested in the Laufer family and especially
in Madeleine Laufer (1808-1865) and her illegitimate children. They were
born in Foussemagne, Morvillars and Ensisheim, all situated in Alsace.

Between 1846 and 1947 about 250 foreigners of Jewish origin who had
immigrated to Barcelona (Spain) or were born there decided to convert to
Catholicism. Martine Berthelot-Puig-Moreno analyzed their cases through
the archives of Barcelona diocese. Ten percent of these persons
converted between 1931 and 1936, none during the Spanish Civil war
(1936-1939) and 66% between 1939 and 1947, when the government of Franco
was a friend of the Nazis and when it was dangerous to appear as a Jew.
The author shows how the foreign family names were wrongly transcribed
and how the given names were hispanized or were accompanied by Spanish
names. After World War II, a certain number of these people went back to
Judaism. But several of them did not go back to Judaism but,
nevertheless, were buried in the Jewish cemetery.

Eliane Roos Schuhl, who is our specialist of Hebrew palaeography, spent
twenty years to find the mohelbuch of Dambach, Alsace (1669-1727). This
register of circumcisions was written by David Levy, born in 1646, and
is pasted in the pages on an old ritual book (a mahzor) printed in
Venice in 1568. Eliane has deciphered all details of this manuscript
including several anecdotes written in the judeo-alsatian dialect. She
gives a detailed analysis of the 293 circumcisions of boys belonging to
a dozen of different communities.

The French Cour Constitutionnelle is roughly the equivalent of the U.S.
Supreme Court but its members are appointed for a nine-year term only.
Recently, on March 8, 2016, the president of this Court, Jean-Louis
Debre transmitted his responsibility to his successor Laurent Fabius.
These two presidents knew that both had Jewish ancestors but they did
not know they were cousins. To proof this was a child game for our
members. They proved that Debre and Fabius had four different common
ancestors : Akiba Elie Trenel (~1710-1774), Salomon Israel Zay
(~1540-1627), Mardochee Halphen (~1555-1631) and Isaac Hesse (~1660 -
<1715). The three former lived and died in Metz, the last one in
Puttelange (Moselle). Within the Trenel branch, Debre is Fabius' fifth
cousin, once removed. Within the Hesse branch, Debre is Fabius' eighth
cousin, once removed.

Georges Graner
www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 126 of Genealo-J #general

Georges Graner
 

Issue 126 of Genealo-J, the Journal of the French Jewish genealogical
Society (CGJ) has just been published.
The cover of this issue shows the portrait of Tobias Koen (1763-1849).
He was the podiatrist of Emperor Napoleon and of Empress Josephine and
after the fall of Napoleon, the podiatrist of King Charles X. Bernard
Lyon-Caen knew he had a vague relationship with this man but he was
surprised to discover he actually was his own ancestor. He found that
Koen's birthplace was one of the several cities called Muhlhausen in
Germany, specifically the one at 20 km >from Bamberg, in Bavaria.
Lyon-Caen visited Muhlhausen and found the tomb of Tobias Moses and
Ribika, Koen's parents. During his long life Koen lived through the
reigns of five kings, one emperor and two republics. It should be noted
that Koen was the only Jew among the 38 members of Napoleon's medical
staff. Tobias had six children and more than 600 descendents of which
Lyon-Caen gives an extensive list. Let's finish by a small amusing
detail. Tobias Koen had for a while his Parisian office at 27 rue de
l'Echiquier, within a few meters of the place where our society moved
two months ago, at number 16 of the same street.
Anne-Marie Fribourg was interested in the Laufer family and especially
in Madeleine Laufer (1808-1865) and her illegitimate children. They were
born in Foussemagne, Morvillars and Ensisheim, all situated in Alsace.

Between 1846 and 1947 about 250 foreigners of Jewish origin who had
immigrated to Barcelona (Spain) or were born there decided to convert to
Catholicism. Martine Berthelot-Puig-Moreno analyzed their cases through
the archives of Barcelona diocese. Ten percent of these persons
converted between 1931 and 1936, none during the Spanish Civil war
(1936-1939) and 66% between 1939 and 1947, when the government of Franco
was a friend of the Nazis and when it was dangerous to appear as a Jew.
The author shows how the foreign family names were wrongly transcribed
and how the given names were hispanized or were accompanied by Spanish
names. After World War II, a certain number of these people went back to
Judaism. But several of them did not go back to Judaism but,
nevertheless, were buried in the Jewish cemetery.

Eliane Roos Schuhl, who is our specialist of Hebrew palaeography, spent
twenty years to find the mohelbuch of Dambach, Alsace (1669-1727). This
register of circumcisions was written by David Levy, born in 1646, and
is pasted in the pages on an old ritual book (a mahzor) printed in
Venice in 1568. Eliane has deciphered all details of this manuscript
including several anecdotes written in the judeo-alsatian dialect. She
gives a detailed analysis of the 293 circumcisions of boys belonging to
a dozen of different communities.

The French Cour Constitutionnelle is roughly the equivalent of the U.S.
Supreme Court but its members are appointed for a nine-year term only.
Recently, on March 8, 2016, the president of this Court, Jean-Louis
Debre transmitted his responsibility to his successor Laurent Fabius.
These two presidents knew that both had Jewish ancestors but they did
not know they were cousins. To proof this was a child game for our
members. They proved that Debre and Fabius had four different common
ancestors : Akiba Elie Trenel (~1710-1774), Salomon Israel Zay
(~1540-1627), Mardochee Halphen (~1555-1631) and Isaac Hesse (~1660 -
<1715). The three former lived and died in Metz, the last one in
Puttelange (Moselle). Within the Trenel branch, Debre is Fabius' fifth
cousin, once removed. Within the Hesse branch, Debre is Fabius' eighth
cousin, once removed.

Georges Graner
www.genealoj.org


Daniel Levy (1837- ) of Guernsey, Channel Islands #unitedkingdom

Sue Levy
 

This is a very long shot.

Daniel Levy was the youngest son of Mark Levy (b. Plymouth, England 1800, d.
Guernsey 1848) and his wife Mary (nee Lambert, b. Christchurch, Dorset 1804,
d. Guernsey 1839), born in the Channel Islands about 1837.

Daniel's last address that we can find was in Devon, England in the 1851
census, when he was living with a Marks family, presumably his stepmother's
brother and family. After that he could have gone anywhere - America
perhaps. Who knows?

Daniel's siblings all made their way to Australia and New Zealand in the
1850-60s and we have masses of detail about their descendants and their
lives.

The picture would be complete if we could track down a family tree with him
near the head, or find evidence of his death.

Any help would be appreciated. More information available to anyone who
recognizes him.

Sue Levy
Perth, Australia
slevy@jalcomputer.com.au

Researching LEVY (Devon, Channel Islands, Australia, NZ); MORDECAI LEVI
(Devon, NZ, Australia)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Daniel Levy (1837- ) of Guernsey, Channel Islands #unitedkingdom

Sue Levy
 

This is a very long shot.

Daniel Levy was the youngest son of Mark Levy (b. Plymouth, England 1800, d.
Guernsey 1848) and his wife Mary (nee Lambert, b. Christchurch, Dorset 1804,
d. Guernsey 1839), born in the Channel Islands about 1837.

Daniel's last address that we can find was in Devon, England in the 1851
census, when he was living with a Marks family, presumably his stepmother's
brother and family. After that he could have gone anywhere - America
perhaps. Who knows?

Daniel's siblings all made their way to Australia and New Zealand in the
1850-60s and we have masses of detail about their descendants and their
lives.

The picture would be complete if we could track down a family tree with him
near the head, or find evidence of his death.

Any help would be appreciated. More information available to anyone who
recognizes him.

Sue Levy
Perth, Australia
slevy@jalcomputer.com.au

Researching LEVY (Devon, Channel Islands, Australia, NZ); MORDECAI LEVI
(Devon, NZ, Australia)


Genealogical Research at Minsk Archives for Marriage and Birth Records #general

Miriam Klepper
 

My granddaughter is going to celebrate her Bat Mitzvah next year. My
daughter asked me to help with my granddaughter's Bar Mitzvah project.
My granddaughter had wanted to talk about the Great-Aunt she'd never
known who was killed by the Nazis during the Shoah.

This great Aunt would have been the half-sister I'd never met, the
daughter of my father's first wife Leah Larinski, probably born in the
mid-1930's. My father had been born in Lida Belarus, in November 15,
1911and that's where I presume that he'd lived with his first wife until
the Shoah, or possible in Vilna, Lithuania. Both the first wife and my
half-sister were killed sometime between 1939 and 1945.

I don't know my half-sister's name as there was no mention of it in the
Bad Aarolsen records. The first wife's name was listed in the Buchenwald
intake records when my father was first incarcerated there in 1943, but
no mention of the child's name. I've searched Jewishgen databases, and
couldn't even find a mention of a Leah Larinski, the first wife. I'm
looking for a both a marriage record and a birth record.

I'd contacted Miriam Weiner of Roots to Roots earlier this week to hire
her research organization to send a researcher to the Minsk archives. I
was dismayed to learn, that her organization consisted of one person who
dutifully trekked to the archives herself to research for whomever had
hired her, and that she was retiring >from such daunting tasks.

It was also very discouraging to hear that thanks to new laws passed since
September 11, 2000, only direct descendants can go to the archives for
genealogical research, and there is a delay of 100 years before one
could actually access the archives.

Complicating matters, according to Ms. Weiner, is that when my father
applied for a marriage license in New York City in 1947, he stated that
he was never married. It's probably something a lot of Holocaust survivors
did when they remarried after the war - they didn't want to have to go to
court to declare the first wife dead, and wait 7 years before they could
remarry. He probably had no documentation to prove she'd died, most
certainly since the Nazis did not keep written records of all those they'd
killed, either in mass shootings, or in gassing their innocent victims.

I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to get the research
done that I need. Ms. Weiner told me that there are researchers out
there who are scam artists, and I should beware of someone who would
just take my money and give me nothing to show for it. My daughter
suggested that perhaps she and I should make a trip to Minsk, Belarus,
but that would involve hiring a researcher over there who spoke both
English and Russian, who could accompany us to the Minsk archives.

Please contact Miriam Klepper privately at bubbieluvs6@gmail.com, to
provide me with any guidance in this matter. Thank you.

Miriam Klepper

MODERATOR NOTE: Be sure to check out the JewishGen InfoFile, "Finding a
Professional Genealogist." This list includes researchers recommended by
other JewishGenners. http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogical Research at Minsk Archives for Marriage and Birth Records #general

Miriam Klepper
 

My granddaughter is going to celebrate her Bat Mitzvah next year. My
daughter asked me to help with my granddaughter's Bar Mitzvah project.
My granddaughter had wanted to talk about the Great-Aunt she'd never
known who was killed by the Nazis during the Shoah.

This great Aunt would have been the half-sister I'd never met, the
daughter of my father's first wife Leah Larinski, probably born in the
mid-1930's. My father had been born in Lida Belarus, in November 15,
1911and that's where I presume that he'd lived with his first wife until
the Shoah, or possible in Vilna, Lithuania. Both the first wife and my
half-sister were killed sometime between 1939 and 1945.

I don't know my half-sister's name as there was no mention of it in the
Bad Aarolsen records. The first wife's name was listed in the Buchenwald
intake records when my father was first incarcerated there in 1943, but
no mention of the child's name. I've searched Jewishgen databases, and
couldn't even find a mention of a Leah Larinski, the first wife. I'm
looking for a both a marriage record and a birth record.

I'd contacted Miriam Weiner of Roots to Roots earlier this week to hire
her research organization to send a researcher to the Minsk archives. I
was dismayed to learn, that her organization consisted of one person who
dutifully trekked to the archives herself to research for whomever had
hired her, and that she was retiring >from such daunting tasks.

It was also very discouraging to hear that thanks to new laws passed since
September 11, 2000, only direct descendants can go to the archives for
genealogical research, and there is a delay of 100 years before one
could actually access the archives.

Complicating matters, according to Ms. Weiner, is that when my father
applied for a marriage license in New York City in 1947, he stated that
he was never married. It's probably something a lot of Holocaust survivors
did when they remarried after the war - they didn't want to have to go to
court to declare the first wife dead, and wait 7 years before they could
remarry. He probably had no documentation to prove she'd died, most
certainly since the Nazis did not keep written records of all those they'd
killed, either in mass shootings, or in gassing their innocent victims.

I am wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to get the research
done that I need. Ms. Weiner told me that there are researchers out
there who are scam artists, and I should beware of someone who would
just take my money and give me nothing to show for it. My daughter
suggested that perhaps she and I should make a trip to Minsk, Belarus,
but that would involve hiring a researcher over there who spoke both
English and Russian, who could accompany us to the Minsk archives.

Please contact Miriam Klepper privately at bubbieluvs6@gmail.com, to
provide me with any guidance in this matter. Thank you.

Miriam Klepper

MODERATOR NOTE: Be sure to check out the JewishGen InfoFile, "Finding a
Professional Genealogist." This list includes researchers recommended by
other JewishGenners. http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Researchers.htm


Finding the BORNSTEIN family in Poland. #general

Bent Bornstein <mail@...>
 

Hi

I am looking for family in Poland.

I know the name of my great-grandfather, Rabbi Chanoch Henrich BORNSTEIN,
but am missing al and his family.

His son was Abraham (Avraham) Meir BORNSTEIN Born: 17.08.1888 in Poland.
Deid in Copenhagen in 14.04.1965

His wife was; Malka SZAJNIAK 1888- 1967

I have photos of the gravestone.

I need some help to find the town of Chanoch Henrich Bornstein, and other
data.

Best
Bent Bornstein
Denmark


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Finding the BORNSTEIN family in Poland. #general

Bent Bornstein <mail@...>
 

Hi

I am looking for family in Poland.

I know the name of my great-grandfather, Rabbi Chanoch Henrich BORNSTEIN,
but am missing al and his family.

His son was Abraham (Avraham) Meir BORNSTEIN Born: 17.08.1888 in Poland.
Deid in Copenhagen in 14.04.1965

His wife was; Malka SZAJNIAK 1888- 1967

I have photos of the gravestone.

I need some help to find the town of Chanoch Henrich Bornstein, and other
data.

Best
Bent Bornstein
Denmark


JGS of Maryland June 26 program #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Mindie Kaplan
Title: "Relatives, Cold Calls and Emails, & DNA Testing"
Date and Time: Sunday, June 26, 2016, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Hadassah meeting room, 3723 Old Court Rd (Dumbarton Offices entrance),
Pikesville, MD

Please join us for our next program, "Relatives, Cold Calls and Emails, & DNA
Testing," presented by Mindie Kaplan. This program provides techniques for
reaching out to relatives, including those who are reluctant to meet with a
stranger, and provides examples that will expand your research.

Relatives: What can living relatives add to my research? How do you contact
"uninterested" relatives, starting a conversation that will get them to open up?

Covered issues: family gatherings, preparation, audio/video recording, photos/
scanning, documentation, and ethics.

Cold calls: How do you find people? How do you reach out to strangers and
convince them to talk? How do phone techniques differ >from emails or social
sites such as Facebook? What if they think you're a con artist? How can you
build a relationship that will turn into a number of conversations, leading to
more relatives?

DNA testing: How do you ask someone to take a DNA test? Who pays? What are some
factors that will get them interested in participating?

Mindie Kaplan has been involved in Jewish genealogy for more than 20 years. Her
family tree currently consists of 3000 individuals. When printed (including
stories and biographies), it comprises 173 pages for the Splaver side and 99
pages for the Entes side. She has years of experience reaching out to distant
family members to learn their stories, discover old photographs, and obtain DNA
samples with the goal of putting together the story of her family. Mindie has
attended nearly every IAJGS conference since 2003 and is involved with the
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied to
membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first meeting.
Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at www.jgsmd.org for
late updates and for the time, location, and program of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD
JGSMD Public Relations


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Maryland June 26 program #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Mindie Kaplan
Title: "Relatives, Cold Calls and Emails, & DNA Testing"
Date and Time: Sunday, June 26, 2016, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Hadassah meeting room, 3723 Old Court Rd (Dumbarton Offices entrance),
Pikesville, MD

Please join us for our next program, "Relatives, Cold Calls and Emails, & DNA
Testing," presented by Mindie Kaplan. This program provides techniques for
reaching out to relatives, including those who are reluctant to meet with a
stranger, and provides examples that will expand your research.

Relatives: What can living relatives add to my research? How do you contact
"uninterested" relatives, starting a conversation that will get them to open up?

Covered issues: family gatherings, preparation, audio/video recording, photos/
scanning, documentation, and ethics.

Cold calls: How do you find people? How do you reach out to strangers and
convince them to talk? How do phone techniques differ >from emails or social
sites such as Facebook? What if they think you're a con artist? How can you
build a relationship that will turn into a number of conversations, leading to
more relatives?

DNA testing: How do you ask someone to take a DNA test? Who pays? What are some
factors that will get them interested in participating?

Mindie Kaplan has been involved in Jewish genealogy for more than 20 years. Her
family tree currently consists of 3000 individuals. When printed (including
stories and biographies), it comprises 173 pages for the Splaver side and 99
pages for the Entes side. She has years of experience reaching out to distant
family members to learn their stories, discover old photographs, and obtain DNA
samples with the goal of putting together the story of her family. Mindie has
attended nearly every IAJGS conference since 2003 and is involved with the
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied to
membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first meeting.
Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at www.jgsmd.org for
late updates and for the time, location, and program of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD
JGSMD Public Relations


Could Ernst be a Girl's name? #germany

ronald Wallace
 

I recently found a photograph of my Great Grandparents together with their
six children. The picture was taken about 1892 in Berlin.

I have everyone's birth dates confirmed both by Birth Certificates and
entries in our Family Bible.

However the ages of the youngest 3 children make no sense unless one of them
named Ernst is in fact a girl.

Does anyone have any knowledge of whether Girls in the late 1800's
(1870-1880) might have been called Ernst. This is the only way that the
picture would make any sense.

I would appreciate any input. This Ernst died at 19 and so never married,
thus I have no reference >from any marriage.

Thank You, Ronny Wallace Apollo Beach, FL ronald@thewallaces.net


German SIG #Germany Could Ernst be a Girl's name? #germany

ronald Wallace
 

I recently found a photograph of my Great Grandparents together with their
six children. The picture was taken about 1892 in Berlin.

I have everyone's birth dates confirmed both by Birth Certificates and
entries in our Family Bible.

However the ages of the youngest 3 children make no sense unless one of them
named Ernst is in fact a girl.

Does anyone have any knowledge of whether Girls in the late 1800's
(1870-1880) might have been called Ernst. This is the only way that the
picture would make any sense.

I would appreciate any input. This Ernst died at 19 and so never married,
thus I have no reference >from any marriage.

Thank You, Ronny Wallace Apollo Beach, FL ronald@thewallaces.net


surname BUSTOS or ANGULO #sephardic

harold ivan angulo bustos <haroldivan@...>
 

I want to confirm with genealogist if surname BUSTOS or ANGULO have
sephardite origin.

Harold Ivan Angulo Bustos


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim surname BUSTOS or ANGULO #sephardic

harold ivan angulo bustos <haroldivan@...>
 

I want to confirm with genealogist if surname BUSTOS or ANGULO have
sephardite origin.

Harold Ivan Angulo Bustos


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois meeting---Sunday, June 26, 2016---Kvell and Tell short presentations #general

events@...
 

Jewish genealogists to share discoveries and offer tips at June 26,
2016, JGSI meeting:

Speakers have been selected for the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois "Kvell and Tell" session on Sunday, June 26, 2016, as part of
its annual meeting. The chosen speakers will take turns sharing family
history discoveries and research tips in five short presentations
starting at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill.

The speakers and topics are: Barry Finkel, "The Saga of Grace Milhouse
and Her Eugenic Baby"; Marcia Hirsch, "The Hirsch Family Book"; Rebecca
Hurwitz, "Creating a Biography Through Genealogy"; Debbie Kroopkin and
Scott Meyer, "What is StoryCorps?"; and Martin Fischer, "Write It! Tips
for Saving and Sharing Family History in Written Form."

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information,
see http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

The June 26 meeting will also feature the co-presidents' annual report
and the introduction of JGSI officers and other board members.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois meeting---Sunday, June 26, 2016---Kvell and Tell short presentations #general

events@...
 

Jewish genealogists to share discoveries and offer tips at June 26,
2016, JGSI meeting:

Speakers have been selected for the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Illinois "Kvell and Tell" session on Sunday, June 26, 2016, as part of
its annual meeting. The chosen speakers will take turns sharing family
history discoveries and research tips in five short presentations
starting at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill.

The speakers and topics are: Barry Finkel, "The Saga of Grace Milhouse
and Her Eugenic Baby"; Marcia Hirsch, "The Hirsch Family Book"; Rebecca
Hurwitz, "Creating a Biography Through Genealogy"; Debbie Kroopkin and
Scott Meyer, "What is StoryCorps?"; and Martin Fischer, "Write It! Tips
for Saving and Sharing Family History in Written Form."

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate members who want to use or borrow genealogy library
materials, get help with genealogy websites, or ask genealogical
questions before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information,
see http://jgsi.org/ or phone 312-666-0100.

The June 26 meeting will also feature the co-presidents' annual report
and the introduction of JGSI officers and other board members.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


Draft Lists for Vilnius 1882-1884 #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group has translated the conscription
lists for Vilnius for 1882 to 1884. For an unknown reason, 1883
conscripts are in a separate file.

Draft and/or Conscription Lists often include the entire family of the
young man who has been drafted. Many of these entries include the
street address where the draftee is living. Because there are not good
revision lists or family lists for this time period, the conscription
lists are a valuable resource.

We can only translate additional years if you help financially. If you
have a family history that an uncle was drafted, please join our group
so that we can raise the funds to translate all of these lists. Your
tax deductible donation to the Vilnius District Research Group of
LitvakSIG of US$100 will qualify you to receive the documents as soon as
we receive them, and approximately two years before they appear in the
All Lithuania Database. More details are on our secure website at:
https://www.litvaksig.org/join-and-contribute/

A list of all surnames appearing in these files is freely available here:
http://www.bit.ly/VilniusDRG

The most common surnames (and the number of times that they appear) in
this time period are:

ARONOVICH ( 22 ), ASS ( 10 ), BALISHANSKI ( 11 ), BEKER ( 11 ),
ELIASHBERG ( 10 ), FRIDMAN ( 16 ), GAMBURG ( 22 ), GOLDMAN ( 19 ),
GORDON ( 19 ), KAGAN ( 38 ), KAMIONSKY ( 10 ), KAPLAN ( 13 ), KASEL ( 11
), KATS ( 12 ), KREMER ( 11 ), KUKSHES ( 10 ), LEVIN ( 14 ), LEVINSON (
11 ), MINIKES ( 18 ), NEMENCHINSKI ( 16 ), POCHTER ( 11 ), PRUZHAN ( 10
), SEGAL ( 26 ), SHTEIN ( 14 ), SLUTSKI ( 10 ), TSITRIN ( 10 ), VILKOMIR
( 20 ).


Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Coordinator, Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Draft Lists for Vilnius 1882-1884 #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group has translated the conscription
lists for Vilnius for 1882 to 1884. For an unknown reason, 1883
conscripts are in a separate file.

Draft and/or Conscription Lists often include the entire family of the
young man who has been drafted. Many of these entries include the
street address where the draftee is living. Because there are not good
revision lists or family lists for this time period, the conscription
lists are a valuable resource.

We can only translate additional years if you help financially. If you
have a family history that an uncle was drafted, please join our group
so that we can raise the funds to translate all of these lists. Your
tax deductible donation to the Vilnius District Research Group of
LitvakSIG of US$100 will qualify you to receive the documents as soon as
we receive them, and approximately two years before they appear in the
All Lithuania Database. More details are on our secure website at:
https://www.litvaksig.org/join-and-contribute/

A list of all surnames appearing in these files is freely available here:
http://www.bit.ly/VilniusDRG

The most common surnames (and the number of times that they appear) in
this time period are:

ARONOVICH ( 22 ), ASS ( 10 ), BALISHANSKI ( 11 ), BEKER ( 11 ),
ELIASHBERG ( 10 ), FRIDMAN ( 16 ), GAMBURG ( 22 ), GOLDMAN ( 19 ),
GORDON ( 19 ), KAGAN ( 38 ), KAMIONSKY ( 10 ), KAPLAN ( 13 ), KASEL ( 11
), KATS ( 12 ), KREMER ( 11 ), KUKSHES ( 10 ), LEVIN ( 14 ), LEVINSON (
11 ), MINIKES ( 18 ), NEMENCHINSKI ( 16 ), POCHTER ( 11 ), PRUZHAN ( 10
), SEGAL ( 26 ), SHTEIN ( 14 ), SLUTSKI ( 10 ), TSITRIN ( 10 ), VILKOMIR
( 20 ).


Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Coordinator, Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSIG


Family Numbers (again) #poland

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

The mystery of "Family Numbers" remains unsolved.

My ancestor Joseph GRUDER (ca. 1795 - 1846) is showed in the Family
Evidence, for the tax purposes as sharing / inheriting ? Family Number 1942
with Mund family, however Joseph has assigned number 505. Since 505 was a
number of another (older) branch of the GRUDER family, I assumed he was a
son of the family. Number 1942 included (I assume) a whole family of
Joseph, including his wife Rachel LICHTENHEIM and their children.

In another document, recording marriages in Lvov, Joseph Gruder, who married
Rachel LICHTENHEIM in Lvov, 1809 has a number 5818. This way Joseph has
three different family numbers! 505, 1942, and 5818.

Can anybody make sense of it? Untangling this knot is important, since it
can shed light on relations between different persons.

Any help is welcomed,

Henryk Gruder


JRI Poland #Poland Family Numbers (again) #poland

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

The mystery of "Family Numbers" remains unsolved.

My ancestor Joseph GRUDER (ca. 1795 - 1846) is showed in the Family
Evidence, for the tax purposes as sharing / inheriting ? Family Number 1942
with Mund family, however Joseph has assigned number 505. Since 505 was a
number of another (older) branch of the GRUDER family, I assumed he was a
son of the family. Number 1942 included (I assume) a whole family of
Joseph, including his wife Rachel LICHTENHEIM and their children.

In another document, recording marriages in Lvov, Joseph Gruder, who married
Rachel LICHTENHEIM in Lvov, 1809 has a number 5818. This way Joseph has
three different family numbers! 505, 1942, and 5818.

Can anybody make sense of it? Untangling this knot is important, since it
can shed light on relations between different persons.

Any help is welcomed,

Henryk Gruder

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