Date   

1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and
the large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@geshergalicia.org


Polish death certificates 1919 #galicia

Jessica Skippon <jskippon@...>
 

A year or two ago there was mention of Poland changing the rule about
death certificates being closed for 100 years. Today I have done a
general search but found nothing to indicate this has happened.

My great-grandmother, Fani BIRN died 16th March 1919, but the place is
unknown. I haven't found her birth (BORGER) or either marriage
(SCHANZER or BIRN) but she lived most of her life in Andrychau and
Bielsko Biala. Several years ago I checked both record offices but came
up empty-handed. (Perhaps this was due to the 100 year rule, but the
person with me didn't say that was the reason). My mother and uncle
both said they'd never heard that she lived anywhere else. But she is
not buried in the Jewish cemeteries in Bielsko or Andrychau, where I
have personally searched. A second Jewish cemetery in Bielsko was
cleared after WWII to build a housing estate.

Two sons lived in Berlin, but but she did not show up on the Berlin index.

A daughter, Babette JACHZEL lived for a while in Gilowice , and then
perhaps moved to Mistelbach, Austria, where her sons were. Fani is not
buried in the Jewish cemetery there.

She was a widow after her first marriage to Raphael BIRN, then she
married Viktor SCHANZER and they divorced within four years. She r
everted to using BIRN and there is no evidence of her using any other
name.

So it seems back to waiting for the 100 years to pass (2020, I guess).
Does anyone know differently, or can suggest another avenue?

Jessica Skippon
London, England

searching in Galicia: SCHANZER, BORGER, BIRN, JACHZEL,
GLUCKSMAN, WALDNER, KRIEGER
Austria: WIMMER, KASTNER, HACKLER


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia 1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and
the large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polish death certificates 1919 #galicia

Jessica Skippon <jskippon@...>
 

A year or two ago there was mention of Poland changing the rule about
death certificates being closed for 100 years. Today I have done a
general search but found nothing to indicate this has happened.

My great-grandmother, Fani BIRN died 16th March 1919, but the place is
unknown. I haven't found her birth (BORGER) or either marriage
(SCHANZER or BIRN) but she lived most of her life in Andrychau and
Bielsko Biala. Several years ago I checked both record offices but came
up empty-handed. (Perhaps this was due to the 100 year rule, but the
person with me didn't say that was the reason). My mother and uncle
both said they'd never heard that she lived anywhere else. But she is
not buried in the Jewish cemeteries in Bielsko or Andrychau, where I
have personally searched. A second Jewish cemetery in Bielsko was
cleared after WWII to build a housing estate.

Two sons lived in Berlin, but but she did not show up on the Berlin index.

A daughter, Babette JACHZEL lived for a while in Gilowice , and then
perhaps moved to Mistelbach, Austria, where her sons were. Fani is not
buried in the Jewish cemetery there.

She was a widow after her first marriage to Raphael BIRN, then she
married Viktor SCHANZER and they divorced within four years. She r
everted to using BIRN and there is no evidence of her using any other
name.

So it seems back to waiting for the 100 years to pass (2020, I guess).
Does anyone know differently, or can suggest another avenue?

Jessica Skippon
London, England

searching in Galicia: SCHANZER, BORGER, BIRN, JACHZEL,
GLUCKSMAN, WALDNER, KRIEGER
Austria: WIMMER, KASTNER, HACKLER


Re: Visa Free Travel To Belarus #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

Please, also note that you must also fly out of Belarus, rather than
take a bus or train out.

However, even with this in mind, quite a few things have gotten simpler.

Andrei Burdenkov


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Visa Free Travel To Belarus #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

Please, also note that you must also fly out of Belarus, rather than
take a bus or train out.

However, even with this in mind, quite a few things have gotten simpler.

Andrei Burdenkov


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #general

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #general

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


Re: Wrong information on census records #general

Roger Lustig
 

Tammy:

To understand censuses, imagine the process of taking them. You don't
necessarily know who provided the information for the family. You don't
know what they might have been afraid of, or wanted to ignore in their
past. For that matter, you don't know what they *remembered* about their
past. People in those days didn't necessarily know their own dates of birth.

Now consider the census-takers. They may have spoken the language of the
residents, but perhaps they could only communicate directly with the
children who were growing up with the new language. They couldn't ask
for documentation, and had enough to do just getting to every door when
someone was at home and then copying the information they'd gathered
into the sheets we know today.

There were thousands of reasons, I'm sure, for fudging one's history on
the census. Some called themselves "German" when the German Jews of New
York tended to look down on their eastern co-religionists. Others,
having fled the Czar's army, used the names they'd used for cover--so 4
brothers might have 4 surnames. Still others simply didn't want to be
identified as members of their family any more. I've worked on a case of
this sort, and the fictions they told the census takers would take your
breath away. Most of these efforts were pointless--ever heard of anyone
arrested for fudging their census responses?

For that matter, try tracking several families through multiple
censuses. Then calculate the percentage of the time that family members
were reported as aging 10 years (or 5 in New York) between censuses.

As with any other document, you're best off approaching it as a piece of
paper with markings on it and going on >from there. Assume nothing unless
not assuming it would be absurd.

Tina Fey's Saturday Night Live census-taker sketch with Betty White is
actually something to keep in mind. I take no responsibility if it hurts
when you laugh.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2017 6:42 PM, Tammy Weingarten tasu1@aol.com wrote:
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a
census record. I have recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband,
wife and 6 of 7 children) are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration
record states she was a widow at that time. In the son's 1918 WWI draft record,
he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record lists the
son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which
provides his mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's
name. >from that information I found a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his
father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly. So, two records
indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he
was not present for the census taker to get that information. I don't know what
to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another
state. His wife and child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number
of years after his move. Yet, I found a 1930 census record that matches the
names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the original home state. The
ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The only
thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a
plumber, when in fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife
lists herself and her daughter without the ex husband's name, but states
herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not common. It is hard to
believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to
how to handle that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced
something similar.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wrong information on census records #general

Roger Lustig
 

Tammy:

To understand censuses, imagine the process of taking them. You don't
necessarily know who provided the information for the family. You don't
know what they might have been afraid of, or wanted to ignore in their
past. For that matter, you don't know what they *remembered* about their
past. People in those days didn't necessarily know their own dates of birth.

Now consider the census-takers. They may have spoken the language of the
residents, but perhaps they could only communicate directly with the
children who were growing up with the new language. They couldn't ask
for documentation, and had enough to do just getting to every door when
someone was at home and then copying the information they'd gathered
into the sheets we know today.

There were thousands of reasons, I'm sure, for fudging one's history on
the census. Some called themselves "German" when the German Jews of New
York tended to look down on their eastern co-religionists. Others,
having fled the Czar's army, used the names they'd used for cover--so 4
brothers might have 4 surnames. Still others simply didn't want to be
identified as members of their family any more. I've worked on a case of
this sort, and the fictions they told the census takers would take your
breath away. Most of these efforts were pointless--ever heard of anyone
arrested for fudging their census responses?

For that matter, try tracking several families through multiple
censuses. Then calculate the percentage of the time that family members
were reported as aging 10 years (or 5 in New York) between censuses.

As with any other document, you're best off approaching it as a piece of
paper with markings on it and going on >from there. Assume nothing unless
not assuming it would be absurd.

Tina Fey's Saturday Night Live census-taker sketch with Betty White is
actually something to keep in mind. I take no responsibility if it hurts
when you laugh.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2017 6:42 PM, Tammy Weingarten tasu1@aol.com wrote:
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a
census record. I have recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband,
wife and 6 of 7 children) are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration
record states she was a widow at that time. In the son's 1918 WWI draft record,
he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record lists the
son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which
provides his mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's
name. >from that information I found a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his
father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly. So, two records
indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he
was not present for the census taker to get that information. I don't know what
to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another
state. His wife and child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number
of years after his move. Yet, I found a 1930 census record that matches the
names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the original home state. The
ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The only
thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a
plumber, when in fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife
lists herself and her daughter without the ex husband's name, but states
herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not common. It is hard to
believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to
how to handle that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced
something similar.


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #ukraine

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #ukraine

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


Viewmate translation requests Polish and Russian #general

Zazu <zazusings@...>
 

Hello

I've posted vital records in Polish and Russian for which I need
translations. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52608 Polish

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52802 Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52803 Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52804 Polish

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52805 Polish

I would appreciate translation of all the names mentioned,
parents,spouses, witnesses and any others, as well as towns mentioned.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Sharon Singer
Toronto, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation requests Polish and Russian #general

Zazu <zazusings@...>
 

Hello

I've posted vital records in Polish and Russian for which I need
translations. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52608 Polish

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52802 Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52803 Russian

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52804 Polish

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52805 Polish

I would appreciate translation of all the names mentioned,
parents,spouses, witnesses and any others, as well as towns mentioned.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Sharon Singer
Toronto, Canada


wrong information on census records #bessarabia

Tammy
 

Hello,
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a census record. I have
recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband, wife and 6 of 7 children)
are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration record states she was a widow at that time. In the
son's 1918 WWI draft record, he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record
lists the son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which provides his
mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's name. >from that information I found
a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly.

So, two records indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he was not present for the
census taker to get that information. I don't know what to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another state. His wife and
child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number of years after his move. Yet, I found a
1930 census record that matches the names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the
original home state. The ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The
only thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a plumber, when in
fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife lists herself and her daughter
without the ex husband's name, but states herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not
common. It is hard to believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to how to handle
that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced something similar.

Thank you,
Tammy Weingarten
searching: Rabinowitz, Wishnefsky, Grubin, Chaykin, Feldman, Alderman, Phenes (Minsk);
Newman, Jacobs, Simiansky, Weinberg (Chisinau); Sarote, Yanoff (Bielsk); Weingarten, Lerner,
Rosenfeld, Goldstein (Lublin and Mezrich)


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia wrong information on census records #bessarabia

Tammy
 

Hello,
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a census record. I have
recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband, wife and 6 of 7 children)
are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration record states she was a widow at that time. In the
son's 1918 WWI draft record, he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record
lists the son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which provides his
mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's name. >from that information I found
a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly.

So, two records indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he was not present for the
census taker to get that information. I don't know what to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another state. His wife and
child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number of years after his move. Yet, I found a
1930 census record that matches the names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the
original home state. The ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The
only thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a plumber, when in
fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife lists herself and her daughter
without the ex husband's name, but states herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not
common. It is hard to believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to how to handle
that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced something similar.

Thank you,
Tammy Weingarten
searching: Rabinowitz, Wishnefsky, Grubin, Chaykin, Feldman, Alderman, Phenes (Minsk);
Newman, Jacobs, Simiansky, Weinberg (Chisinau); Sarote, Yanoff (Bielsk); Weingarten, Lerner,
Rosenfeld, Goldstein (Lublin and Mezrich)


Billy Wilder [who had been a Jewish refugee from Austria in 1934 on the immigrant experience] #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

[Billy Wilder's films included "Some Like it Hot" and "One, Two, Three", a
Cold War satirical comedy set in 1960 Berlin. The latter is hard to find
but (I think) worth looking for.]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sKNGQ6flhk&t=344s

GerSIG friend Yvonne Stern often sends the Moderator links to Internet
content of possible interest to GerSIG readers. Moderator]

At the 1987 (60th) Academy Awards, Billy Wilder was awarded the
Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. His memorable acceptance
speech expressed in a concise and witty manner the dramatic
situation of immigrants, [based on his own experience in 1934]
Date & Venue : April 11, 1988; Shrine Civic Auditorium, LA.

Wilder was Austrian. He was born Samuel Wilder on 22 June 1906 in
Sucha Beskidzka, Austria-Hungary, not far >from Oswiecim (Auschwitz).
The family moved to Vienna in 1916. Later he enrolled at the University
of Vienna and graduated as journalist. In 1926 he went to Berlin,
the rest is History.

Until his death in March 2002 Billy Wilder lived in Los Angeles.
During his long career he won six Oscars, three for the best picture.

You can see the video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kebqj_grGC0

To read the speech go to : http://aaspeechesdb.oscars.org/link/060-23/

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro yvonne.stern17@gmail.com


KehilaLinks Project Report for December 2016 #germany

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a
valuable resource for future generations of their descendants:

Radun (Radin), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/radun.htm
~~~

Vasiliki (Vasilishok), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/vasiliski.htm
~~~

Voranava (Voronov), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/voronovo.htm
~~~

Ostryna (Astryna, Ostrin), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/ostryna.htm
~~~

Piatra Neamt (including Negulesti), Romania
Created by Merle Kastner
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer Greg Meyer
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Piatra_Neamt/
~~~

Rozhanka (Rozanka), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/rozanka.htm
~~~

Shchuchyn (Shtutchin, Scucyn), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/scucyn.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Huncovce (Hunsdorf, Unsdorf), Slovakia
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/huncovce/
~~~

Kesmarok (Kesmark), Slovakia
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kezmarok/

ORPHAN WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by people who are no longer able
to maintain them. We thank them for their past efforts and wish them luck
on their future endeavors.

Or by people who are no longer living. May their Memory be for a Blessing

The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Kopatkevichi (Kopatkevich), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kopatkevichi/
~~~

Rozdil (Rozdol) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Rozdol/Rozdol.htm
~~~

Tetiev, Ukraine
Created by Irwin B. Margiloff z"l
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/tetiev/tetiev.htm
~~~

Shchadryn (Shchedrin), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Scadryn/
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage please contact us at:
<bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


German SIG #Germany Billy Wilder [who had been a Jewish refugee from Austria in 1934 on the immigrant experience] #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

[Billy Wilder's films included "Some Like it Hot" and "One, Two, Three", a
Cold War satirical comedy set in 1960 Berlin. The latter is hard to find
but (I think) worth looking for.]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sKNGQ6flhk&t=344s

GerSIG friend Yvonne Stern often sends the Moderator links to Internet
content of possible interest to GerSIG readers. Moderator]

At the 1987 (60th) Academy Awards, Billy Wilder was awarded the
Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award. His memorable acceptance
speech expressed in a concise and witty manner the dramatic
situation of immigrants, [based on his own experience in 1934]
Date & Venue : April 11, 1988; Shrine Civic Auditorium, LA.

Wilder was Austrian. He was born Samuel Wilder on 22 June 1906 in
Sucha Beskidzka, Austria-Hungary, not far >from Oswiecim (Auschwitz).
The family moved to Vienna in 1916. Later he enrolled at the University
of Vienna and graduated as journalist. In 1926 he went to Berlin,
the rest is History.

Until his death in March 2002 Billy Wilder lived in Los Angeles.
During his long career he won six Oscars, three for the best picture.

You can see the video at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kebqj_grGC0

To read the speech go to : http://aaspeechesdb.oscars.org/link/060-23/

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro yvonne.stern17@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany KehilaLinks Project Report for December 2016 #germany

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a
valuable resource for future generations of their descendants:

Radun (Radin), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/radun.htm
~~~

Vasiliki (Vasilishok), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/vasiliski.htm
~~~

Voranava (Voronov), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/voronovo.htm
~~~

Ostryna (Astryna, Ostrin), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/ostryna.htm
~~~

Piatra Neamt (including Negulesti), Romania
Created by Merle Kastner
Webpage Design by KehilaLinks volunteer Greg Meyer
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Piatra_Neamt/
~~~

Rozhanka (Rozanka), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/rozanka.htm
~~~

Shchuchyn (Shtutchin, Scucyn), Belarus
Compiled by Ellen Sadove Renck
Webmaster: Irene Pupko Newhouse
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/scucyn.htm
~~~

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Huncovce (Hunsdorf, Unsdorf), Slovakia
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/huncovce/
~~~

Kesmarok (Kesmark), Slovakia
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kezmarok/

ORPHAN WEBPAGES

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by people who are no longer able
to maintain them. We thank them for their past efforts and wish them luck
on their future endeavors.

Or by people who are no longer living. May their Memory be for a Blessing

The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Kopatkevichi (Kopatkevich), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kopatkevichi/
~~~

Rozdil (Rozdol) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Rozdol/Rozdol.htm
~~~

Tetiev, Ukraine
Created by Irwin B. Margiloff z"l
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/tetiev/tetiev.htm
~~~

Shchadryn (Shchedrin), Belarus
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Scadryn/
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage please contact us at:
<bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator

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