Date   

Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Jan. 22, 2017, meeting: "Genealogy is Easy, Fascinating, and Fun: How I Found the Feldmans" #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

"Genealogy is Easy, Fascinating, and Fun: How I Found the Feldmans" will be
the topic of a presentation by amateur genealogist Steven Flack at the Sunday,
Jan. 22, 2017, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. His
presentation will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road,
Northbrook, Ill.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy research library
materials, get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions
before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information, visit
http://tinyurl.com/z4kk3gm
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - https://jgsoi.wildapricot.org/event-2344064 ]
or phone 312-666-0100.

In his presentation, Steven Flack, a mostly self-taught genealogist with only
four years of experience, will use his own genealogical journey to vividly
illustrate the techniques that can help both novice and experienced family
history researchers.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JGSGB Offers Expert Help on Research Sunday, Jan. 29 #general

Ellie Goldberg
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston offers expert help at JGSGB's
Research Sunday, January 29, 2:00 - 4:30 pm at Temple Emanuel in Newton Centre.
(http://jgsgb.org/event/research-sunday-7/)

Experienced researchers, strategists and translators meet with members in 20
minute appointments and use JGSGB's extensive research collection of books and
maps.

JGSGB members need to make an appointment and specify the language, skill or
task they are interested in at http://jgsgb.org/event/research-sunday-7/ .
New members may join online or at the door.
Membership info: http://jgsgb.org/join/

Success stories: "I translated a Polish birth record." "I found a photo of my
great grandparents' graves." "I figured out when my grandparents arrived at
Ellis Island." "I learned that the person in a photo is my grandfather's
brother." "Translating the writing on the back of pictures identified relatives."
"I learned how to find census records and get naturalization applications." "I
learned how to get a certificate of arrival and how to get a low cost birth
certificate >from NY." "I found the dates of my great grandparents' deaths."

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB) is dedicated to
helping people discover and research their Jewish family history. JGSGB welcomes
beginners and has expert members with a broad range of skills in various
research techniques who are happy to help others.

Register for the eight-week course "Jewish Genealogy: Discover Your Family
History" starting March 1. (http://jgsgb.org/course).

For more information on programs and events, special interest groups
(SIGs), expert help, resources and membership go to jgsgb.org.

Ellie Goldberg, Newton, MA
goldberg@...
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgboston/
JGSGB events and blog on JewishBoston.com
http://www.jewishboston.com/organization/jewish-genealogical-society-of-greater-boston/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/xqV9eM ]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois Jan. 22, 2017, meeting: "Genealogy is Easy, Fascinating, and Fun: How I Found the Feldmans" #general

News Releases JGSI-Events <jgsi-events@...>
 

"Genealogy is Easy, Fascinating, and Fun: How I Found the Feldmans" will be
the topic of a presentation by amateur genealogist Steven Flack at the Sunday,
Jan. 22, 2017, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. His
presentation will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road,
Northbrook, Ill.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. to
accommodate those who want to use or borrow genealogy research library
materials, get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions
before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information, visit
http://tinyurl.com/z4kk3gm
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - https://jgsoi.wildapricot.org/event-2344064 ]
or phone 312-666-0100.

In his presentation, Steven Flack, a mostly self-taught genealogist with only
four years of experience, will use his own genealogical journey to vividly
illustrate the techniques that can help both novice and experienced family
history researchers.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGB Offers Expert Help on Research Sunday, Jan. 29 #general

Ellie Goldberg
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston offers expert help at JGSGB's
Research Sunday, January 29, 2:00 - 4:30 pm at Temple Emanuel in Newton Centre.
(http://jgsgb.org/event/research-sunday-7/)

Experienced researchers, strategists and translators meet with members in 20
minute appointments and use JGSGB's extensive research collection of books and
maps.

JGSGB members need to make an appointment and specify the language, skill or
task they are interested in at http://jgsgb.org/event/research-sunday-7/ .
New members may join online or at the door.
Membership info: http://jgsgb.org/join/

Success stories: "I translated a Polish birth record." "I found a photo of my
great grandparents' graves." "I figured out when my grandparents arrived at
Ellis Island." "I learned that the person in a photo is my grandfather's
brother." "Translating the writing on the back of pictures identified relatives."
"I learned how to find census records and get naturalization applications." "I
learned how to get a certificate of arrival and how to get a low cost birth
certificate >from NY." "I found the dates of my great grandparents' deaths."

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB) is dedicated to
helping people discover and research their Jewish family history. JGSGB welcomes
beginners and has expert members with a broad range of skills in various
research techniques who are happy to help others.

Register for the eight-week course "Jewish Genealogy: Discover Your Family
History" starting March 1. (http://jgsgb.org/course).

For more information on programs and events, special interest groups
(SIGs), expert help, resources and membership go to jgsgb.org.

Ellie Goldberg, Newton, MA
goldberg@...
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/jgsgboston/
JGSGB events and blog on JewishBoston.com
http://www.jewishboston.com/organization/jewish-genealogical-society-of-greater-boston/
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/xqV9eM ]


1922 Kaunas Census ! #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

The Kaunas 1922 census has now been purchased by the Kaunas District
Research Group.

We are now in the process of raising funds for the translation of this
incredible material, which is in Lithuanian, Russian and Yiddish.
This census contains the address on one page, and the family list with
age, occupation, citizenship on another. As well, there are pages with
information about the apartment itself as this was a census of
apartments so there is information about heating, water supply etc.

Fortunately, it is very obvious which people were Jewish as there is
a nationality column. We will be treating this as a family list and
using the revision list template.

If you are interested in this project and are not a part of the Kaunas
District Research Group, please drop me a line.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas District Research Group
salinger@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania 1922 Kaunas Census ! #lithuania

Salinger Ralph
 

The Kaunas 1922 census has now been purchased by the Kaunas District
Research Group.

We are now in the process of raising funds for the translation of this
incredible material, which is in Lithuanian, Russian and Yiddish.
This census contains the address on one page, and the family list with
age, occupation, citizenship on another. As well, there are pages with
information about the apartment itself as this was a census of
apartments so there is information about heating, water supply etc.

Fortunately, it is very obvious which people were Jewish as there is
a nationality column. We will be treating this as a family list and
using the revision list template.

If you are interested in this project and are not a part of the Kaunas
District Research Group, please drop me a line.

Ralph Salinger
Coordinator Kaunas District Research Group
salinger@...


1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and the
large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@...


JRI Poland #Poland 1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and the
large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@...


1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and
the large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@...


Polish death certificates 1919 #galicia

Jessica Skippon <jskippon@...>
 

A year or two ago there was mention of Poland changing the rule about
death certificates being closed for 100 years. Today I have done a
general search but found nothing to indicate this has happened.

My great-grandmother, Fani BIRN died 16th March 1919, but the place is
unknown. I haven't found her birth (BORGER) or either marriage
(SCHANZER or BIRN) but she lived most of her life in Andrychau and
Bielsko Biala. Several years ago I checked both record offices but came
up empty-handed. (Perhaps this was due to the 100 year rule, but the
person with me didn't say that was the reason). My mother and uncle
both said they'd never heard that she lived anywhere else. But she is
not buried in the Jewish cemeteries in Bielsko or Andrychau, where I
have personally searched. A second Jewish cemetery in Bielsko was
cleared after WWII to build a housing estate.

Two sons lived in Berlin, but but she did not show up on the Berlin index.

A daughter, Babette JACHZEL lived for a while in Gilowice , and then
perhaps moved to Mistelbach, Austria, where her sons were. Fani is not
buried in the Jewish cemetery there.

She was a widow after her first marriage to Raphael BIRN, then she
married Viktor SCHANZER and they divorced within four years. She r
everted to using BIRN and there is no evidence of her using any other
name.

So it seems back to waiting for the 100 years to pass (2020, I guess).
Does anyone know differently, or can suggest another avenue?

Jessica Skippon
London, England

searching in Galicia: SCHANZER, BORGER, BIRN, JACHZEL,
GLUCKSMAN, WALDNER, KRIEGER
Austria: WIMMER, KASTNER, HACKLER


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia 1854 Cadastral Map of Narol in the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room: A complete full-color lithographed
1854 cadastral map of Narol, today in southeastern Poland:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/narol-1854/

Despite its small size, the town of Narol had a significant Jewish
presence, evidenced in the map by the marked masonry synagogue and
the large Jewish cemetery. In 1854, the town was neatly concentrated
around a compact and orderly square, with a few other houses scattered
among fields around the Jewish cemetery, and a mill downstream of town
on the Tanew River. Land and building parcel numbers are noted
throughout the map, making the beautiful map a useful historical and
genealogical resource as well.

Images for this map were provided to Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum
Panstwowe w Przemyslu:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Lviv, Ukraine
maps@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polish death certificates 1919 #galicia

Jessica Skippon <jskippon@...>
 

A year or two ago there was mention of Poland changing the rule about
death certificates being closed for 100 years. Today I have done a
general search but found nothing to indicate this has happened.

My great-grandmother, Fani BIRN died 16th March 1919, but the place is
unknown. I haven't found her birth (BORGER) or either marriage
(SCHANZER or BIRN) but she lived most of her life in Andrychau and
Bielsko Biala. Several years ago I checked both record offices but came
up empty-handed. (Perhaps this was due to the 100 year rule, but the
person with me didn't say that was the reason). My mother and uncle
both said they'd never heard that she lived anywhere else. But she is
not buried in the Jewish cemeteries in Bielsko or Andrychau, where I
have personally searched. A second Jewish cemetery in Bielsko was
cleared after WWII to build a housing estate.

Two sons lived in Berlin, but but she did not show up on the Berlin index.

A daughter, Babette JACHZEL lived for a while in Gilowice , and then
perhaps moved to Mistelbach, Austria, where her sons were. Fani is not
buried in the Jewish cemetery there.

She was a widow after her first marriage to Raphael BIRN, then she
married Viktor SCHANZER and they divorced within four years. She r
everted to using BIRN and there is no evidence of her using any other
name.

So it seems back to waiting for the 100 years to pass (2020, I guess).
Does anyone know differently, or can suggest another avenue?

Jessica Skippon
London, England

searching in Galicia: SCHANZER, BORGER, BIRN, JACHZEL,
GLUCKSMAN, WALDNER, KRIEGER
Austria: WIMMER, KASTNER, HACKLER


Re: Visa Free Travel To Belarus #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

Please, also note that you must also fly out of Belarus, rather than
take a bus or train out.

However, even with this in mind, quite a few things have gotten simpler.

Andrei Burdenkov


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Visa Free Travel To Belarus #belarus

Andrei Burdenkov <andrei.burdenkov@...>
 

Please, also note that you must also fly out of Belarus, rather than
take a bus or train out.

However, even with this in mind, quite a few things have gotten simpler.

Andrei Burdenkov


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #general

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #general

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


Re: Wrong information on census records #general

Roger Lustig
 

Tammy:

To understand censuses, imagine the process of taking them. You don't
necessarily know who provided the information for the family. You don't
know what they might have been afraid of, or wanted to ignore in their
past. For that matter, you don't know what they *remembered* about their
past. People in those days didn't necessarily know their own dates of birth.

Now consider the census-takers. They may have spoken the language of the
residents, but perhaps they could only communicate directly with the
children who were growing up with the new language. They couldn't ask
for documentation, and had enough to do just getting to every door when
someone was at home and then copying the information they'd gathered
into the sheets we know today.

There were thousands of reasons, I'm sure, for fudging one's history on
the census. Some called themselves "German" when the German Jews of New
York tended to look down on their eastern co-religionists. Others,
having fled the Czar's army, used the names they'd used for cover--so 4
brothers might have 4 surnames. Still others simply didn't want to be
identified as members of their family any more. I've worked on a case of
this sort, and the fictions they told the census takers would take your
breath away. Most of these efforts were pointless--ever heard of anyone
arrested for fudging their census responses?

For that matter, try tracking several families through multiple
censuses. Then calculate the percentage of the time that family members
were reported as aging 10 years (or 5 in New York) between censuses.

As with any other document, you're best off approaching it as a piece of
paper with markings on it and going on >from there. Assume nothing unless
not assuming it would be absurd.

Tina Fey's Saturday Night Live census-taker sketch with Betty White is
actually something to keep in mind. I take no responsibility if it hurts
when you laugh.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2017 6:42 PM, Tammy Weingarten tasu1@... wrote:
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a
census record. I have recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband,
wife and 6 of 7 children) are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration
record states she was a widow at that time. In the son's 1918 WWI draft record,
he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record lists the
son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which
provides his mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's
name. >from that information I found a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his
father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly. So, two records
indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he
was not present for the census taker to get that information. I don't know what
to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another
state. His wife and child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number
of years after his move. Yet, I found a 1930 census record that matches the
names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the original home state. The
ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The only
thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a
plumber, when in fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife
lists herself and her daughter without the ex husband's name, but states
herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not common. It is hard to
believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to
how to handle that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced
something similar.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wrong information on census records #general

Roger Lustig
 

Tammy:

To understand censuses, imagine the process of taking them. You don't
necessarily know who provided the information for the family. You don't
know what they might have been afraid of, or wanted to ignore in their
past. For that matter, you don't know what they *remembered* about their
past. People in those days didn't necessarily know their own dates of birth.

Now consider the census-takers. They may have spoken the language of the
residents, but perhaps they could only communicate directly with the
children who were growing up with the new language. They couldn't ask
for documentation, and had enough to do just getting to every door when
someone was at home and then copying the information they'd gathered
into the sheets we know today.

There were thousands of reasons, I'm sure, for fudging one's history on
the census. Some called themselves "German" when the German Jews of New
York tended to look down on their eastern co-religionists. Others,
having fled the Czar's army, used the names they'd used for cover--so 4
brothers might have 4 surnames. Still others simply didn't want to be
identified as members of their family any more. I've worked on a case of
this sort, and the fictions they told the census takers would take your
breath away. Most of these efforts were pointless--ever heard of anyone
arrested for fudging their census responses?

For that matter, try tracking several families through multiple
censuses. Then calculate the percentage of the time that family members
were reported as aging 10 years (or 5 in New York) between censuses.

As with any other document, you're best off approaching it as a piece of
paper with markings on it and going on >from there. Assume nothing unless
not assuming it would be absurd.

Tina Fey's Saturday Night Live census-taker sketch with Betty White is
actually something to keep in mind. I take no responsibility if it hurts
when you laugh.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 1/15/2017 6:42 PM, Tammy Weingarten tasu1@... wrote:
I am wondering if anyone else has encountered misinformation presented on a
census record. I have recently encountered two scenarios.

The first is a 1915 New York State Census in which the entire family (husband,
wife and 6 of 7 children) are listed. However, the wife's 1911 immigration
record states she was a widow at that time. In the son's 1918 WWI draft record,
he only mentions his mother's name and address. This WWI draft record lists the
son's birth date which is an exact match to his Bessarabian birth record, which
provides his mother and father's names as well as his paternal grandfather's
name. >from that information I found a 1910 Bessarabian death record for his
father which matches the names on the birth record, exactly. So, two records
indicate that the husband died before the family came to the US. The 1915 census
record is also odd in that the father's age is not listed. It's almost as if he
was not present for the census taker to get that information. I don't know what
to do with the 1915 Census.

The second scenario is for a divorced couple. The husband moved to another
state. His wife and child stayed behind. He divorced his wife in 1920, a number
of years after his move. Yet, I found a 1930 census record that matches the
names and ages of both the ex-wife and daughter in the original home state. The
ex-husband is listed there as the husband and his age matches, too. The only
thing that does not match is the husband's occupation. He is listed as a
plumber, when in fact, he was a sewing machine salesman. In 1940, the ex wife
lists herself and her daughter without the ex husband's name, but states
herself as married, not divorced. The surname is not common. It is hard to
believe that there could be two different families with the same surname and
same given names and ages for 3 people.

What have other researchers experienced and does anyone have suggestions as to
how to handle that information?

I would greatly appreciate input >from other researchers who have experienced
something similar.


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #ukraine

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine ViewMate translation request - Yiddish postcard #ukraine

Joe Lewis
 

I've posted the back of a postcard written in Yiddish (I believe) for
which I would appreciate a translation. The card is a New Year
greeting sent in the early 1900's >from the ZIDENBERG family to the
LEWINSKY family (those families are my great-great grandparents).

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM52851

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much,
Joe Lewis
Los Angeles, CA

Searching: LEWINSKY, ZIDENBERG (Ekaterinoslav),
KRICHEVSKY, VOLINSKY, WOLINSKY, (Zolotonosha),
SCHARNOFSKY, RUBCHINSKY (Belilovka)
GOFFMAN, BRAVERMAN (Korosten)

71441 - 71460 of 669739