Date   

More Concentration camp info #general

Paul Czerniejewski <ypekia1@...>
 

I recently searched and found my family names listed in Dachau Concentration
camp. Is there anyway of finding photos or more information on these
individuals?? Thanks for your help.

Paul Czerniejewski

MODERATOR NOTE: We are sure JewishGen Discussion Group participants will have good
suggestions. Do make sure to check out the JewishGen InfoFiles for "Holocaust."
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Holocaust


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More Concentration camp info #general

Paul Czerniejewski <ypekia1@...>
 

I recently searched and found my family names listed in Dachau Concentration
camp. Is there anyway of finding photos or more information on these
individuals?? Thanks for your help.

Paul Czerniejewski

MODERATOR NOTE: We are sure JewishGen Discussion Group participants will have good
suggestions. Do make sure to check out the JewishGen InfoFiles for "Holocaust."
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/#Holocaust


ViewMate translation requests - Yiddish and German #general

Martha Neuman <mneuman3@...>
 

I've posted two letters on ViewMate for which I am hoping to find
translation. Each letter has two pages, a front and back. The first
letter is in both German and Yiddish. The second letter is in German,
I think. The links are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53139

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53140

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53141

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53142

Please respond via the form provided in ViewMate.

I am very grateful for what help anyone can provide.

Martha Neuman

MODERATOR NOTE: If one ever has questions about ViewMate or how to post messages
on this or other JewishGen SIG discussion groups, please first check the ViewMate
page or discussion group pages for instructions. Instructions on how to post
messages for each discussion forum is included at the end of each daily digest.
If one's questions are not answered, contact support@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation requests - Yiddish and German #general

Martha Neuman <mneuman3@...>
 

I've posted two letters on ViewMate for which I am hoping to find
translation. Each letter has two pages, a front and back. The first
letter is in both German and Yiddish. The second letter is in German,
I think. The links are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53139

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53140

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53141

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53142

Please respond via the form provided in ViewMate.

I am very grateful for what help anyone can provide.

Martha Neuman

MODERATOR NOTE: If one ever has questions about ViewMate or how to post messages
on this or other JewishGen SIG discussion groups, please first check the ViewMate
page or discussion group pages for instructions. Instructions on how to post
messages for each discussion forum is included at the end of each daily digest.
If one's questions are not answered, contact support@jewishgen.org


Three very interesting 1875 lists translated for Lida and Vasilishki (in the Lida District) #general

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I'm delighted to let you know that we've translated three very interesting
1875 Lists of Men >from the Lida District.

Two are >from Lida town <LID_LID_1_1875_men> (595 individuals) and
<LID_LID_2_1875_men> (679 individals), and one >from Vasilishki
<LID_VAS_1875_men> (1,873 individuals). Despite the names of these files,
they contain many people who are either residing or are registered in Lida
District towns other than Lida and Vasilishki.

<LID_LID_1> is divided by the streets on which people lived -- look for the
orange-highlighted rows with "Novy Gorod Street," "near the Pharmacy" and
other information about a family's location in Lida. This file also contains
some physical descriptions and ages.

There is a surname list for these files at the bottom of our site's homepage
(https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com), under Surname Lists.

While these files will eventually be publicly searchable in the LitvakSIG
All-Lithuania Database and the JewishGen Belarus Database, they are currently
available only to participants in the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group, a qualifying
contribution of $100 to LitvakSIG will guarantee you access to Excel Files
of all translations -- new and old -- of Lida District records through December
31, 2021.

To contribute, please go to:
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and choose Lida District.

Your contribution will not only provide you access to these files, it will help
us translate the 1905 Family Lists for Lida town, Orlya, Radun and Shchuchin.
And because we have been able to obtain a matching grant, everything you
contribute will be doubled and help us reach our goal twice as fast!

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Three very interesting 1875 lists translated for Lida and Vasilishki (in the Lida District) #general

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I'm delighted to let you know that we've translated three very interesting
1875 Lists of Men >from the Lida District.

Two are >from Lida town <LID_LID_1_1875_men> (595 individuals) and
<LID_LID_2_1875_men> (679 individals), and one >from Vasilishki
<LID_VAS_1875_men> (1,873 individuals). Despite the names of these files,
they contain many people who are either residing or are registered in Lida
District towns other than Lida and Vasilishki.

<LID_LID_1> is divided by the streets on which people lived -- look for the
orange-highlighted rows with "Novy Gorod Street," "near the Pharmacy" and
other information about a family's location in Lida. This file also contains
some physical descriptions and ages.

There is a surname list for these files at the bottom of our site's homepage
(https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com), under Surname Lists.

While these files will eventually be publicly searchable in the LitvakSIG
All-Lithuania Database and the JewishGen Belarus Database, they are currently
available only to participants in the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group, a qualifying
contribution of $100 to LitvakSIG will guarantee you access to Excel Files
of all translations -- new and old -- of Lida District records through December
31, 2021.

To contribute, please go to:
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and choose Lida District.

Your contribution will not only provide you access to these files, it will help
us translate the 1905 Family Lists for Lida town, Orlya, Radun and Shchuchin.
And because we have been able to obtain a matching grant, everything you
contribute will be doubled and help us reach our goal twice as fast!

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@aol.com


Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

Susan J. Gordon
 

When I visited my long-estranged father shortly before his death, I asked
him where his immigrant father had come from. He said, "Polanyu" - which
sounded like "Po - lan - nyu." But I have been unable to locate this name as
a town, village or anything else in Galicia, Poland or elsewhere. Also, I'm
pretty sure his family name was "DAYAN," but it was Anglicized in the US.
Any suggestions? Thanks for your help!

Susan Gordon, New York.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Have you heard of Polanyu? #general

Susan J. Gordon
 

When I visited my long-estranged father shortly before his death, I asked
him where his immigrant father had come from. He said, "Polanyu" - which
sounded like "Po - lan - nyu." But I have been unable to locate this name as
a town, village or anything else in Galicia, Poland or elsewhere. Also, I'm
pretty sure his family name was "DAYAN," but it was Anglicized in the US.
Any suggestions? Thanks for your help!

Susan Gordon, New York.


Success Story #general

msalzbank
 

Dear Geners

I want to share a success story that hopefully encourage those who
feel they hit a "dead end". My surname, SALZBANK, is not common at
all. I always felt it was changed at Ellis Island, but long ago, I saw
that it was the name in Galicia.

Using JRI-Poland I discovered a couple of names, Salzbank as well as
my grandfather, Moshe (Morris Salzbank). Neither my father or my uncle
were overly interested in the genealogy and they heard that my
grandfather may have had a sister living in Israel.

For years the search on JRI-Poland pulled the same 3 or 4 names...a
sister who died at 2 years old... but that was it... Just about a year
ago, I did the name search again and this time the marriage record of
Peril in 1909 came up. No doubt she was the sister. Success #1.

Unfortunately, there was no more information other than her husband's
name and his parents... my search on Ancestry came up with no leads...
here in the U.S. or in Israel. I have very little to go on.

**Today**, I see a hint on Ancestry and it is a hint to the marriage
record that I had discovered...why was someone else looking at it?
To my surprise and delight, someone else found this record and
attached it his tree and when I searched his tree I see all of these
living relatives of Peril & Shlomo (indeed in Israel). I have begun to
search and reach out.

Ya, never know... how mysteriously "dead ends" open up

Michael Salzbank


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success Story #general

msalzbank
 

Dear Geners

I want to share a success story that hopefully encourage those who
feel they hit a "dead end". My surname, SALZBANK, is not common at
all. I always felt it was changed at Ellis Island, but long ago, I saw
that it was the name in Galicia.

Using JRI-Poland I discovered a couple of names, Salzbank as well as
my grandfather, Moshe (Morris Salzbank). Neither my father or my uncle
were overly interested in the genealogy and they heard that my
grandfather may have had a sister living in Israel.

For years the search on JRI-Poland pulled the same 3 or 4 names...a
sister who died at 2 years old... but that was it... Just about a year
ago, I did the name search again and this time the marriage record of
Peril in 1909 came up. No doubt she was the sister. Success #1.

Unfortunately, there was no more information other than her husband's
name and his parents... my search on Ancestry came up with no leads...
here in the U.S. or in Israel. I have very little to go on.

**Today**, I see a hint on Ancestry and it is a hint to the marriage
record that I had discovered...why was someone else looking at it?
To my surprise and delight, someone else found this record and
attached it his tree and when I searched his tree I see all of these
living relatives of Peril & Shlomo (indeed in Israel). I have begun to
search and reach out.

Ya, never know... how mysteriously "dead ends" open up

Michael Salzbank


(Canada) Ontario-McMaster University New Virtual Museum of the Holocaust and Resistance #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario created a virtual museum to aid the
public and scholars better understand the Holocaust and resistance movements
of World War ll. It is called the Madeleine and Monte Levy Virtual Museum
of the Holocaust and the Resistance. The museum uses concentration camp
letters, first-hand accounts, images, videos and more to place the Holocaust
and the underground resistance within the overall context of World War ll.

The exhibit has five modules: German Concentration Camps and Prisons;
Jewish Underground Resistance collection; Underground Resistance in Europe;
and Twin Drivers of Nazi Culture. The modules about concentration camps and
Jewish resistance include case studies about individuals and groups who
experienced the Holocaust. There are also links in the Resources section
with links to German Concentration Camps and prisons, Jewish underground
resistance---all free to access.

The Jewish Underground Resistance 1929-1945 was compiled by the late David
Diamant, Polish born, who immigrated to France in the 1920s and where he
remained until his death in 1994. The collection was gathered over a period
of 30 years primarily dealing with the Jewish segment of the French
resistance. Most documents are in French, some in Yiddish and there are
some that deal with Polish groups.

To access the website go to:
http://library.mcmaster.ca/archives/virtualmuseum/. Once on the website
click on the door and it will open to the introduction and the various
modules have links on the left side of the window.

Thank you to Gail Dever and her blog, Genealogy a la carte, for informing
us about this new virtual museum.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Canada) Ontario-McMaster University New Virtual Museum of the Holocaust and Resistance #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario created a virtual museum to aid the
public and scholars better understand the Holocaust and resistance movements
of World War ll. It is called the Madeleine and Monte Levy Virtual Museum
of the Holocaust and the Resistance. The museum uses concentration camp
letters, first-hand accounts, images, videos and more to place the Holocaust
and the underground resistance within the overall context of World War ll.

The exhibit has five modules: German Concentration Camps and Prisons;
Jewish Underground Resistance collection; Underground Resistance in Europe;
and Twin Drivers of Nazi Culture. The modules about concentration camps and
Jewish resistance include case studies about individuals and groups who
experienced the Holocaust. There are also links in the Resources section
with links to German Concentration Camps and prisons, Jewish underground
resistance---all free to access.

The Jewish Underground Resistance 1929-1945 was compiled by the late David
Diamant, Polish born, who immigrated to France in the 1920s and where he
remained until his death in 1994. The collection was gathered over a period
of 30 years primarily dealing with the Jewish segment of the French
resistance. Most documents are in French, some in Yiddish and there are
some that deal with Polish groups.

To access the website go to:
http://library.mcmaster.ca/archives/virtualmuseum/. Once on the website
click on the door and it will open to the introduction and the various
modules have links on the left side of the window.

Thank you to Gail Dever and her blog, Genealogy a la carte, for informing
us about this new virtual museum.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Ode to Finchleystrasse, Cosmos [sic] restaurant in NW London in the early 1940s : actually Cosmo #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aajacobus@...>
 

For those of us who were around in NW London during the war - this area was
known as British West Hampstead.

The Viennese never lost there love of their home town and the lovely old
friend who until he died last year only read books in German although he left
Vienna as a young teenager.
Sad.

Aubrey Jacobus
London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ode to Finchleystrasse, Cosmos [sic] restaurant in NW London in the early 1940s : actually Cosmo #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aajacobus@...>
 

For those of us who were around in NW London during the war - this area was
known as British West Hampstead.

The Viennese never lost there love of their home town and the lovely old
friend who until he died last year only read books in German although he left
Vienna as a young teenager.
Sad.

Aubrey Jacobus
London


(Canada) Ontario-McMaster University New Virtual Museum of the Holocaust and Resistance #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario created a virtual museum to aid
the public and scholars better understand the Holocaust and resistance
movements of World War ll. It is called the Madeleine and Monte Levy Virtual
Museum of the Holocaust and the Resistance. The museum uses concentration
camp letters, first-hand accounts, images, videos and more to place the
Holocaust and the underground resistance within the overall context of
World War ll.

The exhibit has five modules: German Concentration Camps and Prisons;
Jewish Underground Resistance collection; Underground Resistance in
Europe;and Twin Drivers of Nazi Culture. The modules about concentration
camps and Jewish resistance include case studies about individuals and groups
who experienced the Holocaust. There are also links in the Resources section
with links to German Concentration Camps and prisons, Jewish underground
resistance---all free to access.

The Jewish Underground Resistance 1929-1945 was compiled by the late
David Diamant, Polish born, who immigrated to France in the 1920s and where
he remained until his death in 1994. The collection was gathered over a
period of 30 years primarily dealing with the Jewish segment of the French
resistance. Most documents are in French, some in Yiddish and there are
some that deal with Polish groups.

To access the website go to:
http://library.mcmaster.ca/archives/virtualmuseum/. Once on the website
click on the door and it will open to the introduction and the various
modules have links on the left side of the window.

Thank you to Gail Dever and her blog, Genealogy a la carte, for
informing us about this new virtual museum.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


French SIG #France (Canada) Ontario-McMaster University New Virtual Museum of the Holocaust and Resistance #france

Jan Meisels Allen
 

McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario created a virtual museum to aid
the public and scholars better understand the Holocaust and resistance
movements of World War ll. It is called the Madeleine and Monte Levy Virtual
Museum of the Holocaust and the Resistance. The museum uses concentration
camp letters, first-hand accounts, images, videos and more to place the
Holocaust and the underground resistance within the overall context of
World War ll.

The exhibit has five modules: German Concentration Camps and Prisons;
Jewish Underground Resistance collection; Underground Resistance in
Europe;and Twin Drivers of Nazi Culture. The modules about concentration
camps and Jewish resistance include case studies about individuals and groups
who experienced the Holocaust. There are also links in the Resources section
with links to German Concentration Camps and prisons, Jewish underground
resistance---all free to access.

The Jewish Underground Resistance 1929-1945 was compiled by the late
David Diamant, Polish born, who immigrated to France in the 1920s and where
he remained until his death in 1994. The collection was gathered over a
period of 30 years primarily dealing with the Jewish segment of the French
resistance. Most documents are in French, some in Yiddish and there are
some that deal with Polish groups.

To access the website go to:
http://library.mcmaster.ca/archives/virtualmuseum/. Once on the website
click on the door and it will open to the introduction and the various
modules have links on the left side of the window.

Thank you to Gail Dever and her blog, Genealogy a la carte, for
informing us about this new virtual museum.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Russian memorial books ("kniga pamyati") #lodz #poland

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Last week, I posted a question (well, several questions really) asking
whether anyone knows how or where I can search for information about
my family who fled >from Poland into the Soviet Union during WWII, and
in particular about my grandfather who volunteered to fight with the
Red Army, probably >from Simferopol in the Crimea, and was killed in
mid- to late 1941. I received several helpful suggestions that I am
following up, but today I want to focus on Mel Comisarow's informative
post about printed Russian memorial books, "kniga pamyati," which list
slain Red Army soldiers. Mel wrote that there is a four-volume
memorial book specifically listing Jewish Red Army soldiers, and some
200 other books based on region.

It was my understanding that the Jewish book forms the basis of
Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory http://jmemory.org/
and that the regional books form the basis of the Russian Defense
Ministry's OBD memorial website
( http://www.obd-memorial.ru/html/index.html ), both of which sites I
have already searched in the past, without finding anything matching
my grandfather. This week, I found a website specific for the Crimea
( http://rk-memory.ru/ ) and searched that too, once again fruitlessly.
(I should point out that these sites are in Russian only, which I
don't speak, and using online translations and virtual keyboards to
painstakingly type in Cyrillic letters in various combinations for
searches and then going through results has been like pulling teeth!)

But I don't know if my understanding that these websites are based on
the printed books is correct. And even if it is, I don't how many of
the printed books are actually covered in the websites, or if all the
contents of a book that is in the website are included. Can anyone
shed any light on this subject? How much of a correlation is there
between the printed books and the websites? And if the websites don't
cover all the printed books or all their contents, are they adding
content as time goes on, or staying as they are? Any information would
be most appreciated and I'm sure would be useful for quite a few
people.

Thanking you in advance,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Isael.


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Russian memorial books ("kniga pamyati") #poland #lodz

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Last week, I posted a question (well, several questions really) asking
whether anyone knows how or where I can search for information about
my family who fled >from Poland into the Soviet Union during WWII, and
in particular about my grandfather who volunteered to fight with the
Red Army, probably >from Simferopol in the Crimea, and was killed in
mid- to late 1941. I received several helpful suggestions that I am
following up, but today I want to focus on Mel Comisarow's informative
post about printed Russian memorial books, "kniga pamyati," which list
slain Red Army soldiers. Mel wrote that there is a four-volume
memorial book specifically listing Jewish Red Army soldiers, and some
200 other books based on region.

It was my understanding that the Jewish book forms the basis of
Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory http://jmemory.org/
and that the regional books form the basis of the Russian Defense
Ministry's OBD memorial website
( http://www.obd-memorial.ru/html/index.html ), both of which sites I
have already searched in the past, without finding anything matching
my grandfather. This week, I found a website specific for the Crimea
( http://rk-memory.ru/ ) and searched that too, once again fruitlessly.
(I should point out that these sites are in Russian only, which I
don't speak, and using online translations and virtual keyboards to
painstakingly type in Cyrillic letters in various combinations for
searches and then going through results has been like pulling teeth!)

But I don't know if my understanding that these websites are based on
the printed books is correct. And even if it is, I don't how many of
the printed books are actually covered in the websites, or if all the
contents of a book that is in the website are included. Can anyone
shed any light on this subject? How much of a correlation is there
between the printed books and the websites? And if the websites don't
cover all the printed books or all their contents, are they adding
content as time goes on, or staying as they are? Any information would
be most appreciated and I'm sure would be useful for quite a few
people.

Thanking you in advance,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Isael.


Three very interesting 1875 lists translated for Lida and Vasilishki (in the Lida District) #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I'm delighted to let you know that we've translated
three very interesting 1875 Lists of Men >from the Lida District.

Two are >from Lida town <LID_LID_1_1875_men> (595 individuals)
and <LID_LID_2_1875_men> (679 individals), and one from
Vasilishki <LID_VAS_1875_men> (1,873 individuals). Despite
the names of these files, they contain many people who are either
residing or are registered in Lida District towns other than Lida
and Vasilishki.

<LID_LID_1> is divided by the streets on which people lived --
look for the orange-highlighted rows with "Novy Gorod Street,"
"near the Pharmacy" and other information about a family's
location in Lida. This file also contains some physical descriptions
and ages.

There is a surname list for these files at the bottom of our site's
homepage (https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com), under Surname Lists.

While these files will eventually be publicly searchable in
the LitvakSIG All-Lithuania Database and the JewishGen
Belarus Database, they are currently available only to
participants in the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research
Group, a qualifying contribution of $100 to LitvakSIG
will guarantee you access to Excel Files of all translations
-- new and old -- of Lida District records through December
31, 2021.

To contribute, please go to:
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and
choose Lida District.

Your contribution will not only provide you access to these files,
it will help us translate the 1905 Family Lists for Lida town, Orlya,
Radun and Shchuchin. And because we have been able to
obtain a matching grant, everything you contribute will be
doubled and help us reach our goal twice as fast!

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Three very interesting 1875 lists translated for Lida and Vasilishki (in the Lida District) #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

Dear fellow Lida District researchers:

I'm delighted to let you know that we've translated
three very interesting 1875 Lists of Men >from the Lida District.

Two are >from Lida town <LID_LID_1_1875_men> (595 individuals)
and <LID_LID_2_1875_men> (679 individals), and one from
Vasilishki <LID_VAS_1875_men> (1,873 individuals). Despite
the names of these files, they contain many people who are either
residing or are registered in Lida District towns other than Lida
and Vasilishki.

<LID_LID_1> is divided by the streets on which people lived --
look for the orange-highlighted rows with "Novy Gorod Street,"
"near the Pharmacy" and other information about a family's
location in Lida. This file also contains some physical descriptions
and ages.

There is a surname list for these files at the bottom of our site's
homepage (https://lidadistrict.shutterfly.com), under Surname Lists.

While these files will eventually be publicly searchable in
the LitvakSIG All-Lithuania Database and the JewishGen
Belarus Database, they are currently available only to
participants in the LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group.

To become part of the LitvakSIG Lida District Research
Group, a qualifying contribution of $100 to LitvakSIG
will guarantee you access to Excel Files of all translations
-- new and old -- of Lida District records through December
31, 2021.

To contribute, please go to:
https://www.litvaksig.org/membership-and-contributions/join-and-contribute/
Click on "Research Groups for Districts and Gubernias" and
choose Lida District.

Your contribution will not only provide you access to these files,
it will help us translate the 1905 Family Lists for Lida town, Orlya,
Radun and Shchuchin. And because we have been able to
obtain a matching grant, everything you contribute will be
doubled and help us reach our goal twice as fast!

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group
JRBaston@aol.com

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