Date   

Litvak Presentation including Belarusian shtetls #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Please note that I will be giving a presentation titled:

Traces and Memories of Jewish Life
Connecting to our Litvak shtetls

This has been compiled >from my six visits to the region.

My collection of photos and stories showcases:
- the shtetl, where most South Africans originated
- the people on the ground memorialising the shtetl
- the Tolerance Education Centres in schools
- the use of online resources to advance one's own heritage
research

This includes the Belarusian Litvak towns of Grodno, Slonim, Novogrudok,
Mir, Brest and Vysokaye.

Where and When

- In Johannesburg at the RCHCC at the Great Park on Sunday 5 February at
7:30pm
- In Cape Town at the Nelson Mandela Auditorium at the Gardens Shul on
Wednesday 8 February at 7:30pm

For more details visit:

http://elirab.me/talks-in-south-africa/

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me


Belarus SIG #Belarus Litvak Presentation including Belarusian shtetls #belarus

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Please note that I will be giving a presentation titled:

Traces and Memories of Jewish Life
Connecting to our Litvak shtetls

This has been compiled >from my six visits to the region.

My collection of photos and stories showcases:
- the shtetl, where most South Africans originated
- the people on the ground memorialising the shtetl
- the Tolerance Education Centres in schools
- the use of online resources to advance one's own heritage
research

This includes the Belarusian Litvak towns of Grodno, Slonim, Novogrudok,
Mir, Brest and Vysokaye.

Where and When

- In Johannesburg at the RCHCC at the Great Park on Sunday 5 February at
7:30pm
- In Cape Town at the Nelson Mandela Auditorium at the Gardens Shul on
Wednesday 8 February at 7:30pm

For more details visit:

http://elirab.me/talks-in-south-africa/

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia
http://elirab.me


Rezina, Moldova website #general

Fran Cohen
 

Hi Everyone, I wanted to let you know that I am starting to do research for
a new website, Rezina Moldova. It is a work in progress. All members are
welcome to contribute photos, stories, articles, etc. I would greatly
appreciate anything that you can send in to help me out. You can send this
directly to my attention, Fran Cohen at @Fransc01.
Thank you in advance. Fran Cohen

MODERATOR NOTE: Fran's Rezina page will join the many others on JewishGen's
KehilaLinks site <http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rezina, Moldova website #general

Fran Cohen
 

Hi Everyone, I wanted to let you know that I am starting to do research for
a new website, Rezina Moldova. It is a work in progress. All members are
welcome to contribute photos, stories, articles, etc. I would greatly
appreciate anything that you can send in to help me out. You can send this
directly to my attention, Fran Cohen at @Fransc01.
Thank you in advance. Fran Cohen

MODERATOR NOTE: Fran's Rezina page will join the many others on JewishGen's
KehilaLinks site <http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/>.


Yizkor Book Project, January 2017 #france

bounce-3272832-772957@...
 

Shalom,

So, a new year begins and with it much ado in the Yizkor Book Project. Once
again, for instance, I am delighted to inform you that yet another two
projects were successfully completed during January and they were:

Pabianice, Poland (The Pabianice Book: A Memorial for a Community) and I
wish to send out my appreciation to Jack Ekstein who is President of the
Pabianice Landsmanshaft, Melbourne, Australia. This book, which is a
translation of the original Pabianice Yizkor book, was published by the
landsmanshaft in Melbourne and generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project
to our grateful benefit.

Zbarazh, Ukraine (Zbaraz: the Zbaraz Memorial Book), the complete
translation of which came about through the great support of David Schulman,
allowing this project to become a reality.

Just like a journey, a Yizkor Book project begins with an initial step, and
this last month the first step was taken in arranging the translation of the
Nyasvizh, Belarus Yizkor book by the setting up of a Translations Fund to
this end. These funds provide a convenient way for those interested in
supporting the translation of a particular community book. If you have a
book that you would like see translated, please contact me and I'll explain
the steps in setting up such a Translations Fund. Other than that, if you
would like to do a "mitzvah" by supporting the Nyasvizh Fund or any other of
our Translation Funds, please see the link to the list at the end of this
report.

Many of the entries added this last month came >from the various Pinkasei
Kehillot (Community Encyclopedias) which have unique information about
communities that often don't have their own Yizkor book. If there is a
community you are looking for that you are struggling to find information
about, please contact me and I can check and let you know if there is a
relevant section available and how an English translation can be arranged
for it.

Finally, I am pleased to announce that a new book, which was compiled by
William Leibner, has kindly provided for inclusion on our online "shelves".
The book "Brichah" enlightens us in regards the underground "Brichah"
movement which aided Holocaust survivors to clandestinely leave Europe after
WW2 - a fascinating piece of history.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project over January.

We have added in a new book:

- "Brichah" http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brichah/brichah.html

We have also added in 8 new entries:

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka,
New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/raf287.html

- Charsznica, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book, Charsznica and Ksiaz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Mie223.html

- Dolny Kubin, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo138.html

- Luninyets, Belarus (Memorial book of Luniniec / Kozhanhorodok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Luninyets/Luninyetsh.html [Hebrew]

- Piatek, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00201.html

- Plawno, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00203.html

- Praszka, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00204.html

- Velka Ida, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo182.html

We have continued to updated 21 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Bialystoker memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok1/Bialystok1.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chorzele, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Chorzel)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chorzele/Chorzele.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dobromil, Ukraine (Memorial book of Dobromil)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dobromil/Dobromil.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Lviv, Ukraine (Lwow Volume: Part I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lviv/lviv.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book, Charsznica and
Ksiaz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Pabianice, Poland (The Pabianice Book: A Memorial for a Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pabianice1/Pabianice1.html

- Pultusk, Poland (Pultusk memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pultusk/Pultusk.html

- Sarny, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Sarny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sarny/sarny.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Sekiryani, Bessarabia - alive and destroyed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sokyryany/Sokyryany.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Troki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/trakai/trakai.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tykocin/Tykocin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zbarazh, Ukraine (Zbaraz: the Zbaraz Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zbarazh/Zbarazh.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Project, January 2017 #france

bounce-3272832-772957@...
 

Shalom,

So, a new year begins and with it much ado in the Yizkor Book Project. Once
again, for instance, I am delighted to inform you that yet another two
projects were successfully completed during January and they were:

Pabianice, Poland (The Pabianice Book: A Memorial for a Community) and I
wish to send out my appreciation to Jack Ekstein who is President of the
Pabianice Landsmanshaft, Melbourne, Australia. This book, which is a
translation of the original Pabianice Yizkor book, was published by the
landsmanshaft in Melbourne and generously donated to the Yizkor Book Project
to our grateful benefit.

Zbarazh, Ukraine (Zbaraz: the Zbaraz Memorial Book), the complete
translation of which came about through the great support of David Schulman,
allowing this project to become a reality.

Just like a journey, a Yizkor Book project begins with an initial step, and
this last month the first step was taken in arranging the translation of the
Nyasvizh, Belarus Yizkor book by the setting up of a Translations Fund to
this end. These funds provide a convenient way for those interested in
supporting the translation of a particular community book. If you have a
book that you would like see translated, please contact me and I'll explain
the steps in setting up such a Translations Fund. Other than that, if you
would like to do a "mitzvah" by supporting the Nyasvizh Fund or any other of
our Translation Funds, please see the link to the list at the end of this
report.

Many of the entries added this last month came >from the various Pinkasei
Kehillot (Community Encyclopedias) which have unique information about
communities that often don't have their own Yizkor book. If there is a
community you are looking for that you are struggling to find information
about, please contact me and I can check and let you know if there is a
relevant section available and how an English translation can be arranged
for it.

Finally, I am pleased to announce that a new book, which was compiled by
William Leibner, has kindly provided for inclusion on our online "shelves".
The book "Brichah" enlightens us in regards the underground "Brichah"
movement which aided Holocaust survivors to clandestinely leave Europe after
WW2 - a fascinating piece of history.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried out
in the Yizkor Book Project over January.

We have added in a new book:

- "Brichah" http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brichah/brichah.html

We have also added in 8 new entries:

- Bol'shoy Zhelutsk, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka,
New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Rafalovka/raf287.html

- Charsznica, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book, Charsznica and Ksiaz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Mie223.html

- Dolny Kubin, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo138.html

- Luninyets, Belarus (Memorial book of Luniniec / Kozhanhorodok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Luninyets/Luninyetsh.html [Hebrew]

- Piatek, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00201.html

- Plawno, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00203.html

- Praszka, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol1_00204.html

- Velka Ida, Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/slo182.html

We have continued to updated 21 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The Bialystoker memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok1/Bialystok1.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chorzele, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Chorzel)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chorzele/Chorzele.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dobromil, Ukraine (Memorial book of Dobromil)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dobromil/Dobromil.html

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Lviv, Ukraine (Lwow Volume: Part I)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lviv/lviv.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book, Charsznica and
Ksiaz) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ozarow, Poland (Memories of Ozarow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ozarow/Ozarow.html

- Pabianice, Poland (The Pabianice Book: A Memorial for a Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pabianice1/Pabianice1.html

- Pultusk, Poland (Pultusk memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pultusk/Pultusk.html

- Sarny, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Sarny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sarny/sarny.html

- Sokyryany, Ukraine (Sekiryani, Bessarabia - alive and destroyed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sokyryany/Sokyryany.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Troki)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/trakai/trakai.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Tykocin/Tykocin.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

- Zbarazh, Ukraine (Zbaraz: the Zbaraz Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zbarazh/Zbarazh.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Pamiec.pl Auschwitz database #france

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

I tried out the database at

http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=3D2

and found some information I was looking for, but was rather disappointed overall.

One has to know the individual Nazi criminal's name in order to search the database,
and in very many cases the amount of information available is minimal: for example,
only that he served at Auschwitz for a few months in 1944 and in what rank. In a
number of cases, not even that information is available. Of course, that is likely
due to the destruction of archives towards the end of the war and later.

That having been said, the database is surely a good effort that required a great
deal of time and work. One has to be thankful for that.

Some easy improvements to the database might include the addition of search
functions for criteria such as the criminal's place of origin, sex, rank,
occupation, period of presence at Auschwitz, etc. One can hope that pamiec.pl
will see a way to make such improvements in the future.

All the best,

Rick Pinard, Prague


French SIG #France Pamiec.pl Auschwitz database #france

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

I tried out the database at

http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=3D2

and found some information I was looking for, but was rather disappointed overall.

One has to know the individual Nazi criminal's name in order to search the database,
and in very many cases the amount of information available is minimal: for example,
only that he served at Auschwitz for a few months in 1944 and in what rank. In a
number of cases, not even that information is available. Of course, that is likely
due to the destruction of archives towards the end of the war and later.

That having been said, the database is surely a good effort that required a great
deal of time and work. One has to be thankful for that.

Some easy improvements to the database might include the addition of search
functions for criteria such as the criminal's place of origin, sex, rank,
occupation, period of presence at Auschwitz, etc. One can hope that pamiec.pl
will see a way to make such improvements in the future.

All the best,

Rick Pinard, Prague


(Czech Republic) Constitutional Court Retains Archives Access to Nazi and Communist Era Documents #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On January 11, 2017 the Czech Republic Constitutional Court --ustavni soud
(US)-- ruled on the accessibility of archives >from the Nazi and Communist
eras. The ruling stated the information will remain unchanged, overturning a
proposal by the Czech Supreme Court which was against an exception for
historians to access documents >from the Nazi (1939-1945) and Communist
(1948-1989) era regimes. If researchers publish the information they must
take into account to protect personal data of a delicate nature. It is not
necessary to obtain the consent of living persons whose sensitive
information is in the documents. The Supreme Court asked the US judges
whether the legislation was in accordance with the "constitutional order".
Sensitive data relates to information on crime, health, sexuality, political
attitudes and religion.

Historians had expressed concerns that interfering with the archives law
would impede their work. For years Czech historians and researchers had
virtually unlimited access to the documents for the two periods mentioned
above. They had not needed permission >from the living whose sensitive
information were contained in the documents. The documents are those created
before January 1, 1990 regarding work of military courts and state
attorney's offices, courts, the National Front Communist umbrella
parliamentary organization, some archival documents of the German occupation
administration and the documents which were of public nature. According to
the director of Security Services Archives, the archive deal with up to
30,000 files each year-all with multiple names. If the US required the
names not to be released it would have paralyzed research.

The issue at hand emanated >from litigation brought by a man who believed he
was harmed by the archives revealing sensitive data >from his Communist
secret service StgB file to Czech television reporters. He demanded 30,000
Crowns. His claim was denied by the State. The Supreme court will now
decide if the issue brought by the man is bound by the US conclusions.

The US is a judicial body responsible for protecting the constitutionality
of the Czech Republic. It is composed of 15 presidentially appointed
justices who serve for 10 years.

To read more about this ruling see: http://tinyurl.com/js538ow
Original url:
http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/researchers-welcome-ruling-protecti
ng-access-to-historical-archives

For more information on the underlying case that brought this to the US see:
http://tinyurl.com/jpqgt22
Original url:
http://praguemonitor.com/2017/01/12/court-access-totalitarian-archives-data-
not-worsen

Thank you to Rose Feldman, Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA),
for sharing the information with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech (Czech Republic) Constitutional Court Retains Archives Access to Nazi and Communist Era Documents #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

On January 11, 2017 the Czech Republic Constitutional Court --ustavni soud
(US)-- ruled on the accessibility of archives >from the Nazi and Communist
eras. The ruling stated the information will remain unchanged, overturning a
proposal by the Czech Supreme Court which was against an exception for
historians to access documents >from the Nazi (1939-1945) and Communist
(1948-1989) era regimes. If researchers publish the information they must
take into account to protect personal data of a delicate nature. It is not
necessary to obtain the consent of living persons whose sensitive
information is in the documents. The Supreme Court asked the US judges
whether the legislation was in accordance with the "constitutional order".
Sensitive data relates to information on crime, health, sexuality, political
attitudes and religion.

Historians had expressed concerns that interfering with the archives law
would impede their work. For years Czech historians and researchers had
virtually unlimited access to the documents for the two periods mentioned
above. They had not needed permission >from the living whose sensitive
information were contained in the documents. The documents are those created
before January 1, 1990 regarding work of military courts and state
attorney's offices, courts, the National Front Communist umbrella
parliamentary organization, some archival documents of the German occupation
administration and the documents which were of public nature. According to
the director of Security Services Archives, the archive deal with up to
30,000 files each year-all with multiple names. If the US required the
names not to be released it would have paralyzed research.

The issue at hand emanated >from litigation brought by a man who believed he
was harmed by the archives revealing sensitive data >from his Communist
secret service StgB file to Czech television reporters. He demanded 30,000
Crowns. His claim was denied by the State. The Supreme court will now
decide if the issue brought by the man is bound by the US conclusions.

The US is a judicial body responsible for protecting the constitutionality
of the Czech Republic. It is composed of 15 presidentially appointed
justices who serve for 10 years.

To read more about this ruling see: http://tinyurl.com/js538ow
Original url:
http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/researchers-welcome-ruling-protecti
ng-access-to-historical-archives

For more information on the underlying case that brought this to the US see:
http://tinyurl.com/jpqgt22
Original url:
http://praguemonitor.com/2017/01/12/court-access-totalitarian-archives-data-
not-worsen

Thank you to Rose Feldman, Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA),
for sharing the information with us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


information on "Tyhs bei Eger" #austria-czech

Bayla Pasikov
 

Hello,

I just found a record, via the very kind Jewish Community of Essen, showing that my great-
great Uncle was born in Tyhs bei Eger. After an exhaustive search of maps, gazetteers, etc I
cannot find this town.

Has anyone heard of it, or know of its Czech equivalent? I assume this is the German name,
and I believe it's in the Sudetenland.

Thank you in advance.

Beth Kimmel Pasikov
Bet Shemesh, Israel


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech information on "Tyhs bei Eger" #austria-czech

Bayla Pasikov
 

Hello,

I just found a record, via the very kind Jewish Community of Essen, showing that my great-
great Uncle was born in Tyhs bei Eger. After an exhaustive search of maps, gazetteers, etc I
cannot find this town.

Has anyone heard of it, or know of its Czech equivalent? I assume this is the German name,
and I believe it's in the Sudetenland.

Thank you in advance.

Beth Kimmel Pasikov
Bet Shemesh, Israel


JewishGen Success! Stories - January edition #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We bring you three success stories that are sure to inspire. These
accounts bring us to Australia, South Africa, Israel, Poland, Germany,
Scotland, Belarus, Czech Republic, Austria, France, and more. You can
access these stories >from the "About Us" button on our website or by
following this link: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Eli Rabinowitz was named after his great-uncle who had tragically died
in an accident when he was a young man. That was all Eli knew, until a
connection made through JewishGen's Family Finder and an old 1920
school photo >from Poland given to him by his aunt prompted his journey
to solve the mystery of Moshe Rabinowitz.

Martin Tompa and Siva German connected via JewishGen's AustriaCzech
SIG mailing list when they discovered they were both researching the
Schueck family. By working together, they uncovered their common
great-great-grandparents and found the birth records of their
great-grandparents.

from our Archives, we bring you, again, a very moving story by Michael
Tobias, with Meredith Hoffman, about the reunion of cousins Moniek
Garber of Glasgow, Scotland, and Moshe Porat-Perelman of Kfar Saba,
Israel, who had last seen one another in the early spring of 1940.
They were joyously reunited, thanks to JewishGen, sixty-seven years
later, in 2007.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel, Editor
and our new Success! Stories Webmaster, Colin Mathias Justin. We hope
that you, too, will have success in your research using the abundant
resources of JewishGen and we encourage you to submit your own success
stories to us at: success@...

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.
phylliskramer1@...


Email address #austria-czech

Alex Woodle
 

Dear Colleagues,

I am trying to contact Alexander Beider by email. I have tried
abeider@..., but it bounces. please respond privately and thank you.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


(Austria) Gen Team Posts New Online Entries #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

GenTeam, has posted new entries to their website. The new entries include:

. Jewish Community Nuremberg, Germany: Marriages 1906-1942-this is
from the marriage book which miraculously survived World War ll.
. Jewish Community Vienna: Divorces 1870-1942

. "Those who once were" "Wer einmal war" Vienna's Upper Class Jewish
Society 1800-1938 part 2 index. This was published in November but the index
is now online

. Military Casualty Lists Austrian-Hungary World War l. This includes
all wounded, prisoners of war, and fallen >from all member countries of the
Hapsburg Monarchy-approximately 3-3.5 million entries. This includes all
religions-Jewish, Protestant, Catholic, Muslim soldiers. You can find last
name, first name, nobilization and academic degree, charge, body of troop,
sub-branch, home country, district and homeland affiliation, year of birth,
type of casualty and more. Due to the poor print quality of the original
casualty lists full-test searches may not yield the desired result.

. Index of Dominion records of Lower Austria

There are also additions of Catholic and Baptism records.

To access the website go to: www.GenTeam.eu Registration is required. The
site is free. The collection currently contains 15,685,081 entries and is
continually updated.

Thank you to Ing. Felix Gundacker at GenTeam for advising us about the new
additions to the database.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JewishGen Success! Stories - January edition #austria-czech

Phyllis Kramer
 

We bring you three success stories that are sure to inspire. These
accounts bring us to Australia, South Africa, Israel, Poland, Germany,
Scotland, Belarus, Czech Republic, Austria, France, and more. You can
access these stories >from the "About Us" button on our website or by
following this link: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Eli Rabinowitz was named after his great-uncle who had tragically died
in an accident when he was a young man. That was all Eli knew, until a
connection made through JewishGen's Family Finder and an old 1920
school photo >from Poland given to him by his aunt prompted his journey
to solve the mystery of Moshe Rabinowitz.

Martin Tompa and Siva German connected via JewishGen's AustriaCzech
SIG mailing list when they discovered they were both researching the
Schueck family. By working together, they uncovered their common
great-great-grandparents and found the birth records of their
great-grandparents.

from our Archives, we bring you, again, a very moving story by Michael
Tobias, with Meredith Hoffman, about the reunion of cousins Moniek
Garber of Glasgow, Scotland, and Moshe Porat-Perelman of Kfar Saba,
Israel, who had last seen one another in the early spring of 1940.
They were joyously reunited, thanks to JewishGen, sixty-seven years
later, in 2007.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers -- Nancy Siegel, Editor
and our new Success! Stories Webmaster, Colin Mathias Justin. We hope
that you, too, will have success in your research using the abundant
resources of JewishGen and we encourage you to submit your own success
stories to us at: success@...

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.
phylliskramer1@...


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Email address #austria-czech

Alex Woodle
 

Dear Colleagues,

I am trying to contact Alexander Beider by email. I have tried
abeider@..., but it bounces. please respond privately and thank you.

Alex Woodle
Groton, MA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech (Austria) Gen Team Posts New Online Entries #austria-czech

Jan Meisels Allen
 

GenTeam, has posted new entries to their website. The new entries include:

. Jewish Community Nuremberg, Germany: Marriages 1906-1942-this is
from the marriage book which miraculously survived World War ll.
. Jewish Community Vienna: Divorces 1870-1942

. "Those who once were" "Wer einmal war" Vienna's Upper Class Jewish
Society 1800-1938 part 2 index. This was published in November but the index
is now online

. Military Casualty Lists Austrian-Hungary World War l. This includes
all wounded, prisoners of war, and fallen >from all member countries of the
Hapsburg Monarchy-approximately 3-3.5 million entries. This includes all
religions-Jewish, Protestant, Catholic, Muslim soldiers. You can find last
name, first name, nobilization and academic degree, charge, body of troop,
sub-branch, home country, district and homeland affiliation, year of birth,
type of casualty and more. Due to the poor print quality of the original
casualty lists full-test searches may not yield the desired result.

. Index of Dominion records of Lower Austria

There are also additions of Catholic and Baptism records.

To access the website go to: www.GenTeam.eu Registration is required. The
site is free. The collection currently contains 15,685,081 entries and is
continually updated.

Thank you to Ing. Felix Gundacker at GenTeam for advising us about the new
additions to the database.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee