Date   

Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #galicia

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

My gg-grandfather Armin Herman Leopold Tzvi Arye HaCohen EDELMAN z"l
1845-1909 was an innkeeper in Hrabkov, Saros meyge, Magyar Kiralysag
(Kosicky Kraj, Slovenska Republika)

**But** on his matzeva it says "Here lies an enterprising man certified in
the Talmud, one of the sacred Jewish sages. An offspring of holy
Cohanim, Torah teachers, Our teacher and rabbi Rabbi Tzvi Arye HaCohen
Son of the righteous rabbi who served in the rabbinate Our teacher and
rabbi Avraham Aaron HaCohen May the memory of the righteous be of a
blessing Edelman Closed his day, a flower was plucked while still in its
prime Was taken to the sorrow of his wife Died with a good name on 28
Tishri in the year 5670 May his soul be bound in the bond of everlasting
life. Was righteous and honest, his heart was with his Creator Many
followed his light and his righteous ways Toiled and found his destiny
in the Torah, worshiped God with purity Raised his sons on the heels of
his ancestors They recognized his discipline and acquired his qualities
He will be a good advocate for his wife, sons and daughters The Cohen
will be illuminated by light to the end of days with worthiness May his
soul be bound in the bond of everlasting life."

Innkeeper in Hungarian is "kocsmaros"... barkeeper is... you guessed it,
also kocsmaros...

Here's his Geni Profile https://goo.gl/UG9K89
*original url:
https://www.geni.com/people/Armin-Herman-Leopold-Tzvi-Arye-HaCohen-Edelman/6000000012943303925

Todd Tuvia ben Avraham Aharon HaCohen v'Sima Rivka Edelman
Davis, California

Researching:
EDELMAN in Iglo/Spisska Nova Ves, Palocsa/Plavec, Hrabkov/Hrapko, Kosice/Kassa,
Olublo/Stara Lubovna, Olaszliszka, Bodrogkeresztur, Tokaj, Dubine, Hanusovce nad
Toplou, Sandal.
PETERFREUND in Szepeskortvelyes/Spisske Hrusov
WEISBERGER in Kurima, Giralt/Giraltovce, Herhely/Harhaj, Porubka (the one near
Kurima), Mala Polana, Mikova, Medzilaborce, Cleveland, Akron, Barberton.

MODERATOR NOTE: Research list truncated at six lines in accordance with JewishGen
Discussion Group guidelines.

On 04/17/2017 05:12 AM, Thomas Klein tomk@ecologicaltech.com wrote:
The short answer is probably yes.

The longer answer is that not everyone who is inscribed as "moreinu harav"
would fit our definition of "Rabbi". On many gravestones, it is simply a
matter of showing respect for the deceased, and sometimes, it means that
the man studied at yeshiva, but not necessarily that he was a pulpit Rabbi
with a congregation.

In addition, the idea that being a Rabbi was a full-time occupation and a
steady income, is a relatively modern one - many famous rabbis had other
jobs, or wealthy fathers-in-law, for income. Selling liquor was a fairly
common Jewish occupation, so it's not unlikely, and he may also have been
involved in producing or selling kosher liquor, which requires a Rabbi's
supervision.

tom klein, toronto

Russ Maurer <rrmmaur@gmail.com> wrote:
On the tomb of a woman who died in Jodlowa (Galicia) in 1902, her father was
denoted a Rabbi with the abbreviation mem-vav-hay (morenu ha-rav; "our teacher,
the Rabbi"). But in the contemporaneous civil death record, there was no
mention of her father being a Rabbi. Rather, his occupation was given as
"propinator", one licensed to dispense liquor, i.e., a tap-room operator. I
find this involvment in the liquor business surprising, but maybe I shouldn't;
Rabbis had to put bread on the table, too, and maybe this was a way to support
himself. Has anyone else come across examples of Rabbis with side employment,
and more specifically in the liquor business?
[snip]


New Records on the All Galicia Database #poland

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition of new records on

the All Galicia Database (AGD) -- a database that is free and

available to all. See: http://search.geshergalicia.org/


This communications pertains to the Josephine and Franciscan Surveys

Project. To learn more about this initiative follow the link:

https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/josephine-and-franciscan-surveys-project/


The following records were obtained >from the Central State Historical

Archives of Ukraine, Lviv (TsDIAL) and indexed (more than 15,000

entries):


BRODY

i. Josephine Survey 1788 (Fond 19/18/14)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 and 1821 (Fond 20/18/10)


CZORTKOW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/181)


HUSIATYN

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/242)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 & 1821 (Fond 20/10/29)


KOPYCZYNCE

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/240)

ii. Franciscan survey 1820 (Fond 20/10/528)


HORODENKA

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/6)


CHYROW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/65)


LWOW/LEMBERG (the city and 4 districts)

i. Josephine Survey 1787/1788 (Fond 19/12/1 and 3-5)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820-1831 (Fond 20/12/75-79)


PRZEMYSL

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/13/235)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1819 and 1820 (Fond 20/13/181)


Additional uploads for this project are planned in the third quarter of 2017.


Andrew Zalewski

Josephine & Franciscan Surveys Project Coordinator

https://www.geshergalicia.org/

--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #general

Todd Edelman <edelman@...>
 

My gg-grandfather Armin Herman Leopold Tzvi Arye HaCohen EDELMAN z"l
1845-1909 was an innkeeper in Hrabkov, Saros meyge, Magyar Kiralysag
(Kosicky Kraj, Slovenska Republika)

**But** on his matzeva it says "Here lies an enterprising man certified in
the Talmud, one of the sacred Jewish sages. An offspring of holy
Cohanim, Torah teachers, Our teacher and rabbi Rabbi Tzvi Arye HaCohen
Son of the righteous rabbi who served in the rabbinate Our teacher and
rabbi Avraham Aaron HaCohen May the memory of the righteous be of a
blessing Edelman Closed his day, a flower was plucked while still in its
prime Was taken to the sorrow of his wife Died with a good name on 28
Tishri in the year 5670 May his soul be bound in the bond of everlasting
life. Was righteous and honest, his heart was with his Creator Many
followed his light and his righteous ways Toiled and found his destiny
in the Torah, worshiped God with purity Raised his sons on the heels of
his ancestors They recognized his discipline and acquired his qualities
He will be a good advocate for his wife, sons and daughters The Cohen
will be illuminated by light to the end of days with worthiness May his
soul be bound in the bond of everlasting life."

Innkeeper in Hungarian is "kocsmaros"... barkeeper is... you guessed it,
also kocsmaros...

Here's his Geni Profile https://goo.gl/UG9K89
*original url:
https://www.geni.com/people/Armin-Herman-Leopold-Tzvi-Arye-HaCohen-Edelman/6000000012943303925

Todd Tuvia ben Avraham Aharon HaCohen v'Sima Rivka Edelman
Davis, California

Researching:
EDELMAN in Iglo/Spisska Nova Ves, Palocsa/Plavec, Hrabkov/Hrapko, Kosice/Kassa,
Olublo/Stara Lubovna, Olaszliszka, Bodrogkeresztur, Tokaj, Dubine, Hanusovce nad
Toplou, Sandal.
PETERFREUND in Szepeskortvelyes/Spisske Hrusov
WEISBERGER in Kurima, Giralt/Giraltovce, Herhely/Harhaj, Porubka (the one near
Kurima), Mala Polana, Mikova, Medzilaborce, Cleveland, Akron, Barberton.

MODERATOR NOTE: Research list truncated at six lines in accordance with JewishGen
Discussion Group guidelines.

On 04/17/2017 05:12 AM, Thomas Klein tomk@ecologicaltech.com wrote:
The short answer is probably yes.

The longer answer is that not everyone who is inscribed as "moreinu harav"
would fit our definition of "Rabbi". On many gravestones, it is simply a
matter of showing respect for the deceased, and sometimes, it means that
the man studied at yeshiva, but not necessarily that he was a pulpit Rabbi
with a congregation.

In addition, the idea that being a Rabbi was a full-time occupation and a
steady income, is a relatively modern one - many famous rabbis had other
jobs, or wealthy fathers-in-law, for income. Selling liquor was a fairly
common Jewish occupation, so it's not unlikely, and he may also have been
involved in producing or selling kosher liquor, which requires a Rabbi's
supervision.

tom klein, toronto

Russ Maurer <rrmmaur@gmail.com> wrote:
On the tomb of a woman who died in Jodlowa (Galicia) in 1902, her father was
denoted a Rabbi with the abbreviation mem-vav-hay (morenu ha-rav; "our teacher,
the Rabbi"). But in the contemporaneous civil death record, there was no
mention of her father being a Rabbi. Rather, his occupation was given as
"propinator", one licensed to dispense liquor, i.e., a tap-room operator. I
find this involvment in the liquor business surprising, but maybe I shouldn't;
Rabbis had to put bread on the table, too, and maybe this was a way to support
himself. Has anyone else come across examples of Rabbis with side employment,
and more specifically in the liquor business?
[snip]


JRI Poland #Poland New Records on the All Galicia Database #poland

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition of new records on

the All Galicia Database (AGD) -- a database that is free and

available to all. See: http://search.geshergalicia.org/


This communications pertains to the Josephine and Franciscan Surveys

Project. To learn more about this initiative follow the link:

https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/josephine-and-franciscan-surveys-project/


The following records were obtained >from the Central State Historical

Archives of Ukraine, Lviv (TsDIAL) and indexed (more than 15,000

entries):


BRODY

i. Josephine Survey 1788 (Fond 19/18/14)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 and 1821 (Fond 20/18/10)


CZORTKOW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/181)


HUSIATYN

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/242)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 & 1821 (Fond 20/10/29)


KOPYCZYNCE

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/240)

ii. Franciscan survey 1820 (Fond 20/10/528)


HORODENKA

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/6)


CHYROW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/65)


LWOW/LEMBERG (the city and 4 districts)

i. Josephine Survey 1787/1788 (Fond 19/12/1 and 3-5)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1820-1831 (Fond 20/12/75-79)


PRZEMYSL

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/13/235)

ii. Franciscan Survey 1819 and 1820 (Fond 20/13/181)


Additional uploads for this project are planned in the third quarter of 2017.


Andrew Zalewski

Josephine & Franciscan Surveys Project Coordinator

https://www.geshergalicia.org/

--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Br'ansk Russia information Wanted #general

Michelle Sandler
 

Br'ansk Russia is 53 degrees 15 minutes North Latitude; 34 degrees 22 minutes
East Longitude.

I am looking for what is available for 18th century civil and Jewish
records. Routes to Roots Foundation lists nothing. I do not know
where else to look.

Michelle Sandler
Westminster, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Br'ansk Russia information Wanted #general

Michelle Sandler
 

Br'ansk Russia is 53 degrees 15 minutes North Latitude; 34 degrees 22 minutes
East Longitude.

I am looking for what is available for 18th century civil and Jewish
records. Routes to Roots Foundation lists nothing. I do not know
where else to look.

Michelle Sandler
Westminster, CA


Re: Changing borders #general

Roger Lustig
 

The map that Bruce recommends is wonderful. However:

The dates are out of sync with the changes on the map. The German
advance into Russia during WW I, for instance, starts around 1894! A
century-plus before, the partitions of Poland are about 15-20 years
early, and Napoleon's Grand Duchy of Warsaw is established while
Napoleon is still living in Corsica.

Fortunately, Europe east of today's Germany is very simple for the
period 1815-1914. Essentially no changes in national boundaries between
the Congress of Vienna and the outbreak of WW I, and until the end of
the war, little changed in the way of administration, vital records, etc.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 4/16/2017 9:47 AM, Bruce Drake BDrake@PewResearch.org BDrake@PewResearch.org
wrote:
I know at least some JewishGen researchers struggle a bit with keeping
track of the borders that changed over time as far as places >from which
their ancestors came.
This video is a pretty good visualization and for those researching towns
in the Pale, the 19th and 20th century parts of the video are useful (You
can use the progress bar in the YouTube video to skip past earlier years).
Here's the URL:
https://youtu.be/9LfdXoL3Xck


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Changing borders #general

Roger Lustig
 

The map that Bruce recommends is wonderful. However:

The dates are out of sync with the changes on the map. The German
advance into Russia during WW I, for instance, starts around 1894! A
century-plus before, the partitions of Poland are about 15-20 years
early, and Napoleon's Grand Duchy of Warsaw is established while
Napoleon is still living in Corsica.

Fortunately, Europe east of today's Germany is very simple for the
period 1815-1914. Essentially no changes in national boundaries between
the Congress of Vienna and the outbreak of WW I, and until the end of
the war, little changed in the way of administration, vital records, etc.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 4/16/2017 9:47 AM, Bruce Drake BDrake@PewResearch.org BDrake@PewResearch.org
wrote:
I know at least some JewishGen researchers struggle a bit with keeping
track of the borders that changed over time as far as places >from which
their ancestors came.
This video is a pretty good visualization and for those researching towns
in the Pale, the 19th and 20th century parts of the video are useful (You
can use the progress bar in the YouTube video to skip past earlier years).
Here's the URL:
https://youtu.be/9LfdXoL3Xck


New Records on the All Galicia Database #general

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition of new records on the All
Galicia Database (AGD) -- a database that is free and available to all.
See: http://search.geshergalicia.org/

This communications pertains to the Josephine and Franciscan Surveys Project.
To learn more about this initiative follow the link:

https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/josephine-and-franciscan-surveys-project/

The following records were obtained >from the Central State Historical Archives
of Ukraine, Lviv (TsDIAL) and indexed (more than 15,000 entries):

BRODY

i. Josephine Survey 1788 (Fond 19/18/14)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 and 1821 (Fond 20/18/10)

CZORTKOW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/181)

HUSIATYN

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/242)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 & 1821 (Fond 20/10/29)

KOPYCZYNCE

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/240)
ii. Franciscan survey 1820 (Fond 20/10/528)

HORODENKA

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/6)

CHYROW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/65)

LWOW/LEMBERG (the city and 4 districts)

i. Josephine Survey 1787/1788 (Fond 19/12/1 and 3-5)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820-1831 (Fond 20/12/75-79)

PRZEMYSL

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/13/235)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1819 and 1820 (Fond 20/13/181)

Additional uploads for this project are planned in the third quarter of 2017.

Andrew Zalewski
Josephine & Franciscan Surveys Project Coordinator
https://www.geshergalicia.org/

**Please do not reply to this email address.**
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Records on the All Galicia Database #general

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition of new records on the All
Galicia Database (AGD) -- a database that is free and available to all.
See: http://search.geshergalicia.org/

This communications pertains to the Josephine and Franciscan Surveys Project.
To learn more about this initiative follow the link:

https://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/josephine-and-franciscan-surveys-project/

The following records were obtained >from the Central State Historical Archives
of Ukraine, Lviv (TsDIAL) and indexed (more than 15,000 entries):

BRODY

i. Josephine Survey 1788 (Fond 19/18/14)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 and 1821 (Fond 20/18/10)

CZORTKOW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/181)

HUSIATYN

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/242)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820 & 1821 (Fond 20/10/29)

KOPYCZYNCE

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/17/240)
ii. Franciscan survey 1820 (Fond 20/10/528)

HORODENKA

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/6)

CHYROW

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/10/65)

LWOW/LEMBERG (the city and 4 districts)

i. Josephine Survey 1787/1788 (Fond 19/12/1 and 3-5)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1820-1831 (Fond 20/12/75-79)

PRZEMYSL

i. Josephine Survey 1787 (Fond 19/13/235)
ii. Franciscan Survey 1819 and 1820 (Fond 20/13/181)

Additional uploads for this project are planned in the third quarter of 2017.

Andrew Zalewski
Josephine & Franciscan Surveys Project Coordinator
https://www.geshergalicia.org/

**Please do not reply to this email address.**
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org


Banjamin Wolf and/or David WIDRA #general

Jeannette Gelman
 

I have the marriage record of my aunt Malka Grinhauz BEKERMAN to Banjamin Wolf
SZAJNBERG on March 12, 1926 in Wlodawa, Poland. Banjamin Wolf was >from Janow
Podlaski and must have been born around 1897.

But my father Hil Grunhaus Bekerman always mentioned that Malka's
husband was David WIDRA or VIDRA. No mention ever of Banjamin Wolf.

So I am forced to believe that Banjamin Wolf passed away at some point
and my aunt married again.

Question:

Does anyone have any information on either of these people?

Thanks and regards.

Jeannette Grunhaus Gelman
Miami


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Banjamin Wolf and/or David WIDRA #general

Jeannette Gelman
 

I have the marriage record of my aunt Malka Grinhauz BEKERMAN to Banjamin Wolf
SZAJNBERG on March 12, 1926 in Wlodawa, Poland. Banjamin Wolf was >from Janow
Podlaski and must have been born around 1897.

But my father Hil Grunhaus Bekerman always mentioned that Malka's
husband was David WIDRA or VIDRA. No mention ever of Banjamin Wolf.

So I am forced to believe that Banjamin Wolf passed away at some point
and my aunt married again.

Question:

Does anyone have any information on either of these people?

Thanks and regards.

Jeannette Grunhaus Gelman
Miami


Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #galicia

tom
 

The short answer is probably yes.

The longer answer is that not everyone who is inscribed as "moreinu harav"
would fit our definition of "Rabbi". On many gravestones, it is simply a
matter of showing respect for the deceased, and sometimes, it means that
the man studied at yeshiva, but not necessarily that he was a pulpit Rabbi
with a congregation.

In addition, the idea that being a Rabbi was a full-time occupation and a
steady income, is a relatively modern one - many famous rabbis had other
jobs, or wealthy fathers-in-law, for income. Selling liquor was a fairly
common Jewish occupation, so it's not unlikely, and he may also have been
involved in producing or selling kosher liquor, which requires a Rabbi's
supervision.

tom klein, toronto

Russ Maurer <rrmmaur@gmail.com> wrote:

On the tomb of a woman who died in Jodlowa (Galicia) in 1902, her father was
denoted a Rabbi with the abbreviation mem-vav-hay (morenu ha-rav; "our teacher,
the Rabbi"). But in the contemporaneous civil death record, there was no
mention of her father being a Rabbi. Rather, his occupation was given as
"propinator", one licensed to dispense liquor, i.e., a tap-room operator. I
find this involvment in the liquor business surprising, but maybe I shouldn't;
Rabbis had to put bread on the table, too, and maybe this was a way to support
himself. Has anyone else come across examples of Rabbis with side employment,
and more specifically in the liquor business?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #general

tom
 

The short answer is probably yes.

The longer answer is that not everyone who is inscribed as "moreinu harav"
would fit our definition of "Rabbi". On many gravestones, it is simply a
matter of showing respect for the deceased, and sometimes, it means that
the man studied at yeshiva, but not necessarily that he was a pulpit Rabbi
with a congregation.

In addition, the idea that being a Rabbi was a full-time occupation and a
steady income, is a relatively modern one - many famous rabbis had other
jobs, or wealthy fathers-in-law, for income. Selling liquor was a fairly
common Jewish occupation, so it's not unlikely, and he may also have been
involved in producing or selling kosher liquor, which requires a Rabbi's
supervision.

tom klein, toronto

Russ Maurer <rrmmaur@gmail.com> wrote:

On the tomb of a woman who died in Jodlowa (Galicia) in 1902, her father was
denoted a Rabbi with the abbreviation mem-vav-hay (morenu ha-rav; "our teacher,
the Rabbi"). But in the contemporaneous civil death record, there was no
mention of her father being a Rabbi. Rather, his occupation was given as
"propinator", one licensed to dispense liquor, i.e., a tap-room operator. I
find this involvment in the liquor business surprising, but maybe I shouldn't;
Rabbis had to put bread on the table, too, and maybe this was a way to support
himself. Has anyone else come across examples of Rabbis with side employment,
and more specifically in the liquor business?


Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #galicia

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Russ Maurer asked about somebody whose grave marker has the abbreviation
mem-vav-hay, for "morenu ha-rav," standing for "our teacher, the Rabbi". But
in the civil death record said he was a liquor seller, and there was no
mention of rabbi.

My answer is that we have to imagine ourselves in Europe and 100+ years ago,
not the 21st century and where we live now. Many rabbis in Europe had
occupations - a salary >from the synagogue, if there even was one at all, was
not sufficient income to live on. As for the particular occupation that a
rabbi might have had, that depended on his skills or perhaps his family's
business. (Or his wife's family's business.) If anything, Jews in Eastern
Europe were overrepresented in the liquor business, as has been mentioned
previous messages in this group.

Additionally, the particular notation mem-vav-hay on the grave marker should
not be taken literally, and was used for many learned men who were not
rabbis; to confirm he was a rabbi, there should be some additional evidence.

Regards,

Ira

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could a Rabbi be a liquor seller, too? #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Russ Maurer asked about somebody whose grave marker has the abbreviation
mem-vav-hay, for "morenu ha-rav," standing for "our teacher, the Rabbi". But
in the civil death record said he was a liquor seller, and there was no
mention of rabbi.

My answer is that we have to imagine ourselves in Europe and 100+ years ago,
not the 21st century and where we live now. Many rabbis in Europe had
occupations - a salary >from the synagogue, if there even was one at all, was
not sufficient income to live on. As for the particular occupation that a
rabbi might have had, that depended on his skills or perhaps his family's
business. (Or his wife's family's business.) If anything, Jews in Eastern
Europe were overrepresented in the liquor business, as has been mentioned
previous messages in this group.

Additionally, the particular notation mem-vav-hay on the grave marker should
not be taken literally, and was used for many learned men who were not
rabbis; to confirm he was a rabbi, there should be some additional evidence.

Regards,

Ira

Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Seeking identification of photos from 1920s Berlin on ViewMate #general

Connie
 

Hi all,

I've posted 5 photos for which I'd like identification or further information.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54471

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54472

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54473

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54474

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54475

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Connie Springer
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking identification of photos from 1920s Berlin on ViewMate #general

Connie
 

Hi all,

I've posted 5 photos for which I'd like identification or further information.

They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54471

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54472

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54473

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54474

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM54475

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Connie Springer
USA


Re: Pop-up map-finding programme #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Ari Dale (daleari@gmail.com daleari@gmail.com) wrote
on 17 Apr 2017 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

One of the most time-consuming and tiring parts of research is locating
whichever of those thousands of little towns and hamlets in Eastern
Europe to which a correspondent may have referred. To add to the work,
as we all know, towns changed names and those names have multiple
transliterations. Recently a genetic cousin >from FTDNA asked casually
whether I'd checked out her town list. I hadn't and my heart sank at the
thought of doing it; I was interested but it took more time than I
wanted to spend despite the wonderful modern availability of Google
maps and our own JGS Town Finder and Gazeteers. And I, in turn, have
also blithely referred to obscure ancestral locales as if my
correspondents should know where they are. Is there- could there be- a
programme which gives one a simple, pop-up map immediately upon having
high-lighted the name of a place? Is there an ambulatory computer
genius out there who would take this on? Perhaps there is already such a
programme and, if so, I and probably many other researchers would love
to hear of it.

Ari Dale

MODERATOR: Private responses only please. Perhaps after Ari hears about
programs out there he will submit a short summary of the responses he
received
I think this will be of general interest, since it is so simple:

Use a bookmarklet to search in Google Maps,
you can use the one I put here,
drag the bookmarklet to your bookmark-bar:

<http://hannivoort.org/test/FindinGmaps.asp>

This will work on modern town-names [or decimal coordinates]

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)

MODERATOR NOTE: Thank you Evertjan! If there are any questions/comments about
Evertjan's contribution, please contact him directly.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pop-up map-finding programme #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Ari Dale (daleari@gmail.com daleari@gmail.com) wrote
on 17 Apr 2017 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

One of the most time-consuming and tiring parts of research is locating
whichever of those thousands of little towns and hamlets in Eastern
Europe to which a correspondent may have referred. To add to the work,
as we all know, towns changed names and those names have multiple
transliterations. Recently a genetic cousin >from FTDNA asked casually
whether I'd checked out her town list. I hadn't and my heart sank at the
thought of doing it; I was interested but it took more time than I
wanted to spend despite the wonderful modern availability of Google
maps and our own JGS Town Finder and Gazeteers. And I, in turn, have
also blithely referred to obscure ancestral locales as if my
correspondents should know where they are. Is there- could there be- a
programme which gives one a simple, pop-up map immediately upon having
high-lighted the name of a place? Is there an ambulatory computer
genius out there who would take this on? Perhaps there is already such a
programme and, if so, I and probably many other researchers would love
to hear of it.

Ari Dale

MODERATOR: Private responses only please. Perhaps after Ari hears about
programs out there he will submit a short summary of the responses he
received
I think this will be of general interest, since it is so simple:

Use a bookmarklet to search in Google Maps,
you can use the one I put here,
drag the bookmarklet to your bookmark-bar:

<http://hannivoort.org/test/FindinGmaps.asp>

This will work on modern town-names [or decimal coordinates]

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)

MODERATOR NOTE: Thank you Evertjan! If there are any questions/comments about
Evertjan's contribution, please contact him directly.

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