Date   

Response to Susan Zweighaft's Post #dna

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

Dear Susan,

I very much enjoyed meeting you at my talk at the IAJGS Conference in
Orlando. In regard to your statement: "I have so many questions - for
instance, my brother closely matches 2 of the testers used in Dr.
Paull's 2016 study, but they are identified as haplogroup J-L823 and
my brother as J-M267," your brother does, in fact, belong to the same
main J-M267 haplogroup as our three pedigreed Katzenellenbogen
descendants. We did additional SNP testing to further define their
subclade, which is J-L823. Undoubtedly, if you were to test your
brother for the J-L823 SNP, he would test positive for it as well. If
you would like to confirm this by ordering this single SNP, I would be
happy to assist you with that.

Other than this SNP test, there is no other Y-DNA test that I would
recommend that your brother take at the present time. His Y-DNA
results have already provided you with the essential information that
he shares a common ancestor with the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical
lineage. Exactly when that ancestor lived, however, cannot be
pinpointed with accuracy. Perhaps someday, next generation sequencing
(NGS) tests like the Big Y test will enable us to further narrow down
the time during which the most recent common Katzenellenbogen ancestor
lived, but, unfortunately, that is still a ways down the road.

If he hasn't already done so, you might have your brother take a Family
Finder test, and see if he has any genetic matches with Zweighaft among
their ancestral surnames. If so, correspond with them, and find out what
they know about their Zweighaft ancestry.

At this point, with the knowledge that your brother shares a common
ancestor with the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage, I would recommend
putting your time and energy into traditional genealogical research. Try
to find out more about the Zweighaft surname. Where and when did it
originate? Try and find out where your ancestors lived. Did any of them
live in Mannheim, Germany, or in Landau, Germany, or in Lublin, Poland?
If so, those are some of same towns in which the pedigreed
Katzenellenbogen descendants' ancestors also lived. Perhaps there was a
connection between your family and the Katzenellenbogen ancestors there.
Do you have any oral tradition or written evidence of Sephardic ethnic
ancestry? This is yet another clue provided by the Katzellenbogen Y-DNA
study to follow up on.

You won't find all of the answers to these questions overnight, but
step-by-step, you may be able to narrow down where and when your
ancestors connected to the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage. At least
you have some very important clues regarding where to look!

If I can be of any further assistance, please do not hesitate to call or
write.

All the Best,

Jeff

Dr. Jeffrey Mark Paull


Re: Y-DNA Big Y test #dna

R Jaffer
 

Unfortunately, in my response to the question regarding further
testing for someone who has no Y results, I misspoke when I suggested
uploading results to gedmatch. I should have suggested uploading to
YSearch.org.

Roberta Jaffer
Massachusetts


DNA Research #DNA Response to Susan Zweighaft's Post #dna

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

Dear Susan,

I very much enjoyed meeting you at my talk at the IAJGS Conference in
Orlando. In regard to your statement: "I have so many questions - for
instance, my brother closely matches 2 of the testers used in Dr.
Paull's 2016 study, but they are identified as haplogroup J-L823 and
my brother as J-M267," your brother does, in fact, belong to the same
main J-M267 haplogroup as our three pedigreed Katzenellenbogen
descendants. We did additional SNP testing to further define their
subclade, which is J-L823. Undoubtedly, if you were to test your
brother for the J-L823 SNP, he would test positive for it as well. If
you would like to confirm this by ordering this single SNP, I would be
happy to assist you with that.

Other than this SNP test, there is no other Y-DNA test that I would
recommend that your brother take at the present time. His Y-DNA
results have already provided you with the essential information that
he shares a common ancestor with the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical
lineage. Exactly when that ancestor lived, however, cannot be
pinpointed with accuracy. Perhaps someday, next generation sequencing
(NGS) tests like the Big Y test will enable us to further narrow down
the time during which the most recent common Katzenellenbogen ancestor
lived, but, unfortunately, that is still a ways down the road.

If he hasn't already done so, you might have your brother take a Family
Finder test, and see if he has any genetic matches with Zweighaft among
their ancestral surnames. If so, correspond with them, and find out what
they know about their Zweighaft ancestry.

At this point, with the knowledge that your brother shares a common
ancestor with the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage, I would recommend
putting your time and energy into traditional genealogical research. Try
to find out more about the Zweighaft surname. Where and when did it
originate? Try and find out where your ancestors lived. Did any of them
live in Mannheim, Germany, or in Landau, Germany, or in Lublin, Poland?
If so, those are some of same towns in which the pedigreed
Katzenellenbogen descendants' ancestors also lived. Perhaps there was a
connection between your family and the Katzenellenbogen ancestors there.
Do you have any oral tradition or written evidence of Sephardic ethnic
ancestry? This is yet another clue provided by the Katzellenbogen Y-DNA
study to follow up on.

You won't find all of the answers to these questions overnight, but
step-by-step, you may be able to narrow down where and when your
ancestors connected to the Katzenellenbogen rabbinical lineage. At least
you have some very important clues regarding where to look!

If I can be of any further assistance, please do not hesitate to call or
write.

All the Best,

Jeff

Dr. Jeffrey Mark Paull


DNA Research #DNA Re: Y-DNA Big Y test #dna

R Jaffer
 

Unfortunately, in my response to the question regarding further
testing for someone who has no Y results, I misspoke when I suggested
uploading results to gedmatch. I should have suggested uploading to
YSearch.org.

Roberta Jaffer
Massachusetts


Re: So called "Bogdan" in Czechoslovakia #general

tom
 

That's nice but a bit misleading.

The 1913 gazeteer of greater Hungary (bogardi.com) lists eight places
for "bogdan", where it is the customary Hungarian usage to prepend an
adjective, such as "nyir-" or "tisza-" to distinguish it >from other
places with the same name.

In this particular case, Nyirbogdany is one of the two that are still
in present-day Hungary (Dunabogdany is the other), that were never
part of Czechoslovakia - which probably rules them out. Three of the
others are in present-day Slovakia, 2 in Romania, and 1 in Ukraine.
Only 2 of the hits were in the same megye (county).

The four most likely candidates are the 3 Slovak towns, and the one in
the Ukraine, and my bet is on Tiszabogdany (Maramaros), which is
present-day Bohdan in the Ukraine. (It's also in the JewishGen
communities database.)

....... tom klein, toronto

PS. "Bogdan" was once a very common given name, of Slavic origin,
which means "gift of god" (equivalent to "Theodore" or "Netanyahu" :-)).
It later became a surname, as well as a place name.

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@gmail.com> wrote:

Eve Line Blum posted : I couldn't find any town named "Bogdan" in
that country that is now divided between the Czech Republic and
Slovakia.Is there someone who knows what is the real name of "Bogdan" ?
There is an oh so simple way to find this town...go to the JewishGen
Communities database and search for towns beginning with BOG...i found
Nyirbogdany, Hungary, also known as Bogdan in Yiddish. That's one of
the special features of our communities database...it contains the
Yiddish names of the towns.

Isnt JewishGen wonderful!?!

Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: re: So called "Bogdan" in Czechoslovakia #general

tom
 

That's nice but a bit misleading.

The 1913 gazeteer of greater Hungary (bogardi.com) lists eight places
for "bogdan", where it is the customary Hungarian usage to prepend an
adjective, such as "nyir-" or "tisza-" to distinguish it >from other
places with the same name.

In this particular case, Nyirbogdany is one of the two that are still
in present-day Hungary (Dunabogdany is the other), that were never
part of Czechoslovakia - which probably rules them out. Three of the
others are in present-day Slovakia, 2 in Romania, and 1 in Ukraine.
Only 2 of the hits were in the same megye (county).

The four most likely candidates are the 3 Slovak towns, and the one in
the Ukraine, and my bet is on Tiszabogdany (Maramaros), which is
present-day Bohdan in the Ukraine. (It's also in the JewishGen
communities database.)

....... tom klein, toronto

PS. "Bogdan" was once a very common given name, of Slavic origin,
which means "gift of god" (equivalent to "Theodore" or "Netanyahu" :-)).
It later became a surname, as well as a place name.

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@gmail.com> wrote:

Eve Line Blum posted : I couldn't find any town named "Bogdan" in
that country that is now divided between the Czech Republic and
Slovakia.Is there someone who knows what is the real name of "Bogdan" ?
There is an oh so simple way to find this town...go to the JewishGen
Communities database and search for towns beginning with BOG...i found
Nyirbogdany, Hungary, also known as Bogdan in Yiddish. That's one of
the special features of our communities database...it contains the
Yiddish names of the towns.

Isnt JewishGen wonderful!?!

Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education


Re: Polish Jews in Russian Army Records (Nowy Targ) #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Ben Forman wrote:

I recently found that the Uncle of my GGF died in 1867 in his home
town of Kaluszyn whilst on unlimited leave >from the army. He was
stationed at "Targ City Command"(Targiejskiej Miejskiej Komendy) I'm
told this refers to Nowy Targ.

Does anyone know if there is an archive which might hold records
related to his service or related to the history of Nowy Targ and the
Russian Army's activity there in around this time.

---
Nowy Targ is unlikely reference as this town was located till the end
of WWI within Austro-Hungarian Empire, and Russian activity was not
heard about this town.

"Targ" is known in Polish as a marketplace, and if you forward to me
scanned copy of the original Russian text we might figure out what
kind of command text is referring to.

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Polish Jews in Russian Army Records (Nowy Targ) #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Ben Forman wrote:

I recently found that the Uncle of my GGF died in 1867 in his home
town of Kaluszyn whilst on unlimited leave >from the army. He was
stationed at "Targ City Command"(Targiejskiej Miejskiej Komendy) I'm
told this refers to Nowy Targ.

Does anyone know if there is an archive which might hold records
related to his service or related to the history of Nowy Targ and the
Russian Army's activity there in around this time.

---
Nowy Targ is unlikely reference as this town was located till the end
of WWI within Austro-Hungarian Empire, and Russian activity was not
heard about this town.

"Targ" is known in Polish as a marketplace, and if you forward to me
scanned copy of the original Russian text we might figure out what
kind of command text is referring to.

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #galicia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience, and
plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic. This
enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with experts,
while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and forge new
connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people stopped by
the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members of other
organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer
(a member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfather's Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide
Burial Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her
great-great-grandfather, which also included the name of her
great-great-great-grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped
by the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques
Project, and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's
youth department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Inquiring about a possible family connection - Hersch HELFER from Brody, Poland #galicia

Joyce Eastman
 

I am trying to determine if there are any records that indicate that
my 3x great-grandfather, Hersch HELFER is the brother of Chaim
HELFER. Both were born in Brody, Poland. While I do not have any
dates of birth or death for my 3x great-grandfather, I know >from my
research that Chaim HELFER was born about 1797 and died on April
24, 1853 at the age of 56. It is interesting to note that the first born
children of both Hersch and Chaim HELFER were born in 1819. Also,
that Hersch HELFER's wife died on August 19, 1834. She was also
from Brody, Poland.
Confirming the relationship between Hersch HELFER and Chaim
HELFER is key to my being able to join all the HELFER information I
obtained >from my researcher years ago - as well as >from various
individuals who are also researching the HELFER family line, who are
most likely all distant cousins on my paternal grandmother's side.
My paternal grandmother was Sime Bruche HELFER, daughter of
Aron ZINKOWER and Judith/Judes HELFER - all born in Brody,
Poland.

Please respond privately with any information/documentation or
suggestions of where to look to resolve this issue. I have researched
JewishGen, JRI-Poland, as well as the Gesher Galicia Database and
Ancestry.com without any success. I currently have a virtual tree on
Geni.com. Thank you in advance for any assistance you may be able
to provide to assist me in resolving this possible family connection.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

Researching: WILDER / HONIG / HELFER / ZINKOWER: Brody,
Poland / Ukraine and Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala / Sucha /
Zywiec / Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany and Brazil; SCHEIER /
ROBINSOHN: Biala / Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow, Poland /
Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL / FODOR / PORGES /
GROSSMANN/ KOHN / WEISZ: Vaj Ujhely, Hungary / Trencin, Slovakia


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Conference Highlights #2 - New Exhibitor Booth & Booth Talks #galicia

Groll, Avraham
 

Dear JewishGen Family,

JewishGen had a very successful and productive experience at the 37th
annual IAJGS Conference (which was held July 23-28 in Orlando, FL),
offering an outstanding variety of sessions, workshops, and luncheons
throughout its duration. During these weeks following the conference,
we are posting highlights of our activity, including a review of some
of the major announcements which were first unveiled at the conference.
The previous issue can be accessed here:
http://tinyurl.com/IAJGS2017-A

Today's focus is on JewishGen's new Exhibitor Booth. We designed this
booth with the intention of offering a more professional experience, and
plan to use it as we expand our marketing efforts and promote
JewishGen to a much wider audience. As part of this strategy, we also
debuted our "Booth Talks" program, whereby JewishGen experts offered
booth visitors a short, five minute presentation on a particular topic. This
enabled conference participants an opportunity to connect with experts,
while giving JewishGen staff the opportunity to engage, and forge new
connections. Throughout the conference, hundreds of people stopped by
the booth, >from JewishGen volunteers, donors, users, members of other
organizations, and even some of the hotel staff. Here are some highlights:

(1) Yizkor Books: A member of the JewishGen family walked up to the
booth, pulled an old book out of her bag, and asked Rebecca Schaeffer
(a member of the booth team, and Assistant to the Director) if she could
identify it. Rebecca explained that it was a Yizkor (memorial) book,
written by Holocaust survivors to perpetuate the history and heritage of
towns which once had thriving Jewish communities. Visibly moved, the
individual asked if there was a translated version in English, and when
she was given the link to the translated book on JewishGen, and started
reading it, she broke down in tears.

(2) Great-Great Grandfather's Matzeiva (Tombstone): Another individual
stopped by and expressed her longing to find any information about her
great-great-grandfather. Nolan Altman (VP for Data Acquisition) was
there, did a quick search on JOWBR (JewishGen's Online Worldwide
Burial Registry) and helped her find the record for the gravestone of her
great-great-grandfather, which also included the name of her
great-great-great-grandfather!

(3)Bar/Bat Mitzvah Projects: A member of the JewishGen family stopped
by the booth, saw the literature about JewishGen's Memorial Plaques
Project, and was so inspired that he committed to having his synagogue's
youth department participate.

(4) Possible Connections: An individual was thrilled to discover the
JewishGen Family Finder, and that there were 90 people researching the
same town she was.

To view a listing of the Booth Talks which took place at the conference,
along with a few pictures, please visit:
http://tinyurl.com/BoothTalks2017

Please stay tuned for more updates.

Avraham Groll
Director
JewishGen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Inquiring about a possible family connection - Hersch HELFER from Brody, Poland #galicia

Joyce Eastman
 

I am trying to determine if there are any records that indicate that
my 3x great-grandfather, Hersch HELFER is the brother of Chaim
HELFER. Both were born in Brody, Poland. While I do not have any
dates of birth or death for my 3x great-grandfather, I know >from my
research that Chaim HELFER was born about 1797 and died on April
24, 1853 at the age of 56. It is interesting to note that the first born
children of both Hersch and Chaim HELFER were born in 1819. Also,
that Hersch HELFER's wife died on August 19, 1834. She was also
from Brody, Poland.
Confirming the relationship between Hersch HELFER and Chaim
HELFER is key to my being able to join all the HELFER information I
obtained >from my researcher years ago - as well as >from various
individuals who are also researching the HELFER family line, who are
most likely all distant cousins on my paternal grandmother's side.
My paternal grandmother was Sime Bruche HELFER, daughter of
Aron ZINKOWER and Judith/Judes HELFER - all born in Brody,
Poland.

Please respond privately with any information/documentation or
suggestions of where to look to resolve this issue. I have researched
JewishGen, JRI-Poland, as well as the Gesher Galicia Database and
Ancestry.com without any success. I currently have a virtual tree on
Geni.com. Thank you in advance for any assistance you may be able
to provide to assist me in resolving this possible family connection.

Joyce Eastman
Orange City, FL USA

Researching: WILDER / HONIG / HELFER / ZINKOWER: Brody,
Poland / Ukraine and Vienna, Austria; RUFEISEN: Biala / Sucha /
Zywiec / Szare, Poland, Israel, Germany and Brazil; SCHEIER /
ROBINSOHN: Biala / Sucha, Poland and Stanislawow, Poland /
Ukraine (Ivano-Frankvisk); FRANKL / FODOR / PORGES /
GROSSMANN/ KOHN / WEISZ: Vaj Ujhely, Hungary / Trencin, Slovakia


Polish to English translation request #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

I request that some member translate the 4 documents listed below. All
4 are >from the same letter written to my father back around 1930. I am
not certain if they are in the correct order but all belong to the same letter.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58405
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58406
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58407
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58408

Thanks

Errol Schneegurt
Long Island, NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Polish to English translation request #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

I request that some member translate the 4 documents listed below. All
4 are >from the same letter written to my father back around 1930. I am
not certain if they are in the correct order but all belong to the same letter.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58405
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58406
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58407
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM58408

Thanks

Errol Schneegurt
Long Island, NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Sounds like Scarbbuba #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Has anyone heard a word that sounds like Scarbbub / Scarboba? Great
grandfather had a fish stand in the big market in Lemberg. My father said that he
was called Leib Scarbbub by his friends and did not know the origin of the
name. I looked for streets around the market thinking it was the name of
the street that he had his stand and came up empty.

Any guesses?

Please respond directly.

Thanks
Errol Schneegurt
Long Island, NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Sounds like Scarbbuba #galicia

Errol Schneegurt
 

Has anyone heard a word that sounds like Scarbbub / Scarboba? Great
grandfather had a fish stand in the big market in Lemberg. My father said that he
was called Leib Scarbbub by his friends and did not know the origin of the
name. I looked for streets around the market thinking it was the name of
the street that he had his stand and came up empty.

Any guesses?

Please respond directly.

Thanks
Errol Schneegurt
Long Island, NY
ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Bostomsky and Froom #lithuania

Bubbles Segall
 

I am helping a family with their research. This is what they have
given me:

Boris [Borukh] Bostomsky
Born in Vilnius, Lithuania 30 November 1895
Died in Johannesburg, South Africa 31 March 1979

Married Millie Froom
She was born in Papile in Lithuania 4 March 1903
She died in Johannesburg, South Africa 11 August 1977

My query:
What were the names of Millie Froom's parents?

Bubbles Segall


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Bostomsky and Froom #lithuania

Bubbles Segall
 

I am helping a family with their research. This is what they have
given me:

Boris [Borukh] Bostomsky
Born in Vilnius, Lithuania 30 November 1895
Died in Johannesburg, South Africa 31 March 1979

Married Millie Froom
She was born in Papile in Lithuania 4 March 1903
She died in Johannesburg, South Africa 11 August 1977

My query:
What were the names of Millie Froom's parents?

Bubbles Segall


Ovadia #lithuania

Hanna Grinberg <grinbergla@...>
 

My father Ovadia Chaim (last name Jochelson) was born in Kaunas, Lithuania
in 1901. His father was born in 1849 in Vilnius, Lithuania. His grandfather
Ovadia Zalman was born in Lithuania as well.
I never met or heard of anyone >from Lithuania that is named Ovadia. In
Israel, Ovadia is a popular first name of older Jews >from Yemen.

I wonder how prevalent is first name Ovadia among Lithuanian Jews.

Hanna Grinberg

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(which contains 2.5 million listings) for the given name Ovadia, using
a "phonetically like" search, you will find about 400 listings, most
of them with the spelling variant Avadia.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Ovadia #lithuania

Hanna Grinberg <grinbergla@...>
 

My father Ovadia Chaim (last name Jochelson) was born in Kaunas, Lithuania
in 1901. His father was born in 1849 in Vilnius, Lithuania. His grandfather
Ovadia Zalman was born in Lithuania as well.
I never met or heard of anyone >from Lithuania that is named Ovadia. In
Israel, Ovadia is a popular first name of older Jews >from Yemen.

I wonder how prevalent is first name Ovadia among Lithuanian Jews.

Hanna Grinberg

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(which contains 2.5 million listings) for the given name Ovadia, using
a "phonetically like" search, you will find about 400 listings, most
of them with the spelling variant Avadia.

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